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Editorial Results (free)

1. Renting Out Homes for Super Bowl Can Bring Big Bucks -

PHOENIX (AP) – Hundreds of people gather every year to hobnob with A-list celebrities at a charity bash thrown in the Super Bowl's host city. But instead of heading to a trendy nightclub or swanky restaurant, organizers this year are throwing the party inside a private home.

2. Settlement Could Fund I-Zone Schools -

With federal money about to run out for the Shelby County Schools Innovation Zone schools, the $8 million in cash due from the city of Memphis next month is most likely to land in the bank account for that effort.

3. Strickland In Mayor's Race, Wharton Responds -

After months of speculation, Memphis City Council member Jim Strickland confirmed Thursday, Jan. 15, he is in the 2015 race for Memphis mayor.

4. Executive Inn Demolition Long Time Coming -

The old Executive Inn hotel on Airways Boulevard where Brooks Road dead ends is the latest problem vacant property to be demolished and touted by Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. as another step in his administration’s anti-blight effort.

5. OK, It’s a Great House! Can We Please See It? -

In Nashville real estate circles, it is difficult to say goodbye to 2014. We loved that 2014 and she was wonderful.

Missing her already, we hope she returns in 2015. But for the current trend to continue, Nashville is going to need some inventory.

6. Creative Destruction -

For about three years Veronica Skinner called the two-story, 24-unit apartment building at 480 Tillman St. in the Binghampton neighborhood home.

7. Rental Showdown -

Tiffany H., 43, has found the perfect way to make money. It’s close to home, easy-to-manage and gives her the flexibility she needs as a busy mom shuttling two children back and forth to two different schools each day.

8. Graceland Jets on Auction Block -

Two jets once owned by Elvis Presley that have been part of tours of Graceland since the mid-1980s are going on the auction block, the auction company authorized by Graceland announced Friday, Jan. 2.

9. Editorial: Pursuit of Authentic Memphis is a Winding Road -

Last year at this time, we talked about city finances and our pursuit of economic development. The year before, it was federal government shutdown.

This year, we will offer a change of pace from that and follow the lead of our cover story, which features suggestions about the city’s promise and its challenges in the year ahead and the year now in the books.

10. Memphis Resolutions -

The end of the year hastens a season of resolutions about the year ahead, resolutions about what to include on the blank canvas of a new year.

No matter who you are, the road to 2015 starts at the same place – through the experience of 2014. With that in mind, we surveyed many of the people we’ve covered in these pages in the last year to talk about the possibilities ahead.

11. Goat Milk and Smart Marketing -

Maybe it was that last Facebook post that put them over the top. Or, maybe it was the #voteforgoats hashtag.

Little Seed Farm’s goats aren’t telling, but they do look a bit smug.

The goats, along with Little Seed Farm owners James and Eileen Ray, recently pulled in a cool $25,000 by snagging the top spot in furnishing retailer west elm’s, “We Love LOCAL Small Business’’ grant contest.

12. Ramsey an Important, Unfamiliar Pioneer -

In this season of thankfulness, Knoxvillians should pay homage to Francis Alexander Ramsey, but many people are probably not familiar with his name.

13. Deck the Halls -

It was early Tuesday, a little more than 48 hours before Overton Square was set to throw a major holiday celebration complete with a tree-lighting ceremony, school choirs and dozens of participating tenants.

14. Mid-South Grows in Popularity for Retirees -

Florida or bust?

Not necessarily, not anymore.

Retirees coming from the Midwest and Northeast are realizing they have other options, and increasingly they are acting on them. Several Mid-South states have developed formal recruitment programs with the hope of luring out-of-state retirees – new money, in economic development parlance.

15. ’Tis the Season -

After the recession struck, desperate retailers competing for a shrinking amount of shopping dollars and market share began tinkering with time-tested holiday marketing strategies.

Good prices, great values, unique offerings and convenience no longer were enough to boost retail sales.

16. After Overcoming Hurdles, Southwest Opens Nursing School -

More than four years after breaking ground for a new nursing building, leaders of Southwest Tennessee Community College last week formally opened the school’s new Nursing, Natural Sciences and Biotechnology Building.

17. More at Moore -

The large old trees on its campus and the large paned windows of its brick buildings indicate the William R. Moore College of Technology has been around for a while.

It was the idea of William R. Moore, a dry goods wholesaler, who left a $500,000 endowment to fund the institution following his death in 1909.

18. Hillsboro High Land Sale: New School, Big Profit -

Merritt Rowe knows her children will never personally benefit from any changes to Hillsboro High School in Green Hills, but as the parent of two current students and another starting next year, it is something she is willing to fight for and encourages other parents – especially those of future students – to do the same.

19. Moore Tech Awakens -

The large old trees on its campus and the paned windows of its brick buildings indicate the William R. Moore College of Technology has been around for a while.

It was the idea of William R. Moore, a dry goods wholesaler, who left a $500,000 endowment to fund the institution following his death in 1909.

20. Boyle Sees Opportunity in East Memphis -

Memphis-based Boyle Investment Co. hopes to break ground next year on a new office building at its Ridgeway Center complex near Poplar Avenue and Shady Grove Road, according to company officials.

21. Enjoy Low Interest Rates While They Last -

In what has become expected in this post-Recession boom, home sales continue to set records each month with no end in sight, based on October sales figures from the Greater Nashville Association of Realtors.

22. Former FedEx Headquarters Up for Auction -

This week you can acquire a sizeable piece of Memphis business history at a deep discount.

The Commerce Center complex on Lamar Avenue – former home to Memphis-based corporate titans Holiday Inn and FedEx – is on the auction block.

23. Downtown Knoxville Tourism Finally Finds its Stride -

When Kim Trent moved to Knoxville in 1990, she could stand along Gay Street on a Sunday and be the only soul in sight. Today, she’s a face in the crowd.

24. Room for Growth -

Sardor and Gulam Umarov are used to fighting battles with seemingly long odds.

Between 2005 and 2009, the brothers waged a high-profile human rights campaign against the authoritarian government in their native Uzbekistan for the release of their father, Sanjar Umarov, a Germantown businessman thrown into prison for opposing the regime.

25. Smart Growth Plan Sets Stage in Germantown -

In 2007, the city of Germantown adopted its Smart Growth plan and accompanying zoning regulations, which promoted more walkable, accessible mixed-use development in its central business district and surrounding neighborhoods.

26. Raising Concerns Over Education Coverage -

With just one person reporting on schools in a metropolitan area of more than 1.3 million people, The Commercial Appeal is forging ahead with a relationship with a nonprofit journalism organization dedicated to covering education.

27. Bloodworth: Greenways Increasing Residential Values -

The Memphis region’s existing 50 miles of greenways, paths and trails are responsible for some increase in property values, particularly residential property, says Rusty Bloodworth, vice president of Boyle Investment Co. and past chairman of the Urban Land Institute’s Memphis chapter.

28. Reshaping a City, One Lot at a Time -

John G. Brittle Jr. doesn’t have an office. He has a war room. The space, crowded with maps, charts, books, piles of paper and marked-up spreadsheets, is ground zero for InfillNashville, the 10-person team of site selection specialists that Brittle leads at Village Real Estate Services.

29. Roast of the Town -

If you catch Jimmy Lewis these days and get him talking about coffee roasting, chances are he might never stop.

30. Midtown Corner Could See Turnaround -

While Midtown as a whole is experiencing a resurgence, two properties at the key intersection of Union Avenue and McLean Boulevard remain vacant, decaying eyesores.

But a real estate agent representing the owner of the vacant office building and hotel at the southwest corner of Union and McLean says both properties are under contract to be sold.

31. Business on Wheels -

When asked once by a reporter whether he’d consider supplementing his business with a food truck like many of his industry peers, the owner of a popular Midtown restaurant was matter-of-fact in his reply.

32. Lawsuit Over Nineteenth Century Club Dropped -

The Union Avenue building that once housed the Nineteenth Century Club could soon meet the wrecking ball.

A plaintiff seeking to stop the planned demolition of the once-stately mansion has dropped the appeal of a lawsuit challenging the legality of the sale of the property, removing a major obstacle to its proposed redevelopment.

33. Springing to Life -

When Ridgeland, Miss.-based development firm the Bryan Co. broke ground on The Horizon condominium tower in 2007, it was at the peak of the housing bubble and optimism from elected officials and Downtown boosters was equally high.

34. Lawsuit Over Nineteenth Century Club Dropped -

The Union Avenue building that once housed the Nineteenth Century Club could soon meet the wrecking ball.

A plaintiff seeking to stop the planned demolition of the once-stately mansion has dropped the appeal of a lawsuit challenging the legality of the sale of the property, removing a major obstacle to its proposed redevelopment.

35. Lawsuit Over Sale of Nineteenth Century Club Dropped -

The Union Avenue building that once housed the Nineteenth Century Club could soon meet the wrecking ball.

Plaintiffs seeking to stop the planned demolition of the once-stately mansion have dropped their appeal of a lawsuit challenging the legality of the sale of the property, removing a major obstacle to the property's proposed redevelopment.

36. ‘Significant Headwinds’ -

When Gov. Bill Haslam joined local economic development and civic officials at FedExForum in January to announce that Conduit Global would open a call center in Shelby County that would employ 1,000 people over the next three to five years, it provided a much-needed boost to the local office real estate sector.

37. Timing Key Element of County Tax Rate Debate -

More funding from Shelby County government for prekindergarten classrooms is a matter of timing, say those on both sides of the property tax rate question on which the $2.8 million in additional funding hinges.

38. Heart of Arlington -

When Sandy Brewer and her family moved more than eight years ago from Cordova to a turn-of-the-century home just two blocks from Arlington’s Depot Square, she said it felt like taking a step back in time.

39. Brady: Zoo Parking Solution Difficult -

The president of the Memphis Zoo says solutions to the parking problem at Overton Park won’t be easy and likely will involve change for all of the park’s institutions.

“Overton Park is a community park. … It’s clearly not a neighborhood park,” Chuck Brady told The Daily News in his first interview since protests began in late May over the zoo’s use of the park greensward for overflow parking. “It’s easy to define the problem. But it’s difficult to carve out a solution.”

40. Council to Vote on Insurance Changes, Budget -

Most of council day at City Hall Tuesday, June 17, will be devoted to closing out most, but not all, of the city’s budget season.

The Memphis City Council should make final decisions Tuesday on a stable city property tax rate and approve operating and capital budgets for the fiscal year that begins July 1.

41. ‘A Step Closer’ -

The general contractor for the Crosstown redevelopment project recently applied for three building permits totaling $115.3 million as the development team approaches a key period for financing the ambitious project.

42. 20twelve Brings Style to Broad -

There’s an energy in the Broad Avenue Arts District that Chantal Johnson insists “you just can’t bottle.”

The area, in other words, is bursting with enthusiasm from stakeholders such that it’s fast becoming a commercial and civic focal point in the city. So, in at least one sense, the location of Johnson’s new lifestyle store 20twelve, which is opening soon, was probably foreordained.

43. Brooks Reaction Seeks Way Back to Minority Business Issues -

At the end of a turbulent week, Shelby County Commissioner Henri Brooks offered several alternate explanations for her remarks about Hispanics and their experience as minorities in Memphis.

In one explanation, Brooks said she didn’t remember saying some of the most controversial of her comments during the Monday, May 12, commission meeting. In others, she said she meant every word and didn’t consider it disparaging or insulting.

44. Land Grab -

It’s been implied, but an agreement on the general idea of building a Memphis Zoo parking garage was put in writing this week by the Overton Park Conservancy as protests over paid zoo parking on the park’s greensward are likely to continue.

45. Economic Gardening Program Expands Reach -

A program aimed at helping small and midsize companies grow is being expanded with the hope it will allow existing companies to extend their roots in the community.

The Economic Gardening program, which was launched as a pilot program last year to help 22 existing businesses reach the next level, is expanding to assist 25 more companies, and local officials hope the program can become a permanent fixture in the local economic development toolbox.

46. Mall Owners Concerned About City Plans -

Leaders of the holding company that owns Raleigh Springs Mall expressed concern Thursday, May 1, about Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s plans to turn the mall into a town center.

Michael Aschenbrener, attorney for Raleigh Springs Mall LLC, says the group has been working diligently to renovate and revitalize the mall since it bought the property a year ago.

47. Raleigh Springs Mall Owners Concerned About City Plans -

Leaders of the holding company that owns Raleigh Springs Mall expressed concern Thursday, May 1, about Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s plans to turn the mall into a town center.

Michael Aschenbrener, attorney for Raleigh Springs Mall LLC, says the group has been working diligently to renovate and revitalize the mall since it bought the property a year ago.

48. Forest Hill Technology Center Sells for $5.2 Million -

3860 Forest Hill-Irene Road
Germantown, TN 38125
Sale Amount: $5.2 million

Sale Date: March 31, 2014
Buyer: 3860 Forest Hills Irene LLC
Seller: BACM 2007-1 Irene Road LLC
Loan Amount: $5.6 million
Loan Date: April 17, 2014
Maturity Date: N/A
Lender: First Tennessee Bank NA

49. Tillman Cove Apartments Sell for $1 Million -

The 116-unit Tillman Cove Apartments at 2998 Tillman Cove in Binghampton have sold for $1 million.

50. Brewery Project Looks for Answers -

When the Untapped event at the Tennessee Brewery ends June 1, the fortress-like landmark on the south bluffs will still be tentatively slated for demolition in August.

But organizers of the event, which mixes live entertainment, local beer and food, and the experience of gathering in a long-closed courtyard, hope some answers will have emerged about a possible life beyond August.

51. Where There’s Smoke -

DON’T WAIT FOR THE FIRE TO FIND THE WATER. Neglect and denial burns in empty buildings and blighted neighborhoods, futures are hazy, moods are dark and the smoke from all of it chokes cities and sends those able to flee to greener ground at the edges, leaving behind a bitter landscape, a smoldering threat.

52. New Partners Sign On to Tennessee Brewery Effort -

This weekend, volunteers will return to the Tennessee Brewery property to continue getting it ready for Tennessee Brewery Untapped, a six-week series of community events that will run April 24 through June 1.

53. Clash of Contenders -

Shelby County Commissioner Steve Mulroy says his political plans last year didn’t include running for county mayor in 2014.

He was on U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen’s short list of recommendations for an open federal judgeship, a White House appointment he said he knew he might not get “the first time.”

54. Heritage Trail Likely to Continue Despite Rejection -

The plan to demolish the last large public housing development in Memphis and use the demolition as a catalyst for a larger redevelopment of the surrounding area did not make the final cut with federal housing officials in Washington.

55. Coca-Cola Exploring Expansion in Chattanooga -

CHATTANOOGA (AP) – Officials with Coca-Cola Bottling Co. United are looking at expanding in Chattanooga.

56. Lamanna Loves Client Relationship of Accounting -

Frank Lamanna attributes his interest in pursuing accounting as a career to an early episode in his life – taking an accounting class at Christian Brothers High School.

57. School Board Pay Raise Returns to Commission -

Shelby County Commissioners vote Monday, Feb. 10, on a $20,800 pay raise for Shelby County School board members.

The commission meets at 1:30 p.m. at the Vasco Smith Administration Building.

Follow the meeting @tdnpols, www.twitter.com/tdnpols.

58. Judicial Campaign Season Emerges With Different Rules -

Fundraisers and other campaign events for judicial candidates are difficult.

Sometimes there are more candidates for other offices at them than citizens with no direct political interest who are undecided on who to vote for. And more so than in any other field of candidates, judges are limited by ethics in what they can say when trying to persuade someone to vote for them.

59. New Life -

When Rob Clark and his wife moved into their home in the historic Evergreen neighborhood in 1993, catalog and distribution operations were still active at the Sears Crosstown building.

That soon changed, and for roughly two decades the hulking property stood as a towering, painful reminder of the area’s faded glory.

60. New Life -

When Rob Clark and his wife moved into their home in the historic Evergreen neighborhood in 1993, catalog and distribution operations were still active at the Sears Crosstown building.

That soon changed, and for roughly two decades the hulking property stood as a towering, painful reminder of the area’s faded glory.

61. Schools Reformation Enters New, Complex Stage -

Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson meets this week with the newly installed superintendents of the county’s still-forming suburban school systems to talk details and cooperation.

The talks are part of a complex relationship forming among the school systems and the emerging structure of a county with seven public school systems. On another level, Hopson will be looking for some certainty on the start dates of the municipal school district for his own planning purposes in the 2014-2015 school year. And he is preparing a fast-track plan to specifically compete to keep the best teachers and principals in those suburban schools in Shelby County Schools.

62. Property Struggle -

Discussions are underway about the particulars of an imminent demolition contract for the Tennessee Brewery, and the owners of the castle-like structure Downtown could decide the property’s fate by sometime in February or March.

63. Little Outlines Options for City’s Pension Liability -

Changing retirement and health care benefits for city of Memphis employees going forward is a given, said city Chief Administrative Officer George Little this week.

64. Germantown Planning Commission OKs Plan for Whole Foods -

Developers on Tuesday, Jan. 7, cleared a key regulatory hurdle for a planned Whole Foods Market store in Germantown.

Before a packed house, the Germantown Planning Commission voted to approve a revamped plan for a new Whole Foods store at the southeast corner of the intersection of Poplar Avenue and Pete Mitchell Road, on the eastern edge of Germantown’s Central Business District.

65. Retirement Unlikely for Some Blue-Collar Americans -

Tom Edwards grew up in a family that's been cutting trees and hauling timber in the Pacific Northwest for more than a century. The Spanaway, Wash., resident says he has worked as a logger since he was a kid – it's just what an able-bodied youngster was expected to do.

66. Lakeland Seeks Outlet Mall Revival -

Officials in Lakeland are hopeful that a long-planned redevelopment of the old Lakeland Factory Outlet Mall site could finally become a reality.

The Lakeland Board of Commissioners recently passed a resolution expressing support for the project, including asking city staff to explore possible incentives that could get the project off the drawing board and into development.

67. Van Vliet Takes on Roles at UT Medical, The MED -

Dr. Michael M. Van Vliet has joined the department of plastic surgery at UT Medical Group, has been named assistant professor at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center and has been appointed director of burn critical care for the Firefighters Regional Burn Center at The Regional Medical Center at Memphis.

68. Crosstown Effort Shines as Development Example -

Construction documents for the $180 million revitalization of the Crosstown building were scheduled to be finished Friday, Dec. 6, with the project moving toward closing and construction in the next months.

69. Soulful Synergy -

What happened at the corner of McLemore Avenue and College Street in the 1960s is nothing short of extraordinary.

At the crossroads of segregated neighborhoods in South Memphis, two white business partners would open the doors wide to whites and blacks alike, who congregated to write and record songs that would set off a soul explosion heard around the world.

70. Events -

Germantown Performing Arts Center will host a visual arts exhibition by Ron Olson and Saj Crone Tuesday, Dec. 3, to Jan. 3 in the GPAC lobby, 1801 Exeter Road. Cost is free. Visit gpacweb.com.

71. Events -

The WRVR Toy Truck will be at Bud Davis Cadillac, 5433 Poplar Ave., from Monday, Dec. 2, to Friday, Dec. 6 to collect gifts for children served by Porter Leath. New, unwrapped toys can be dropped off between 5 a.m. and 7 p.m. Visit porterleath.org.

72. Events -

Small Business Saturday will be held Saturday, Nov. 30, at participating small businesses across Memphis. The nationwide event includes retailers, restaurants, museums, entertainment venues and more. Visit shopsmall.com for a list of participating businesses.

73. Ending Tax Breaks Eyed as Way to Ease Budget Cuts -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Democrats' new mantra in budget talks is to close tax loopholes for certain businesses, investors and professionals as a way to raise more revenue to help ease autopilot spending cuts that soon are to become more painful.

74. Overton Square Momentum Connects With History -

If you think Midtown’s recent momentum, particularly in and around Overton Square, is real growth, you are right.

But it is growth in development that Overton Square developer Bob Loeb believes will bring along a denser population in the area.

75. Suburban Prospects -

Walker Taylor’s business philosophy is a simple one, and it’s helping keep his Germantown-based restaurant a must-visit for diners from around the world.

76. Campus Connections -

The University of Memphis is in the early stages of updating its campus master plan, and it will seek input from its neighbors as it moves into its next century of higher education.

The U of M has hired the Smith Group JJR of Ann Arbor, Mich., to lead the effort with Memphis-based LRK Inc. serving as the local partner.

77. New in Rural Tennessee: Discovery Park of America -

UNION CITY, Tenn. (AP) – The gleaming white building with curved exteriors and a spaceship-like tower emerges from the flat landscape of West Tennessee like something out of science fiction, but it's not a villain's lair or superhero's headquarters.

78. EDGE Board Remains on Political Hot Seat -

The next time Shelby County Commissioners gather to talk over funding for the Economic Development Growth Engine, they hope to have EDGE leaders and city leaders in their committee room.

The commission delayed action Monday, Oct. 28, on a resolution of intent that would have announced commissioners’ intention to block their confirmation of any appointees to the EDGE board by the city of Memphis.

79. Whole Foods Eyes Germantown Site -

Whole Foods Market and local development firm Cypress Realty Holdings Co. are targeting the Poplar Avenue corridor in Germantown for the Memphis area’s second Whole Foods store.

80. Another Deadline Issued in Nineteenth Century Club Case -

The court case over the future of the Midtown mansion known as the Nineteenth Century Club has been issued another deadline.

The plaintiffs in the Chancery Court case, which is now on appeal, have until Nov. 1 at 10 a.m. to raise an additional $50,000 in a court bond if they hope to stay demolition pending appeal.

81. As Shutdown Drags On, Time to Call in Mediator? -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Maybe it's time to call in a mediator – if there's one not on furlough.

President Barack Obama and congressional Republicans are in stalemate over a partial government shutdown now in its second week. And a looming crisis over the federal debt limit is rapidly approaching, with economists saying that could have a devastating effect on the U.S. economy.

82. Room Service -

Hilton Worldwide celebrates its second Global Week of Service this week, and more than 700 Hilton employees are working locally on community involvement projects, such as this year’s signature event at the Pilgrim’s Rest housing facility, 747 Court Ave.

83. Beale Street Future Returns to Bankruptcy Court -

The future path of Beale Street development is back in federal bankruptcy court after a plan that would both lease Handy Park and pay off a $600,000 loan for park improvements was scrapped Tuesday, Sept. 17, by Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.

84. Green Growth -

Tioga Environmental Consultants is adding new staff and ramping up for an increased workload, due at least in part to new commercial regulations expected next year on lead-based paint in commercial facilities.

85. Mary Carter Decorating Center to Grow, Relocate -

A venerable Memphis cake decorating and supply store is moving to a new location on Summer Avenue.

Mary Carter Decorating Center signed a 4,800-square-foot lease in Cloverleaf Shopping Center at 733 N. White Station Road.

86. Offense Best Defense in Music Suit? -

The crossword clue was “Gray areas, maybe.” The answer was BORDER LINES. With 11 letters, it fit nicely across the puzzle’s center.

When I saw the word “lines” was involved, I pulled for “blurred” to be the first word. Too many letters, though. In “Blurred Lines,” we have a pop culture-intellectual property dispute. News of which did not break until suit was filed.

87. Neighborhood Vitality -

The history at the Four-Way Restaurant is as rich and soulful as the food.

The walls of the South Memphis institution are decorated with photographs of politicians, athletes, entertainers, business leaders and civil rights icons – including the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. – who made the famous restaurant at Mississippi Boulevard and Walker Avenue a “home away from home.”

88. Walgreen Co. Closes Ike’s Gas Station -

Walgreen Co. has closed the gas station at its Ike’s store on Union Avenue, but the company isn’t saying anything else about the property’s future.

89. Improving Real Estate Metrics Offer Hope -

The 2013 countywide reappraisal resulted in a historic drop in property values, but improving real estate metrics are providing a glimmer of hope for the local economy.

That was the message industry professionals heard Thursday, July 25, at real estate information company Chandler Reports’ 2013 Mid-Year Master Your Market seminar at the Memphis Marriott East.

90. Editorial: Financial Stability Critical for City -

At the overtime sudden death end of the local budget season, if you live in Memphis you leave with a combined $7.78 cent tax rate – city of Memphis and county property tax rates – the highest property tax rate in the state of Tennessee.

91. Entry Point -

The city of Germantown is embarking on an effort to guide growth and development of the city’s western gateway corridor for the next 20 years.

The planning area encompasses the Poplar Avenue corridor at the city’s western gateway, paying special attention to proposed development opportunities, improvements to Poplar Avenue and Kirby and a new set of regulations designed to guide development.

92. Suburbs See Different Sales Tax Realities -

While Shelby County and city of Memphis government leaders have grappled with the loss of property value and its impact on the property tax rates for both governments, suburban leaders have a different reality.

93. Eviction Notice -

Managers of apartment complexes and other rental properties in Shelby County used to have a good grapevine or network when it came to trouble tenants, especially drug dealers, who had been evicted.

94. Council Grapples With Attrition Plan Reality -

Every version of a city budget the Memphis City Council and Mayor A C Wharton Jr. considered in June included a plan to lose 300 city employees through attrition for long-term savings toward meeting rising future debt obligations.

95. Green Shoots -

The busiest time of the year along the Shelby Farms Greenline is also the busiest time of the year for Cheffie’s, an example of a business that is a direct beneficiary of being near the Tillman Street end of the greenline that extends east to Shelby Farms Park.

96. Potter Resets Hearing for Nineteenth Century Club -

Environmental Court Judge Larry Potter said Monday, June 24, that he hopes the new owners of the historic Nineteenth Century Club building on Union Avenue will preserve the decaying structure.

97. Potter Resets Hearing for Nineteenth Century Club -

Environmental Court Judge Larry Potter said Monday, June 24, that he hopes the new owners of the historic Nineteenth Century Club building on Union Avenue will preserve the decaying structure.

98. New Campaign Urges Support of Students in Merger -

A new campaign launched Monday, June 24, to prepare for the opening of the consolidated school district in August is urging citizens to support students of the new school system.

“Our Children. Our Success.” is privately funded by SchoolSeed, which was formerly the Memphis City Schools Foundation. The campaign began Monday with new billboards across the county.

99. City Council Again Tackles Budget, Tax Rate -

Some Memphis City Council members say they are prepared for a long day Tuesday, June 18, at City Hall as they continue down the arduous path to a tax rate and budget for the coming fiscal year.

“Let’s just be ready to spend the night,” said council member Harold Collins last week. He commented as council-mediated discussions between the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. and municipal union leaders on possible cuts in employee benefits got nowhere quickly and ended after less than an hour.

100. Lee House Renovation ‘Ready to Go’ -

The group that wanted to convert the historic James Lee House in Victorian Village has purchased the home and construction is expected to begin in the next few weeks.