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Editorial Results (free)

1. Unlikely Path -

It all started on whim. Cassius Cash was on his way to band practice at the University of Arkansas when he decided to practice his interview skills instead.

“Someone informed me the (U.S.) Forest Service was doing recruitment, but I had no intention of going in there and landing the internship,” says Cash of that interview for a wildlife biologist internship. “I thought the interview was about as far as I was going to go to chase my dreams.”

2. Resurrection Health Expands With Whitehaven Clinic -

A faith-based, evangelical health service organization that’s only halfway through its first year of existence has opened a second clinic to help support its mission of addressing health care disparities in Memphis.

3. I Choose Memphis: Isaac Rodriguez -

“I Choose Memphis” spotlights Memphians who are passionate about calling this community home. New Memphis Institute provides the profiles.

Name: Dr. Isaac Rodriguez

4. Proton’s Weaver Wizard of Tech Innovation -

On any given day, business executives, scientists and chemical engineers from across the U.S. and around the world come to East Tennessee to see for themselves the renewable energy technology developed by Lenoir City-based Proton Power Inc.

5. NTSB: Amtrak Engineer Wasn't Talking, Texting on Cellphone -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The engineer in last month's fatal Amtrak crash wasn't using his cellphone to talk, text or download anything just before the train sped off the tracks, investigators said Wednesday, addressing one big question about what might have caused the accident but only deepening the mystery of what did.

6. TBI Warns of Dangerous Pills That Resemble Oxycodone -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The Tennessee Bureau of Investigation has issued a warning about illicit pills that appear to be oxycodone but instead are a drug 50 times more potent than heroin.

7. Study Finds 3-1 Shortfall of Women in STEM Careers -

Women in the United States have made great strides in education and entry in the workplace over the past 50 years, yet they continue to be underrepresented in science, technology, engineering and math, referred to collectively as STEM disciplines.

8. Convincing Girls, Women to Pursue Science and Math Careers -

Claudia Rawn is used to talking about science, so when asked to speak about women in the STEM disciplines, she was a bit out of her comfort zone.

The speaking invitation came from organizers with the University of Tennessee’s inaugural Women in STEM Research Symposium, held in April.

9. Beautiful Minds -

Someday, a famous innovator’s biography may include the story of the first time she used a hammer – at age 4 or 5, at a private Memphis girls school, to pound on a strip of copper.

And how she then took that strip of copper and molded it into the shape of a heart, a tiara or a cool design that meant something to her evolving mind but that adults couldn’t identify.

10. Genetic Testing Moves Into World of Employee Health -

Your employer may one day help determine if your genes are why your jeans have become too snug.

Big companies are considering blending genetic testing with coaching on nutrition and exercise to help workers lose weight and improve their health before serious conditions like diabetes or heart disease develop. It's a step beyond the typical corporate wellness programs that many companies are using to make workers more aware of their risk factors and improve their health.

11. New Oak Ridge Airport Awaits Review by DOE -

For years, area business leaders and aviation enthusiasts have advocated the need for a general aviation airport in Oak Ridge to complement commercial air service provided by McGhee Tyson Airport, the largest commercial airport in East Tennessee.

12. Sea You in Three Months -

If someone approached you and suggested you try living in an underwater habitat the size of a college dorm for three months, would you do it?

Aquanauts Bruce Cantrell and Jessica Fain jumped at the chance and even ended up breaking a world record while they were at it.

13. Memphis Civil Rights Map Broadens History’s Reach -

The civil rights history of the Memphis area is so rich and so deep that a new GIS map of historic sites by the Benjamin L. Hooks Institute for Social Change will probably be a work in progress for some time.

14. Five of the Nation’s Finest -

Each year the U.S. Chamber of Commerce recognizes the contribution of small business to the national economy with the Blue Ribbon Small Business Awards. Five from Knoxville’s business community – The Tomato Head, Management Solutions LLC, Design Innovation Architects Inc., Visionary Solutions LLC and AMS Corp. – have been chosen for inclusion in the annual program.

15. UTHSC Researchers Part of Global Brain Study -

In the largest collaborative study of the brain to date, researchers from the University of Tennessee Health Science Center are part of a global consortium of 190 institutions working to identify eight common genetic mutations that appear to age the brain an average of three years. The discovery could lead to targeted therapies and interventions for Alzheimer’s disease, autism and other neurological conditions.

16. UTHSC Researchers Part of Global Brain Study -

In the largest collaborative study of the brain to date, researchers from the University of Tennessee Health Science Center are part of a global consortium of 190 institutions working to identify eight common genetic mutations that appear to age the brain an average of three years. The discovery could lead to targeted therapies and interventions for Alzheimer’s disease, autism and other neurological conditions.

17. Now You See It … -

Ferris Hall is an unassuming brick building on the edge of the University of Tennessee’s College of Engineering campus and home to the Department of Materials Science Engineering. There, Drs. Ramki Kalyanaraman and Gerd Duscher have opened the door to applying the magic of Hogwarts to military camouflage, cancer treatment or even Halloween costumes for a new generation.

18. Medical Company Opening New Division in Memphis -

MedComp Sciences, a Louisiana-based diagnostic laboratory, is planning to launch a pharmacognetic laboratory division, MedComp Gx, in Memphis next month.

The company says MedComp Gx pharmacogenetic analysis “will provide patients easy to read and interpret information based on their genetically driven response to numerous medications.”

19. Car Built With 3-D Printer Stirs Industry -

At the recent North American International Auto Show in Detroit, innovative carmaker Local Motors offered an up close look at the future of automobile manufacturing.

In a microfactory set up on the auto show floor, Local Motors built the latest version of its Strati, a lightweight, two-seat electric car. It took about 40 hours using the latest 3-D printing technology, all while thousands of auto show visitors watched.

20. Building From a New Blueprint -

When recruiting new businesses, East Tennessee economic development officials have long touted the benefits of partnering with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee.

The lab and the university both have a history of working closely with private business to develop cutting-edge manufacturing techniques, technologies and new products. That research effort recently received a major boost with President Obama’s announcement of a new manufacturing innovation hub based in the Knoxville area.

21. Medical Company Opening New Division in Memphis -

MedComp Sciences, a Louisiana-based diagnostic lab, is launching a pharmacognetic laboratory division, MedComp Gx, in Memphis. The company says MedComp Gx pharmacogenetic analysis “will provide patients easy to read and interpret information based on their genetically driven response to numerous medications.

22. VW Taking Applications For Tennessee Academy -

Volkswagen is now accepting applications for its three-year apprenticeship program at its plant in Chattanooga.

The German automaker will select 12 apprentices each for its automation mechatronics and car mechatronics programs.

23. UTHSC to Host Open House for Prospective Students Feb. 20 -

Students possibly interested in a health care career have an opportunity to come to an open house at the College of Health Professions at UT Health Science Center on Friday, Feb. 20, from 2 to 4 p.m.

24. ‘Government’s Too Big and People are Sick of It’ -

Knox County Mayor Tim Burchett is an enigma of the modern civil servant, a career politician who doesn’t seem to take himself too seriously. He thinks he’s paid too much (his salary is state mandated) and brings it up often in interviews with the media.

25. Welch Allyn Acquires Hubble Telemedical -

Welch Allyn Inc. has acquired Hubble Telemedical Inc., a privately held health care company founded by University of Tennessee Health Science Center researcher Edward Chaum and Oak Ridge National Laboratory researcher Kenneth Tobin, who developed a way to provide remote diabetic retinopathy screening and analysis in primary care doctors’ offices and other convenient settings.

26. Welch Allyn Acquires Hubble Telemedical -

Welch Allyn Inc. has acquired Hubble Telemedical Inc., a privately held health care company founded by University of Tennessee Health Science Center researcher Edward Chaum and Oak Ridge National Laboratory researcher Kenneth Tobin, who developed a way to provide remote diabetic retinopathy screening and analysis in primary care doctors’ offices and other convenient settings.

27. Alexander Elected to Chair Senate Appropriations Panel -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander has been elected to chair the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development.

The Tennessee Republican was elected this week by his colleagues in Washington.

28. UT, Vanderbilt Have Roles in Public/Private Auto Partnership -

The U.S. government also is showing its faith in Tennessee’s auto industry.

Last Friday, President Obama announced a $250 million manufacturing hub will be anchored at The University of Tennessee-Knoxville, focusing on advanced materials, like polymer composites, which combine fiber with plastics to create products that are stronger and lighter than steel.

29. Key US Military Command's Twitter, YouTube Sites Hacked -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Hackers claiming to work on behalf of Islamic State militants seized control of the Twitter and YouTube sites of the military's U.S. Central Command on Monday. The Pentagon swiftly suspended the sites and said it appears that no classified material was breached.

30. Former St. Jude CEO Wins Claes Nobel Award -

Dr. William E. Evans, former president and CEO of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, has been honored with a 2014 Claes Nobel World Betterment Award, named for Claes Nobel, senior member of the Nobel family and founder of the National Society of High School Scholars Foundation.

31. Celebrating the Holiday Season in East Tennessee -

Even ole Ebenezer Scrooge could find something in Knoxville to get him in the holiday spirit.

Area residents have a wide selection of holiday activities including a Clarence Brown Theatre rendition of Scrooge’s Christmas Eve’s nocturnal visitors. Many of the activities are free, but others range in price. Visit the websites for more detailed information, including time, ticket price and availability.

32. Former St. Jude CEO to Receive Claes Nobel Award -

Dr. William E. Evans, former president and CEO of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, will receive a 2014 Claes Nobel World Betterment Award on Saturday, Dec. 6, in Atlanta.

Claes Nobel, senior member of the Nobel family and founder of the National Society of High School Scholars Foundation, will present the 2014 Claes Nobel World Betterment Award to Evans, as well as to Laura Turner Seydel, chairperson of Captain Planet Foundation, and Arne Duncan, former CEO of Chicago Public Schools and current U.S. Secretary of Education.

33. More at Moore -

The large old trees on its campus and the large paned windows of its brick buildings indicate the William R. Moore College of Technology has been around for a while.

It was the idea of William R. Moore, a dry goods wholesaler, who left a $500,000 endowment to fund the institution following his death in 1909.

34. Rogero Talks ‘Smart Growth,’ Democratic Politics -

Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero became the first woman to hold that office when she won the election in 2011.

She’s been actively involved in a number of local issues since her election, from urban-core revitalization and business recruitment to broader social issues such as marriage equality.

35. Moore Tech Awakens -

The large old trees on its campus and the paned windows of its brick buildings indicate the William R. Moore College of Technology has been around for a while.

It was the idea of William R. Moore, a dry goods wholesaler, who left a $500,000 endowment to fund the institution following his death in 1909.

36. TBI Receives New Accreditations -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The Tennessee Bureau of Investigation has obtained new accreditations for its forensic facilities in Nashville, Memphis and Knoxville.

The accreditations come after a lengthy assessment by the American Society of Crime Laboratory Directors' Laboratory Accreditation Board.

37. TVA ‘Robo Houses’ a Success, On the Market -

For the past five years, several residents of the Campbell Creek subdivision have had the quietest neighbors they could have ever wanted. Now they’re going to have to adjust to having people instead.

38. Local Ebola Response Rolls With Changes -

The medical and public health response to Ebola has changed since the disease came to America because the science around the disease has changed in that time, says the infectious disease consultant to Baptist Memorial Health Care.

39. Chimerix Gets FDA OK to Test Drug for Ebola -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A North Carolina drugmaker plans to test its experimental antiviral drug in patients who have Ebola, after getting authorization from regulators at the Food and Drug Administration.

40. University of Tennessee Students Help Design Nashville’s Future -

Nashville may be a city on the rise, attracting new residents by the droves. But it’s also a laboratory for students at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville’s College of Architecture and Design, where they are designing the communities of the future in partnership with the Nashville Civic Design Center.

41. TriMetis Acquires Biologistics Startup -

The pre-clinical research services company TriMetis Life Sciences has expanded by acquiring FoundationBio, a biospecimen procurement startup with offices in Memphis and Boston.

FoundationBio uses access to tissue donors via hospitals and community oncology clinics and their supporting pathology and laboratory services partners around the world to get specimens for research. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

42. Oak Ridge Biomass Steam Plant Already Closed -

OAK RIDGE, Tenn. (AP) – When Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Biomass Steam Plant opened in 2012, it was supposed to save the lab money while also cutting pollution. But the plant had to be shut down after just a year and a half when a systems check found that some parts were already failing.

43. TriMetis Acquires Biologistics Startup -

The pre-clinical research services company TriMetis Life Sciences has expanded by acquiring FoundationBio, a biospecimen procurement startup with offices in Memphis and Boston.

FoundationBio uses access to tissue donors via hospitals and community oncology clinics and their supporting pathology and laboratory services partners around the world to get specimens for research. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

44. College of Health Professions to Celebrate Name Change -

The College of Health Professions at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center will hold two celebrations Wednesday, Aug. 27, to commemorate the college’s renaming.

A lunchtime event for students, faculty and staff will be held in the Student-Alumni Center, 800 Madison Ave., from noon to 1:30 p.m., while a reception for alumni and donors is set for 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. in the lobby of the Madison Plaza. About 300 UTHSC team members are expected at the afternoon gathering, and some 150 donors and alumni will join the evening reception.

45. UTHSC College of Health Professions to Celebrate Name Change -

The College of Health Professions at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center will hold two celebrations Wednesday, Aug. 27, to commemorate the college’s renaming.

A lunchtime event for students, faculty and staff will be held in the Student-Alumni Center, 800 Madison Ave., from noon to 1:30 p.m., while a reception for alumni and donors is set for 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. in the lobby of the Madison Plaza. About 300 UTHSC team members are expected at the afternoon gathering, and some 150 donors and alumni will join the evening reception.

46. Obama Order Presses Contractors to Obey Labor Laws -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama moved Thursday to require federal contractors to give their workers more rights in labor disputes, putting his pen to an executive order the day after the House voted to sue him for allegedly exceeding his presidential powers. In an election-year dare to Republicans, Obama said congressional obstinacy would only embolden him to take even more aggressive actions on his own.

47. UTHSC Researcher Gets Neonatal Project Grant -

Dr. Adebowale Adebiyi, assistant professor in the physiology department at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, has received a $1.5 million grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, a subsidiary of the National Institutes of Health.

48. UTHSC Researcher Gets Neonatal Project Grant -

Dr. Adebowale Adebiyi, assistant professor in the physiology department at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, has received a $1.5 million grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, a subsidiary of the National Institutes of Health.

49. UTHSC College of Allied Health Sciences Gets New Name -

Come fall, nearly 600 students will be enrolled in the University of Tennessee Health Science Center’s College of Health Professions – and that will be a first because on July 1, that became the new name for what formerly was known as the College of Allied Health Sciences.

50. Oak Ridge Launching Imaging Institute -

The Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory, in Oak Ridge, Tenn., has launched the Institute for Functional Imaging of Materials, which aims to accelerate the development of new materials that can be used to produce more efficient solar cells, batteries and other products.

51. Cosmic Caffeine: Astronauts Getting Espresso Maker -

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) – Talk about a cosmic caffeine jolt. The International Space Station is getting a real Italian espresso machine.

Astronauts of all nationalities – but especially the Italians – have long grumbled about the tepid instant coffee served in pouches and drunk with straws 260 miles above Earth. The pouches and straws aren't going away, but at least the brew will pack some zero-gravity punch.

52. Oak Ridge Launching Imaging Institute -

The Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, in Oak Ridge, Tenn., has launched the Institute for Functional Imaging of Materials, which aims to accelerate the development of new materials that can be used to produce more efficient solar cells, batteries and other products.

53. I’ll Be Back -

MEMPHIS FROM THE BEACH. I’m on vacation, but I’ll be home soon, and here are some thoughts about that I first shared a couple of years ago.

Right now, I’m probably on the beach, keeping the sand out of my beer and helping my dogs stare at the ocean. It’s a big ocean – big enough to help you forget whatever you were so worried about a couple of days ago. Staring at it properly is a big job – big enough that making sure you don’t miss the next dolphin breaking the surface or the next crab making a break for it is more important than whatever you were doing last week. That’s pretty much the way the dogs look at it, too. We don’t miss a thing.

54. Prime Urgent Clinic Rebrands as MedPost -

Prime Urgent Medical Clinic, located in Cordova, has a new name: MedPost Urgent Care.

The center becomes part of a new and growing national network of urgent care centers launched by Tenet Healthcare, the parent company of Saint Francis Hospital. The MedPost network currently consists of 23 urgent care centers in eight states.

55. Alexander Addresses Device Tax Frustrations -

When U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander came to Bartlett in March to talk with leaders of several local biotech companies, he had a specific issue in mind – the medical device tax that is part of the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare.

56. Prime Urgent Clinic Rebrands as MedPost -

Prime Urgent Medical Clinic, located in Cordova, has a new name: MedPost Urgent Care.

The center becomes part of a new and growing national network of urgent care centers launched by Tenet Healthcare, the parent company of Saint Francis Hospital. The MedPost network currently consists of 23 urgent care centers in eight states.

57. Owens Named MERI Executive Director -

Jason K. Owens has been named executive director of the Medical Education & Research Institute. Owens previously served as education/research planning manager of the nonprofit medical teaching and training bioskills laboratory, and has led cross-functional initiatives specific to the MERI’s strategic education and research planning, mobile education development and operational management.

58. Norris Defends Rape Kit Backlog Approach -

State Senate Republican leader Mark Norris of Collierville says the Tennessee Legislature wants to know the size of the statewide problem of untested rape kits, an explanation of why it happened and a credible plan for eliminating it before coming up with funding to deal with the problem.

59. Sherman Breath of Fresh Air for Sportswriters -

I have waited for San Antonio point guard Tony Parker to take a shower, dress, whip a winter scarf around his neck and then say something so boring that my tape recorder yawned.

60. Harmonyx Diagnostics Earns Accreditation -

Memphis-based Harmonyx Diagnostics has earned accreditation from the College of American Pathologists after the organization’s inspectors made a recent inspection and site visit to the automated genetic-testing laboratory.

61. UTHSC Seeks Surgery Department Chair -

Timothy C. Fabian, professor and chair of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center Department of Surgery, will step down from his position as chair once his successor has been named.

Fabian has been chair of Surgery at UTHSC for more than 14 years. After he steps down as chair, he will continue to serve as a professor in the department.

62. UTHSC to Conduct Search for Surgery Department Chair -

Timothy C. Fabian, professor and chair of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center Department of Surgery, will step down from his position as chair once his successor has been named.

Fabian has been chair of Surgery at UTHSC for more than 14 years. After he steps down as chair, he will continue to serve as a professor in the department.

63. UTHSC Professor Awarded $1.58 Million Grant -

Professor Jonathan Wall of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center has received a $1.58 million grant for amyloid disease research.

64. Harmonyx Diagnostics Earns Accreditation -

Memphis-based Harmonyx Diagnostics has earned accreditation from the College of American Pathologists after the organization’s inspectors made a recent inspection and site visit to the automated genetic-testing laboratory.

65. Midtown Medical Office Building Sells for $2.6 Million -

A partnership of two Utah-based companies has acquired a medical office building on Union Avenue near Overton Square.

Trivalis LLC and Novalis LLC, both based in Utah, acquired the medical office building built in 1967 at 2076 Union Ave., next door to the IHOP restaurant, for $2.6 million. The property, at the corner of Union Avenue and Florence Street, was appraised at $1.3 million in 2013, according to the Shelby County Assessor of Property’s office. The sellers, Missouri-based Roundabout Real Estate LLC and Visual Projects LLC, acquired the property in 2008 for $2 million.

66. Rape Kit Backlog Lawsuit Shifts Questions -

Since August, Memphis City Council members have been reviewing the numbers. Asking questions about them. Verifying them. Categorizing them.

It is the other numbers discussion at City Hall these days – the one about how many rape kits city agencies took on sexual assault victims that the Memphis Police Department never processed over a period of approximately 30 years.

67. Federal Lawsuit Filed Over Rape Kit Backlog -

A Memphis woman sexually assaulted in 2001 filed a “Jane Doe” lawsuit in Memphis Federal Court Friday, Dec. 20, against the city of Memphis over the city’s backlog of unprocessed rape kits going back to the 1980s.

68. Federal Lawsuit Filed Over Rape Kit Backlog -

A Memphis woman sexually assaulted in 2001 filed a “Jane Doe” lawsuit in Memphis Federal Court Friday, Dec. 20, against the city of Memphis over the city’s backlog of unprocessed rape kits going back to the 1980s.

69. Start Co. Joins Global Accelerator Network -

Start Co., the Memphis-based venture development group focused on grooming startup companies and their founders, is itself about to do some starting anew.

70. UTHSC Taps Davis to Lead Biomedical Informatics -

Dr. Robert L. Davis has been appointed as the founding director of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center’s Center in Biomedical Informatics and the University of Tennessee-Oak Ridge National Laboratory Governor’s Chair in Biomedical Informatics.

71. Trumbull Labs Receives Pathology Accreditation -

Trumbull Laboratories LLC has been awarded accreditation by the Accreditation Committee of the College of American Pathologists based on the results of a recent onsite inspection.

72. Cancer Lab to Expand Operations in Franklin -

FRANKLIN, Tenn. (AP) – A cancer-testing laboratory is set to be built in Franklin – a $2.7 million investment by Nashville-based health care company DiaTech Oncology.

The Tennessean reported that the facility, which will be built over the next two years, will add 39 jobs to the company.

73. Trumbull Labs Receives Pathology Accreditation -

Trumbull Laboratories LLC has been awarded accreditation by the Accreditation Committee of the College of American Pathologists based on the results of a recent onsite inspection.

74. Oak Ridge National Laboratory to Reduce Workforce -

KNOXVILLE (AP) – The Oak Ridge National Laboratory plans to eliminate up to 475 jobs in an effort to cope with budget cuts and uncertainty about its financial picture in the future.

The Knoxville News Sentinel reports ORNL Director Thom Mason announced a "voluntary separation program" to staff in a message on Thursday. He said financial incentives will be offered to those who willingly leave.

75. Intermodal Conference to Tackle Freight Issues -

The Intermodal Freight Transportation Institute at the University of Memphis will host its seventh annual Intermodal Freight Conference at the FedEx Institute of Technology on the University of Memphis campus Tuesday, Sept. 24.

76. Endless Opportunities -

Although she didn’t think of it this way at the time, Desiree Evans proved as a little girl that she understood science had value on several levels, including monetary.

“I was 9 or 10,” Evans recalled, “and I asked my mom for a microscope for Christmas.”

77. Sci-Fi Moment Sparked Career Ambition for Bell -

For many children coming of age in the 1970s and 1980s, a viewing of the “Star Wars” trilogy led to afternoons of battling make-believe Stormtroopers with homemade light sabers in a backyard re-imagined as the Death Star.

78. Prescription for Success -

It’s been nearly a decade since the Memphis medical community and city leaders teamed up to create a master plan for what they called the Memphis Medical Center.

The district – which follows the main corridors of Union and Madison avenues and extends from Danny Thomas Boulevard to Cleveland Street and from Peabody Avenue to the Interstate 240 loop – already was home to more than 40 organizations that specialized in everything from clinical care to research. But the Memphis Medical Center organizers wanted to improve safety and promote overall economic development, including commercial, retail and residential real estate.

79. Bayer CropScience Files Permit Application for Greenhouse -

Bayer CropScience is moving ahead with construction of its $17 million greenhouse near Agricenter International, filing a $2 million permit application with the city-county Office of Construction Code Enforcement.

80. Bigger Joins TriMetis as Business Development Specialist -

Lauren Bigger has joined preclinical services company TriMetis, a subsidiary of Memphis Bioworks Foundation, as a business development specialist. In her new role, Bigger will work with the operations and scientific teams to drive new projects for the TriMetis specialized laboratory and manage the sales and protocol review processes.

81. ‘Process’ Keeps Alabama, Saban on Top -

The best coach in college football admitted that he – and everyone else at Alabama – was proud of the team’s recent accomplishments. You know, two straight national titles and, if you want to deal in ancient history, three in the last four years.

82. Mapping the Way to a More Fair Wait for New Livers -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Where you live can affect your chances of getting a liver transplant, and your risk of dying while waiting. The nation's transplant network says it's time to make the system fairer – and it may take a cue from how politicians redraw voting maps.

83. Organic Education -

Bethel Grove Elementary School of Memphis marked the opening of its American Heart Association Teaching Garden recently with a Plant Day Celebration and ribbon-cutting ceremony that included garden crafts, music and physical activity education.

84. Editorial: School Year Signals New Education Era -

For those hoping the opening of the school year would be the end of the turbulence in public education in Shelby County, we have bad news.

We also have bad news for those who fervently believed the opening of the school year would simply be the end of public education in Shelby County, at least until suburban school systems are formed one year from now.

85. Advisory Board to Examine Community Health Needs -

Dr. David Stern, executive dean of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Medicine, has launched a unique effort to address community health needs in Memphis.

“It’s my belief that a medical school has a very unique opportunity to interact with the community,” Stern said. “I consider our community to be a very important laboratory – it is an underserved, minority community that is in ill health. The biggest contribution we can make is to move the needle on overall community health and to develop new methods that we can apply to other communities like Memphis.”

86. Haslam Names Richard Montgomery Parole Board Chair -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam has appointed former state lawmaker Richard Montgomery to be the new chairman of the Board of Parole.

87. Grizz Claw Into Conference Finals -

His team had just overcome a 17-point first-half deficit and beaten Oklahoma City in overtime to win Game 4 and take a commanding 3-1 lead in their best-of-seven Western Conference semifinal series. So someone asked Grizzlies coach Lionel Hollins if he was impressed.

88. Then and Now -

Jay Bailey pictured marching bands and floats when his mother told him he was going on a march.

“We thought of it as a parade,” said Bailey, who was 6 years old in March 1968. “We thought of it as something fun.”

89. Cestaro: Lab Will be First of its Kind -

TriMetis president Phil Cestaro took a year off after he resigned from Nashville-based SCRI Global Services at the Sarah Cannon Research Institute in 2011, where he was president.

“I didn’t know how much time I was going to take off, I just knew I was going to enjoy life and my family,” he said. “It was the best decision I ever made.”

90. Agriculture Boom Fuels Agricenter Expansions -

Agriculture is a promising business, especially considering the rapidly growing worldwide demand for food and fiber products by a ballooning international population.

That’s the backdrop for construction that’s set to begin soon on a state-of-the-art greenhouse and research laboratory at Agricenter International.

91. Agribusiness Companies Give Peek at New Facilities -

Two agribusiness companies have cut the ribbon on their respective facilities at Agricenter International where they are making investments totaling almost $20 million.

Executives from Bayer CropScience and Helena Chemical were on hand at the Agricenter Monday, April 1, to give a sneak peek at the plans for both facilities, which include a new laboratory and greenhouse facilities. Officials on hand for the announcement included Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell and Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr., and at least one economic development official on hand noted informally that the Agricenter is well on the way toward becoming a major agribusiness hub.

92. Agricenter Breaks Ground on Two New Projects -

Bayer CropScience and Helena Chemical Co. have committed to separate investments at Agricenter International totaling nearly $20 million.

93. UTHSC, UT Medical Group Form Dermatopathology Lab -

A recently launched joint venture between the University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC) and UT Medical Group will bring an academic touch to the diagnosis of skin diseases.

UT DermPath, a new dermatopathology lab that opened Jan. 1, will give dermatology residents hands-on experience while assisting private clinicians.

94. Health Care Decisions -

In the past four years, the health care premiums Courtney Liebenrood Ellett has paid for her 12 employees have risen about 70 percent.

Liebenrood Ellett, the founder and principal at Obsidian Public Relations in Memphis, has paid 100 percent of her employees’ premiums since 2009.

95. Bioworks Foundation to Launch TriMetis -

In May, The Memphis Bioworks Foundation will launch TriMetis, a for-profit research company that will be the first of its kind in the region.

Phil Cestaro, TriMetis president, says the company will operate the Memphis Specialized Laboratory, a facility designed to help medical device, pharmaceutical, industrial, biotech and academic institutions conduct research that will meet the quality levels and oversight required by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

96. Agricenter Breaks Ground on Two New Projects -

Bayer CropScience and Helena Chemical Co. have committed to separate investments at Agricenter International totaling nearly $20 million.

97. Companies Investing $20 Million at Agricenter -

Bayer CropScience and Helena Chemical Co. have committed to separate investments at Agricenter International totaling nearly $20 million.

98. Phipps Named Vice President, COO at American Esoteric Laboratories -

Dr. Amber R. Phipps has joined American Esoteric Laboratories, the Mid-South division of Sonic Healthcare USA, as vice president and chief operations officer. In her new role, Phipps will oversee all operations for AEL, which includes nine laboratories and more than 800 employees in six states. A captain in the U.S. Army Reserves, Phipps most recently served as a medical operations officer stationed at Fort Sam Houston, Texas.

99. Administration Advances Brown for TVA Board -

The Obama administration has angered Tennessee’s U.S. senators by again nominating energy-efficiency expert Marilyn Brown for a full term on the Tennessee Valley Authority board.

100. Gun Ban Would Protect More Than 2,200 Firearms -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Congress' latest crack at a new assault weapons ban would protect more than 2,200 specific firearms, including a semi-automatic rifle that is nearly identical to one of the guns used in the bloodiest shootout in FBI history.