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Editorial Results (free)

1. Memphis Remains Key for Back Yard Burgers Turnaround -

More than a year after coming out of bankruptcy protection, Nashville-based Back Yard Burgers is a different restaurant company – one that enjoyed a 10.6 percent increase in same-store sales in the first quarter as well as 12 straight months of increased revenue.

2. Lower Risk of Degenerative Eye Condition -

Age-Related Macular Degeneration (ARMD) is the leading cause of blindness among the U.S population older than 50.

A study in 2002 by researchers found that there were 1.6 million Americans with advanced ARMD and that by the year 2020 there will be 2.7 million Americans with advanced ARMD because of the increasing baby-boomer populations. This study did not take into account the millions of cases of patients around the U.S. with only early and moderate ARMD, which can also cause vision loss.

3. Ugwueke Named Methodist Le Bonheur President -

Michael O. Ugwueke has been named president and chief operating officer of Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare, as well as president and CEO of Methodist Healthcare Memphis Hospitals. In his new role, Ugwueke will be responsible for strategic management of the operations of six hospitals within the Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare system, as well as other key corporate functions.

4. Thawing Out: Warmer Temperatures Lift US Economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Spring's thaw is reviving the economy, too.

A recent batch of government and business reports show a U.S. economy emerging from winter's deep freeze.

Economists had expected the growth to accelerate in 2014 after two years of slow and steady improvement. But an unusually bitter winter sent factories, hiring and consumer spending into hibernation.

5. How to Keep a Fundraising Job -

Part two in a two-part series. We have seen nonprofit executive directors and college presidents pull their hair out over their relationship – or lack of a relationship – with their development staff. There are magic words development professionals say that pour gasoline on a slow smoldering fire. Here are a few.

6. Overton Square Parking Gets Latest Solution -

Work on a pair of pedestrian crosswalks across Cooper Street at Monroe Avenue in the next two months could be the beginning of remedying traffic problems in Overton Square.

The crosswalks are the first crucial part in the plan that so far includes permits for residential parking on Monroe and some reserved parking in the Overton Square garage specifically for businesses in the area.

7. Late Sign-Ups Improve Outlook for Obama Health Law -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A surge of eleventh-hour enrollments has improved the outlook for President Barack Obama's health care law, with more people signing up overall and a much-needed spark of interest among young adults.

8. 108th General Assembly Adjourns for Year -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — State lawmakers concluded a session Thursday in which they approved measures to allow folks to buy wine in grocery stores, fight methamphetamine production and give high school graduates free tuition at community colleges.

9. Innovation Risk Brings Rewards -

Suppose I told you that you could spend $185,000 and turn it into $25 million or more in a few years. You would accuse me of phishing, an investment scam, or dismiss the proposition as foolhardy. Yet, these are the types of returns we see from clients and those in the world who invest in breakthrough innovation at their companies.

10. Cates, Kornegay Look to Future While Honoring Colliers’ Past -

The memory is scorched in Andy Cates’ mind.

It was 2005 and Cates, just 29 years old at the time, was being made a partner at Colliers International Memphis, the commercial real estate firm.

11. 108th General Assembly Adjourns for the Year -

NASHVILLE (AP) – State lawmakers concluded a session Thursday in which they approved measures to allow folks to buy wine in grocery stores, fight methamphetamine production and give high school graduates free tuition at community colleges.

12. Intaxicating Humor -

To file or not to file? For an extension, that is. Indeed, this is the question. For mid-April is upon us yet again.

In desperation, if not also procrastination, I seek the ease that only humor can bring. Read that: I decide to try my hand at writing tax jokes. Which proves to be a bit of a problem, as I am not by trade a joke writer. Not one to be deterred by such technicalities, I press onward:

13. McCullough: Trucking Critical to Local Economy -

Editor’s note: This is the first in a series on Carnival Memphis’ annual Business & Industry Salute, which this year is trucking.

Jim McCullough could have ended up in a cubicle working in the accounting industry after he graduated from the Mississippi State University School of Business.

14. ABA President Silkenat Shares Notion Of ‘Civil Gideon’ -

The president of the American Bar Association sees at least a discussion on the way about a “civil Gideon” – a requirement that a citizen who cannot afford an attorney in a civil court proceeding should have one appointed by the court.

15. The Business Case for Investing in Green Space -

Editor’s Note: This column will appear Tuesdays through April in honor of Sustainability Month for Memphis and Shelby County.

During 2013 the Greater Memphis Chamber formed the Chairman’s Circle, a group of over 100 Memphis business leaders organized to push for action on key issues to accelerate the regional economy. Early in the life of the organization we created “moon missions,” which are coordinated efforts to truly transform our community.

16. Backend of Innovation -

Many of the CEOs we talk to tell us that they have more growth ideas than they know what to do with. It seems like there is a universal love affair with generating ideas but less enthusiasm when it comes to figuring out which ideas are the most commercially viable and how to actually implement.

17. Free Tuition Plan Goes to Key Panel -

Gov. Bill Haslam’s signature proposal to create a program that would cover a full ride at two-year colleges for any high school graduate was scheduled to be heard by a key legislative committee on Tuesday.

18. Tony Back to Being Tony in Key Win -

Someday a professor of sports science will write a book on the Grizzlies’ Tony Allen or the good professor’s head will explode in the trying.

19. Report: Exchanges Yield More Specialty Drug Claims -

Patients from the health care overhaul's new insurance exchanges have been more likely to use expensive specialty drugs for chronic conditions, according to data from the nation's largest pharmacy benefits manager.

20. Minutes Show Fed Struggled to Agree on Rate Policy -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Federal Reserve struggled last month over how to convey to investors that it will raise short-term interest rates only slowly once it increases them from record lows.

21. Traffic on Southwest Airlines Rose in March -

DALLAS (AP) – Southwest Airlines Co. said Tuesday that passenger traffic and a key revenue figure rose slightly last month compared with March 2013.

22. Haslam Free Tuition Plan Goes to Key Panel -

Gov. Bill Haslam's signature proposal to create a program that would cover a full ride at two-year colleges for any high school graduate was scheduled to be heard by a key legislative committee on Tuesday.

23. End of Windows XP Support Spells Trouble for Some -

NEW YORK (AP) – Microsoft will end support for the persistently popular Windows XP on Tuesday, and with an estimated 30 percent of businesses and consumers still using the 12-year-old operating system, the move could put everything from the operations of heavy industry to the identities of everyday people in danger.

24. High-Skilled Visas Snapped Up in Days -

Businesses seeking highly skilled workers from overseas took less than a week to snap up all 85,000 visas available for next year, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services announced Monday.

The agency had been accepting applications just since April 1 for the 2015 fiscal year quota of the highly coveted H-1B visas, which are used for computer programmers, engineers and other skilled workers employed in the Silicon Valley and elsewhere.

25. Business Cards as Prospecting Tool -

Nonprofit CEOs, board chairs, and college presidents are constantly out and about meeting people and picking up business cards. Here’s what we know: You can use those cards to stack the deck in favor of your fundraising success.

26. Redistricting Has Little Effect on Tenn. GOP -

While Republican lawmakers in some states may have benefited from congressional redistricting, the changes had little effect in Tennessee.

Republicans were able to give themselves a built-in advantage in House elections by doing well in the statewide elections in many states, then gerrymandering congressional districts in key states after the 2010 census. The strategy may prove to be advantageous going into the 2014 midterm elections and beyond, regardless of the political climate in November.

27. US Home Market: Few Buyers and Not Enough Sellers -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Entering the 2014 spring buying season, the U.S. housing market faces an unusual dilemma: Too few people are selling homes. Yet too few buyers can afford the homes that are for sale.

28. Bill Extends Tax Breaks for Wind Farms, Filmmakers -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Wind farms, NASCAR tracks and filmmakers would keep their treasured tax breaks as part of an $85 billion package of temporary tax cuts passed by a key Senate committee Thursday.

29. White House: 7 Million Signed Up for Health Care -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In a key milestone for the 4-year-old health care law, the Obama administration says more than 7 million people signed up for health care through insurance exchanges, surpassing a threshold once seen as unattainable.

30. Deadline Brings High Interest for Health Insurance -

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) – A blizzard, jammed phone lines and unreliable websites failed to stop throngs of procrastinating Americans from trying to sign up for health coverage by the midnight Monday deadline for President Barack Obama's signature domestic policy initiative.

31. Auto Safety Chief Says GM Didn't Share Key Data -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A federal safety regulator says General Motors didn't share key information that might have led to a faster recall of small cars.

In written testimony to a House subcommittee, acting National Highway Traffic Safety Administration chief David Friedman says GM had information connecting defective ignition switches to the non-deployment of air bags, but didn't share it until last month.

32. Yellen: Job Market Needs Low Rates 'For Some Time' -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen made clear Monday that she thinks the still-subpar U.S. job market will continue to need the help of low interest rates "for some time."

33. Redistricting Has Little Effect on Tennessee GOP -

While Republican lawmakers in some states may have benefited from congressional redistricting, the changes had little effect in Tennessee.

Republicans were able to give themselves a built-in advantage in House elections by doing well in the statewide elections in many states, then gerrymandering congressional districts in key states after the 2010 census. The strategy may prove to be advantageous going into the 2014 midterm elections and beyond, regardless of the political climate in November.

34. Effort to Rewrite Tenn. Whiskey Law Fails -

State lawmakers on Tuesday decided not to rewrite the legal definition of Tennessee whiskey this session, meaning the rules supported by Jack Daniel’s will govern other distillers in the state for at least another year.

35. Effort to Rewrite Tennessee Whiskey Law Fails -

State lawmakers on Tuesday decided not to rewrite the legal definition of Tennessee whiskey this session, meaning the rules supported by Jack Daniel's will govern other distillers in the state for at least another year.

36. Commission Votes Down Family-Planning Rebid -

Shelby County commissioners voted down a bid Monday, March 24, to rebid the county’s contract for federally funded family-planning services with Christ Community Health Services.

Some commissioners branded Commissioner Steve Mulroy’s effort to urge County Mayor Mark Luttrell’s administration to rebid the contract as a political effort. Mulroy is taking criticism from former Commissioner Deidre Malone in the three-way Democratic primary race for county mayor for his vote in favor of the contract in 2011.

37. High Court Seems Divided Over Birth Control Rule -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court seemed divided Tuesday over whether employers' religious beliefs can free them from a part of the new health care law that requires that they provide coverage of birth control for employees at no extra charge.

38. Commission Takes Up Family Planning Contract -

Shelby County commissioners Monday, March 24, take up an attempt to end the county’s contract for federally funded family planning and related health services with Christ Community Health Services.

39. Ballo Begins New Roles At UTHSC, West Clinic -

Dr. Matthew T. Ballo has received appointments as founding chairman of the new Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center and director of radiation oncology at the UT/West Clinic.

40. Jack Daniel’s Opposes Changing Whiskey Law -

If it isn’t fermented in Tennessee from mash of at least 51 percent corn, aged in new charred oak barrels, filtered through maple charcoal and bottled at a minimum of 80 proof, it isn’t Tennessee whiskey. So says a year-old law that resembles almost to the letter the process used to make Jack Daniel’s, the world’s best-known Tennessee whiskey.

41. Chris Christie to Keynote Tenn. GOP fundraiser -

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie is scheduled to headline the Tennessee Republican Party’s annual fundraiser on May 30.

State Republican Party Chairman Chris Devaney said the appearance will give voters a chance to form their own impressions about Christie as he considers a presidential bid.

42. Jeb Bush: Follow Through on Common Core Standards -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush on Wednesday urged state officials to follow through on Common Core education standards despite what he called an "avalanche" of criticism from those who oppose them.

43. Chris Christie to Keynote Tennessee GOP fundraiser -

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie is scheduled to headline the Tennessee Republican Party’s annual fundraiser on May 30.

State Republican Party Chairman Chris Devaney said the appearance will give voters a chance to form their own impressions about Christie as he considers a presidential bid.

44. Memphis Bioworks Leads New Entrepreneurship Venture -

The Memphis Bioworks Foundation has been tapped to lead a new entrepreneurship venture in Memphis called The EPIcenter, the product of one of several so-called moon mission strategies of the Greater Memphis Chamber’s Chairman’s Circle.

45. Lawmakers Mull Full Repeal of Tennessee Whiskey Law -

NASHVILLE (AP) – State lawmakers are considering an outright repeal of a 2013 law that for the first time established a legal definition of Tennessee whisky.

Supporters of the move say the law enacted last year unfairly benefits Jack Daniel's, the world's most famous Tennessee whiskey.

46. Haslam Pushing Common Core Standards -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam reiterated Tuesday that Common Core education standards are crucial to continuing to improve education in Tennessee and he hopes to dismiss misconceptions about them.

47. Jack Daniel's Opposes Changing Whiskey Law -

If it isn't fermented in Tennessee from mash of at least 51 percent corn, aged in new charred oak barrels, filtered through maple charcoal and bottled at a minimum of 80 proof, it isn't Tennessee whiskey. So says a year-old law that resembles almost to the letter the process used to make Jack Daniel's, the world's best-known Tennessee whiskey.

48. FDIC Sues 16 Big Banks That Set Key Rate -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. has sued 16 big banks that set a key global interest rate, accusing them of fraud and conspiring to keep the rate low to enrich themselves.

49. Ballo Begins New Roles At UTHSC, West Clinic -

Dr. Matthew T. Ballo has received appointments as founding chairman of the new Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center and director of radiation oncology at the UT/West Clinic.

50. Marketing Is About Strategy -

The word marketing has lost its true meaning in common business vernacular. Instead of a strategic activity that contemplates price, product, promotion and place, marketing has largely come to mean tactical execution of advertising or sales materials.

51. Tennessee House Votes to Delay Common Core Standards -

NASHVILLE (AP) – A proposal to delay further implementation of the state's Common Core standards was approved in the House on Thursday, even though Republican Gov. Bill Haslam has called them key to Tennessee students' improvement.

52. Dollar General Fiscal Fourth-Quarter Profit Rises -

GOODLETTSVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Dollar General's profit during the fourth-quarter was curtailed by harsh winter storms that have affected the entire retail sector, but it also issued a weak outlook for this year and shares slipped in premarket trading.

53. McCusker Aims for Criminal Court Clerk -

Michael McCusker is used to the assumptions when the assistant district attorney general tells voters he is running for office this year.

“A lot of people keep saying to me, ‘Wouldn’t judge be a natural progression for you?’ In some respects it would be,” admitted McCusker, who is instead running in the May Democratic primary for Criminal Court clerk.

54. Staging Success -

When the Live at the Garden summer concert series at Memphis Botanic Garden launches its 14th season in June, it will feature a new permanent stage and several other amenities.

Besides the new stage, the $6.1 million project now under construction includes a food court, box offices and a below-grade “pit” in front of the stage that can hold around 125 people.

55. White House Promotes Economic Issues Facing Women -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Add pay equity to President Barack Obama's 2014 do-it-himself wish list.

The White House is launching a campaign to promote a host of economic issues facing women, a key voting bloc in this year's midterm election.

56. Bill to Prohibit Teacher Licensure Rules -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Legislation that would prohibit student test scores from being tied to teacher licensing has passed a key House panel.

The proposal sponsored by Republican Rep. Matthew Hill of Jonesborough passed the House Education Subcommittee 8-1 on Tuesday.

57. Women Leading in Memphis Startup Scene -

Memphis has made all the difference for me as a female startup founder. Memphis isn’t often sought after as an entrepreneurial hub, but I found it to be just what I was looking for: supportive and empowering for woman founders like myself. Memphis startup events aren’t only balanced on gender, but also in race. A mind-set for inclusion here is really setting our community apart from others.

58. US Employers Posted More Open Jobs in January -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. employers advertised slightly more jobs in January than in December, a sign that hiring should remain steady in coming months.

The Labor Department said Tuesday that employers posted 3.9 million job openings, up 1.5 percent from December. That is still below November's nearly six-year high of 4.1 million, the first month that openings topped 4 million since March 2008.

59. Flight Cancelations Take a Toll on Airline Revenue -

DALLAS (AP) – Airlines are still tallying up the damage from this winter's storms, but solid demand for travel means they are likely to weather the rocky start to 2014 in good shape.

Reports from some of the airlines point to higher average prices, and executives say spring bookings look strong.

60. Court Dismissal Leaves Matter of School Board Restructuring -

UPDATE: U.S. District Judge Samuel "Hardy" Mays approved Tuesday, March 11, the Shelby County Commission's plan to restructure the Shelby County Schools board to a nine-member board with the August 2014 elections.

61. Mays Accepts Suburban Schools Settlements, Dismisses Related Court Claims -

The Memphis Federal Court judge overseeing the three-year old court case over the reformation of public schools in Shelby County has dismissed the last major claim of the case, all remaining claims still pending.

62. Mays Accepts Suburban Schools Settlement, Dismisses Related Court Claims -

The Memphis Federal Court judge overseeing the three-year old court case over the reformation of public schools in Shelby County has dismissed the last major claim of the case, all remaining claims still pending.

63. Health Law Cited as US Uninsured Rate Drops -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The share of Americans without health insurance is dropping to the lowest levels since President Barack Obama took office, but sign-ups under his health care law lag among Hispanics – a big pool of potential beneficiaries.

64. Unlocking Doors to Education -

George Washington Carver is quoted as saying that “Education is the key to unlock the golden door to freedom.” In our community, there are many education doors; however, there is not a master key that opens all the doors.

65. Pets Get the Hollywood Treatment at Growing Chain -

Shawn McGhee grew up on a farm in Southern California with sheep and cattle and “a dozen dogs, a dozen cats, running loose.”

66. Commission to Vote on Crosstown Funding -

Shelby County Commissioners will vote Monday, March 10, on $5 million in public infrastructure funding for the Crosstown redevelopment project.

The commission meets at 1:30 p.m. at the Vasco Smith County Administration Building, 160 N. Main St. Follow the meeting @tdnpols, www.twitter.com/tdnpols.

67. Bad Weather Hurts Fred’s February Sales -

Memphis-based discount retailer Fred’s Inc. said Thursday that February sales at stores open at least a year fell 2.2 percent, hindered by severe winter weather.

The performance surprised analysts polled by Thomson Reuters, who were expecting a 0.2 percent increase in the metric.

68. Valero Delays Memphis Plant Maintenance -

Valero Energy Corp. has moved maintenance work on its Memphis plant to April from March after a key parts supplier went out of business, according to a report from Bloomberg News.

69. Kroger: Storm Response Helped Boost Sales -

NEW YORK (AP) – Kroger said its ability to keep its supermarkets open and well-stocked as customers rushed to hoard groceries ahead of winter storms helped boost its results in the fourth quarter.

70. US Applications for Jobless Aid Reach 3-Month Low -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The number of people seeking U.S. unemployment benefits dropped 26,000 last week to a seasonally adjusted 323,000, the lowest level in three months as layoffs remain at pre-recession levels.

71. Bad Weather Hurts Fred's February Sales -

Memphis-based discount retailer Fred's Inc. said Thursday that February sales at stores open at least a year fell 2.2 percent, hindered by severe winter weather.

72. Valero Delays Memphis Plant Maintenance -

Valero Energy Corp. has moved maintenance work on its Memphis plant to April from March after a key parts supplier went out of business, according to a report from Bloomberg News.

73. RadioShack Closing 1,100 Stores as Troubles Grow -

NEW YORK (AP) – There will soon be about 1,100 fewer places to buy batteries.

RadioShack said Tuesday that it plans to close up to 1,100 stores, or about a fifth of its U.S. locations. The news came as the retailer reported a wider quarterly loss after a disappointing holiday season. Its stock tumbled 16 percent in afternoon trading.

74. Eddleman Joins Family Safety Center -

Vernetta Eddleman has joined the Family Safety Center, Memphis and Shelby County’s center for victims of domestic violence, as director of client services.

In her new role, Eddleman will be responsible for the planning, design, development and management of client services, and will also supervise and train staff and partner agency providers in delivering quality care to victims and their families.

75. Primaries Offer First Major Test of Voter ID Laws -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In elections that begin next week, voters in 10 states will be required to present photo identification before casting ballots – the first major test of voter ID laws after years of legal challenges arguing that the measures are designed to suppress voting.

76. GAO Report: Too Few Pilots or Too Little Pay? -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The nation's regional airlines are having trouble hiring enough pilots, the government says, suggesting one reason may be that they simply don't pay enough.

A pool of qualified pilots is available, but it's unclear whether they are willing to work for low entry-level wages, the Government Accountability Office said in a report released Friday.

77. Estimated Q4 Economic Growth Rate Cut to 2.4 Percent -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy grew at a 2.4 percent annual rate last quarter, sharply less than first thought, in part because consumers didn't spend as much as initially estimated.

78. No Sign of Expansion at Plant Where UAW Dealt Loss -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Friday marks the end of the two-week period within which U.S. Sen. Bob Corker promised Volkswagen would announce another line at its factory in Tennessee if workers there rejected representation by the United Auto Workers union.

79. Next Step: Innovate Open Young Minds -

Our last Let’s Grow column focused on an outgrowth of our efforts with some sharp peers, the Memphis Innovation Bootcamp.

One objective of the Bootcamp is to build a community of innovators. The more we socialize these methods and tools, the larger the social and business problems can be met with creativity, empathy and the widest range of possible solutions.

80. Integrity Oncology Receives Recognition -

Integrity Oncology Foundation, a part of Baptist Medical Group and a major player in the Baptist Cancer Center, has been recognized by the Quality Oncology Practice Initiative Certification Program, an affiliate of the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

81. Demerger Debate -

In five months, a new school year will begin in Shelby County. And for a second straight academic year, many parents will be able to say it is unlike any in their lifetimes.

The first and last school year of the unified Memphis City and Shelby County Schools systems will be followed by what educators are calling the “demerger.”

82. Yellen: Fed Monitoring Recent Weaker Economic Data -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen noted Thursday that recent economic data have pointed to weaker-than-expected gains in consumer spending and job growth. She said the Fed will be watching to see whether the slowdown proves only a temporary blip caused by severe winter weather.

83. Integrity Oncology Receives Recognition -

Integrity Oncology Foundation, a part of Baptist Medical Group and a major player in the Baptist Cancer Center, has been recognized by the Quality Oncology Practice Initiative Certification Program, an affiliate of the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

84. Goldsworthy: Germantown, Collierville Discuss Schools Contract -

Germantown Mayor Sharon Goldsworthy says Germantown and Collierville schools leaders are discussing a contract to allow Collierville students to continue attending the Germantown district’s Houston High in the new academic year.

85. Lilly Diabetes Drug Meets Late-Stage Goal -

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) – Eli Lilly and Co.'s experimental injectable diabetes treatment dulaglutide fared on par in a late-stage study with another drug that's already on the market.

The Indianapolis drugmaker said Tuesday that a once-weekly, 1.5-milligram dose of dulaglutide was not inferior to a daily, 1.8 milligram dose of Novo Nordisk's Victoza in a study of nearly 600 patients who were already taking metformin, an older diabetes treatment. A non-inferior finding essentially means that the drug did not show superiority or inferiority to the other treatment. That determination was the main goal of the study.

86. Stop Asking for Referrals -

Referred prospects offer one of the strongest returns of any marketing or sales strategy you can deploy. After all, a good referral costs nothing to generate and a referred prospect is much more likely to become a customer than an average lead.

87. Warren Buffett Offers Lesson in Value Investing -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) – Warren Buffett is offering a refresher course on his approach to investing in his annual letter to Berkshire Hathaway Inc. shareholders.

88. Three Keys to Building Alumni Relations -

Colleges and universities look to alumni for financial support. If you attended or graduated from college you likely receive fundraising solicitations from your alma mater.

Some colleges excel at engaging their alumni and raising money from them. Their programs have been built over generations: First-year students are encouraged to set alumni giving as a personal goal. Other institutions such as community colleges are newer to engaging alumni. Some small private and public universities also face challenges.

89. Council Rethinking Streetlight Fee -

Memphis City Council members are rethinking the streetlight fee Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division has been charging.

The monthly fee has several different rates for homeowners, renters, small commercial property owners and large commercial property owners.

90. Shockey ‘Ideal Fit’ as Chamber Chair -

Leigh Shockey had gone to Memphis International Airport in her role as an executive for the family business – Drexel Chemical Co.

91. Roland ReElected At Filing Deadline, Two Countywide Races Set For August -

One of the six Shelby County Commission incumbents seeking re-election this year was effectively elected to a new four-year term in a new district with the noon Thursday, Feb. 20, filing deadline for candidates in the May county primaries.

92. Tennessee House Passes Supermarket Wine Sales Bill -

NASHVILLE (AP) – A years-long effort to allow wine to be sold outside of Tennessee liquor stores easily cleared what was expected to be its toughest hurdle on Thursday when the state House overwhelmingly approved the measure.

93. Fed Minutes Point to Continued Paring of Stimulus -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve officials agreed at their January meeting that further gradual reductions in their stimulus would be appropriate as long as the economy keeps improving.

94. Council Rethinking Streetlight Fee -

Memphis City Council members are rethinking the streetlight fee Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division has been charging.

The monthly fee has several different rates for homeowners, renters, small commercial property owners and large commercial property owners.

95. Council Tours Pyramid, Weighs City Offices In Two Malls -

Memphis City Council members heard Tuesday, Feb. 18, that the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. wants to move some city government offices into the Soulsville Town Center in South Memphis and is weighing whether to renovate or tear down and build anew on the site of the Southbrook Mall in Whitehaven.

96. Improving Disparities -

Working to better understand, and thus bring down, Shelby County’s infant mortality rate would be a giant undertaking.

But that is but one of many challenges that lie ahead of a husband-and-wife team of doctors who nine months ago moved from Nashville to Memphis to set up the Research Center on Health Disparities, Equity and the Exposome.

97. Weather, Computer Outage Cause Flight Delays -

DALLAS (AP) — More than 600 U.S. flights were canceled and about 2,600 were running late on Tuesday as a winter storm swept across the Northeast.

Adding to travelers' woes: United Airlines experienced problems with its passenger-service computer system for much of the morning.

98. After UAW Defeat, Can GOP Fulfill Promise of Jobs? -

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (AP) — Republicans fighting a yearslong unionization effort at the Volkswagen plant in Tennessee painted a grim picture in the days leading up to last week's vote. They said if Chattanooga employees joined the United Auto Workers, jobs would go elsewhere and incentives for the company would disappear.

99. CDC Leaders Have Challenges in Communities -

Community development corporations are designed to help create more housing in areas where investors and banks might not normally invest without incentives.

But the CDCs, as they are known, are increasingly in the business of adding business development to the housing in a combination of community building.

100. Council to Review Mall Conversions -

Memphis City Council members get a look at plans for the redevelopment of two shopping malls Tuesday, Feb. 18.

But the council’s last meeting for February apparently won’t include any presentation of a proposal to change the benefits of new city hires and city employees with less than 10 years on the job, as promised earlier by Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s administration.