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Editorial Results (free)

1. Baptist Foundation Adds Development Officer -

Penny Aviotti has joined the Baptist Memorial Health Care Foundation staff as a development officer. Previously, she managed First Tennessee Foundation, evaluating the distribution of dollars to nonprofit agencies throughout Tennessee.

2. First State Bank Given SBA Lending Honor -

First State Bank has been named the 2013 Small Business Administration Community Bank of the Year for Tennessee.

3. First-Quarter Bankruptcies Remain Flat -

Bankruptcies in Shelby County were almost the same in number for the first three months of 2014 as they were for the first quarter of 2013.

There were 3,036 bankruptcies filed in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Western District of Tennessee in the first quarter, a slight increase from the 3,031 filed during the first quarter of 2013, according to The Daily News Online, www.memphisdailynews.com.

4. New Perspective -

When the U.S. Postal Service closed its branch office at 826 Mississippi Blvd. near E.H. Crump Boulevard in 2012, workers carted off an oil painting that hung there for several decades with little thought about the man portrayed in the painting.

5. Volkswagen Expansion Talks at Standstill in Tennessee -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Expansion talks at Volkswagen's lone U.S. plant have ground to a halt amid disagreements about the role of organized labor at the factory in Tennessee.

An acrimonious vote in February at the plant in Chattanooga resulted in the narrow defeat of the United Auto Workers union.

6. Haslam Free Tuition Plan Garners Praise, Concern -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam's signature proposal this year, a program that would cover a full ride at two-year colleges for any high school graduate, appears on track to pass as lawmakers enter the waning days of the legislative session. The details, however – including how to pay for this perk in the years to come – remain scattered.

7. This week in Memphis history: April 4-10 -

2013: The Memphis Soul concert in the East Room of the White House featuring Sam Moore and Justin Timberlake.

8. New Partners Sign On to Tennessee Brewery Effort -

This weekend, volunteers will return to the Tennessee Brewery property to continue getting it ready for Tennessee Brewery Untapped, a six-week series of community events that will run April 24 through June 1.

9. Methodist University Hospital Names Liebman New CEO -

Jeff Liebman has joined Methodist University Hospital as chief executive officer. In his new role, Liebman said, he will ensure the hospital continues to be a community resource providing the highest possible quality of care to the community while following the guidelines of the Methodist LeBonheur mission.

10. Berger Withdraws From Commission Race -

In a somewhat abrupt turnaround, Memphis businessman Taylor Berger has decided to withdraw his candidacy for the Shelby County Commission about a month after announcing his intent to run for the District 5 seat.

11. Haslam’s Medicaid Expansion Talks Continue -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam has walked a fine line since announcing a year ago that the state would not accept federal funding for an expansion of TennCare, Tennessee’s version of Medicaid, at least for now.

12. Clash of Contenders -

Shelby County Commissioner Steve Mulroy says his political plans last year didn’t include running for county mayor in 2014.

He was on U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen’s short list of recommendations for an open federal judgeship, a White House appointment he said he knew he might not get “the first time.”

13. Second Rape Kit Lawsuit Names More Officials -

The second federal lawsuit since December over the Memphis Police Department’s backlog of 12,000 untested rape kits casts a wider net of defendants than the first lawsuit, including the current and former Memphis police directors and the current and former district attorneys general.

14. Common Core Spawns Widespread Political Fights -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — More than five years after U.S. governors began a bipartisan effort to set new standards in American schools, the Common Core initiative has morphed into a political tempest fueling division among Republicans.

15. The Daily News Claims Four Awards -

The Daily News and The Memphis News earned first place honors over the weekend for editorials in the annual Tennessee Associated Press Managing Editors awards.

The editorials were judged the best among Division 3 newspapers across the state of Tennessee, newspapers with a circulation of up to 15,000.

16. Backlog Backlash -

The first thing Veronica Coleman-Davis wanted to do was take a look at where thousands of untested rape kits had been stored over the last 30 years.

The former U.S. attorney is investigating how the backlog came to be. It’s an effort that, until her appointment in February by Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr., had been pointed at clearing the backlog with no answers from any of the players in the criminal justice system about how the backlog happened in the first place.

17. City Pension Change Outlined for 2015 -

The administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. made its formal proposal of a “long-term solution” and change in the city’s pension plan to a 401(k) style plan this week with specific terms Wharton has long said would be included.

18. ‘Champion of Working Man’ Rep. Turner Set to Retire -

State Rep. and Nashville Democrat Mike Turner is retiring from the General Assembly and considering a run for mayor.

19. County Commissioners Review Ethics Code -

Shelby County Commissioners take their first look Wednesday, March 19, at possible changes to county government’s ethics code.

The changes, proposed by Commissioner Steve Mulroy, touch on issues raised earlier this year when a panel of the county ethics commission considered and ultimately dismissed a complaint filed by Commissioner Terry Roland against fellow Commissioner Sidney Chism.

20. ‘Bigger and Better’ -

At a benefit concert earlier this month at Evergreen Presbyterian Church for the financially struggling Memphis Symphony Orchestra, one audience member was noticeably moved during a performance of “Capriccio Espagnol,” a piece based on Spanish folk melodies from the late 1800s by Nikolai Rismky-Korsakov.

21. Ruling Sets School Board Membership at Nine -

No local elected body in Shelby County has changed as many times in as short a period of time as the Shelby County Schools board.

The federal court order Tuesday, March 11, by U.S. District Judge Samuel “Hardy” Mays approving the restructure of the school board to a nine-member body effective Sept. 1 will mark the third change in the school board in three years when it takes effect following August school board elections.

22. Court Dismissal Leaves Matter of School Board Restructuring -

UPDATE: U.S. District Judge Samuel "Hardy" Mays approved Tuesday, March 11, the Shelby County Commission's plan to restructure the Shelby County Schools board to a nine-member board with the August 2014 elections.

23. Mays Accepts Suburban Schools Settlements, Dismisses Related Court Claims -

The Memphis Federal Court judge overseeing the three-year old court case over the reformation of public schools in Shelby County has dismissed the last major claim of the case, all remaining claims still pending.

24. Mays Accepts Suburban Schools Settlement, Dismisses Related Court Claims -

The Memphis Federal Court judge overseeing the three-year old court case over the reformation of public schools in Shelby County has dismissed the last major claim of the case, all remaining claims still pending.

25. Election Commission Hopeful for School Board Ruling -

John Ryder, an attorney for the Shelby County Election Commission, capped a week of cryptic court filings in the case by quoting a line from “Macbeth” as he made the Election Commission’s point that Judge Samuel “Hardy” Mays should rule soon.

26. Fed: Memphis Banks Improved in 2013 -

Memphis banks ended 2013 in somewhat better shape collectively than they stood at the end of 2012, based on new numbers from the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.

27. First Tennessee Celebrates 150th Anniversary -

First Tennessee Bank is using Abraham Lincoln’s famed top hat as a symbol of the milestone the venerable financial institution is celebrating this year.

28. The Sweet Spot -

Gary Wilkes usually doesn’t notice the smell at the family business, Wayne’s Candy Co. Inc., unless he has just returned from vacation.

29. Bell Joins First State Bank as Commercial Loan Officer -

Jonathan Bell has joined First State Bank as vice president/commercial loan officer. Bell, who has more than 13 years of experience in the banking industry, will provide banking services for businesses in Collierville and the surrounding area.

30. Fields Begin to Gel for May and August Ballots -

With two weeks to the filing deadline for candidates in the May Shelby County primary elections and two months to the deadline for those in the August state and federal primaries and county nonpartisan elections, the fields have solidified enough that some political players are weighing their prospects for a late entry before the filing deadlines.

31. Cohen Against Haslam’s College Plan -

The legislator who pushed and finally won passage of the Tennessee Lottery a decade ago doesn’t like the plan by Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam to use most of the lottery reserve for an endowment to offer two years of community college free to every Tennessee high school graduate.

32. Bourbon, Tennessee Whiskey Sales Up in US, Overseas -

FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) – Global thirst for Kentucky bourbon and Tennessee whiskey caused exports to spike beyond $1 billion for the first time ever in 2013, a distilled spirits trade group said Tuesday.

33. 10 Things to Know About Haslam's $32.6 Billion Budget -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Here's 10 items you should know about Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam's $32.6 billion spending proposal for the budget year beginning in July:

DRIVE TO 55: The governor is proposing to waive tuition to two-year colleges in the state as part of his "Drive to 55" campaign to increase higher education graduation rates from the current 32 percent to 55 percent by 2025. The program would be paid for through an endowment created with lottery reserve money. He has also earmarked $15 million in new spending toward the effort.

34. Meghan McMahon Joins Glankler Brown as Associate -

Meghan K. McMahon has joined Glankler Brown PLLC as an associate, concentrating her practice in business and commercial litigation and intellectual property. McMahon previously worked in academic and membership affairs for the NCAA, and has experience with issues relating to NCAA compliance, sports and entertainment contracts, intellectual property.

35. Haslam: Remove Higher Education Barriers -

When Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam outlined an endowment from Tennessee lottery reserve funds to offer two years of community college free to all Tennesseans graduating high school – a plan he presented during his State of the State address Monday, Feb. 3 – it was a concept that had been years in the making.

36. Ethics Complaint Against Chism Dismissed -

It was commissioner against commissioner in the highest profile use so far of Shelby County government’s current ethics policy.

And the dispute that affected the commission’s deliberations on a county property tax rate ended last week with a three-citizen panel dismissing County Commissioner Terry Roland’s complaint against fellow Commissioner Sidney Chism.

37. Doctors Go Digital -

The name – Baptist OneCare – really does say it all. Baptist Memorial Health Care Corp. is in the midst of installing an electronic health records system that is as ambitious an undertaking as any in Baptist’s century-plus history.

38. Ethics Panel Dismisses Roland Complaint Against Chism -

The highest profile use of Shelby County government’s ethics policy since it was implemented in 2008 has ended with the three-citizen panel hearing a complaint by County Commissioner Terry Roland against fellow Commissioner Sidney Chism dismissing Roland’s claim.

39. Ethics Panel Dismisses Roland Complaint Against Chism -

The highest profile use of Shelby County government’s ethics policy since it was implemented in 2008 has ended with the three-citizen panel hearing a complaint by County Commissioner Terry Roland against fellow Commissioner Sidney Chism dismissing Roland’s claim.

40. Beretta to Build New Firearms Plant in Tennessee -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Italian gun maker Beretta said Wednesday that Tennessee's support for gun rights was a major factor in its decision to build a manufacturing and research facility in the Nashville suburb of Gallatin.

41. UTHSC Nurse Develops 'Socrates' Board Game -

Her students were bored. She was frustrated.

That was the setup for discovery, invention and entrepreneurship.

Dr. Hallie Bensinger, an advanced practice nurse at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, planned to play a “Jeopardy”-style game as part of a PowerPoint lecture in hopes of jumpstarting her students’ brains. So she went to a supply store in search of fake money to use in the game. Instead, she found her eureka moment.

42. Campbell, Weiss Open Judicial Campaigns -

John Campbell and Robert Weiss are judges on different sides of the civil-criminal divide in Shelby County jurisprudence.

43. Sharp’s Exit From Solar Part of Industry Trend -

Sharp Corp.’s announcement last week that it would end solar panel production at its Memphis plant is the latest indication of how volatile the solar energy industry has become.

44. Details Surface in Ambitious Digital Pilot Program -

Toward the end of his run as Memphis City Schools superintendent, Kriner Cash talked of a switch in schools to digital devices for learning away from school.

It ultimately didn’t get very far in terms of details like how it would be paid for. And school board members at the time greeted the idea of giving students such devices to take home with silence.

45. Great Expectations -

The Memphis Convention & Visitors Bureau forecasts 2014 to be a banner year, thanks to increased consumer confidence with leisure travelers and a booking pace for conventions, meetings and sporting events that is easily outpacing last year.

46. January 17-23: This week in Memphis history -

1998: A Klan group rallied on the steps of the Shelby County Courthouse to protest the federal holiday honoring civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The protest ended with police using pepper spray and nightsticks to disperse the crowd of counter demonstrators and onlookers after several counter demonstrators breached a police barrier.

47. January 17-23: This week in Memphis history -

1998: A Klan group rallied on the steps of the Shelby County Courthouse to protest the federal holiday honoring civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The protest ended with police using pepper spray and nightsticks to disperse the crowd of counter demonstrators and onlookers after several counter demonstrators breached a police barrier.

48. Counseling Group Opens for Backlog Rape Victims -

The Shelby County Rape Crisis Center is starting a weekly support group for rape victims whose rape kits were among the 12,000 left untested by Memphis Police Department over a 30-year period.

The announcement of the support group came Tuesday, the same day the Tennessee Legislature convened for the year, with several proposals connected to the scandal expected to at least be debated, if not acted on, during the short election-year session.

49. Henderson Censure Latest Chapter in Death Penalty Case -

A veteran Shelby County prosecutor has been censured by the Tennessee Board of Professional Responsibility for his conduct in a high-profile death penalty case from the 1990s that is scheduled to be retried later this year in Shelby County Criminal Court.

50. BancorpSouth Acquires Louisiana Bank -

TUPELO, Miss. (AP) – BancorpSouth has announced an agreement to acquire Monroe, La.-based Ouachita Bancshares Corp. and its main subsidiary, Ouachita Independent Bank.

51. Gold Strike Promotes Slade to PR Manager -

Elizabeth Slade has been promoted to public relations manager at Gold Strike Casino Resort. In her new role at the MGM Resorts International property, Slade will lead in developing and executing integrated marketing communication plans with components such as media relations, social media strategy, community partnerships and brand management.

52. 15 Vie for County Commission Seat -

Shelby County Commissioners will interview a group of 15 citizens Wednesday, Jan. 8, who want to become the newest member of the elected body.

The committee session interviews come before the full commission is to vote Monday, Jan. 13, on a replacement for Commissioner Wyatt Bunker.

53. Editorial: City Hall Reeling in Financial Straits -

The issue that promises or threatens to dominate 2014 at City Hall is the one that just about everyone in city government would rather see out of the spotlight.

In a word, it’s money.

City Hall’s money problem is not one that historically gets a lot of the spotlight for very long.

54. Debt and Liability -

There is rarely a good answer to the question “How much?” in politics.

With issues including the unfunded pension liability, overall debt, and revenue estimates and their validity, City Hall’s overall money problem begins but hardly ends with the question. It won’t be that simple.

55. Hats in the Ring -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam will be seeking a second term as governor, and U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander will be running for re-election – both starting with the Aug. 7 statewide primaries that open for filing Friday, Jan. 3.

56. Highland Street Family Dollar Sells for $1.6 Million -

656 S. Highland St.
Memphis, TN 38111
Sale Amount: $1.6 million

Sale Date: Dec. 2, 2013
Buyer: Amicorp Enterprises Inc.
Seller: DCTN3 328 Highland Memphis TN LLC
Loan Amount: $600,000
Loan Date: Nov. 25, 2013
Maturity Date: N/A
Lender: The Bank of Hemet
Details: The Family Dollar retail store at 656 S. Highland St. near the University of Memphis has sold for $1.6 million.

57. Tunica Furniture Market to Make Debut -

The first Tunica Furniture Market is ramping up to descend on Gold Strike Casino Resort and Harrah’s Tunica Jan. 8-9, with approximately 60,000 square feet of showroom space displaying furniture available for purchase by retailers.

58. Health Care Tactics Split Republican Senate Rivals -

ATLANTA (AP) – Republicans who want to regain control of the Senate will first have to do battle among themselves in 2014 primary elections, due largely to differences over how to proceed against the law they deride as "Obamacare."

59. Cordova Creek Apartments Sell for $12.5 Million -

1175 N. Germantown Parkway
Memphis, TN 38016
Sale Amount: $12.5 million

60. FBI Questions Surprise Local Politicos -

As harsh as the criticism has been of the way the Shelby County Election Commission conducted elections in 2012, no one, including those who filed two Chancery Court lawsuits over the results, have said or presented proof it was intentional.

61. Haslam Appoints Kirby to Tenn. Supreme Court -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam has appointed Holly M. Kirby of Memphis to the Tennessee Supreme Court. Kirby will succeed Janice M. Holder, who announced her retirement from the bench on June 28, upon expiration of her term.

62. Building Capacities -

Major road and highway projects like the Interstate 269 loop, I-40/240 and the Mallory Road interchange near Frank Pigeon Industrial Park made substantial progress during 2013, with several phases of important transportation corridors wrapping up and new projects planned for 2014 and beyond.

63. Haslam Appoints Kirby to Tennessee Supreme Court -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam has appointed Holly M. Kirby of Memphis to the Tennessee Supreme Court. Kirby will succeed Janice M. Holder, who announced her retirement from the bench on June 28, upon expiration of her term.

64. Baptist CEO Set to Retire Next May -

Baptist Memorial Health Care Corp. President and CEO Stephen Reynolds will retire next May, with Jason Little, Baptist’s executive vice president and chief operating officer, taking over as the hospital system’s next president and CEO.

65. Van Vliet Takes on Roles at UT Medical, The MED -

Dr. Michael M. Van Vliet has joined the department of plastic surgery at UT Medical Group, has been named assistant professor at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center and has been appointed director of burn critical care for the Firefighters Regional Burn Center at The Regional Medical Center at Memphis.

66. Wharton to Present Pension Plan to City Council -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. will take a five-year plan for meeting the city’s $709 million unfunded pension liability Tuesday, Dec. 17, to Memphis City Council members during their executive session.

67. Haslam Unsure of Reason for Few Court Applicants -

NASHVILLE (AP) – They sit at the pinnacle of Tennessee's justice system, enjoying power, privileges, prestige – and even a job nearly for life, once in office.

With all the enviable perks that justices on the state Supreme Court earn, it's no wonder Gov. Bill Haslam is at a loss to explain why only five people applied for the seat being vacated by retiring Justice Janice Holder.

68. Bad Blood -

December was already going to be a busy month at City Hall for the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.

He would be bringing a plan to provide $15 million in city financing for the $180 million Crosstown revitalization project and rolling out its fix to address the Tennessee Comptroller’s vocal concerns about the city’s unfunded pension liability.

69. College Football Season Brought Many Surprises -

It seems like just yesterday that temperatures were stifling and everyone who really mattered in the college football world – the SEC’s coaches and top players – had met in Hoover, Ala., for that little party known as SEC Media Days.

70. Stites & Harbison Brings Patent Expertise to Bioworks -

In an effort to enhance expertise in patent cases among U.S. district judges, the 10-year Patent Pilot Program went into effect assigning patent cases to 14 federal district courts in 2011. The U.S. District Court for the Western District of Tennessee was one of those courts chosen.

71. Arlington Developmental Center Court Case Ends After 21 Years -

The Federal Court lawsuit over conditions at the Arlington Developmental Center is over after 21 years.

U.S. District Court Judge Jon McCalla formally closed the case Wednesday, Dec. 4, by entering an order and final judgment in the court for the Western District of Tennessee.

72. First Horizon Stresses Patience to Investors -

The business of banking isn’t exactly a picnic at the moment for a company like First Horizon National Corp., which has made big strides toward lowering its risk profile but continues to see lower near-term profitability than it would like.

73. Leggett Joins Electronic Security Specialists -

Electronic Security Specialists, the largest electronic security provider in the Mid-South, is growing its operations with the addition of Wayne Leggett as new vice president and security sales specialist.

74. Schools Deals Get Pushback From Some Commissioners -

The first dissent from the idea that the suburban schools agreements are a good deal in which no side got everything it wanted began when the six sets of talks, which began in June, went public.

It came during the Shelby County Commission’s votes Friday, Nov. 22, to approve the tentative agreements with Lakeland and Arlington.

75. Suburban Leaders Turn to Schools Details -

Shelby County Schools board members have schools agreements with suburban leaders in Bartlett, Collierville and Millington on their agenda Tuesday, Nov. 26, a week after approving the same type of agreements with different dollar amounts with Arlington and Lakeland.

76. Team Players -

The key players, from Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. to St. Louis Cardinals chairman and CEO Bill DeWitt Jr., grabbed the microphone at an invitation-only rally held on the club level of AutoZone Park and made their best pitches.

77. Connection Complete -

State and local officials will cut the ribbon on the last piece of Tenn. 385 on the morning of Friday, Nov. 22, and the eight-mile stretch of road will open to motorists later in the day.

The roughly eight-mile section between Macon Road and Tenn. 57 in Piperton is the final piece of a nearly 50-mile route that travels from Millington through Arlington and south through Fayette County and into Collierville before linking back to Interstate 240 in the city of Memphis. Work on the $74 million section began in November 2009.

78. Flipping the Switch -

Tim Bolding, executive director of United Housing Inc., had become increasingly interested over the years in energy efficiency, sustainability and alternate energy sources when he saw homes in New Orleans being rebuilt with solar panels.

79. Alzheimer’s Groups Paint Memphis Purple -

November is Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month, and the Alzheimer’s Association’s local chapter and assisted living facilities such as The Gardens of Germantown Memory Care want to paint the town purple to raise awareness about the deadly, irreversible disease.

80. Events -

Ignite Memphis, Vol. 6, will be held Tuesday, Nov. 19, from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. at Crosstown Arts, 430 N. Cleveland St. Twelve Memphians will enlighten attendees on a variety of topics via five-minute, 20-slide presentations. Cost is $15. Visit ignitememphis.com.

81. AutoZone Park Deal Resurfaces at Crucial Time -

The Christmas tree in the plaza of AutoZone Park is more than a reminder of the holiday season.

The tree serves as a reminder for the tight timeframe that awaits a proposal for a city government purchase of the baseball park as the St. Louis Cardinals baseball franchise buys the Memphis Redbirds ball club, the Cardinals AAA minor league affiliate.

82. Law School Draws Honors, High-Profile Speakers -

From a slew of high-profile guests who’ve come to speak over the past year, to a string of recent awards, to a U.S. Supreme Court justice’s visit next month, it could be argued the University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law is having a moment.

83. Millington School Board Meets Public -

A group of 100 citizens in Millington Tuesday, Nov. 12, had a lot of questions and angst about the coming of a Millington municipal school system.

The town hall meeting was the first gathering of the seven Millington school board members elected Nov. 7. They won’t take office until next month, so a lot of the questions at the Millington Civic Center Tuesday evening from a room that was mostly teachers and other educators were about decisions the board hasn’t started making yet.

84. Builders Showcase -

The Vesta Home Show kicked off over the weekend, with large crowds turning out to explore six new homes in a gated Germantown community.

Don Glays, executive director of the West Tennessee Home Builders Association, said attendance during the opening weekend of the show was strong.

85. Campus Revival -

The University of Tennessee Health Science Center hosted a public information session on the development of its new campus plan last week at the Student-Alumni Center Dining Hall on its Midtown campus at 800 Madison Ave.

86. Tencarva Looking to Expand Memphis Presence -

The story of how industrial distributor Tencarva Machinery Co. got its start has all the makings of a great motivational business speech – or a tale told in the iconic style of Sophia Petrillo from “The Golden Girls.”

87. Grant Helps HopeWorks Expand GED Program -

Last month, Andy Burgess of Memphis received his GED diploma. With his sights set on a career in the transportation industry, Burgess knew the high school equivalency certificate would make him a more viable job candidate.

88. Oldham Opens Sheriff Re-Election Bid -

Shelby County Sheriff Bill Oldham opened his re-election campaign Saturday, Nov. 2, with something he didn’t have four years ago: a record.

89. UT Health Science Center to Outline New Campus Master Plan -

The University of Tennessee Health Science Center is set to revamp its campus, and the school will host a public information session on the development of a new master plan Tuesday, Nov. 5, from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. in the Student-Alumni Center Dining Hall, 800 Madison Ave.

90. Tomasik Gets Libertarian Heading on Ballot -

Attorneys for the state of Tennessee had argued in a Nashville federal court that third-party candidates in Tennessee should be able to be listed under a heading including the names of their parties. And they lost in their defense of a state law permitting the listing.

91. New in Rural Tennessee: Discovery Park of America -

UNION CITY, Tenn. (AP) – The gleaming white building with curved exteriors and a spaceship-like tower emerges from the flat landscape of West Tennessee like something out of science fiction, but it's not a villain's lair or superhero's headquarters.

92. Campaigns Begin In Abortion Referendum -

Anti-abortion rights activists are planning a high-dollar fundraiser next week to kick off their campaign for a constitutional amendment next fall that would give lawmakers more power to restrict access to abortions.

93. Healthy Memphis Common Table Marks 10 Years of Promoting Health -

With a motto of “eat healthy, eat less and move more,” Healthy Memphis Common Table (HMCT) has made its mark in the local community during the past decade, encouraging the public to lead healthier lifestyles and to “get activated” with their health and health care options.

94. Performance Ranges Widely at Local Companies -

Here’s a snapshot of the recent performance of some of Memphis’ publicly traded companies – businesses that cast a shadow far beyond the Memphis city limits in industries including finance, package delivery and bioscience.

95. Industrial Revolution -

Frank C. Pidgeon Industrial Park was completed in 1967, but it’s only now, four-plus decades later, that the property is finally realizing its full potential.

The 3,500-acre industrial park was developed when Memphis and Shelby County paid roughly $4.5 million to buy the land in the late 1950s after city, county and Port Commission leaders saw the need for a large industrial park following the creation of Presidents Island.

96. Reconfigured Interchange To Improve Traffic Flow -

Phase II of substantial improvements are about to begin on the Interstate 40/240 interchange in East Memphis that will address the expected traffic increase in this area for decades to come. The average daily traffic (ADT) on I-40 has grown from 49,000 vehicles in 1985 to about 200,000 vehicles a day in 2013. By 2035, projections show the interchange could be handling well over 350,000 vehicles.

97. Catholic Charities Launches Program For Homeless Veterans -

This month Catholic Charities of West Tennessee launches a new program called St. Sebastian Veteran Services to provide critical assistance to homeless veterans and their families and to those facing imminent eviction or foreclosure.

98. Cohen Pushes Medicaid Expansion in Wake of Shutdown -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen, D-Memphis, got a lift back to his district from Sen. Roger Wicker, R-Miss., at the end of a long week in Washington in which Congress ended the government shutdown just as it was hours from intersecting with the debt ceiling.

99. Council Approves Beale Deal, Delays Highland McDonald's -

Memphis City Council members sent a plan Tuesday, Oct. 15, to settle the last barrier to direct day to day city control of the Beale Street entertainment district to a federal bankruptcy judge.

The council approved a resolution that would use $400,000 from a dormant city fund related to the abandoned Midtown interstate corridor and $100,000 in revenues it has collected from the Beale Street district to pay off a loan Beale Street developer John Elkington took out for improvements he made to Handy Park.

100. Shelby County Housing Permits Drop 14 Percent in Quarter -

Shelby County’s homebuilding industry showed signs of cooling in the third quarter, with builders pulling 14 percent fewer permits than in the same period a year ago.

Builders filed 197 permits in Shelby County in the third quarter, compared with 229 permits in third quarter 2012, according to real estate information company Chandler Reports, www.chandlerreports.com.