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1. Emami's Care2Manage Startup Helps Families Care for Aging Loved Ones -

Ela Emami has a vision for her startup Care2Manage, an entity focused on helping families caring for a loved one, that blends technology with a human touch.

Her venture is a service platform for families with an elderly loved one that connects them to social workers, local elder care resources and organizes total health care needs. Emami also works as a geriatric care consultant, something she sees as a complementary service to her technology platform.

2. Methodist Caps Busy 2015 With $40M Plans for Transplant Institute -

New money is pouring in to the Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare system, and it will be put to use as investments in everything from patient care to research. Construction work is under way at a number of facilities, and myriad future projects are in the works.

3. Rings and Pacifiers: Health Gadgets Get Sophisticated -

HELSINKI (AP) — After the smartphone and fitness bracelet, here comes the smart ring. And the smart pacifier, and smart rollator.

"Wellness" computers that monitor your pulse, temperature and other health indicators are becoming increasingly sophisticated and varied to cover every aspect — and age — of human life.

4. What Hiring Managers Wish You Knew -

Recently, I had the opportunity to speak with a group of hiring managers at a conference hosted by the Society for Information Management. It’s an organization that encourages networking and education for technology leaders.

5. From University Labs to the Marketplace -

The health care industry contributed $38.8 billion to Middle Tennessee’s economy in 2014, according to a study released by the Nashville Health Care Council, which is a 32.9 percent increase from the 2010.

6. Toyota to Invest $50M in Car-Tech Research at Stanford, MIT -

EAST PALO ALTO, Calif. (AP) — Toyota is investing $50 million with Stanford University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in hopes of gaining an edge in an accelerating race to phase out human drivers.

7. Is State’s Role to Provide a Service or Turn a Profit? -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam appears to be on the brink of privatizing state government. But he won’t be able to do it without a battle, especially from university unions and Democratic lawmakers.

8. When Did We Stop New Thinking? -

Human evolution is a complex topic. Personal growth may be more perplexing even to the best psychologists. The theme that really defies reason is when a whole organization or market segment falls into the trap of formal rigidity, as in “it’s just the way it is.”

9. Health Law Sign-Ups Keep Growing; Uninsured Rate Declines -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Nearly a million people signed up for health insurance under President Barack Obama's law even after the official enrollment season ended, helping push the share of uninsured Americans below 10 percent and underscoring how hard it could be for Republicans to dismantle the program.

10. Study Says West Tennessee Economy Has Lagged -

West Tennessee’s economy has been lagging behind other regions in the state but is starting to make inroads in employment growth and technology-related hirings, a new report says.

The region’s mayors and economic development officials met Thursday at Jackson State Community College to review the report, The Jackson Sun reported. The study was financed by a $50,000 grant given by the Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development.

11. Charles Hughes to Head Rhodes’ Memphis Center -

Dr. Charles L. Hughes has been named director of Rhodes College’s Memphis Center, an academic hub focused on the human experience of the Memphis and Mid-South region. He will be teaching classes on Memphis history and culture, coordinating student projects and developing programs, and also will be continuing his own research on the area.

12. As Amazon Turns 20, A Look at Its Biggest Bets -

NEW YORK (AP) – Amazon has come a long way from selling books out of a Seattle garage.

The company had an inauspicious start in July 1995 at the dawn of the Web as an online bookseller. It narrowly escaped the dot-com bust of 2000 to reinvent online retailing. And eventually, it morphed into the global e-commerce powerhouse it is today with $89 billion in annual revenue.

13. IBM Claims Breakthrough in Making Chips Even Smaller -

NEW YORK (AP) – IBM says it has achieved a breakthrough in making computer chips even smaller, creating a test version of the world's first semiconductor that shrinks down the circuitry by overcoming "one of the grand challenges" of the tech industry.

14. US Unemployment Falls to 7-Year Low, But Wages are Flat -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. unemployment fell to a seven-year low of 5.3 percent and employers hired at a solid pace in June, but other gauges of the job market drew a bleaker picture: A wave of people stopped looking for work, and paychecks failed to budge.

15. New Laws Include 48-Hour Waiting Period for Abortion -

A mandate for a 48-hour waiting period before an abortion is one of many new Tennessee laws taking effect on Wednesday, July 1.

The abortion measure affects all seven of the state’s abortion clinics. Another law will require abortion facilities performing more than 50 abortions a year be held to the same health and safety standards as other outpatient surgical facilities.

16. New Laws Include 48-Hour Waiting Period for Abortion -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A mandate for a 48-hour waiting period before an abortion is one of many new Tennessee laws taking effect Wednesday.

The abortion measure affects all seven of the state's abortion clinics. Another law will require abortion facilities performing more than 50 abortions a year be held to the same health and safety standards as other outpatient surgical facilities.

17. New Tennessee Laws Include 48-Hour Waiting Period for Abortion -

A mandate for a 48-hour waiting period before an abortion is one of many new Tennessee laws taking effect on Wednesday, July 1.

The abortion measure affects all seven of the state’s abortion clinics. Another law will require abortion facilities performing more than 50 abortions a year be held to the same health and safety standards as other outpatient surgical facilities.

18. Alliance for Nonprofit Excellence Develops Tighter Focus -

In good times and bad, change is a constant. During the recession, nonprofits were stretched financially and emotionally as demands for services increased and funding declined.

A recalibration was in order, and that was something that the Alliance for Nonprofit Excellence preached.

19. How Pope Francis’ Climate Encyclical Translates to Memphis -

On Thursday, June 18, the Vatican released Pope Francis’ much-anticipated encyclical, “Laudato si” (Praise Be to You: On the Care for Our Common Home). For some time now, Catholics, environmentalists and other Vatican watchers were aware that Francis was going to focus on the environment, especially the problem of global climate change.

20. Who Donates The Most? Individuals! -

The numbers are in: Americans gave an estimated $358.38 billion to charity in 2014. That’s 7.1 percent over 2013, and the fifth year in a row that giving increased. Individuals – that’s you and me – continue to give an estimated 90 percent of all gifts.

21. American Bar Association President Pushes Online Models for Civil Disputes -

The president of the American Bar Association says the traditional method of providing pro bono legal services in civil matters to those who can’t afford to pay for an attorney isn’t working despite best efforts.

22. Tennessee State Employees Slighted by 'Voluntary' Buyout -

More and more, Tennessee’s state employees are feeling the same harsh realities of those working – or formerly working – in corporate America.

On the heels of 1,500 buyouts under the Bredesen administration in 2008 and 850 layoffs in 2010, Gov. Bill Haslam’s administration is offering voluntary buyouts to more than 2,000 employees in the executive branch.

23. Apple Music Brings Change to Streaming, But Is It Enough? -

When Apple launches its Apple Music streaming service at the end of June, it will affect things big and small in the music industry.

Hundreds of millions of iPhone and iPad users in more than 100 countries will get to try the $10-per-month service for free for the next three months when it is pushed to their devices with a free upgrade.

24. Council to Fill Vacancy, Consider Buying State Office Building -

Memphis City Council members appoint a new council member Tuesday, May 18, and consider spending more than $8 million to purchase, renovate and relocate workers to the Donnelley J. Hill state office building that stands near City Hall in Civic Center Plaza.

25. TCAT’s 27 Campuses Offer ‘A Different Life’ -

Ready for a new career? If you’re looking for a fresh start, Tennessee may be one of the best places in the world to find it.

Through May 15, residents who want to retrain in a new career field can apply for a full scholarship to the Tennessee College of Applied Technology, a unique and highly effective system of technical colleges with 27 main campuses around the state.

26. Cannabis Oil Bill Could Lead to More ‘Evil Weed’ Wins -

Logan and Stacie Mathes were on "pins and needles" as they waited for Gov. Bill Haslam to sign legislation into law allowing cannabis oil to be used to treat seizures and similar medical problems in Tennessee.

27. Welcome to the New Era of Automation -

When Netflix put the video rental retail stores in their coffins, there was still a sizable segment of people who missed the convenience, were suspect of a mail-order or streaming subscription service or simply didn’t have the connectivity to enjoy it.

28. Council Remains Critical of City Plans for State Office Building -

The city of Memphis’ information technology department recently signed a new lease for office space at Pembroke Square Downtown.

The city inked the 20,595-square-foot lease as the administration of Mayor A C Wharton Jr. is trying to win council approval to buy the Donnelley J. Hill state office building for $1.5 million.

29. Don't Panic, College Seniors: Jobs for Grads Likely to Grow -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The consulting and accounting firm EY is aggressively recruiting on college campuses this spring. The company formerly known as Ernst & Young plans to hire 9,000 graduates from U.S. universities this year, up from 7,500 in 2014. But recruiting isn't as easy as it used to be.

30. 'Entopreneurs' Feed Growing Appetite for Edible Insects -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – They hop. They crawl. They squirm. And they could be coming to a dinner plate near you.

An increasing number of "entopreneurs" are launching businesses to feed a growing appetite for crickets, mealworms and other edible insects.

31. What Better Place for an NRA Convention? -

When the National Rifle Association announced that it would hold its 2015 convention in Nashville, the timing was propitious.

In 2010, gun sales and handgun permits were booming, and Tennessee had just enacted a controversial and contested new “guns in bars” law that allowed people with handgun permits to carry concealed firearms into bars and restaurants that serve alcohol.

32. Internet Outages Reveal Gaps in US Broadband Infrastructure -

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) – When vandals sliced a fiber-optic cable in the Arizona desert last month, they did more than time-warp thousands of people back to an era before computers, credit cards or even phones. They exposed a glaring vulnerability in the nation's Internet infrastructure: no backup systems in many places.

33. How to Delve Further Into User Insights -

Think of it as the front end of the front end, this fusion of methods for solving problems for real people and creating a better experience for them.

By fusing Design Thinking and User Experience, you learn the socio-psychological wants and desires of your user base and understand their world, as well unpacking attitudes, reactions, and emotions about a specific tested object.

34. The Science Behind Making the Visible Invisible -

Researchers like Dr. Rami Kalyanaraman and Gerd Duscher, associate professors of materials science engineering at the University of Tennessee, could not develop cloaking devices or work to achieve true invisibility without the use of metamaterials. But what are these fancy new materials and how do they work?

35. Drones Rule: Proposed Rules for Commercial Unmanned Aircraft -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Drone on, the government says.

Just not through the night sky. Or close to an airport. Or out of the operator's sight. And probably not winging its way with a pizza or package, any time soon.

36. Sunday Deadline Driving Health Law Sign-Ups for 2015 -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Ahead of a Sunday deadline, consumers are stepping up to enroll for 2015 coverage under President Barack Obama's health care law, administration officials said Wednesday.

37. Anthem Breach: A Gap in Federal Health Privacy Law? -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Insurers aren't required to encrypt consumers' data under a 1990s federal law that remains the foundation for health care privacy in the Internet age – an omission that seems striking in light of the major cyberattack against Anthem.

38. Living Well -

Depression doesn’t make reservations in advance. It just descends. There is also no formula for a human being’s breaking point. Especially when there could be neurologic or psychiatric forces in play, perhaps without the affected person even being aware of them.

39. Obama Administration on Track to Surpass Health Care Goal -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Some 9.5 million people have already signed up for 2015 coverage under President Barack Obama's health care law, and the administration is on track to surpass its nationwide enrollment target set last year.

40. Home Services Keep Seniors Independent -

Sooner or later, most people end up caring for aging mothers and fathers or become seniors themselves, wondering who to turn to when independent daily living becomes impossible.

Both propositions are frightening and stressful.

41. Medicare Chief Steps Down, Ran Health Care Rollout -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Medicare's top administrator unexpectedly resigned Friday, becoming the latest casualty in the turmoil over the president's health care law, which is still struggling for acceptance even as millions benefit from expanded coverage.

42. Three Ways to Evaluate Nonprofit Technology -

Part one of a two-part series. “The main reason nonprofits look to update or implement technology is to acquire additional functionality that will automate more tasks, which they hope will free up time to work on more strategic projects.” – Janna Finch

43. Tennessee’s Health Problem -

For years, the concept of “wellness” or “preventive health” measures has been the “eat your vegetables” mantra of a growing national discussion on health care that has focused primarily on the cost of such care and who should pay for it or try to control it.

44. Average Affordable Care Premiums Going Up in 2015 -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Many people covered under President Barack Obama's health care law will face higher premiums next year, the administration acknowledged Thursday. While the average increases are modest, it's more fodder for the nation's political battles over health care.

45. Small Business Insurance Exchanges Seek Rebound -

Early enrollment for the health overhaul's small business insurance exchanges fell far short of the 2 million workers who were expected to sign up this year. The shortfall calls into question the future of the exchanges as they begin accepting enrollment for 2015.

46. FedEx Founder: Expect More Automation -

FedEx founder, chairman and CEO Fred Smith is pretty confident that robotics, automation and perhaps drones will play an increasingly large role in the FedEx of the future.

47. TVA ‘Robo Houses’ a Success, On the Market -

For the past five years, several residents of the Campbell Creek subdivision have had the quietest neighbors they could have ever wanted. Now they’re going to have to adjust to having people instead.

48. Tech Support -

As FedEx evolved, it developed its own technologies for moving packages around the globe, such as handheld devices that scan packages. When those devices experienced problems, FedEx technicians repaired them.

49. Recruiter’s Career Twist -

Ask Janet Miller about her remarkable career at the Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce and she’ll likely attribute it to good timing or pass credit onto others.

50. Searching for Doctors -

So here’s the offer: lower salary – meaning it will take longer to pay down your student loan debt – less prestige, and perhaps even a questioning of your intelligence and skill.

In 2014, that’s what comes with the decision to become a primary care physician. Recently, a fourth-year medical student at the University of Pennsylvania, Mara Gordon, wrote an article for The Atlantic explaining her decision to become a primary care doctor.

51. SpaceX Breaks Ground on Texas Rocket Launch Site -

BROWNSVILLE, Texas (AP) – The commercial rocket launches that could begin as early as 2016 in the southernmost tip of Texas will be a critical step toward one day establishing a human presence on Mars, SpaceX founder and CEO Elon Musk said Monday.

52. Road to Better Mass Transit -

Picking a new transit chief is critical for a city in transition.

Next year, Nashville residents will elect a new mayor and turn over its large Metro Council.

Davidson County also expects some 200,000 new residents over the next 20 years, and much of the success of future development will depend on the ease of navigating around Nashville – already the nation’s second-worst area for sprawl, according to Smart Growth America.

53. Unintended Consequences: ER Visits Increase -

Hospital officials have been pushing for the state to expand Medicaid health care coverage for thousands of Tennessee’s poorest citizens, despite two significant and related concerns:

Expansion will lead to increased visits to the most expensive place in America for routine health care, the emergency room.

54. Pew: Split Views on Robots' Employment Benefits -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In 2025, self-driving cars could be the norm, people could have more leisure time and goods could become cheaper. Or, there could be chronic unemployment and an even wider income gap, human interaction could become a luxury and the wealthy could live in walled cities with robots serving as labor.

55. Incoming Civil Rights Museum President Seeks Connection -

The incoming president of the National Civil Rights Museum remembers a quick and hurried visit to the museum shortly after the debut of an extensive renovation earlier this year.

“It lends itself to giving people a physical, spiritual experience in coming here. It is a moving institution,” said Terri Lee Freeman, who comes to the museum from being president of the Community Foundation for the National Capital Region in Washington, D.C. “I come from a town where there are a lot of museums. I’ve never had the experience of being physically moved by a museum like I had when I came here the first time.”

56. Regional One Health Expands Footprint -

In the last year, Regional One Health has added about 100 employees and its new name.

Of course, for about three decades it was known as The Regional Medical Center at Memphis – or simply The MED. That officially changed back on Feb. 26 when Regional One Health became the new name for the Shelby County Health Care Corp. and the “umbrella” name for the hospital.

57. US to Ask China to Restart Cyber Working Group -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The United States wants to restart a cybersecurity working group that China shut down after the U.S. indicted five Chinese military officers on charges of hacking into American companies' computers to steal trade secrets.

58. Hopson Contract Extension Represents Reform Mandate -

Public school superintendents in Tennessee are not elected in a popular vote anymore. They are appointed by school boards – the only hiring decision school boards make.

So when the Shelby County Schools board voted 6-0 Monday, June 23, to extend the three-year contract of superintendent Dorsey Hopson through June 2018, it was a mandate by the board for the student achievement gains Hopson and the board have set as goals.

59. Hopson's Contract Extended Through June 2018 -

Dorsey Hopson’s contract as Shelby County Schools superintendent runs through June of 2018 after the school board approved Monday, June 23, a two-year extension of the original three year employment contract with him.

60. New Health Chief Moves to Put Stamp on Overhaul -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Aiming to avoid more insurance chaos this fall, the nation's new health care chief announced Friday she's revamping the management of President Barack Obama's health overhaul.

61. Culture of Collaboration -

Despite tremendous advances in technology that yield nearly infinite access to information and the Internet’s connectivity of the world’s greatest experts, many companies continue to look inward for new product development and innovation.

62. Google to Build Prototype of Truly Driverless Car -

LOS ANGELES (AP) – Google plans to build and launch onto city streets a small fleet of subcompact cars that could operate without a person at the wheel.

Actually, the cars wouldn't even have a wheel. Or gas and brake pedals. The company says the vehicles will use sensors and computing power, with no human needed.

63. Cleaner Air Could Mean Higher Electric Bills -

NEW YORK (AP) – Electricity prices are probably on their way up across much of the U.S. as coal-fired plants, the dominant source of cheap power, shut down in response to environmental regulations and economic forces.

64. Technology Keeps Hatcher’s Landscape Business Booming -

Whether it was pagers, two-way radios, fax machines or the Internet, Michael Hatcher has always been quick to embrace technological advances as a way to help grow his small business, the landscaping firm Michael Hatcher & Associates Inc.

65. Former Cardinal Herr to Appear at Redbirds Game -

If you’re a St. Louis Cardinals fan, you may not believe what you are about to hear from former second baseman Tom Herr who played on three Cardinals World Series teams in the 1980s.

Yes, those included the 1985 club that lost to the Kansas City Royals in the World Series and had Game 6 in Kansas City slip away, in part, because of the blown call at first base by umpire Don Denkinger. Herr believes the Cardinals probably would have won it all without the missed call; there was no instant replay back then.

66. Is Hot Market for IPOs Cooling? -

NEW YORK (AP) – A hot market for initial public offerings may soon face a cooler reception from investors.

IPOs are having their best start to a year since 2000. Eighty-nine companies have raised $19 billion through sales of new stock so far in 2014. But demand for more offerings depends largely on the health of the broader market, and after last week's sell-off, the clamor from buyers may quiet down.

67. Milestone Year -

The day after First Tennessee Bank celebrated its 150th birthday a few weeks ago by shooting fireworks over its Downtown Memphis headquarters, with executives and bank stakeholders mingling on a nearby hotel rooftop, the bank’s chairman, president and CEO looked back with pride at his bank’s long history.

68. Patrick Accounting Launches Payroll Business -

Patrick Accounting and Tax Services PLLC is in something of an extended growth spurt, with a newly launched expanded payroll services business, a Nashville office that opened this past summer and the possibility of even more expansion beyond Memphis.

69. Millions Could Get Extra Time for Health Sign-Ups -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Millions of Americans could get extra time to enroll for taxpayer-subsidized coverage this year under President Barack Obama's health care law. That would let the administration boost sign-ups and aid Democrats under attack over the program's troubles.

70. With Health Law, Workers Ponder the I-Quit Option -

CHICAGO (AP) – For uninsured people, the nation's new health care law may offer an escape from worry about unexpected, astronomical medical bills. But for Stephanie Payne of St. Louis, who already had good insurance, the law could offer another kind of escape: the chance to quit her job.

71. ‘History Has Changed’ -

The headquarters for Freedom Summer is still being set up and nearby the stage is almost ready for the March on Washington.

The almost-finished exhibit on the black power movement includes an interactive media table that is as bold as the moments and cultural history it offers.

72. Google Redesigns Android to Power Smartwatches -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Google thinks it's time for an Internet-connected watch that performs many of the same tasks as a smartphone but with fewer distractions and rude interruptions.

The Internet's most influential company is trying to unleash a new era in mobile computing with a version of its Android software tailored for high-tech watches and other devices that can be worn instead of held.

73. Events -

Sales & Marketing Society of the Mid-South will meet Wednesday, March 19, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at The Racquet Club of Memphis, 5111 Sanderlin Ave. Scott Lackey, founder and president of Meridian Performance Group LLC, will present “Your Strategy Earned You the Opportunity; Don’t Let Your Personality Kill It.” Cost is $35 at the door. Visit sms-midsouth.org.

74. Apple CEO Tim Cook Teases, Reassures Shareholders -

CUPERTINO, Calif. (AP) – Apple CEO Tim Cook is still trying to convince shareholders that the iPhone maker remains a step ahead in the race to innovate, even though recent performance of the company's stock lags behind other technology trendsetters.

75. January Insurance Sign-Ups Meet Monthly Goal -

WASHINGTON (AP) – While states are having varying success getting people to sign up, January marked the first time since new health insurance markets opened last fall that a national monthly enrollment target was met.

76. Burleigh Consulting Group Changes With Times -

Robert C. Burleigh still enjoys playing tennis four times a week. But the 78-year-old founder of Burleigh Consulting Group admits he is playing more doubles matches these days.

“I’m running a little slower now, so it’s mostly doubles now, not a lot of singles,” said Burleigh with a chuckle.

77. CBIZ Memphis Adding 20 Hires, Interns -

The Memphis office of CBIZ MHM LLC is welcoming a host of new faces in 2014.

The firm, which provides financial services such as accounting, tax, financial advisory and others, in recent days added a new business development manager. Drew Bringhurst joined the office’s marketing department with more than 10 years of experience in a variety of industries, including sales, marketing and human resources.

78. Doctors Go Digital -

The name – Baptist OneCare – really does say it all. Baptist Memorial Health Care Corp. is in the midst of installing an electronic health records system that is as ambitious an undertaking as any in Baptist’s century-plus history.

79. If It Can Be Imagined, It Can Be Made -

The industrial revolution brought efficiency but led to the decline of human creation by hand. We stopped tinkering and started operating machines, becoming inherently less ingenious.

Over the past century, new product developed hinged on access to expensive machines out of reach for the individual. Thus, new production development and innovation became the domain of companies with the cutting edge equipment.

80. Health Care Website Passed Recent Security Test -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Cybersecurity concerns over President Barack Obama's health care website have been cleared up through testing, a government security professional who initially had qualms about the system assured lawmakers Thursday.

81. Feds Won't Renew Health Website's Lead Contractor -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The government's much-maligned health insurance website is getting a new outside contractor to steer the revamped portal through the remainder of open enrollment season.

82. Jolly Helpers -

This year, a group of researchers from London’s Centre for Economics and Business Research in London teamed up with the founders of the Big Bang UK Young Scientists and Engineers Fair to tackle some tough Santa statistics.

83. Health Care Signups Pick Up but May Not Close Gap -

WASHINGTON (AP) – With time running short, the nation's health care rolls still aren't filling up fast enough.

New signup numbers Wednesday showed progress for President Barack Obama's health care law, but not enough to guarantee that Americans who want and need coverage by Jan. 1 will be able to get it. Crunch time is now, as people face a Dec. 23 deadline to sign up if they are to have coverage by New Year's.

84. Amazon.com Sees Delivery Drones as Future -

NEW YORK (AP) – Amazon.com is working on a way to get packages to customers in 30 minutes or less – via self-guided drone.

Consider it the modern version of a pizza delivery boy, minus the boy.

85. News Media Protest White House Press Access Limits -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Dozens of leading news organizations protested to the White House on Thursday against restrictions that sometimes keep journalists from taking pictures and video of President Barack Obama performing official duties. At the same time, two press groups urged their members to stop using official photos and video handed out by the White House, dismissing them as little more than "government propaganda."

86. Sesley-Baymon Named CEO of Memphis Urban League -

Tonja Sesley-Baymon has been appointed president and CEO of the Memphis Urban League by its board of directors. Sesley-Baymon, who has worked with the league for eight years, previously served as programs director for the 70-year-old organization. In her new role, she will provide executive leadership to the league and advocate on behalf of social justice and economic issues affecting Memphis.

87. Mechatronics -

“Mechatronics.” Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam said the word so fast that it got lost in the echo of the large aircraft hangar at the Tennessee College of Applied Technology near Memphis International Airport.

88. New Security Issues Surface as Sebelius Testifies -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama's embattled top health official declared herself accountable Wednesday for failures of the much-maligned health insurance website as a newly surfaced government memo pointed to security concerns that were laid out just days before its launch.

89. Obama Turns to Trusted Adviser on Health Care Woes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A career management consultant with a knack for taming bureaucratic backlogs is the man President Barack Obama is now counting on to help turn around a problem-plagued website that has marred the rollout of Obama's signature health care law.

90. Bite Yourself Before You Get Bitten -

A few weeks ago we attended the FedEx Institute of Technology’s Innovation Expo to hear Philip Mudd, formally of the CIA and FBI, speak about risk, and A.G. Lafley, CEO of Procter & Gamble, discuss product development and market strategy. We will share with you their messages in our next two columns, as both had unique insight on strategy.

91. Diverse Corporate Experience Leads Crosby to Form PeopleCap -

Meg Crosby’s career might be summed up as an exercise in adaptation.

A principal with the boutique human resources firm PeopleCap, Crosby left her hometown of Memphis for college at the University of Richmond for a double major in English and interpersonal communications. Her pragmatic father insisted on throwing some business courses into the mix.

92. Obama Administration Projected Strong Health Plan Signups -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Obama administration's internal projections called for strong enrollment in the states in the first year of new health insurance markets, according to unpublished estimates obtained by The Associated Press. Whether those expectations will bear out is unclear.

93. 3 US Economists Win Nobel for Work on Asset Prices -

STOCKHOLM (AP) – Three American professors won the Nobel prize for economics Monday for shedding light on how stock, bond and house prices move over time– work that's changed how people around the world invest.

94. Citrone: Logistics Not Just for Men -

It’s hard to picture Cheryl Burch Citrone, a partner at executive recruiting and consulting firm Vaco Memphis, hanging around railroad tracks or shooting the breeze about shipping lanes and trucks.

95. Some Employers See Perks of Hiring Older Workers -

Older people searching for jobs have long fought back stereotypes that they lack the speed, technology skills and dynamism of younger applicants. But as a wave of baby boomers seeks to stay on the job later in life, some employers are finding older workers are precisely what they need.

96. Gathering Targets Region’s Workforce Development -

When state officials gather at The University of Memphis University Center Wednesday, Sept. 4, to talk about workforce training, it won’t be with a check in hand to lead the effort.

State Senate Republican Leader Mark Norris of Collierville, who organized the 8:30 a.m. to noon session, wants state labor commissioner Burns Phillips and others from Nashville to listen to details of the training programs local business and higher education leaders have cobbled together over the last three years.

97. Conference to Bridge Gap Between Employers, Training Programs -

Out of the near-crisis in hiring workers after the city’s set of economic development plums in the last three years came a workforce training formula that has worked.

But many of the city’s companies aren’t aware of that formula or the existing programs that grew out of what amounted to an emergency response by local leaders. That’s according to a recent survey of manufacturing company leaders by the Greater Memphis Chamber.

98. Nasdaq Breakdown Puts Pressure on Crisis Work -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The latest high-tech disruption in the financial markets increases the pressure on Nasdaq and other electronic exchanges to take steps to avoid future breakdowns and manage them better if they do occur.

99. Facebook Aims to Get More People Online -

NEW YORK (AP) – Facebook wants to get more of the world's more than 7 billion people – all of them, actually – online through a partnership with some of the world's largest mobile technology companies.

100. A Push for Harmony Among Workers, Young and Old -

CHICAGO (AP) – There's a sense of urgency to the quest for workplace harmony, as baby boomers delay retirement and work side-by-side with people young enough to be their children – or grandchildren.