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Editorial Results (free)

1. Both Sides Dig In for Insure Tennessee Special Session -

Battle lines have been drawn for a Feb. 2 special session of the state Legislature to determine the fate of Gov. Bill Haslam’s Insure Tennessee proposal, which would use federal funds to catch some 280,000 working people falling through a health insurance coverage gap.

2. Both Sides Dig In For Insure Tennessee Special Session -

Battle lines have been drawn for a Feb. 2 special session of the state Legislature to determine the fate of Gov. Bill Haslam’s Insure Tennessee proposal, which would use federal funds to catch some 200,000 working people falling through a health insurance coverage gap.

3. Drowning in Student Loan Debt -

Three-and-a-half years after graduating from the University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Yasameen Hoffman is still trying to land the kind of full-time job that will help her start paying off her student loan.

4. Record iPhone Sales Drive Blowout Quarter for Apple -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Apple had another blowout quarter thanks to its new plus-sized iPhones, which helped the company smash sales records for the holiday season.

Apple said Tuesday that it sold 74.5 million iPhones during the three months that ended Dec. 31, beating analysts' expectations for the latest models of Apple's most popular gadget, introduced in September.

5. Home Services Keep Seniors Independent -

Sooner or later, most people end up caring for aging mothers and fathers or become seniors themselves, wondering who to turn to when independent daily living becomes impossible.

Both propositions are frightening and stressful.

6. Trucking Industry in ‘Desperate’ Need of Drivers -

With demand on the upswing thanks to improving economic growth and lower fuel prices, a scarcity of truck drivers could put the brakes on the trucking industry and cripple a critical piece of global supply chains.

7. Taxing Question -

With gas prices in a historic plunge, the idea of hiking state and federal gas taxes and fees to pay for transportation infrastructure improvements is gaining traction.

Democratic and Republican leaders in both chambers of Congress in recent weeks have signaled a willingness to approve an increase in the federal gas tax to help fund improvements to the nation’s crumbling roads and bridges. Meanwhile, a new statewide coalition has launched to support an increase and reform in Tennessee’s transportation fees.

8. Agape Receives Grant From March of Dimes -

The March of Dimes Tennessee Chapter has awarded a grant to Agape Child & Family Services to support its Families In Transition, or FIT, ministry.

FIT serves homeless pregnant and parenting mothers and their children. The grant’s focus is on improving maternity and birth outcomes for the underserved maternal and child health needs in the Mid-South.

9. Agape Receives Grant From March of Dimes -

The March of Dimes Tennessee Chapter has awarded a grant to Agape Child & Family Services to support its Families In Transition, or FIT, ministry.

FIT serves homeless pregnant and parenting mothers and their children. The grant’s focus is on improving maternity and birth outcomes for the underserved maternal and child health needs in the Mid-South.

10. Federal Deficit in October-December Up Slightly at $176.7 Billion -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The federal deficit for the first three months of the budget year is up slightly from the same period a year ago, reflecting the absence of a special payment from mortgage company Freddie Mac that helped narrow the gap in 2014.

11. Rudd Defends Relay Partnership For Teachers -

The University of Memphis’ College of Education produced 19 teachers last year who are teaching in the 59 lowest performing schools in the Shelby County Schools system.

University of Memphis president David Rudd wants the number to be around 600 a year and he wants the school’s College of Education to partner with the nonprofit Relay Graduate School of Education to meet that goal.

12. Tennessee’s Health Problem -

For years, the concept of “wellness” or “preventive health” measures has been the “eat your vegetables” mantra of a growing national discussion on health care that has focused primarily on the cost of such care and who should pay for it or try to control it.

13. Q&A: Jake Elliott, University of Memphis Placekicker -

FAST FACTS: Elliott was the American Athletic Conference’s Special Teams Player of the Year in 2014 as a sophomore; he scored 13 points in the Miami Beach Bowl victory to give him 120 for the year, second in school history to the 138 points scored by running back DeAngelo Williams in 2004; Elliott holds the school record for longest field goal (56 yards) and kicked a 55-yard field goal to tie the score in the bowl game vs. BYU and send the game into a second overtime.

14. Tanger Outlets Confirms Southaven Involvement -

Tanger Factory Outlet Centers Inc. has confirmed what The Daily News first reported in December: It will play a key role in the development of a massive outlet mall in Southaven.

15. Shrinking Foreign Oil Bill Sends US Trade Deficit Lower -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. trade deficit fell in November to the lowest level in almost a year, thanks to the country's swiftly shrinking thirst for foreign oil.

The deficit – imports minus exports – narrowed to $39 billion during the month, down 7.7 percent from a revised October deficit of $42.2 billion, the Commerce Department reported Wednesday.

16. How Wealth Gap Complicates Sibling Relationships -

NEW YORK (AP) – When Jayson Seaver thinks about why he makes so much money while some Americans can't catch a break, he thinks of the sacrifices he's made, the jobs he worked to pay for college, the 12-hour days he spends at the office now.

17. Shelby County Homebuilding Activity Continues to Slow -

Homebuilding in Shelby County was off last year’s pace again in November, with builders pulling fewer permits and selling fewer homes than in November 2013.

Shelby County homebuilders filed 43 permits last month, down 29.5 percent from 61 permits in November 2013, according to real estate information company Chandler Reports, www.chandlerreports.com. The 43 permits filed in November is down 31.7 percent from the 63 permits filed in October.

18. Being Uninsured in America Will Cost You More -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Being uninsured in America will cost you more in 2015.

It's the first year all taxpayers have to report to the Internal Revenue Service whether they had health insurance for the previous year, as required under President Barack Obama's law. Those who were uninsured face fines, unless they qualify for one of about 30 exemptions, most of which involve financial hardships.

19. Why the US Will Power the World Economy in 2015 -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The United States is back, and ready to drive global growth in 2015.

After long struggling to claw its way out of the Great Recession, the world's biggest economy is on an extended win streak that is edging it closer to full health. But the new year doesn't look quite so bright in other major countries.

20. Wal-Mart Tests Gift Card Exchange -

NEW YORK (AP) – Starting Christmas Day, Wal-Mart began letting customers exchange gift cards from more than 200 retailers, airlines and restaurants for a Wal-Mart card. The cards don't expire and can be used in stores and online.

21. Losing Streak Ends Impressive Stretch by Grizzlies -

After the Grizzlies lost to the Chicago Bulls, their second six-game winning streak of the season coming to an end, Mike Conley made a fair point.

22. Counterpart Experiences Big 2014 -

2014 was a particularly consequential year for Counterpart Communication Design. The marketing communications firm with offices in Memphis and Dallas grew its staff by almost 40 percent this year, for example, in addition to reimagining its creative department and adding a Web analysis team to meet constantly evolving digital needs.

23. Expanding East -

Tamp & Tap, the name of the popular Downtown coffee shop and restaurant, is an allusion to both espresso – which is tamped for compression before going into the machine – and also kegs of beer, which are tapped.

24. UAW Head: Companies Can Raise Pay, Be Competitive -

DETROIT (AP) – United Auto Workers President Dennis Williams says he's not buying the Detroit Three automakers' argument against wage increases for longtime workers.

25. Social Change and Nonprofits -

Ferguson, Mo., and Staten Island, N.Y. Cleveland, Ohio. Michael Brown. Eric Garner. Tamir Rice. These cities and the deaths of these African-American males – men and boys – are in the headlines. So are people’s responses.

26. Wealth Gap Widens Between Whites and Minorities -

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) – The economic recovery has not been equal among the races, according to a Pew Research Center study released Friday.

The study found that the wealth gap between white households and minorities has widened in recent years.

27. E-Cigarette Tech Takes Off as Regulation Looms -

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) – Just a few years ago, early adopters of e-cigarettes got their fix by clumsily screwing together a small battery and a plastic cartridge containing cotton soaked with nicotine.

28. US Trade Deficit Drops to $43.4 Billion in October -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. trade deficit fell slightly in October as exports rebounded while oil imports dipped to the lowest level in five years.

The deficit edged down 0.4 percent to $43.4 billion, a drop from a revised $43.6 billion in September, the Commerce Department reported Friday.

29. Year-End Reflections – Part One -

As 2014 comes to an end, we find ourselves reflecting on our work and this column. They are both intertwined: FUNdraising Good Times is one way we help nonprofit organizations and institutions position themselves for fundraising success.

30. Thanksgiving Trumps Black Friday for Deals -

NEW YORK (AP) – Thanksgiving could be the best day to shop all year.

An analysis of sales data and store circulars by two research firms contradicts conventional wisdom that Black Friday is when shoppers can get the most and biggest sales of the year.

31. Germantown Mayor-Elect Discusses Revenue, Schools -

The incoming mayor of Germantown wants to grow the city’s sales tax base to make its government a bit less reliant on property tax revenue.

Property taxes fund about 60 percent of Germantown city services, said mayor-elect Mike Palazzolo, who takes office Dec. 16. Sales tax revenue funds another 16 percent, with the rest coming from fees and state and federal funding.

32. One Stop Grows From Changing Church Base -

In a city known for its churches and the culture of those churches, Betty Hobson has found a business model that shows just how broad and deep the influence of those churches can be.

33. Rogero Talks ‘Smart Growth,’ Democratic Politics -

Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero became the first woman to hold that office when she won the election in 2011.

She’s been actively involved in a number of local issues since her election, from urban-core revitalization and business recruitment to broader social issues such as marriage equality.

34. US Pension Insurer Ran Record $62 Billion Deficit in 2014 -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The federal agency that insures pensions for about 41 million Americans saw its deficit nearly double in the latest fiscal year. The agency said the worsening finances of some multi-employer pension plans mainly caused the increased deficit.

35. Keeping Promises -

With more than 50,000 high school seniors applying for free community college tuition and fees through Gov. Bill Haslam’s Tennessee Promise, it’s reasonable to wonder if Tennessee’s community colleges have the infrastructure – including classroom space and instructors – to handle such an influx of new students.

36. Vols Unlikely to Repeat November 2013 Collapse -

KNOXVILLE – University of Tennessee football coach Butch Jones doesn’t have to remind his team about the disappointing fade last November.

UT went 0-3 to start what has historically been its best month of football. First, the Vols lost to Missouri and Auburn. Then a 14-10 loss to Vanderbilt in Neyland Stadium knocked the Vols out of bowl eligibility.

37. The ‘Meh’ Generation -

ALL THIS IS GETTING OLD. Mitch McConnell is 117. Across the aisle, Harry Reid is 132, same age as Nancy Pelosi over in the House, and John Boehner is 98.

The last time any of them had an original idea, they had to call it in on a rotary phone. The way they get somewhere, or fail to, is as antiquated as our infrastructure, as much in danger of collapse as our bridges.

38. Harahan Boardwalk Construction Begins -

It was about four years ago that a group of Memphians flew to Omaha, Neb., to talk with Union Pacific railroad executives about building a bicycle and pedestrian boardwalk on the northern side of the Harahan Railroad Bridge across the Mississippi River.

39. Analyst Expects $89B in Online Holiday Sales -

This year more Americans than ever are expected to make their lists, check them twice, and then click the "add to cart" button.

Forrester Research said Monday that it expects U.S. consumers to spend $89 billion by Christmas. That's up 13 percent, or about $10 billion, from a year ago.

40. Council Pans City Garbage Proposal -

The administration of Mayor A C Wharton Jr. calls it SMART – Save Money And Reduce Trash. It’s a rebranding of the slow move to a pay-as-you-throw concept for city garbage and trash pickup.

41. Council Votes Down Elvis Presley Boulevard Car Lot -

The Memphis City Council voted down Tuesday, Nov. 4, the move of a used car lot on land owned by Graceland to a lot further north on Elvis Presley Boulevard near the new 450-room resort style hotel Elvis Presley Enterprises is building.

42. US Trade Deficit Expands in September -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. trade deficit rose in September as exports slumped, a sign that the world's biggest economy is starting to feel the impact of weakening global growth.

The Commerce Department said Tuesday that the trade deficit rose 7.6 percent to $43 billion in September. That marks the first increase in four months. A deficit occurs when a country imports more than it exports.

43. Analyst Expects $89 Billion in Online Holiday Sales -

This year more Americans than ever are expected to make their lists, check them twice, and then click the "add to cart" button.

Forrester Research said Monday that it expects U.S. consumers to spend $89 billion by Christmas. That's up 13 percent, or about $10 billion, from a year ago.

44. University of Memphis Weighing Minimum Wage -

The University of Memphis is considering paying a minimum wage of $10.10 an hour and stepping into a national debate over how much workers should make for their efforts.

University President M. David Rudd told employees in an email last week that he's asked the state Board of Regents to raise base pay for the school's workers up from $8.75 an hour.

45. Dobbs Makes Strong Case for Vols Starting QB Job -

KNOXVILLE – University of Tennessee football coach Butch Jones faces a big question this week about his starting quarterback for Saturday night’s game at South Carolina.

Will it be sophomore Josh Dobbs, whose impressive debut off the bench in last Saturday’s 34-20 loss to No. 4-ranked Alabama gave UT a dual-threat QB?

46. US Economy Rallies to Solid Third-Quarter Growth -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy powered its way to a respectable growth rate of 3.5 percent from July through September, outpacing most of the developed world and on track to extend the momentum through the end of the year and beyond.

47. Commission Sets Votes on Health Insurance -

Shelby County Commissioners may not hear a whole lot new in the way of answers between now and a Thursday special meeting to settle the politically volatile issue of changes to health insurance coverage for county government employees.

48. Commission Moves Health Insurance Vote to Thursday -

Shelby County Commissioners moved a critical vote on changing health insurance benefits for county employees to a special Thursday, Oct. 30, meeting in a Monday session dominated by the proposed changes.

49. University of Memphis Weighing Minimum Wage -

The University of Memphis is considering paying a minimum wage of $10.10 an hour and stepping into a national debate over how much workers should make for their efforts.

University President M. David Rudd told employees in an email last week that he's asked the state Board of Regents to raise base pay for the school's workers up from $8.75 an hour.

50. SEC Finds Dominance at Top of Associated Press Poll -

Another week, another first in the Associated Press college football poll. For the first time, one conference – yes, the SEC – has placed four teams in the top five. Mississippi State remained No. 1 after its bye week. Florida State of the ACC stayed No. 2 after defeating Notre Dame. Ole Miss held at No. 3 after beating Tennessee, Alabama moved up three spots to No. 4 after blasting Texas A&M 59-0, and Auburn moved up a spot to fifth after its bye week.

51. Yellen: Greatly Concerned By Widening Inequality -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen sounded an alarm Friday about widening economic inequality in the United States, suggesting that America's longstanding identity as a land of opportunity was at stake.

52. Exploring Possibilities -

Just a few weeks before construction is scheduled to begin on the Big River Crossing boardwalk on the Harahan Bridge, bicycle riders will gather in West Memphis for a 100-kilometer bike ride designed to showcase what’s on the other side of the bicycle and pedestrian boardwalk across the Mississippi River.

53. Ailing Global Economy Could Lead Fed to Delay Hike -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Just as the U.S. job market has finally strengthened, the Federal Reserve now confronts a new worry: A sputtering global economy that's spooked investors across the world.

54. Unequal Pay: Must Be a Lot of Good Karma Out There -

NEW YORK (AP) – Don't ask for a raise. Keeping quiet will give you "superpowers" that will translate into employer trust and other "good karma" that will eventually come back around to your purse.

55. After Florida, How Do Vols Get Excited About UTC? -

Look around the University of Tennessee’s Neyland Stadium about mid-afternoon Saturday.

No more human orange-and-white checkerboard in the stands. Some empty seats, for sure. The most diehard of UT football fans will turn out to cheer for their beloved Vols against Tennessee-Chattanooga.

56. Wealthy Giving Less to Charity; Utah Tops States -

NEW YORK (AP) – Even as the income gap widens, the wealthiest Americans are giving a smaller share of their income to charity, while poor and middle-income people are donating a larger share, according to an extensive analysis of IRS data conducted by the Chronicle of Philanthropy.

57. Methodist Opens Care Clinic in Marion -

A subsidiary of Memphis-based Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare has opened a primary care clinic in Marion, Ark., and officials hope more providers will follow suit to close the gap left by the sudden closure of Crittenden Regional Hospital in West Memphis.

58. Prices at the Pump Head Below $3 in Much of US -

NEW YORK (AP) – The price of a gallon of gasoline may soon start with a "2'' across much the country.

Gasoline prices typically decline in autumn, and this year they are being pulled even lower by falling global oil prices. By the end of the year, up to 30 states could have an average gasoline price of less than $3 a gallon.

59. Stock Gains Lift US Household Wealth to Record High -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Strong stock market gains and higher home prices boosted Americans' net worth in the April-June quarter to a record high, a trend that could encourage more spending.

U.S. households also took on the most new debt in five years, driven mostly by student and auto loans. More borrowing can be a sign of confidence, although greater student debt can pose a burden for younger households.

60. Little Sees ‘Acceptance’ in City Insurance Drama -

City Chief Administrative Officer George Little says he hopes the city’s long debate about health insurance coverage changes will mean a shorter discussion about proposed pension changes to come.

61. US Wealth Gap Putting the Squeeze on State Revenue -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Income inequality is taking a toll on state governments.

The widening gap between the wealthiest Americans and everyone else has been matched by a slowdown in state tax revenue, according to a report being released Monday by Standard & Poor's.

62. Coverage Gap Leaves Rural Tennessee Hospitals on Life Support -

Four rural hospitals have closed and dozens are at risk of shuttering: That’s the fallout, some say, from Gov. Bill Haslam’s decision not to join the Affordable Care Act in 2013 and tap into millions in promised federal funds for Tennessee’s financially-strapped health care institutions.

63. Legacy Building -

2014 is shaping up to be a banner year for Legacy Wealth Management, an independent financial planning and portfolio management firm that’s moved into a prominent new space, continued staffing up over the last several months and is preparing to launch a seminar series.

64. Fast-Food Protesters Cuffed at Higher-Pay Rallies -

NEW YORK (AP) – Police handcuffed dozens of protesters in cities around the country on Thursday as they blocked traffic in the latest attempt to escalate their efforts to get McDonald's, Burger King and other fast-food companies to pay their employees at least $15 an hour.

65. Survey: Americans' Pessimism on Economy Has Grown -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Americans are more anxious about the economy now than they were right after the Great Recession ended despite stock market gains, falling unemployment and growth moving closer to full health.

66. Fuchs Joins Vaco Logistics as Recruiter -

Eddie Fuchs has joined Vaco Memphis as an executive recruiter for Vaco Logistics, where he’ll consult with distribution, transportation and manufacturing companies to help identify candidates for leadership and specialized skill positions. Fuchs, who previously worked in the business development department of Intermodal Cartage Co., was recently named to the Greater Memphis Chamber’s 2014 Young Memphians list.

67. Steffner Adds SIOR Role to Real Estate Resume -

Since Joe Steffner opened his own commercial real estate firm 10 years ago, the industry veteran has had a front row seat to some wild changes in the industry.

He experienced everything from the boom days of the early- and mid-2000s to the depths of the recession and its crushing aftermath as the decade ended.

68. Sex Crimes Unit Completes ‘Eye-Opening’ Training -

Memphis police officers working in the sex crimes unit have been in training this month about neurological changes in rape and sexual assault victims they work with.

The training, along with new positions specifically to handle the city’s rape kit backlog, is among the latest changes in the Memphis Police Department’s approach.

69. US Won't Reveal Records on Health Website Security -

WASHINGTON (AP) – After promising not to withhold government information over "speculative or abstract fears," the Obama administration has concluded it will not publicly disclose federal records that could shed light on the security of the government's health care website because doing so could "potentially" allow hackers to break in.

70. Google's Pivotal IPO Launched a Decade of Big Bets -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Google's IPO, a decade ago this week, launched the company on a trajectory that continues to reshape its business and much of the world in its orbit.

And CEO Larry Page is determined to push even further.

71. Consumers Driving Health Care Innovation -

Everyone in the U.S complains about health care – the rising costs of insurance premiums and co-pays, the lack of innovation, the poor experience at doctor’s offices and hospitals, and price of medications.

72. Democrats Struggle With Generation Gap -

Memphis Democrats don’t agree on a whole lot these days, especially since the Aug. 7 county general elections in which Democratic nominees lost to Republicans in all but one race – Shelby County assessor, won by the lone countywide Democratic incumbent, Cheyenne Johnson.

73. Memphis In May Ends Fiscal Year on High -

The Memphis in May International Festival finished its fiscal year with about $180,000 more in revenues than expenditures.

Unaudited figures from the festival’s fiscal year, which ended July 31, show total revenues for the monthlong set of events and programs of $7.2 million and expenses of $7.1 million.

74. Harahan Rebid Comes in $5 Million Lower -

Preliminary bids on the Harahan Bridge pedestrian and bicycle boardwalk and a West Memphis trail system connecting to the bridge came in $5 million lower than the first round of bids on the projects.

75. Pew: Split Views on Robots' Employment Benefits -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In 2025, self-driving cars could be the norm, people could have more leisure time and goods could become cheaper. Or, there could be chronic unemployment and an even wider income gap, human interaction could become a luxury and the wealthy could live in walled cities with robots serving as labor.

76. US Trade Gap Narrows to Lowest Level in 5 Months -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. trade deficit fell in June to its lowest level since January as imports dropped sharply, led by lower shipments of cellphones, petroleum, and cars.

The trade deficit fell 7 percent in June to a seasonally adjusted $41.5 billion, from $44.7 billion in May, the Commerce Department said Wednesday.

77. S&P: Wealth Gap is Slowing US Economic Growth -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Economists have long argued that a rising wealth gap has complicated the U.S. rebound from the Great Recession.

Now, an analysis by the rating agency Standard & Poor's lends its weight to the argument: The widening gap between the wealthiest Americans and everyone else has made the economy more prone to boom-bust cycles and slowed the 5-year-old recovery from the recession.

78. Tigers’ Progression Dependent on Solid Defense -

When the Tigers’ 3-9 season was done, there were not a lot of statistics to point to with pride. But the University of Memphis did finish the 2013 college football season ranked 12th nationally against the run, and a respectable 39th nationally in total defense.

79. Health Care Safety Net Tops Council Agenda -

Memphis City Council members get more information during the Tuesday, Aug. 5, council day on different parts of City Hall’s ongoing health benefits and pension liability discussions.

But the only item on the agenda for a vote Tuesday is a resolution to create a $2 million “safety net” that was delayed last month.

80. Fast Food Workers Prepare to Escalate Wage Demands -

CHICAGO (AP) – Fast food workers say they're prepared to escalate their campaign for higher wages and union representation, starting with a national convention in suburban Chicago where more than 1,000 workers will discuss the future of the effort that has spread to dozens of cities in less than two years.

81. Lot Shortage Poses Next Roadblock -

Local homebuilders say a dearth of developed lots is slowing down the new housing rebound, weighing down an industry still trying to drag itself out of the rubble left by the worst recession in decades.

82. Women Business Owners Face Gender Gap, Report Says -

NEW YORK (AP) – Women who own small business are still far behind their male counterparts when it comes to getting loans and government contracts, a congressional report said Wednesday.

83. Council Moves to Bridge Gaps in Health Coverage Changes -

The ad hoc committee that gathered municipal union leaders, city retirees and Memphis City Council members at the same table to talk about city health insurance meets Thursday, July 17, for the first time since the council approved health insurance plan changes that have drawn vocal protests from city employees and retirees.

84. City Council Turns Again to Benefits Discussions -

Memphis City Council members won’t take any major votes Tuesday, July 15, on city employee benefits.

But the controversial topic will likely dominate much of another council day at City Hall. The council is in the gap between its approval of health insurance changes in June and an October vote on the companion proposal to change city employee pension plans for new hires and those with less than 10 years of service.

85. US Records $71 Billion Budget Surplus in June -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. government ran a monthly budget surplus in June, putting it on course to record the lowest annual deficit since 2008.

The Treasury Department said Friday that its June surplus totaled $71 billion, following a $130 billion deficit in May. The government also ran a surplus in June 2013, bolstered by dividends from Fannie Mae, the mortgage giant under federal conservatorship for the past six years.

86. Economists Lower Forecasts for US Growth -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. business economists have sharply cut their growth forecasts for the April-June quarter and 2014, though they remain optimistic that the economy will rebound from a dismal first quarter.

87. UTHSC Researcher Finds Racial Gap in Med Adherence -

The launch of the Medicare Part D prescription drug benefit in 2006 has encouraged more elderly patients to take their heart medications as prescribed.

But while the longstanding gap between white and minority patients in cardiovascular medication adherence has narrowed, black seniors are still less likely to adhere to medication goals than Hispanic Medicare participants, and both groups lag white seniors in the rate of adherence in using the common drugs that treat high blood pressure and heart failure.

88. UTHSC Researchers Find Racial Gap in Medication Adherence -

The launch of the Medicare Part D prescription drug benefit in 2006 has encouraged more elderly patients to take their heart medications as prescribed.

But while the longstanding gap between white and minority patients in cardiovascular medication adherence has narrowed, black seniors are still less likely to adhere to medication goals than Hispanic Medicare participants, and both groups lag white seniors in the rate of adherence in using the common drugs that treat high blood pressure and heart failure.

89. US Trade Deficit Drops to $44.4 Billion in May -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. trade deficit fell in May as U.S. exports hit an all-time high, helped by a jump in exports of petroleum products. Imports dipped slightly.

The trade deficit narrowed 5.6 percent in May to $44.4 billion after hitting a two-year high of $47 billion in April, the Commerce Department reported Thursday.

90. Brooks Residency Case Resumes in Court -

When Chancellor Kenny Armstrong takes the bench Thursday, July 3, to resume his hearing on the effort to unseat Shelby County Commissioner Henri Brooks, he will likely have the same basic question he had when the hearing recessed Tuesday in his courtroom.

91. Highway Crisis Looms as Soon as August, US Warns -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Gridlock in Washington will lead to gridlock across the country if lawmakers can't quickly agree on how to pay for highway and transit programs, President Barack Obama and his top officials warned Tuesday.

92. Baker’s Career Mirrored State’s Political Story -

As the week begins, political leaders of both parties and across several generations will gather in East Tennessee for the funeral of former U.S. Sen. Howard Baker.

93. New Push to Get Girls Into Computer Sciences -

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. (AP) – Diana Navarro loves to code, and she's not afraid to admit it. But the 18-year-old Rutgers University computer science major knows she's an anomaly: Writing software to run computer programs in 2014 is – more than ever – a man's world.

94. Current Account Deficit Up From 14-Year Low -

A drop in U.S. exports and lower income from overseas investments drove the U.S. current account deficit to its highest level in 18 months.

The Commerce Department says the deficit jumped to a seasonally adjusted $111.2 billion in the January-March quarter, up from a revised total of $87.3 billion in the October-December quarter. The fourth quarter's total was the smallest in 14 years.

95. Good Medicine for the Soul -

It was one of those medication one-upmanships at a recent meeting when some attendees were discussing the number of medications they were taking to address a plethora of medical conditions.

Needed as the medications were, it seemed like a lot of information, side effects and drug interactions to manage, not to mention vitamins, herbal remedies and over-the-counter medicine. Seeing different specialists for different conditions and inconsistent communication seems to be a growing concern, a gap in patient care, particularly for those who do not have the knowledge or resources to manage their medication.

96. Editorial: MERI Helping City Address Big Problem -

In the alphabet soup of acronyms that sometimes define to the public any organization with lots of moving parts, the Medical Education and Research Institute – or MERI – may be just another set of letters to some.

97. Training Ground -

You can’t perfectly simulate a real-life disaster. Dr. Joe Holley knows this better than most.

98. Many Seek New Homes Near Cities But are Priced Out -

WASHINGTON (AP) – City living has been a blessing for Tim Nelson.

The Phoenix lawyer moved downtown a few months ago into a new $389,000 home with a warehouse-style floor plan, a Jacuzzi tub and kitchen counters made of Caesarstone quartz. His favorite coffee spot is three blocks away. When the Arizona Diamondbacks play on Friday nights, he can watch postgame fireworks from his deck.

99. Coalition Vows Push for Minority Business Gains -

For decades, goals and percentages have been set for minority business participation in city and county governments.

Both governments have compliance offices. Elected officials look at percentages and ask questions about participation on particular projects.

100. Auto Industry Gets Serious About Lighter Materials -

DEARBORN, Mich. (AP) – Roofs made of carbon fiber. Plastic windshields. Bumpers fashioned out of aluminum foam.

What sounds like a science experiment could be your next car.

While hybrids and electrics may grab the headlines, the real frontier in fuel economy is the switch to lighter materials.