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Editorial Results (free)

1. 3 Ways Insurers Can Discourage Sick From Enrolling -

Insurers can no longer reject customers with expensive medical conditions thanks to the health care overhaul. But consumer advocates warn that companies are still using wiggle room to discourage the sickest – and costliest – patients from enrolling.

2. Beset by Money Woes, Crittenden Hospital to Close -

WEST MEMPHIS, Ark. (AP) – The Crittenden Regional Hospital in West Memphis stopped admitting patients Monday and will shut down permanently on Sept. 7, despite the recent passage of a sales tax increase intended to help the financially struggling facility.

3. City Union Presents Alternative Plan on Benefits -

Memphis Fire Fighters Association president Thomas Malone takes the union’s plan for reversing city employee and retiree health insurance coverage cutbacks to a city oversight committee Thursday, Aug. 21, on employee issues.

4. Fullilove Calls Off Sales Tax Hike Try, Unions May Try -

Memphis City Council member Janis Fullilove pulled the plug Tuesday, Aug. 19, on a proposed November referendum on a citywide half cent sales tax hike.

5. US Won't Reveal Records on Health Website Security -

WASHINGTON (AP) – After promising not to withhold government information over "speculative or abstract fears," the Obama administration has concluded it will not publicly disclose federal records that could shed light on the security of the government's health care website because doing so could "potentially" allow hackers to break in.

6. Council Reviews Pension Investment Changes -

For the first time in months, Memphis City Council members have no committee discussions scheduled Tuesday, Aug. 19, on city health insurance benefits or proposed pension plan changes.

But the council will vote on the first in a series of pension plan changes to come.

7. PILOT Critics Push for Fuller Accounting -

One of the most vocal critics of payment-in-lieu-of-taxes economic development incentives – or PILOTs – says he intends to make them an issue in the 2015 Memphis elections.

Rev. Kenneth Whalum Jr. said his problem with the property tax abatements is the lack of disclosure about their details and how companies getting them have met the goals of creating jobs for Memphians.

8. Consumers Driving Health Care Innovation -

Everyone in the U.S complains about health care – the rising costs of insurance premiums and co-pays, the lack of innovation, the poor experience at doctor’s offices and hospitals, and price of medications.

9. City Debuts Health Benefits Website -

The city of Memphis debuted a new website this week that explains changes in health care insurance and coverage for city employees and retirees.

The debut of benefitsmemphis.com comes ahead of the Oct. 1 effective date for premium increases city employees will begin paying.

10. City Debuts Health Benefits Website -

The city of Memphis debuted a new website this week that explains changes in health care insurance and coverage for city employees and retirees.

The debut of benefitsmemphis.com comes ahead of the Oct. 1 effective date for premium increases city employees will begin paying.

11. Deadline to Clear Up Health Law Eligibility Near -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Hundreds of thousands of people who signed up under the new health care law risk losing their taxpayer-subsidized insurance unless they act quickly to resolve questions about their citizenship or immigration status. The government warned on Tuesday that they have just over three weeks to show that they're eligible.

12. Pressure Builds to Grant More Tax Breaks -

The head of the Economic Development Growth Engine organization says there is another side to the controversy over granting property tax abatements through payments-in-lieu-of-taxes that isn’t heard in the current civic discussion about the incentives.

13. Springing to Life -

When Ridgeland, Miss.-based development firm the Bryan Co. broke ground on The Horizon condominium tower in 2007, it was at the peak of the housing bubble and optimism from elected officials and Downtown boosters was equally high.

14. Sales Tax Hike Clears First Hurdle -

After lingering for several weeks as the politically charged environment at City Hall has subsided some, the idea of a city sales tax hike to restore funding for health insurance cuts to city employees and retirees is moving. But it may not get very far.

15. Graceland Campus Financing Relies on Tight Boundaries -

When Elvis Presley Enterprises breaks ground next week on the $75 million, 450-room hotel-resort it will build north of Graceland mansion, it will be the beginning of crossing something off the company’s wish list since Elvis Presley’s mansion opened for tours in the early 1980s.

16. Council Approves Graceland Plan, Moves on Sales Tax Hike Referendum -

Memphis City Council members approved Tuesday, Aug. 5, a tourism development zone application for the 120-acre Graceland campus and the master plan the zone would finance that includes a 450-room resort hotel and an archive exhibition space.

17. Poll: Obama Health Law is a Tale of 2 Americas -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama's health care law has become a tale of two Americas.

States that fully embraced the law's coverage expansion are experiencing a significant drop in the number of uninsured residents, according to a major new survey released Tuesday. States whose leaders still object to "Obamacare" are seeing much less change.

18. Health Care Safety Net Tops Council Agenda -

Memphis City Council members get more information during the Tuesday, Aug. 5, council day on different parts of City Hall’s ongoing health benefits and pension liability discussions.

But the only item on the agenda for a vote Tuesday is a resolution to create a $2 million “safety net” that was delayed last month.

19. Homebuilders Launch Insurance Program -

The West Tennessee Home Builders Association has joined forces with other homebuilder associations in Tennessee and contracted with national employee benefit consulting firm gbac inc. and Memphis-based Shoemaker Financial to launch the Tennessee Construction Industry Health Insurance Program.

20. Probe Exposes Flaws Behind HealthCare.gov Rollout -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Management failures by the Obama administration set the stage for the computer woes that paralyzed the president's new health care program last fall, nonpartisan investigators said in testimony released Wednesday.

21. City Hall Saga Charts New Directions -

After a bit of a breather, all sides in City Hall’s simmering political dispute over health insurance changes for city employees and retirees sat down at the same table Tuesday, July 29, and offered a few new directions.

22. City Union Floats Alternative Health Care Plan as City Outlines Trust Fund -

Memphis City Council members will at least discuss an alternative health insurance plan next month.

The high deductible plan, which restores many of the coverage cuts approved in June by the council, is the proposal of the Memphis Fire Fighters Association.

23. Frayser Town Center Would be Based on Manhattan Park -

The town center plan for Frayser that debuted this past weekend at the first annual “Frayser Day” celebration is built on the model of Bryant Park in Manhattan only on a smaller scale to fit the Frayser Plaza Shopping Center.

24. Homebuilders Launch Insurance Program -

The West Tennessee Home Builders Association has joined forces with other homebuilder associations in Tennessee and contracted with national employee benefit consulting firm gbac inc. and Memphis-based Shoemaker Financial to launch the Tennessee Construction Industry Health Insurance Program.

25. Kelsey Calls for Tennessee to Join Obamacare Suit -

State Sen. Brian Kelsey of Germantown called Tuesday, July 22, for Tennessee Attorney General Robert Cooper to join a lawsuit over federal subsidies in the form of tax breaks for those who buy health insurance on an exchange established in the Affordable Care Act.

26. Tennesseans to Share $10 Million in Refunds -

More than 336,000 Tennessee residents will split $10 million in refunds from health insurance companies because of a provision in the Affordable Care Act.

The Tennessean reported the refunds will average $53 per family and came about because of the medical loss ratio rule in the law. That provision requires insurers to spend at least 80 percent of insurance premiums on patient care and quality improvement efforts. The refunds are for premiums paid in 2013.

27. Varying Health Premium Subsidies Worry Consumers -

MIAMI (AP) – Linda Close was grateful to learn she qualified for a sizable subsidy to help pay for her health insurance under the new federal law. But in the process of signing up for a plan, Close said her HealthCare.gov account showed several different subsidy amounts, varying as much as $180 per month.

28. Tennesseans to Share $10 Million in Refunds -

More than 336,000 Tennessee residents will split $10 million in refunds from health insurance companies because of a provision in the Affordable Care Act.

The Tennessean reported the refunds will average $53 per family and came about because of the medical loss ratio rule in the law. That provision requires insurers to spend at least 80 percent of insurance premiums on patient care and quality improvement efforts. The refunds are for premiums paid in 2013.

29. Wharton Sticking to Budget Plan Without Tax Hike -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. knows there’s a push coming for a city sales tax hike referendum to reverse health care insurance cuts approved by the Memphis City Council in June.

He knows that because he was at the meeting with municipal union leaders Tuesday, July 23, in which those hosting the meeting, the Memphis chapter of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, said they back the union leaders’ call for the referendum. And they are expected to take that call to the council next month.

30. Health Advocacy Groups File Lawsuit Against State -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Three advocacy groups filed a class action lawsuit on Wednesday accusing the state of Tennessee of failing to provide certain services required by the federal health care law.

31. Kelsey Calls for Tennessee to Join Affordable Care Act Lawsuit -

State Sen. Brian Kelsey of Germantown called Tuesday, July 22, for Tennessee Attorney General Robert Cooper to join a lawsuit over federal subsidies in the form of tax breaks for those who buy health insurance on an exchange established in the Affordable Care Act.

32. Sales Tax Push Continues in City Debate -

The idea of a sales tax hike referendum in November to fund a restoration of cuts in city health care insurance benefits keeps rolling.

The Memphis chapter of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference came out in favor of the citywide local option sales tax hike Tuesday, July 22, after a closed luncheon attended by leaders of municipal unions and Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.

33. Dueling Rulings: Courts Split on Health Law Clash -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama's health care law is snarled in another big legal battle, with two federal appeals courts issuing contradictory rulings on a key financing issue within hours of each other Tuesday.

34. Mays Dismisses Unions' Claim Against City -

U.S. District Judge Samuel “Hardy” Mays has dismissed a 3-year-old lawsuit filed by 13 labor unions representing city employees against the city of Memphis for the 4.6 percent pay cut all city employees took that year.

35. Early Vote Expands as Campaigns Enter New Phase -

There is a unique and persistent part of the political process that gnaws at candidates, separating them from the voters they court and sometimes stalk. You might call it the day of the ballot.

In the weeks leading up to the start of early voting, they get hit up constantly by those putting out endorsement ballots to be distributed during early voting and on election day, most often by paid poll workers. Candidates must pay to be on a ballot, which those organizing the ballots say is necessary to cover printing and distribution costs.

36. Wharton Ready to Shift Talk on Benefits Debate -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. is trying to turn the page on the emotional City Hall debate over cuts in health insurance benefits to city employees and retirees and also close the book on the city budget for the two-week old fiscal year.

37. Editorial: City Falters in Benefits Changes Approach -

There was a better way for the city of Memphis to make needed changes to health insurance benefits for city employees and retirees.

A lot more leadership from the mayor is at the top of the list of “should haves” we have in how this has been handled to date with pension changes still to come in October.

38. Wharton Clarifies He Won't Propose Sales Tax Ballot Question -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. clarified Thursday, July 17, that he has no intention of proposing a ballot question later this year asking city voters to approve a half cent increase in the city’s local option sales tax.

39. Largest US Insurer's Move Signals Industry Shift -

The nation's largest health insurer expects to play a much bigger role in the health care overhaul next year, as the federal law shifts from raising giant questions for the sector to offering growth opportunities.

40. Number of 'Sick' Memphis Officers Dropping -

MEMPHIS (AP) – The number of Memphis police officers who are calling in sick with the so-called "Blue Flu" is dropping.

Memphis Police Department spokeswoman Karen Rudolph said 178 officers were out sick Wednesday, down from a high of 557 reached last week.

41. Council Moves to Bridge Gaps in Health Coverage Changes -

The ad hoc committee that gathered municipal union leaders, city retirees and Memphis City Council members at the same table to talk about city health insurance meets Thursday, July 17, for the first time since the council approved health insurance plan changes that have drawn vocal protests from city employees and retirees.

42. Council Hears Alternatives to Health Insurance Cuts -

Memphis City Council members fielded several plans Tuesday, July 15, for alternatives to health insurance cuts approved by the council last month. But leaders of the police and fire unions were not among those making an alternative proposal at the committee session, the first in a series of what amount to public hearings.

43. States Told to Find Way to Clear Medicaid Backlog -

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) – A half-dozen states with backlogs for Medicaid enrollees were facing a federal deadline Monday to create plans for getting those low-income residents enrolled in health coverage.

44. Sick Calls Drop, But Benefits Debate Still Volatile -

The Memphis Police Department returned to normal operations Sunday, July 13, for the first time in more than a week with fewer than 350 officers calling in sick.

And the number of sick calls among Memphis firefighters dropped to 60 Sunday, the lowest total for the department since sick calls among firefighters spiked Wednesday, July 9.

45. City Council Turns Again to Benefits Discussions -

Memphis City Council members won’t take any major votes Tuesday, July 15, on city employee benefits.

But the controversial topic will likely dominate much of another council day at City Hall. The council is in the gap between its approval of health insurance changes in June and an October vote on the companion proposal to change city employee pension plans for new hires and those with less than 10 years of service.

46. Wharton Courts Alternatives in Benefits Dispute -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. says any alternatives are welcome to the coming health insurance changes for city employees and retirees.

But delaying the roll out of those changes in January is not an option. And neither is reopening the city budget or the city property tax rate.

47. Budget Reality Informs Response to Sick-Outs -

For about a year, Memphis Fire Department Director Alvin Benson has been taking ladder trucks out of service to deal with firefighters on vacation and on sick leave at much lower levels than those that surfaced Wednesday.

48. Benson Says Fire Absences Cause Concern But Not Alarm -

Memphis Fire Director Alvin Benson admits the 65 firefighters out sick Wednesday, July 9, is “the highest number we’ve had off sick in one day for some time." However, he declined to call it a job action.

49. Chamber Head: Hard Choices on City Benefits Necessary -

The president and CEO of the Greater Memphis Chamber says efforts by municipal union leaders to boycott business members of the chamber and get those businesses to drop their chamber membership is having only a minimal effect.

50. Wharton Says City Won’t ‘Split Hairs’ on Blue Flu -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. said Tuesday, July 8, the city will “approach it accordingly” when it comes to the more than 550 Memphis Police officers who have called in sick in the last week.

51. Cushman & Wakefield Adds Yates to Capital Markets Team -

Alex Yates has joined the Cushman & Wakefield/Commercial Advisors Capital Markets team as vice president, assisting and executing investment sales, debt/equity placement and development advisory projects. Yates’ efforts will be heavily concentrated in multifamily and retail, but he will focus on other product types as well.

52. Blue Flu Tops 550 Cops Out -

As Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong has watched the number of police officers on sick leave grow and top 550, so has much of the city.

Armstrong and the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. have gone public in not just talking about the impact but putting numbers to it.

53. Armstrong Cancels Regular Days Off as Blue Flu Spreads -

As the work week after the Fourth of July holiday began, the number of Memphis Police officers taking sick leave grew from 308 Sunday evening to 522 by the end of the work day Monday, July 7 in a widening job action by cops unhappy with the city’s cut in health insurance benefits.

54. In Rare Move, Police Confirm ‘Blue Flu’ -

In the storied history of labor relations between City Hall and the rank and file of the Memphis Police Department, there is a standing rule about work slowdowns, sometimes referred to as “blue flu.”

55. Armstrong Confirms Blue Flu, Wharton Seeks Alternatives -

More than 400 Memphis police officers called in sick during the Fourth of July holiday week in what Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong acknowledged Sunday, July 6, is most likely an organized work slowdown by officers upset over cuts in health insurance benefits.

56. Armstrong Tallies 181 Cops Out Sick for Fourth -

Memphis police brass count 181 police officers who have called in sick during the Fourth of July holiday week, according to a Saturday, July 5, statement from Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong.

57. Corporations are People? It's a Real Legal Concept -

WASHINGTON (AP) – There may be more to that "we the people" notion than you thought.

These are boom times for the concept of "corporate personhood."

Corporations are people?

58. Pharmacy Sales Boost Major Drugstores in June -

A jump in pharmacy revenue fueled June sales growth for two of the nation's largest drugstore chains, and they may start adding gains from the health care overhaul later this year.

Walgreen Co. and Rite Aid Corp. said Thursday that pharmacy revenue from their established stores climbed more than 11 percent at Walgreen and 5 percent at Rite Aid last month. Walgreen runs the nation's largest drugstore chain with 8,215 stores, while Rite Aid ranks third with 4,754. The company in the middle, CVS Caremark Corp., doesn't report monthly results.

59. Different Pension Path Possible in Council Delay -

Memphis City Council members are looking at hybrid pension plans for city employees that could have separate terms for police officers and firefighters and enroll all other city employees in the Social Security plan.

60. Council Delays Action on Pension Plan Changes To October -

Memphis City Council members voted Tuesday, July 1, to delay final votes on a set of ordinances to change the city’s pension for new hires and employees on the job for less than 10 years.

The council had planned to vote on the pension changes at its July 15 meeting. But the council moved to delay it further after a council day briefing of several hours from Segal Consulting of Atlanta, the consulting firm hired by the council specifically to advise it on pension plan changes proposed by Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.

61. Report: Health Law Sign-Ups Dogged by Data Flaws -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Many of the 8 million Americans signed up under the new health care law now have to clear up questions about their personal information that could affect their coverage.

62. Cohen Touts Labor Union Endorsements -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen, D-Memphis, rolled out endorsements Monday, June 30, from much of the leadership of local labor unions in his re-election campaign.

63. Supreme Court: Religious Rights Trump Birth Control Rule -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A sharply divided Supreme Court ruled Monday that some companies with religious objections can avoid the contraceptives requirement in President Barack Obama's health care overhaul, the first time the high court has declared that businesses can hold religious views under federal law.

64. Gastro One Forms New Practice -

Gastro One and Memphis Gastroenterology Group have merged, creating the largest gastroenterology practice in the Memphis Metro area.

The merged practice, which will operate under the Gastro One brand name, features 35 doctors covering the spectrum of gastroenterology – the study, treatment and health of the digestive system (esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine/colon, liver, pancreas and gallbladder). Each gastroenterologist is a medical specialist trained in internal medicine and in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases involving the digestive system.

65. Council Moves Toward Pension Changes -

Two weeks after approving changes in health insurance plans for city employees and retirees, the Memphis City Council meets Tuesday, July 1, to talk over a companion set of changes to the city’s pension plan for employees.

66. Economy Shrank at Steep 2.9 Percent Rate in First Quarter -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy shrank at a steep annual rate of 2.9 percent in the January-March quarter as a harsh winter contributed to the biggest contraction since the depths of the recession five years ago. But the setback is widely thought to be temporary, with growth rebounding solidly since spring.

67. Southern College of Optometry Opens TearWell Dry Eye Center -

If you don’t have it, it doesn’t sound like that big of a deal. Dry eye? So what?

“Dry eye sounds really benign,” said Dr. Whitney Hauser, clinical director at the Southern College of Optometry’s new TearWell: Advanced Dry Eye Treatment Center.

68. Benefits Debate Goes Larger Than City Hall -

When several hundred firefighters, police officers and other city employees and retirees formed a picket line around City Hall Tuesday, June 24, it signaled the beginning of an escalating political dispute bigger than the City Council’s decision a week earlier to cut health insurance benefits for employees and retirees.

69. Why a Grim US Economic Picture is Brightening -

WASHINGTON (AP) – When the government updates its estimate Wednesday of how the U.S. economy fared last quarter, the number is pretty sure to be ugly. Horrible even.

The economy likely shrank at an annual rate of nearly 2 percent in the January-March quarter, economists estimate. That would be its bleakest performance since early 2009 in the depths of the Great Recession.

70. Fire, Police Union Brass Say Lawsuit is Coming -

The leaders of the Memphis police and fire unions say they will sue the city over changes in employee health insurance approved this month and are prepared to add pension changes to the litigation if the council approves those changes next month.

71. New Health Chief Moves to Put Stamp on Overhaul -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Aiming to avoid more insurance chaos this fall, the nation's new health care chief announced Friday she's revamping the management of President Barack Obama's health overhaul.

72. Poll: Many Still Struggle to Pay Health Premiums -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Most people who signed up under President Barack Obama's health care law rate their new insurance highly, but a substantial number are struggling with the cost, according to a poll released Thursday.

73. Battle Lines -

The city’s operating and capital budgets are just about set for the new fiscal year next month. Hard decisions made about health insurance for city employees and retirees Tuesday, June 17, are unlikely to be revisited by the Memphis City Council.

74. Long Council Day Comes With Change, Emotions -

It was apparent early in the long council day Tuesday, June 17, at City Hall that there wouldn’t be many amendments to the $600 million operating budget and $84 million capital budget the council would approve later that evening.

75. Council Approves Budgets, Stable Tax Rate, Health Insurance Changes -

Memphis City Council members approved a $600 million operating budget and an $84 million capital budget Tuesday, June 17, for the city government fiscal year that begins July 1.

And the council gave final approval to larger changes to employee and retiree health insurance plans designed to make long term changes necessary to right the city’s financial condition.

76. $1,000-a-Pill Sovaldi Jolts US Health Care System -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Your money or your life?

Sovaldi, a new pill for hepatitis C, cures the liver-wasting disease in 9 of 10 patients, but treatment can cost more than $90,000.

Leading medical societies recommend the drug as a first-line treatment, and patients are clamoring for it. But insurance companies and state Medicaid programs are gagging on the price. In Oregon, officials propose to limit how many low-income patients can get Sovaldi.

77. Council to Vote on Insurance Changes, Budget -

Most of council day at City Hall Tuesday, June 17, will be devoted to closing out most, but not all, of the city’s budget season.

The Memphis City Council should make final decisions Tuesday on a stable city property tax rate and approve operating and capital budgets for the fiscal year that begins July 1.

78. Insurers Propose Changes To Obama Health Law -

Insurers want to change President Barack Obama’s health care law to provide financial assistance for people buying bare-bones coverage. That would entice the healthy and the young, the industry says, holding down premiums.

79. Insurers Propose Changes to Obama Health Law -

Insurers want to change President Barack Obama’s health care law to provide financial assistance for people buying bare-bones coverage. That would entice the healthy and the young, the industry says, holding down premiums.

80. Council Weighs Timeline for Key Votes -

The Memphis City Council’s vote later this month on health insurance changes for city employees and retirees is critical in terms of increasing the city’s annual required contribution toward its unfunded pension liability.

81. Council to Review Actuary Numbers Tuesday -

Memphis City Council members meet in committee Tuesday, June 10, at 5 p.m. to go over the latest numbers from the actuary consulting firm they hired to review city finances.

Segal Consulting of Atlanta’s preliminary estimate of the city’s unfunded pension liability was $457 million, well below the $700 million preliminary estimate from Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s administration.

82. Now Application 'Inconsistencies' Vex Health Law -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A huge new paperwork headache for the government could also be jeopardizing coverage for some of the millions of people who just got health insurance under President Barack Obama's law.

83. Council Takes First Steps on Pension, Insurance -

The first votes by the Memphis City Council this week on righting the city’s financial affairs were tentative steps, making it hard to predict whether there will be seven votes to pass dramatic changes in city pensions and health care insurance.

84. Council Begins Decisions on City Financial Changes -

Memphis City Council members took the first steps Tuesday, June 3, toward major changes in pension benefits for city employees and began delving into the details of even broader changes in health insurance coverage for city employees and retirees.

85. Redmont Joins HORNE as Tax Consulting Manager -

Richard Redmont has joined HORNE LLP as a tax consulting manager. Redmont, a certified public accountant, has more than 25 years of tax and consulting experience with international firms in the accounting and insurance industries, and has served clients in the manufacturing, retail, distribution, health care and financial services industries. He also served on a national Sarbanes-Oxley team for an international firm.

86. U.S. Senate Primaries Feature Different Realities -

The statewide primary races for U.S. Senate on the August ballot feature the longest and best-known political back story in Tennessee politics and competing realities about what it takes for Democrats to end their shutout in statewide offices.

87. Council to Discuss Retirement Plan Changes -

Memphis City Council members begin moving Tuesday, June 3, toward the first of three votes on a quartet of ordinances that would fundamentally change health care and pension benefits for city employees.

88. US Bank Earnings Decline 7.7 Percent in First Quarter -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. banks' earnings declined 7.7 percent in the January-March quarter from a year earlier, as higher interest rates dampened demand for mortgage refinancing and reduced banks' revenue from the mortgage business.

89. New Rosenfelt Novel Delivers -

David Rosenfelt has done it again! Kept me in my chair for two whole hours, that is. Once I got to page 100 of “Without Warning,” I had to just go ahead and finish it. You know, to see how it would end.

90. Study: Political TV Ads on Health Law Total $445 Million -

CHICAGO (AP) – A new analysis finds the nation's health care overhaul deserves a place in advertising history as the focus of extraordinarily high spending on negative political TV ads that have gone largely unanswered by the law's supporters.

91. Hospitals Reach Out to Attract Affluent Immigrants -

HOUSTON (AP) – The menu includes pork or chicken dumplings, fried rice or chicken congee soup with jasmine rice and ginger. It's an enviable repast that diners take in bed – hospital beds.

92. Editorial: Wellness Programs Can Play Key Role in City -

Corporate wellness plans have come a long way in the last 20 years.

So has the idea of fitness and exercise in a city whose population is part of a region consistently near the top of national rankings for some significant health problems.

93. Culture of Health -

Twenty-five years ago, Carol Harshman was an aerobics instructor working for a Springfield, Mo., health club.

As someone with a job that allowed her to live out a lifestyle of health and wellness at work, she was in the minority.

94. New Health Cost Controls Get Go-Ahead From Feds -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Obama administration has given the go-ahead for insurers and employers to use a new cost-control strategy that puts a hard dollar limit on what health plans pay for some expensive procedures, such as knee and hip replacements.

95. Consumers Losing Doctors With New Insurance Plans -

MIAMI (AP) – Some consumers who bought insurance under President Barack Obama's health care law are experiencing buyer's remorse after realizing that their longtime doctors aren't accepting the new plans.

96. US on Track for Narrowest Budget Gap Since 2008 -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. government ran a big surplus in April, thanks to a flood of tax payments that helped keep the budget on track for the lowest annual deficit in six years.

The Treasury Department said Monday that April's surplus totaled $106.9 billion, down slightly from last April's $112.9 billion surplus. The government typically runs a surplus during April, when individual tax returns are due and corporations make quarterly tax payments.

97. Parenting Pilot Project Aims To Break Cycle -

The statistics from the original Adverse Childhood Experiences Study are overwhelming, even sobering.

But most important for leaders in Memphis committed to trying to break a destructive cycle, those same statistics provided the evidence for Greater Memphis to serve as the future site of two pilot “parenting places” that will offer pre-emptive and professional support to parents and caregivers.

98. Health Insurers Just Say No to Marijuana Coverage -

Patients who use medical marijuana for pain and other chronic symptoms can take an unwanted hit: Insurers don't cover the treatment, which costs as much as $1,000 a month.

Once the drug of choice for hippies and rebellious teens, marijuana in recent years has gained more mainstream acceptance for its ability to boost appetite, dull pain and reduce seizures in everyone from epilepsy to cancer patients.

99. Health Insurers: Payment Rates Above 80 Percent -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Top health insurance companies told members of Congress Wednesday that more than 80 percent of people who've signed up under the president's new health care law have gone on to pay their premiums – a necessary step for the enrollment figures touted by the Obama administration to hold up.

100. Health Care Law-Holocaust Comparison Criticized -

NASHVILLE (AP) – A state Senator's blog post likening the insurance requirement under President Barack Obama's health care law to the forced deportation of Jews during the Holocaust drew swift condemnation Monday from leaders of both parties in Tennessee.