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Editorial Results (free)

1. House GOP Sues Administration Over Health Care Law -

WASHINGTON (AP) – House Republicans sued the Obama administration on Friday over its implementation of President Barack Obama's health care law, saying he had overstepped his legal authority in carrying out the program.

2. Poll: Employers Watching Insurance Costs Closely -

Despite years of rising medical costs and pressure from the health care overhaul, employers consider employee health insurance a priority. But new surveys suggest coverage may grow skimpier in the coming years.

3. Incumbent Council Members Weighing Choices -

The only open seat on the Memphis City Council in the 2011 city elections is once again an open seat going into the 2015 city elections.

Current council member Lee Harris was elected to the state Senate in the August elections and will resign effective Jan. 12. That means the remaining 12 council members will appoint someone to fill the year remaining in Harris’s four-year council term of office.

4. Wharton’s Hybrid Pension Falls in Council -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s hybrid pension proposal, the second of two parts of his overhaul of city employee benefits, was voted down Tuesday, Nov. 18, by the Memphis City Council in a bid by some on the council to end “uncertainty” among city employees.

5. Tennessee Has Lowest Number of Uninsured in Decade -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A new University of Tennessee report says the number of uninsured people in Tennessee has hit a 10-year low.

Media cited the study in reporting that the number of people without health insurance shrunk about 25 percent in the first year of the health insurance marketplace, which was implemented under the federal Affordable Care Act. It was the biggest drop since the university began collecting data 20 years ago.

6. Wharton Defends Record, ‘Tough’ Decisions -

When he ran for Memphis mayor in the 2009 special election, A C Wharton Jr. said he was running to win, but also to change the nature of the city’s politics.

“This is what hurts us in politics today,” Wharton said five years later during the first fundraiser Monday, Nov. 17, in his campaign for re-election to a second full four-year term as mayor. “Everybody wants to stand up and say how is this going to go over. And if it doesn’t look like it’s going to go over well, they back down.”

7. Wharton Begins Re-Election Fundraising -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. told a group of supporters Monday, Nov. 17, at his first re-election fundraiser that he is running to win and in the race for a second full term to stay.

Wharton estimated he drew a group of 300 supporters to the fundraiser at the Memphis Botanic Gardens with some leaving early to attend a Grizzlies basketball game Downtown.

8. College Prices Continue to Creep Up -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Time to stock up on the ramen noodles. The average cost of attending college crept up again this year, the College Board said Thursday.

The average sticker price, with room and board included, for undergraduate students attending a four-year college or university in their home state was $18,943. Out-of-state students at those schools paid, on average, $32,762. At two-year public schools, in-state students paid an average $11,052.

9. Small Business Insurance Exchanges Seek Rebound -

Early enrollment for the health overhaul's small business insurance exchanges fell far short of the 2 million workers who were expected to sign up this year. The shortfall calls into question the future of the exchanges as they begin accepting enrollment for 2015.

10. Ask Your Parent the Difficult Questions -

Ray’s take: The whole idea of talking to your elderly parent about their finances and estate planning may make you feel slightly ill.

You may worry that they’ll think you’re invading their privacy, don’t trust their judgment or are trying to make a grab for their money, all of which seem like good reasons to put off that conversation. The more financially successful many parents are may make them more patriarchal.

11. McGuire Joins Insight Risk Management -

Myles McGuire has joined Insight Risk Management LLC as a corporate consultant. In his new role, he will consult with commercial clients and place them with the appropriate coverages to protect their business from risk and liability issues.

12. Justices to Hear Challenge to Health Law Subsidies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court agreed Friday to hear a new challenge to President Barack Obama's health care law.

The justices said they will decide whether the law authorizes subsidies that help millions of low- and middle-income people afford their health insurance premiums.

13. US Services Firms Grow More Slowly, But Hiring Up -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. services firms expanded more slowly in October, but the pace of growth was still healthy. Hiring also rose to the fastest pace in more than nine years.

The Institute for Supply Management said Wednesday that its services index dropped to 57.1 in October, down from 58.6 in September. That was the second straight drop after the index had risen steadily since February to 59.6 in August, the highest in eight years. Any reading over 50 indicates expansion.

14. Council to Vote on New Pension Proposal -

Memphis City Council members start all over Tuesday, Nov. 4, in their votes on pension reforms.

A pair of ordinances representing a revised pension proposal by Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. are on Tuesday’s agenda for the first of three readings. They replace another set of ordinances that had been set for final votes at the last council meeting in October.

15. Medicare Paid for Meds After Patients Were Dead -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Call it drugs for the departed: A quirky bureaucratic rule led Medicare's prescription drug program to pay for costly medications even after the patients were dead.

That head-scratching policy is now getting a second look.

16. Evans Rules City Health Insurance Cuts Can Proceed -

Chancellor Walter Evans has denied a move by city government retirees to stop the city from enacting changes to health insurance coverage effective Jan. 1.

17. City, County Take Different Paths on Insurance -

City of Memphis human resources director Quintin Robinson came from City Hall on the other side of the Main Street Mall last week to watch how Shelby County government handled changes to its health insurance plan for employees.

18. County Commission Approves Health Insurance Changes -

Shelby County Commissioners approved changes to county government employee health insurance coverage Thursday, Oct. 30, that raises employee premiums by 5 percent and drops working spouses who are offered equivalent coverage of the county’s bronze plan by their employers effective Jan. 1.

19. Health Overhaul's Subsidies at Supreme Court -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Supreme Court justices have their first chance this week to decide whether they have the appetite for another major fight over President Barack Obama's health care law.

20. County Commission to Meet on Health Insurance -

For the second time in a week, Shelby County Commissioners meet Thursday, Oct. 30, to take up changes in health insurance coverage for county government employees.

Commissioners voted at their regular Monday to delay a vote on the changes to get more information.

21. Commission Sets Votes on Health Insurance -

Shelby County Commissioners may not hear a whole lot new in the way of answers between now and a Thursday special meeting to settle the politically volatile issue of changes to health insurance coverage for county government employees.

22. Commission Moves Health Insurance Vote to Thursday -

Shelby County Commissioners moved a critical vote on changing health insurance benefits for county employees to a special Thursday, Oct. 30, meeting in a Monday session dominated by the proposed changes.

23. Events -

Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation will hold a presentation and public hearing on the 2015-2025 Solid Waste and Materials Management Plan Monday, Oct. 27, from 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. in the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library meeting room A, 3030 Poplar Ave. Visit tn.gov/environment/solid-waste to review the draft plan.

24. County Commission Differences Remain -

Shelby County Commissioners still have a problem with each other. And the problem at the center of all of the complexities of what are normally routine items remains a Democratic county commissioner elected chairman in September with the votes of all six Republican commissioners and himself.

25. HealthCare.gov's EZ Form Not for Legal Immigrants -

WASHINGTON (AP) — HealthCare.gov's simpler online application is being touted as a big win for consumers. But it can't be used by legal immigrants and naturalized U.S. citizens, who represent millions of potential new health insurance customers.

26. Pension Reform Decision Back At Square One -

It happened in the shadow of a change in the pension reform proposal Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. had backed all through the summer and two of three council votes.

As the Memphis City Council got its first formal presentation Tuesday, Oct. 21, of Wharton’s new hybrid pension plan, it settled City Hall’s tumultuous discussion about changes to health insurance coverage for city employees and retirees.

27. Hybrid Pension Plan Resets Council Debate on Benefits -

If it wasn’t apparent before, it became apparent Tuesday, Oct. 21, that the city’s effort to change the pension system of city employees is back at square one.

The council was already scheduled Tuesday to hear from Segal Consulting, the actuary firm the council hired at the outset of its discussion about pension changes proposed by Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.

28. Advocates Continue Call for Medicaid Expansion -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Members of the state chapter of the NAACP and other health care advocates held a mock funeral across from the state Capitol on Tuesday to characterize lives they say will be lost if Medicaid is not expanded in Tennessee.

29. County Charts Quieter Course On Insurance -

With less than two weeks to the open enrollment period for county employees, Shelby County Commissioners take a look at changes to county employee health care benefits Wednesday, Oct. 22, in committee sessions.

30. GOP Governors Don't See 'Obamacare' Going Away -

WASHINGTON (AP) — While Republicans in Congress shout, "Repeal Obamacare," GOP governors in many states have quietly accepted the law's major Medicaid expansion. Even if their party wins control of the Senate in the upcoming elections, they just don't see the law going away.

31. Council Wades Into Pension Reform -

For the second time in three weeks, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. has made major changes to the overall plan to right the city’s financial condition by changing employee and retiree benefits.

Late Friday, Oct. 17, Wharton proposed a “hybrid” retirement plan for employees that would allow new hires and those with less than 10 years on the job to enroll in a two-part plan that includes a professionally managed market-based fund as well as a 401(k)-like plan.

32. City Council Parses Wharton's Pension Revision -

A weekend revision by Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. to his proposed changes in the city’s pension plan goes to Memphis City Council members Tuesday, Oct. 21, in council committees.

The council has set aside a two-hour executive session starting at 1 p.m. to hear from its consultants on Wharton’s original plan, now his new plan and other option.

33. Wharton Proposes Hybrid City Pension Plan -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. wants to change his original proposal from earlier this year to overhaul the city’s pension plan.

Wharton is proposing a new hybrid pension plan that is a mix of a market-based plan and the defined contributions plan, like a 401-k plan, for all city new hires as well as employees with under 10 years of service who are not vested in the city’s current defined benefits plan.

34. Recruiter’s Career Twist -

Ask Janet Miller about her remarkable career at the Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce and she’ll likely attribute it to good timing or pass credit onto others.

35. City Hall Opens Enrollment on Changing Health Plan -

City of Memphis employees just emerged from the open enrollment period for the still-evolving changes in health insurance benefits for 2015. And city retirees are about to enter their open enrollment period for the same benefits plans that take effect in January.

36. Regions Insurance Expands in Memphis -

The recent expansion of the employee benefits practice of Regions Insurance in Memphis involved the addition of Stuart Zalowitz and Jonathan Frisch, owners of Zalowitz Frisch Benefits Group, along with a team of associates.

37. Poll: Many Insured Struggle With Medical Bills -

WASHINGTON (AP) – They have health insurance, but still no peace of mind. Overall, 1 in 4 privately insured adults say they doubt they could pay for a major unexpected illness or injury.

38. November Council Vote On Pension Reform Likely -

Memphis City Council members again delayed final votes on a set of ordinances that would change pension benefits for city employees.

The delay Tuesday, Oct. 7, on third and final reading of several pension ordinances was expected. The items are now on the Oct. 21 council agenda, but council members expect there will not be a vote then either and city Chief Administrative Officer George Little said the administration can live with a further delay.

39. Annual Church Health Center Christmas Cards Return -

The idea isn’t new or original. It’s just successful and worth repeating. In 1989, the Church Health Center started a Christmas card program as a fundraiser. Now, the annual CHC Christmas card effort raises about $250,000 annually.

40. Some Council Members Feel Dissed By Wharton -

It was a phrase guaranteed to put more diss in the dysfunction between the Memphis City Council and Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.

And some on the council had plenty to say Tuesday, Oct. 7, about the weekend press release from Wharton announcing changes in the city’s health insurance plan starting next year.

41. Council Delays Pension Action, Broods Over 'Key Members' Designation -

Memphis City Council members debated who is a “key member” of the body Tuesday, Oct. 7, as they delayed action on changes to city employee pensions into November.

The delay on third and final reading of several pension ordinances was expected. The items are now on the Oct. 21 council agenda. But council members expect there will not be a vote then either and city Chief Administrative Officer George Little said the administration can live with a further delay.

42. Health Law Waivers: Too Complicated to Claim? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Millions of Americans may qualify for waivers from the most unpopular part of President Barack Obama's health care overhaul. But getting that exemption could be an ordeal.

43. Wal-Mart Cuts Health Benefits for Some Part-Timers -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wal-Mart Stores Inc. plans to eliminate health insurance coverage for some of its part-time U.S. employees in a move aimed at controlling rising health care costs of the nation's largest private employer.

44. Retirees, City Attorneys Spar Over Lifetime Subsidies -

The move by city retirees to block the end of a 70-percent subsidy of their health insurance premiums by the city of Memphis drew heavy fire Monday, Oct. 6, in Shelby County Chancery Court.

Several retirees testified before Chancellor Walter Evans that they were promised the subsidies for the rest of their lives when they were hired by city government.

45. Evans Hears Arguments Over City Health Insurance Benefits -

Chancellor Walter Evans won’t rule until later this month on a move by city retirees to at least temporarily halt the city’s plan to end a 70 percent subsidy of health insurance premiums for city retirees.

46. Wal-Mart Plans 1-Stop Health Coverage Shopping -

Wal-Mart is taking one-stop shopping to another area: health insurance.

The world's largest retailer plans to work with DirectHealth.com, an online health insurance comparison site and agency, to allow shoppers to compare coverage options and enroll in Medicare plans or the public exchange plans created under the Affordable Care Act.

47. City Council Weighs Fluid Benefits Decisions -

Memphis City Council members have third and final votes scheduled Tuesday, Oct. 7, on a set of changes to the city’s pension benefits that are the second of two major sets of reforms in benefits for city employees and retirees.

48. Wharton Makes More Health Care Changes -

The working wives and husbands of city of Memphis employees will remain on the city’s health insurance plan through 2015 as long as they pay an increased monthly surcharge of $100, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. announced Friday, Oct. 3, in the latest changes to the city’s health insurance plan.

49. Airbnb, Other In-Home Vacation Rentals Face Rules, Taxes -

When Hume-Fogg teacher Elizabeth Smith and her husband became empty-nesters, they talked about downsizing.

50. Wellness Clinic Part of City’s Insurance Changes -

A new “wellness clinic” for city of Memphis employees and retirees opens Wednesday, Oct. 1, in Midtown and takes its place in City Hall’s summer to fall political tempest over changes in health insurance coverage approved by the Memphis City Council in June.

51. Haslam Checks In With Bond Rating Agencies -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam was in New York City last week to talk with the major bond rating agencies.

Normally such trips come when a local or state government is about to issue new debt and wants a credit rating from the agencies. In this case, the Thursday, Sept. 25, visit was not for that. It was more of a status report on the state’s financial condition.

52. Searching for Doctors -

So here’s the offer: lower salary – meaning it will take longer to pay down your student loan debt – less prestige, and perhaps even a questioning of your intelligence and skill.

In 2014, that’s what comes with the decision to become a primary care physician. Recently, a fourth-year medical student at the University of Pennsylvania, Mara Gordon, wrote an article for The Atlantic explaining her decision to become a primary care doctor.

53. Senators: Widen Medicaid Program for Frail Seniors -

WASHINGTON (AP) – More than a dozen U.S. senators from both parties are calling on the Obama administration to broaden a Medicaid program for the nation's frailest seniors, calling it a proven alternative to pricier nursing home care as states seek to limit long-term medical costs.

54. Middle-Class Squeeze: From Day Care to Health Care -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Three years ago, Jason Prosser was stunned to discover the cost of child care for his newborn son – so much so that he and his wife postponed having a second child.

55. Certified Financial Planner – One Big Thing -

Ray's take: In today’s world of financial specialists, each one has their own view of what you should do – because each one is focused on their own focused area of the big picture: the CPA, the insurance agent, the attorney, etc.

56. More Insurers to Offer Health Law Plans Next Year -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Obama administration says consumers in most states will have more insurance options next year under the president's health care law.

The Health and Human Services department on Tuesday reported a net increase of 63 insurers joining the market in 43 states plus Washington, DC. The preliminary figures show 77 insurers entering for the first time, while 14 are dropping out.

57. Health Law Enrollment Now 7.3 Million -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Obama administration says 7.3 million people have signed up for subsidized private health insurance under the health care law – down from 8 million reported earlier this year.

58. Little Sees ‘Acceptance’ in City Insurance Drama -

City Chief Administrative Officer George Little says he hopes the city’s long debate about health insurance coverage changes will mean a shorter discussion about proposed pension changes to come.

59. Drugstores, Retailers Dive Deeper Into Vaccines -

Walgreen provided enough flu shots last season to protect a population roughly twice the size of Los Angeles.

CVS doled out more than 5 million, or double its total from a few years ago. And Wal-Mart, the world's largest retailer, offers flu shots at more than 4,200 of its U.S. stores that have pharmacies.

60. Door Remains Open on City Health Insurance Changes -

The political struggle to close the door and lock in changes to city health insurance coverage is proving to be a challenge for the Memphis City Council.

The council voted Tuesday, Sept. 16, to adjust the health insurance changes it approved in June to grandfather in for a year approximately 300 retirees and their spouses when it comes to the 70 percent subsidy on insurance premiums they currently get from the city.

61. City Employees Return to Court Over Benefits -

The basic elements of an overhaul of city health insurance and pension benefits got some changes this week at the Memphis City Council. And it looks like the council might put off a vote on pension benefit changes originally set for a vote in October.

62. Retirees Sue As Council Adjusts Health Insurance Changes -

Three retired Memphis Police officers and the widow of a Memphis Police officer filed suit Tuesday, Sept. 16, against the city of Memphis seeking a temporary restraining order to stop changes in city government health insurance benefits by the time the open enrollment period begins next month.

63. Council Could Close Door on Alternative Health Plans -

Memphis City Council members could put to rest alternatives to the health care insurance benefits cuts they approved in June when they meet Tuesday, Sept. 16.

The question is whether they would do that with some kind of vote or indication through discussion or whether they will simply let the June decision stand and take no further votes.

64. Grizzlies Partner With BlueCross BlueShield -

The Memphis Grizzlies and BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee have entered into a collaborative partnership, making BlueCross the official health insurance carrier of the Memphis Grizzlies and an executive partner in several Grizzlies health and wellness initiatives, the team announced.

65. Unintended Consequences: ER Visits Increase -

Hospital officials have been pushing for the state to expand Medicaid health care coverage for thousands of Tennessee’s poorest citizens, despite two significant and related concerns:

Expansion will lead to increased visits to the most expensive place in America for routine health care, the emergency room.

66. Coverage Gap Leaves Rural Tennessee Hospitals on Life Support -

Four rural hospitals have closed and dozens are at risk of shuttering: That’s the fallout, some say, from Gov. Bill Haslam’s decision not to join the Affordable Care Act in 2013 and tap into millions in promised federal funds for Tennessee’s financially-strapped health care institutions.

67. Council Bogs Down in Health Insurance Numbers -

When Memphis City Council members meet Tuesday, Sept. 16, they will still be considering alternatives to the health care insurance plan changes they approved in June.

And they probably still will be trying to make sense of a mind-numbing array of conflicting numbers.

68. Federal Judge Rules Against TennCare -

The state's expanded Medicaid program must hold hearings for people who have waited months to learn whether they qualify for coverage because of delays in processing applications, a federal judge has ruled.

69. Federal Judge Rules Against TennCare -

The state's expanded Medicaid program must hold hearings for people who have waited months to learn whether they qualify for coverage because of delays in processing applications, a federal judge has ruled.

70. Council Aims at Moving Insurance Targets -

At just about every turn of the debate at City Hall about changes in health insurance coverage, Memphis City Council members have seen crucial numbers shift about the impact of the changes and the city’s liability.

71. Council To Review Conflicting Health Insurance Numbers -

City government’s open enrollment period for health insurance begins in October and new details of health insurance benefit cuts approved in June go in the mail later this month. Yet Memphis City Council members meet in a special committee session next week to again review conflicting numbers from actuaries on the coverage.

72. Gov. Haslam's Medicaid Talk Draws GOP Criticism -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam's suggestion this week that he may soon submit a proposal for Medicaid expansion in Tennessee received some blowback from a fellow Republican leader in the Legislature on Friday.

73. Council to Review Alternative Health Plan -

Memphis City Council members Tuesday, Sept. 2, talk over a proposed high-deductible health insurance plan that would restore health benefits for city employees and retirees.

The 1:30 p.m. executive session discussion by the full council is the first since the leaders of the Memphis Fire Fighters Association pitched the plan at a health insurance oversight committee session in July.

74. Client Service Remains Top Priority at The Barnett Group -

The Barnett Group, a Memphis-based employee benefits and financial services firm, didn’t get to the point where it’s provided benefits to more than 75,000 people by accident.

It’s always a reality that businesses are looking to do more with less, cut costs and look for areas where resources can be optimized. The industry space in which The Barnett Group operates is a fast-changing one, with a constant stream of new rules and regulations governing it.

75. Advocates Urge Governor to Expand Medicaid -

NASHVILLE (AP) – The state chapter of the NAACP and other advocates for health care are urging Gov. Bill Haslam to expand Medicaid in Tennessee.

About 50 protesters gathered on the War Memorial Plaza across the street from the state Capitol on Thursday.

76. 3 Ways Insurers Can Discourage Sick From Enrolling -

Insurers can no longer reject customers with expensive medical conditions thanks to the health care overhaul. But consumer advocates warn that companies are still using wiggle room to discourage the sickest – and costliest – patients from enrolling.

77. Beset by Money Woes, Crittenden Hospital to Close -

WEST MEMPHIS, Ark. (AP) – The Crittenden Regional Hospital in West Memphis stopped admitting patients Monday and will shut down permanently on Sept. 7, despite the recent passage of a sales tax increase intended to help the financially struggling facility.

78. City Union Presents Alternative Plan on Benefits -

Memphis Fire Fighters Association president Thomas Malone takes the union’s plan for reversing city employee and retiree health insurance coverage cutbacks to a city oversight committee Thursday, Aug. 21, on employee issues.

79. Fullilove Calls Off Sales Tax Hike Try, Unions May Try -

Memphis City Council member Janis Fullilove pulled the plug Tuesday, Aug. 19, on a proposed November referendum on a citywide half cent sales tax hike.

80. US Won't Reveal Records on Health Website Security -

WASHINGTON (AP) – After promising not to withhold government information over "speculative or abstract fears," the Obama administration has concluded it will not publicly disclose federal records that could shed light on the security of the government's health care website because doing so could "potentially" allow hackers to break in.

81. Council Reviews Pension Investment Changes -

For the first time in months, Memphis City Council members have no committee discussions scheduled Tuesday, Aug. 19, on city health insurance benefits or proposed pension plan changes.

But the council will vote on the first in a series of pension plan changes to come.

82. PILOT Critics Push for Fuller Accounting -

One of the most vocal critics of payment-in-lieu-of-taxes economic development incentives – or PILOTs – says he intends to make them an issue in the 2015 Memphis elections.

Rev. Kenneth Whalum Jr. said his problem with the property tax abatements is the lack of disclosure about their details and how companies getting them have met the goals of creating jobs for Memphians.

83. Consumers Driving Health Care Innovation -

Everyone in the U.S complains about health care – the rising costs of insurance premiums and co-pays, the lack of innovation, the poor experience at doctor’s offices and hospitals, and price of medications.

84. City Debuts Health Benefits Website -

The city of Memphis debuted a new website this week that explains changes in health care insurance and coverage for city employees and retirees.

The debut of benefitsmemphis.com comes ahead of the Oct. 1 effective date for premium increases city employees will begin paying.

85. City Debuts Health Benefits Website -

The city of Memphis debuted a new website this week that explains changes in health care insurance and coverage for city employees and retirees.

The debut of benefitsmemphis.com comes ahead of the Oct. 1 effective date for premium increases city employees will begin paying.

86. Deadline to Clear Up Health Law Eligibility Near -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Hundreds of thousands of people who signed up under the new health care law risk losing their taxpayer-subsidized insurance unless they act quickly to resolve questions about their citizenship or immigration status. The government warned on Tuesday that they have just over three weeks to show that they're eligible.

87. Pressure Builds to Grant More Tax Breaks -

The head of the Economic Development Growth Engine organization says there is another side to the controversy over granting property tax abatements through payments-in-lieu-of-taxes that isn’t heard in the current civic discussion about the incentives.

88. Springing to Life -

When Ridgeland, Miss.-based development firm the Bryan Co. broke ground on The Horizon condominium tower in 2007, it was at the peak of the housing bubble and optimism from elected officials and Downtown boosters was equally high.

89. Sales Tax Hike Clears First Hurdle -

After lingering for several weeks as the politically charged environment at City Hall has subsided some, the idea of a city sales tax hike to restore funding for health insurance cuts to city employees and retirees is moving. But it may not get very far.

90. Graceland Campus Financing Relies on Tight Boundaries -

When Elvis Presley Enterprises breaks ground next week on the $75 million, 450-room hotel-resort it will build north of Graceland mansion, it will be the beginning of crossing something off the company’s wish list since Elvis Presley’s mansion opened for tours in the early 1980s.

91. Council Approves Graceland Plan, Moves on Sales Tax Hike Referendum -

Memphis City Council members approved Tuesday, Aug. 5, a tourism development zone application for the 120-acre Graceland campus and the master plan the zone would finance that includes a 450-room resort hotel and an archive exhibition space.

92. Poll: Obama Health Law is a Tale of 2 Americas -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama's health care law has become a tale of two Americas.

States that fully embraced the law's coverage expansion are experiencing a significant drop in the number of uninsured residents, according to a major new survey released Tuesday. States whose leaders still object to "Obamacare" are seeing much less change.

93. Health Care Safety Net Tops Council Agenda -

Memphis City Council members get more information during the Tuesday, Aug. 5, council day on different parts of City Hall’s ongoing health benefits and pension liability discussions.

But the only item on the agenda for a vote Tuesday is a resolution to create a $2 million “safety net” that was delayed last month.

94. Homebuilders Launch Insurance Program -

The West Tennessee Home Builders Association has joined forces with other homebuilder associations in Tennessee and contracted with national employee benefit consulting firm gbac inc. and Memphis-based Shoemaker Financial to launch the Tennessee Construction Industry Health Insurance Program.

95. Probe Exposes Flaws Behind HealthCare.gov Rollout -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Management failures by the Obama administration set the stage for the computer woes that paralyzed the president's new health care program last fall, nonpartisan investigators said in testimony released Wednesday.

96. City Hall Saga Charts New Directions -

After a bit of a breather, all sides in City Hall’s simmering political dispute over health insurance changes for city employees and retirees sat down at the same table Tuesday, July 29, and offered a few new directions.

97. City Union Floats Alternative Health Care Plan as City Outlines Trust Fund -

Memphis City Council members will at least discuss an alternative health insurance plan next month.

The high deductible plan, which restores many of the coverage cuts approved in June by the council, is the proposal of the Memphis Fire Fighters Association.

98. Frayser Town Center Would be Based on Manhattan Park -

The town center plan for Frayser that debuted this past weekend at the first annual “Frayser Day” celebration is built on the model of Bryant Park in Manhattan only on a smaller scale to fit the Frayser Plaza Shopping Center.

99. Homebuilders Launch Insurance Program -

The West Tennessee Home Builders Association has joined forces with other homebuilder associations in Tennessee and contracted with national employee benefit consulting firm gbac inc. and Memphis-based Shoemaker Financial to launch the Tennessee Construction Industry Health Insurance Program.

100. Kelsey Calls for Tennessee to Join Obamacare Suit -

State Sen. Brian Kelsey of Germantown called Tuesday, July 22, for Tennessee Attorney General Robert Cooper to join a lawsuit over federal subsidies in the form of tax breaks for those who buy health insurance on an exchange established in the Affordable Care Act.