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Editorial Results (free)

1. Craft Beer Boom -

Looking to replace that regular beer with something more exotic? Get hoppy and explore Knoxville’s craft-beer scene, because by bottle and tap, growler and flight, the national beer movement has come to East Tennessee in a very substantial way.

2. Big Legal Need Among Low-Income Tennesseans -

A new study found more than 60 percent of low-income Tennesseans face a significant civil legal need.

According to a news release from the Tennessee Supreme Court, respondents cited conflicts with creditors and landlords, problems obtaining or paying for health care, and difficulties with government benefits.

3. Walk in the Park -

They hike the trails, ride their bikes on the Greenline, maybe even go horseback riding or play disc golf.

“We see that age group out here all day long,” said Coral O’Connor, program assistant at Shelby Farms Park.

4. Events -

Chickasaw Council of the Boy Scouts of America will honor Barbara and J.R. “Pitt” Hyde with a Distinguished Citizens Award at a ceremony Monday, Nov. 24, with a reception at 6 p.m. and dinner at 7 p.m. Visit chickasaw.org/distinguishedcitizensawarddinner for tickets and more information.

5. I Choose Memphis: Philipp von Holtzendorff-Fehling -

“I Choose Memphis” spotlights Memphians who are passionate about calling this community home. New Memphis Institute provides the profiles.

Name: Philipp von Holtzendorff-Fehling

6. Wharton Defends Record, ‘Tough’ Decisions -

When he ran for Memphis mayor in the 2009 special election, A C Wharton Jr. said he was running to win, but also to change the nature of the city’s politics.

“This is what hurts us in politics today,” Wharton said five years later during the first fundraiser Monday, Nov. 17, in his campaign for re-election to a second full four-year term as mayor. “Everybody wants to stand up and say how is this going to go over. And if it doesn’t look like it’s going to go over well, they back down.”

7. Wharton Begins Re-Election Fundraising -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. told a group of supporters Monday, Nov. 17, at his first re-election fundraiser that he is running to win and in the race for a second full term to stay.

Wharton estimated he drew a group of 300 supporters to the fundraiser at the Memphis Botanic Gardens with some leaving early to attend a Grizzlies basketball game Downtown.

8. US Pension Insurer Ran Record $62 Billion Deficit in 2014 -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The federal agency that insures pensions for about 41 million Americans saw its deficit nearly double in the latest fiscal year. The agency said the worsening finances of some multi-employer pension plans mainly caused the increased deficit.

9. TVA ‘Robo Houses’ a Success, On the Market -

For the past five years, several residents of the Campbell Creek subdivision have had the quietest neighbors they could have ever wanted. Now they’re going to have to adjust to having people instead.

10. Survey: US Businesses Add 230,000 Jobs in October -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. companies added 230,000 jobs in October, a private survey said, the most in four months and a sign that businesses are still willing to hire despite signs of slowing growth overseas.

11. For-Profit Programs Face 'Gainful Employment' Rule -

WASHINGTON (AP) – For-profit colleges with graduates unable to pay back their student loans could soon face scrutiny by the federal government.

Schools with career-oriented programs that fail to comply with the new rule announced Thursday by the Obama administration stand to lose access to federal student-aid programs.

12. HealthCare.gov's EZ Form Not for Legal Immigrants -

WASHINGTON (AP) — HealthCare.gov's simpler online application is being touted as a big win for consumers. But it can't be used by legal immigrants and naturalized U.S. citizens, who represent millions of potential new health insurance customers.

13. Pension Reform Decision Back At Square One -

It happened in the shadow of a change in the pension reform proposal Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. had backed all through the summer and two of three council votes.

As the Memphis City Council got its first formal presentation Tuesday, Oct. 21, of Wharton’s new hybrid pension plan, it settled City Hall’s tumultuous discussion about changes to health insurance coverage for city employees and retirees.

14. County Charts Quieter Course On Insurance -

With less than two weeks to the open enrollment period for county employees, Shelby County Commissioners take a look at changes to county employee health care benefits Wednesday, Oct. 22, in committee sessions.

15. Obama Announces Plan to Tighten Card Security -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Saying more must be done to stop data breaches affecting consumers, President Barack Obama announced on Friday a government plan to tighten security for the debit cards that transmit federal benefits like Social Security to millions of Americans.

16. City Hall Opens Enrollment on Changing Health Plan -

City of Memphis employees just emerged from the open enrollment period for the still-evolving changes in health insurance benefits for 2015. And city retirees are about to enter their open enrollment period for the same benefits plans that take effect in January.

17. Regions Insurance Expands in Memphis -

The recent expansion of the employee benefits practice of Regions Insurance in Memphis involved the addition of Stuart Zalowitz and Jonathan Frisch, owners of Zalowitz Frisch Benefits Group, along with a team of associates.

18. Ailing Global Economy Could Lead Fed to Delay Hike -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Just as the U.S. job market has finally strengthened, the Federal Reserve now confronts a new worry: A sputtering global economy that's spooked investors across the world.

19. Service Without a Smile: Why Airlines Aren't Nice -

NEW YORK (AP) – Passengers cherish Virgin America for its mood lighting, live TV, fancy cocktails and friendly flight attendants. That nice-guy approach to air travel wins awards and attracts a cult following, but may not fly with Wall Street.

20. Council Delays Pension Action, Broods Over 'Key Members' Designation -

Memphis City Council members debated who is a “key member” of the body Tuesday, Oct. 7, as they delayed action on changes to city employee pensions into November.

The delay on third and final reading of several pension ordinances was expected. The items are now on the Oct. 21 council agenda. But council members expect there will not be a vote then either and city Chief Administrative Officer George Little said the administration can live with a further delay.

21. Four Memphis Companies Join The TENN -

Launch Tennessee has picked this year’s crop of 10 companies that will participate in The TENN, its master accelerator program for graduates of Tennessee’s nine startup accelerators.

And, like last year, Memphis companies again represent almost half of the statewide batch of companies taking part in the program.

22. City Council Weighs Fluid Benefits Decisions -

Memphis City Council members have third and final votes scheduled Tuesday, Oct. 7, on a set of changes to the city’s pension benefits that are the second of two major sets of reforms in benefits for city employees and retirees.

23. Wharton Makes More Health Care Changes -

The working wives and husbands of city of Memphis employees will remain on the city’s health insurance plan through 2015 as long as they pay an increased monthly surcharge of $100, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. announced Friday, Oct. 3, in the latest changes to the city’s health insurance plan.

24. Wellness Clinic Part of City’s Insurance Changes -

A new “wellness clinic” for city of Memphis employees and retirees opens Wednesday, Oct. 1, in Midtown and takes its place in City Hall’s summer to fall political tempest over changes in health insurance coverage approved by the Memphis City Council in June.

25. Real Estate Experts Look at Impact of North Mississippi -

Six years after the real estate bubble burst nationally, the recovery of the commercial and residential sectors in Memphis is slower than in other parts of the country. But they are recovering on their own new terms, say the incoming president of the Memphis Area Association of Realtors, the president of the West Tennessee Home Builders Association and a mortgage lender.

26. New Seat, Same Drive -

Dawn Distler was a bus driver for 10 years, but these days she does her work from the passenger seat.

Knoxville’s new director of transit, on the job since June 1, rides the Knoxville Area Transit buses often, making the most of her commute, traveling to work-related events or taking her staff on a friendly fact-finding mission.

27. Council Bogs Down in Health Insurance Numbers -

When Memphis City Council members meet Tuesday, Sept. 16, they will still be considering alternatives to the health care insurance plan changes they approved in June.

And they probably still will be trying to make sense of a mind-numbing array of conflicting numbers.

28. FedEx Ground Planning Memphis Hub Expansion -

FedEx Ground is planning a $3.3 million expansion and upgrade of its South Memphis facility, according to a news report.

This week, FedEx Ground pulled a building permit for its hub at 555 Compress Drive, according to The Commercial Appeal. The permit calls for a 10,000-square-foot expansion of its city van haul facility and a 2,343-square-foot office expansion, according to the report.

29. Big Love Bus a Big Hit With Titans, Vols Fans -

If you want the ride to a Titans or Tennessee Vols game to be as fun as the football game itself, the Big Love Bus could be your ticket – and a safe one at that.

Launched in May and July by Jessica Jackson and Renee Sprouse, the Big Love Bus incorporates psychedelic painting on the outside of three former school buses with renovated interiors designed to make a trip to any event an experience.

30. Council Aims at Moving Insurance Targets -

At just about every turn of the debate at City Hall about changes in health insurance coverage, Memphis City Council members have seen crucial numbers shift about the impact of the changes and the city’s liability.

31. Council To Review Conflicting Health Insurance Numbers -

City government’s open enrollment period for health insurance begins in October and new details of health insurance benefit cuts approved in June go in the mail later this month. Yet Memphis City Council members meet in a special committee session next week to again review conflicting numbers from actuaries on the coverage.

32. FedEx Ground Planning Memphis Hub Expansion -

FedEx Ground is planning a $3.3 million expansion and upgrade of its South Memphis facility, according to a news report.

This week, FedEx Ground pulled a building permit for its hub at 555 Compress Drive, according to The Commercial Appeal. The permit calls for a 10,000-square-foot expansion of its city van haul facility and a 2,343-square-foot office expansion, according to the report.

33. Client Service Remains Top Priority at The Barnett Group -

The Barnett Group, a Memphis-based employee benefits and financial services firm, didn’t get to the point where it’s provided benefits to more than 75,000 people by accident.

It’s always a reality that businesses are looking to do more with less, cut costs and look for areas where resources can be optimized. The industry space in which The Barnett Group operates is a fast-changing one, with a constant stream of new rules and regulations governing it.

34. Mortarville to Memphis -

On the walls of his office at Hickory Ridge Middle School, principal Cedric Smith has a poster of an Iraqi flag. It’s from the time his Army reserve unit was called up in 2009 and stationed on a base that soldiers nicknamed “Mortarville” for how often it was hit by enemy shells.

35. 3 Ways Insurers Can Discourage Sick From Enrolling -

Insurers can no longer reject customers with expensive medical conditions thanks to the health care overhaul. But consumer advocates warn that companies are still using wiggle room to discourage the sickest – and costliest – patients from enrolling.

36. Huckabee: 'Stop the Fight' Over Common Core -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Conservatives should "stop the fight" over Common Core and instead consider the benefits that the academic standards offer students in struggling schools, former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee said Friday. The position puts him at odds with a significant bloc of Republicans.

37. Reshaping a City, One Lot at a Time -

John G. Brittle Jr. doesn’t have an office. He has a war room. The space, crowded with maps, charts, books, piles of paper and marked-up spreadsheets, is ground zero for InfillNashville, the 10-person team of site selection specialists that Brittle leads at Village Real Estate Services.

38. Regions Insurance Grows Benefits Practice -

Regions Insurance, an affiliate of Regions Bank, has expanded its employee benefits practice in Memphis.

Joining Regions Insurance are Stuart Zalowitz and Jonathan Frisch, owners of Zalowitz Frisch Benefits Group. That addition continues Regions Insurance’s efforts to expand its coverage and capabilities throughout the Southeast.

39. American Marketing Association Memphis Chapter Preps for New Events -

The Memphis chapter of the American Marketing Association is gearing up to be a hub of new networking and educational opportunities for local marketing professionals in the city.

Along with the finalization of its Memphis charter, the organization has elected a new board of directors packed with experienced marketing leaders from the area. The chapter also plans to offer “unexpected, unique and creative” benefits to help it stand out from traditional professional organizations.

40. Regions Insurance Grows Benefits Practice -

Regions Insurance, an affiliate of Regions Bank, has expanded its employee benefits practice in Memphis.

Joining Regions Insurance are Stuart Zalowitz and Jonathan Frisch, owners of Zalowitz Frisch Benefits Group. That addition continues Regions Insurance’s efforts to expand its coverage and capabilities throughout the Southeast.

41. Health Care Safety Net Tops Council Agenda -

Memphis City Council members get more information during the Tuesday, Aug. 5, council day on different parts of City Hall’s ongoing health benefits and pension liability discussions.

But the only item on the agenda for a vote Tuesday is a resolution to create a $2 million “safety net” that was delayed last month.

42. Clean-Air Rules Assailed as Too Much, Too Little -

DENVER (AP) — Hundreds of people across the country lined up Tuesday to tell the Environmental Protection Agency that its new rules for power-plant pollution either go too far or not far enough.

43. ‘Drive for Progress’ -

There’s a duality of meaning implied in the name of the civic organization where Nancy Coffee serves as president and CEO.

44. Largest US Insurer's Move Signals Industry Shift -

The nation's largest health insurer expects to play a much bigger role in the health care overhaul next year, as the federal law shifts from raising giant questions for the sector to offering growth opportunities.

45. Council Moves to Bridge Gaps in Health Coverage Changes -

The ad hoc committee that gathered municipal union leaders, city retirees and Memphis City Council members at the same table to talk about city health insurance meets Thursday, July 17, for the first time since the council approved health insurance plan changes that have drawn vocal protests from city employees and retirees.

46. Dance Teacher Spreads Love of Dance From Cordova -

Arman Sahakyan, born in Armenia’s capital city of Yerevan, started taking dance classes as a 6-year-old.

Fast forward almost three decades, and today the 33-year-old remains committed to dance as an art form – only now he’s also spreading that enthusiasm to others as the owner of Dancing With Arman, a dance studio in Cordova.

47. ‘Significant Headwinds’ -

When Gov. Bill Haslam joined local economic development and civic officials at FedExForum in January to announce that Conduit Global would open a call center in Shelby County that would employ 1,000 people over the next three to five years, it provided a much-needed boost to the local office real estate sector.

48. Health Choice Selects Abisch to Lead Population Health Services -

Ellen Abisch has joined Health Choice LLC as senior director of population health services. In the newly created position, Abisch will be responsible for designing, implementing and managing population health and wellness programs for the Health Choice network.
Prior to joining the physician hospital organization, she served as manager of benefits and wellness for ServiceMaster.

49. FAA, Developers Clash Over Tall Buildings -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The government wants to dramatically reduce the allowable height of buildings near hundreds of airports – a proposal that is drawing fire from real estate developers and members of Congress who say it will reduce property values.

50. Court Raises Bar for Securities Class Action Cases -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court on Monday made it tougher for investors to join together to sue corporations for securities fraud, a decision that could curb the number of multimillion dollar legal settlements companies pay out each year.

51. $1,000-a-Pill Sovaldi Jolts US Health Care System -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Your money or your life?

Sovaldi, a new pill for hepatitis C, cures the liver-wasting disease in 9 of 10 patients, but treatment can cost more than $90,000.

Leading medical societies recommend the drug as a first-line treatment, and patients are clamoring for it. But insurance companies and state Medicaid programs are gagging on the price. In Oregon, officials propose to limit how many low-income patients can get Sovaldi.

52. Partners Drive Startup Ecosystem -

Building startups is tough work that requires the engagement of money, mentorship and professional support.

Back before there were incubators, accelerators and formal platforms to systematically assist startup companies, there were critical trusted advisers in the community to help guide entrepreneurs as they started up. Those advisers were local bankers, lawyers, marketers, accountants and others where entrepreneurs could turn for support and guidance. While new startup infrastructures have sprung up to provide knowledge, capital and other resources, professionals continue to be the backbone driving entrepreneurial growth.

53. Why Retailers Need Tenant Representatives -

National and regional retailers have embraced tenant representation for many years as a way to bring local market knowledge to their real estate site selection equation. The local retailer is apt to say, “I know my market well and what locations will work for me, so why do I need a tenant representative to increase my cost?”

54. Yearlong Party -

It’s perhaps fitting that the Germantown Performing Arts Center celebrates its 20th anniversary this year with Paul Chandler as its executive director, a job he’s had for almost two years now.

55. Wal-Mart Faces Big Hurdles -

The world's largest retailer faces new challenges at a time when low prices and one-stop shopping can be a few clicks away on a tablet computer or mobile phone.

Wal-Mart Stores Inc. built its reputation on everyday low prices and convenient supercenters that allow customers to do all their shopping in one place.

56. Apple's Beats Buy is Two-Sided for Music Streaming -

LOS ANGELES (AP) – Apple's $3 billion purchase of Beats sheds light on a rarely recognized reality in the streaming music industry: It's hard to succeed in the business without offering other products and services.

57. Selling Memphis -

Not too long ago, Dudley Boyd, president and CEO of National Bankers Trust, entered a conference room at the Greater Memphis Chamber’s office at the Falls Building Downtown.

58. Obama Hosts CEOs Whose Firms are Investing in US -

WASHINGTON (AP) – It's the yin and the yang of the U.S. corporate climate.

At the White House, President Barack Obama played the role of business pitchman Tuesday, saluting executives whose companies have chosen to gain or expand their footprint in the United States.

59. In Rhythm -

It started with ice cream 25 years ago, probably vanilla with chocolate sauce, because that’s his favorite. Or maybe it was pure coincidence, except that over the years Tim Lyles noticed a pattern.

60. AT&T Aims for TV's Future With $48.5 Billion DirecTV Deal -

LOS ANGELES (AP) – AT&T says it views its planned $48.5 billion purchase of DirecTV as a way to help redefine the video entertainment industry, giving it opportunities to bundle services and tap into growing Latin American markets.

61. City Council Reviews Fire Budget -

Memphis City Council members resume budget deliberations Tuesday, May 20, in committee sessions that take up half of the council day at City Hall.

Most of the time spent in the budget committee, chaired by council member Lee Harris, will be devoted to a review of the Memphis Fire Department budget proposal.

62. Culture of Health -

Twenty-five years ago, Carol Harshman was an aerobics instructor working for a Springfield, Mo., health club.

As someone with a job that allowed her to live out a lifestyle of health and wellness at work, she was in the minority.

63. Schools Merger ‘Closeout’ Underway -

The first and only year of a single public school system in Shelby County comes to an end May 23 with the last day of school.

And the legal details of the demerger are quickly taking shape.

Leaders of Shelby County’s seven public school systems met Tuesday, May 13, to discuss the closeout procedures starting June 2 that will begin the actual demerger of public education in Shelby County.

64. Untapped Beer Garden Supports Nonprofits -

The organizers and sponsors of Tennessee Brewery Untapped have announced the event’s second Beer Garden with Benefits on May 4 yielded more than $1,200 in contributions to five Memphis-area nonprofits: Knowledge Quest, Ballet Memphis, Broad Avenue Arts District, Urban Bicycle Ministry and Church Health Center.

65. Brewery Untapped Beer Garden Supports Nonprofits -

The organizers and sponsors of Tennessee Brewery Untapped have announced the event’s second Beer Garden with Benefits on May 4 yielded more than $1,200 in contributions to five Memphis-area nonprofits: Knowledge Quest, Ballet Memphis, Broad Avenue Arts District, Urban Bicycle Ministry and Church Health Center.

66. Employers Get Affordable Care Act Rundown -

In a world made more complicated for everyone by the Affordable Care Act, the title of a Wednesday morning seminar at the Crescent Club had to be attractive:

“Employee Benefits and Health Care Reform: An Opportunity in Disguise.”

67. Preventive Care Group Adds Memphis Partner -

Primary Care Group LLC-Mid-South Family Medicine in Memphis has been named an EHE-certified preventive care center by EHE International, the oldest and largest preventive medicine specialist in the country.

68. Wellness Programs Grow More Popular With Employers -

That little voice nagging you to put down the cake and lace up the running shoes is increasingly coming from your employer and is likely to grow louder with a looming change under the federal health care overhaul.

69. Preventive Care Group Adds Memphis Partner -

Primary Care Group LLC-Mid-South Family Medicine in Memphis has been named an EHE-certified preventive care center by EHE International, the oldest and largest preventive medicine specialist in the country.

70. Affordable Care Act Only Chips Away at a Core Goal -

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) – Swan Lockett had high hopes that President Barack Obama's health overhaul would lead her family to an affordable insurance plan, but that hasn't happened.

Instead, the 46-year-old mother of four from Texas uses home remedies or pays $75 to see a doctor when she has an asthma attack.

71. Year on The Bridge -

In a tiny chapel at St. Mary’s Episcopal Cathedral, a group of three people listened intently last week as traffic whizzed by an open door onto Poplar Avenue on the other side of a wrought iron fence.

72. Wharton Takes Budget to City Council -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. takes a budget proposal to the Memphis City Council Tuesday, April 15, that is supposed to be a departure for an administration that, since 2010, has come to the council with options instead of a total budget plan.

73. Savers Beware: Fees May be Shrinking Your 401(k) -

WASHINGTON (AP) – It's the silent enemy in our retirement accounts: High fees.

And now a new study finds that the typical 401(k) fees – adding up to a modest-sounding 1 percent a year – would erase $70,000 from an average worker's account over a four-decade career compared with lower-cost options. To compensate for the higher fees, someone would have to work an extra three years before retiring.

74. Experts Highlight Health Care Game-Changers -

Both before the Affordable Care Act became law and after, consumers viewed health care costs differently than they do other costs.

So said Dr. Scott Morris during a panel discussion at The Daily News Publishing Co. Inc.’s Health Care Reform seminar Thursday, April 3, at the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art.

75. Council Unhappy With Budget Plans So Far -

The administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. got a rough reception at the Tuesday, April 1, Memphis City Council session as it set the stage for Wharton’s budget proposal to come in two weeks.

76. Judge Upholds Country of Origin Label for Meat -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Shoppers who want to buy American beef for dinner instead of meat from Canada or Mexico will still be able to find the country of origin on the label.

A federal appeals court ruling Friday allows the government to go forward with rules that require labels on packaged steaks, ribs and other cuts of meat to say where the animals were born, raised and slaughtered. The meat industry attempted to block the rules, which went into effect last year, saying they are costly and provide no health benefits to the consumer.

77. Employers, Workers Navigate Compliance Rules -

As a certified health care reform specialist, Tim Finnell can stand back and from a distance say the Affordable Care Act does not really have a beginning and an end.

“There will never be final rules,” said Finnell, the president and founder of Group Benefits LLC. “Everything’s going to keep changing.”

78. Caught in the Middle -

Even before the Affordable Care Act came along, Deborah Casey was living between a logistical rock and an economic hard place. Casey, a 61-year-old widow, draws a monthly Social Security check based on her husband’s earnings. She works part-time for Shelby County (no benefits), and to continue receiving the same amount in that Social Security check, she has to keep tabs on how much she makes. This is exactly how someone who wants to provide for herself winds up on a “fixed income.”

79. Millions Could Get Extra Time for Health Sign-Ups -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Millions of Americans could get extra time to enroll for taxpayer-subsidized coverage this year under President Barack Obama's health care law. That would let the administration boost sign-ups and aid Democrats under attack over the program's troubles.

80. Seminar Explores Complicated Details of Health Care Law -

The Affordable Care Act, more commonly known as Obamacare, became law in 2010.

But the law has grown and changed so much since then that its pages number more than 25,000, and if you stack them one on top of another they are more than 10 feet high, says Tim Finnell, founder and president of Group Benefits LLC.

81. With Health Law, Workers Ponder the I-Quit Option -

CHICAGO (AP) – For uninsured people, the nation's new health care law may offer an escape from worry about unexpected, astronomical medical bills. But for Stephanie Payne of St. Louis, who already had good insurance, the law could offer another kind of escape: the chance to quit her job.

82. Marijuana Study in Veterans Wins Federal Backing -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The federal government has signed off on a long-delayed study looking at marijuana as a treatment for veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder, a development that drug researchers are hailing as a major shift in U.S. policy.

83. Health Law Cited as US Uninsured Rate Drops -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The share of Americans without health insurance is dropping to the lowest levels since President Barack Obama took office, but sign-ups under his health care law lag among Hispanics – a big pool of potential beneficiaries.

84. Kroger: Storm Response Helped Boost Sales -

NEW YORK (AP) – Kroger said its ability to keep its supermarkets open and well-stocked as customers rushed to hoard groceries ahead of winter storms helped boost its results in the fourth quarter.

85. US Applications for Jobless Aid Reach 3-Month Low -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The number of people seeking U.S. unemployment benefits dropped 26,000 last week to a seasonally adjusted 323,000, the lowest level in three months as layoffs remain at pre-recession levels.

86. 2-Year Extension Offered for Canceled Health Plans -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Warding off the specter of election-year health insurance cancellations, the Obama administration Wednesday announced a two-year extension for individual policies that don't meet requirements of the new health care law.

87. Court Weighs Securities Fraud Case Changes -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court on Wednesday seemed open to the possibility of making it harder for investors to join together to sue corporations for securities fraud – but maybe not as hard as companies that have to defend such lawsuits would like.

88. Eddleman Joins Family Safety Center -

Vernetta Eddleman has joined the Family Safety Center, Memphis and Shelby County’s center for victims of domestic violence, as director of client services.

In her new role, Eddleman will be responsible for the planning, design, development and management of client services, and will also supervise and train staff and partner agency providers in delivering quality care to victims and their families.

89. Obama Admin Drives Ahead With New Cleaner Gas Rule -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Obama administration is driving ahead with a dramatic reduction in sulfur in gasoline and tailpipe emissions, declaring that cleaner air will save thousands of lives per year at little cost to consumers.

90. Rules to Limit Marketing Unhealthy Food in Schools -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Even the scoreboards in high school gyms will have to advertise only healthy foods under new rules announced Tuesday by the Obama administration.

Promotion of sugary drinks and junk foods around campuses during the school day will be phased out under the rules, intended to ensure that such marketing is brought in line with health standards that already apply to school foods.

91. Visible Appeal -

At one point a few days ago, the performance space at Visible Music College near the front entrance to the school was booming with raucous applause and with the strains of musicians performing, cutting loose and using the stage to explore the range of their musical talents.

92. Older Americans Are Early Winners Under Health Law -

CHICAGO (AP) — For many older Americans who lost jobs during the recession, the quest for health care has been one obstacle after another. They're unwanted by employers, rejected by insurers, struggling to cover rising medical costs and praying to reach Medicare age before a health crisis.

93. Few Eligible Patients Can Get Weight Loss Surgery -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Like 78 million other Americans, MaryJane Harrison is obese.

And like many critically overweight Americans, Harrison cannot afford to have weight loss surgery because her health insurance doesn't cover it. The financial burden makes it nearly impossible for her to follow the advice of three physicians who have prescribed the stomach-shrinking procedure for Harrison, who is four-feet, 10 inches and weighs 265 pounds.

94. Start Co. Forms New Investment Partnership -

Andre Mouton, director of investment at the Singapore-based boutique investment firm Angaros Group, traveled to Memphis last year to participate in the “Investor Day” for Seed Hatchery, the startup accelerator whose programming culminates with participating startups to make funding pitches to investors.

95. Visible Music College Introduces Music Week -

This summer, Visible Music College is introducing Visible Music Week – a weeklong program for students in middle school and above that will be held at Visible’s Memphis and Chicago campuses.

96. Visible Music College Introduces Music Week -

This summer, Visible Music College is introducing Visible Music Week – a weeklong program for students in middle school and above that will be held at Visible’s Memphis and Chicago campuses.

97. Luttrell: Financial ‘Perfect Storm’ Over -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell doesn’t see the storm he saw last year at about this time.

98. Little Outlines Options for City’s Pension Liability -

Changing retirement and health care benefits for city of Memphis employees going forward is a given, said city Chief Administrative Officer George Little this week.

99. American Airlines Begins Post-Merger Changes -

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) – American Airlines and US Airways began Tuesday to let passengers earn and redeem frequent-flier miles on either airline.

So-called elite frequent fliers – those logging the most miles – began to get extra reciprocal benefits including priority boarding and free bag-checking on either airline. The airlines also gave members of their airport-lounge clubs access to each other's facilities.

100. Will Surge of Older Workers Take Jobs From Young? -

CHICAGO (AP) – It's an assertion that has been accepted as fact by droves of the unemployed: Older people remaining on the job later in life are stealing jobs from young people.

One problem, many economists say: It isn't supported by a wisp of fact.