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Editorial Results (free)

1. US New-Home Sales Plummet in June -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Sales of new U.S. homes plunged in June, a sign that real estate continues to be a weak spot in the economy.

New home sales fell 8.1 percent last month to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 406,000, the Commerce Department said Thursday. The report also revised down the May sales rate to 442,000 from 504,000.

2. Airlines Report Big Second-Quarter Profits -

Investing in airlines has long been the butt of jokes, especially when many U.S. carriers traipsed through bankruptcy court in the past decade.

Now riding a post-merger tide of higher fares and stable fuel costs, those same airlines are piling up profits – and sharing the newfound riches with investors.

3. IMF Sees US Growth at Weakest Since Recession -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. economic growth this year will likely be at the weakest pace since the Great Recession ended, the International Monetary Fund said, mostly because of a sharp, weather-related contraction in the first quarter.

4. US Economy, Though Sluggish, May Now Be Sturdier -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Out of a seemingly hollow recovery from the Great Recession, a more durable if still slow-growing U.S. economy has emerged.

That conclusion, one held by a growing number of economists, might surprise many people. After all, in the five years since the recession officially ended, Americans' pay has basically stagnated. Millions remain unemployed or have abandoned their job searches. Economic growth is merely plodding along.

5. Health Advocacy Groups File Lawsuit Against State -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Three advocacy groups filed a class action lawsuit on Wednesday accusing the state of Tennessee of failing to provide certain services required by the federal health care law.

6. Supreme Court Justices Make Campaign Push -

Among the candidates going door to door in Memphis this summer looking for votes was a Tennessee Supreme Court justice.

Sharon Lee, one of three justices seeking re-election in the yes-no retention races on the August ballot, campaigned Saturday, July 19, in Hickory Hill.

7. Sales Tax Push Continues in City Debate -

The idea of a sales tax hike referendum in November to fund a restoration of cuts in city health care insurance benefits keeps rolling.

The Memphis chapter of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference came out in favor of the citywide local option sales tax hike Tuesday, July 22, after a closed luncheon attended by leaders of municipal unions and Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.

8. Dueling Rulings: Courts Split on Health Law Clash -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama's health care law is snarled in another big legal battle, with two federal appeals courts issuing contradictory rulings on a key financing issue within hours of each other Tuesday.

9. Early Voting Draws 673 in First Weekend -

Democratic political leaders and candidates put a lot of emphasis this past weekend on a strong start to the early voting period in advance of the Aug. 7 elections.

The early voting period opened Friday, July 18, with three Tennessee Supreme Court justices in town as well to campaign for retention in their nonpartisan races at the bottom of the ballot.

10. Wharton Ready to Shift Talk on Benefits Debate -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. is trying to turn the page on the emotional City Hall debate over cuts in health insurance benefits to city employees and retirees and also close the book on the city budget for the two-week old fiscal year.

11. FedEx Charged With Assisting Illegal Pharmacies -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Federal authorities have charged FedEx Corp. with assisting illegal pharmacies by knowingly delivering dangerous drugs to customers without prescriptions.

12. Latest Fed Survey Sees Improved Economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The economy kept expanding in all regions of the country in June and early July, helped by strength in consumer spending, a Federal Reserve survey released Wednesday indicates.

13. Council Moves to Bridge Gaps in Health Coverage Changes -

The ad hoc committee that gathered municipal union leaders, city retirees and Memphis City Council members at the same table to talk about city health insurance meets Thursday, July 17, for the first time since the council approved health insurance plan changes that have drawn vocal protests from city employees and retirees.

14. Yellen Says Economy Still Needs Fed Support -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said Tuesday that the economic recovery is not yet complete and for that reason the Fed intends to keep providing significant support to boost growth and improve labor market conditions.

15. States Told to Find Way to Clear Medicaid Backlog -

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) – A half-dozen states with backlogs for Medicaid enrollees were facing a federal deadline Monday to create plans for getting those low-income residents enrolled in health coverage.

16. Volkswagen to Build New SUV in Tennessee, Add 2,000 Jobs -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Volkswagen plans to build a new seven-passenger SUV at its factory in Chattanooga, Tennessee, adding about 2,000 factory jobs as it tries to reverse U.S. sales that have fallen for the past two years.

17. Downside of Low US Mortgage Rates: Less Selling -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Would-be home sellers across the country are grappling with a once-in-a-lifetime problem: They have mortgage rates so absurdly low it would hurt them financially to sell.

18. House Votes to Make Business Tax Break Permanent -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House voted Friday to make permanent a temporary tax break that makes it easier for businesses to invest in new equipment, one of many expired tax breaks that Congress must deal with by the end of the year.

19. US Records $71 Billion Budget Surplus in June -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. government ran a monthly budget surplus in June, putting it on course to record the lowest annual deficit since 2008.

The Treasury Department said Friday that its June surplus totaled $71 billion, following a $130 billion deficit in May. The government also ran a surplus in June 2013, bolstered by dividends from Fannie Mae, the mortgage giant under federal conservatorship for the past six years.

20. Changing Landscape -

It’s been confusing from a distance.

The formal groundbreaking for Shelby Farms Park’s $70 million “Heart of the Park” improvements, including an expansion of Patriot Lake, came the same week last month the Memphis City Council voted to delay for one year the city’s portion of funding for the Shelby Farms Parkway.

21. Fed No. 2 Fischer Says Care Needed to Avert Crisis -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Federal Reserve's new No. 2 official says regulators must continue to work to end the need for the government to bail out big banks in a crisis. Stricter capital requirements, rather than breaking up the biggest banks, is the better remedy, he says.

22. Fed Split on Signals for First Rate Increase -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve officials had differing views in June on the best way to signal to financial markets when they might raise a key short-term interest rate. They were in broad agreement, however, that they will likely announce an end to their monthly bond buying program in October.

23. Events -

National Hispanic Professional Organization-Memphis will meet Thursday, July 10, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Hilton Memphis, 939 Ridge Lake Blvd. Martha Perine Beard, president of the Federal Reserve in Memphis, will speak. Cost is free for members and $20 for nonmembers. Email info@nhpomemphis.us.

24. For the Red, White & Blue -

Let’s start this column with holiday quiz:

1. Who immortalized Paul Revere’s “midnight ride” and how?
2. Which body of water did Washington and his men cross on Christmas 1776?
3. According to legend, who sewed the first American flag?
4. Who wrote “The Star Spangled Banner”?
5. Which European countries fought for the colonies and which did not?
6. What was thrown into Boston Harbor in 1773 and why?
7. Who was the primary author of the Declaration of Independence?
8. Which state whose name starts with V was not one of the original 13 colonies?
9. How did John Adams explain to Abigail the colonies’ defeat at Long Island?
10. What was the approximate population of the 13 colonies on July 4, 1776?

25. US Companies Post Most Jobs in 7 Years in May -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. employers advertised more jobs in May than in any month in the past seven years, a sign that this year's strong hiring trend is likely to continue.

More Americans also quit their jobs, a good sign because it usually occurs when workers find new and higher-paying jobs. It also opens up more positions for those out of work.

26. Cushman & Wakefield Adds Yates to Capital Markets Team -

Alex Yates has joined the Cushman & Wakefield/Commercial Advisors Capital Markets team as vice president, assisting and executing investment sales, debt/equity placement and development advisory projects. Yates’ efforts will be heavily concentrated in multifamily and retail, but he will focus on other product types as well.

27. Report: Health Law Sign-Ups Dogged by Data Flaws -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Many of the 8 million Americans signed up under the new health care law now have to clear up questions about their personal information that could affect their coverage.

28. Highway Crisis Looms as Soon as August, US Warns -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Gridlock in Washington will lead to gridlock across the country if lawmakers can't quickly agree on how to pay for highway and transit programs, President Barack Obama and his top officials warned Tuesday.

29. Court to Weigh Government Duty to Settle Bias Claims -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court said Monday it will consider a dispute over the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's duty to try and settle charges of job discrimination before filing lawsuits against employers.

30. Supreme Court: Religious Rights Trump Birth Control Rule -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A sharply divided Supreme Court ruled Monday that some companies with religious objections can avoid the contraceptives requirement in President Barack Obama's health care overhaul, the first time the high court has declared that businesses can hold religious views under federal law.

31. Veterans Town Hall Mirrors Washington Frustration -

Depending on how you look at it, a group of 300 frustrated local veterans last week either got a look at the “corrosive” culture of the Department of Veterans Affairs or a look at change in progress.

32. Council Moves Toward Pension Changes -

Two weeks after approving changes in health insurance plans for city employees and retirees, the Memphis City Council meets Tuesday, July 1, to talk over a companion set of changes to the city’s pension plan for employees.

33. Anti-Meth Law Among Those Taking Effect July 1 -

NASHVILLE (AP) – A law limiting the purchase of cold and allergy medicines used to make illegal methamphetamine is among those taking effect Tuesday, as are statutes that require more disclosure from the Tennessee Department of Children's Services and allow use of the electric chair to execute death row inmates.

34. Baker’s Career Mirrored State’s Political Story -

As the week begins, political leaders of both parties and across several generations will gather in East Tennessee for the funeral of former U.S. Sen. Howard Baker.

35. Events -

Hattiloo Theatre will hold a free season nine community grand opening Saturday, June 28, from 8 a.m. to midnight in its new Overton Square theater, 37 S. Cooper St. Events include performances, tours, concerts and more. Tickets to each event are on a first-come/first-served basis. Visit hattiloo.org/grand-opening-season-9.php for schedule.

36. Editorial: Park Should Be Place to Unify Community -

There is something about an economic impact study of a 4,500-acre park that at first glance seems out of place.

But given the recent travels of Shelby Farms Park through our local political machinery, further proof of the park’s worth is still needed.

37. Obama Aims to Put Human Face on Economic Struggles -

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) – President Barack Obama said Thursday that Washington needs to stop "playing to the most fringe elements of politics" and help Americans who are fighting to make ends meet, as he spent an afternoon with a working mother who wrote to him about her struggles.

38. Drones Could Help Mississippi Farm Industry -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – The applications for drones have softened, shifting from machines of war to whirlybirds that can capture incredible aerial photos of any event under the sun.

The newest possibility mixes that magic with cost-savings that could prove revolutionary for Mississippi's agricultural industry.

39. Events -

Stax Music Academy, Stax Museum and Memphis Public Library will host Steve Cropper, guitarist for Booker T. & the MGs, for a Soul & Blues Brown Bag Series concert and Q&A Friday, June 27, at noon in the amphitheater behind the academy, 926 E. McLemore Ave. Visit staxmuseum.com.

40. 'Get a Warrant' to Search Cellphones, Justices Say -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In an emphatic defense of privacy in the digital age, a unanimous Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that police generally may not search the cellphones of people they arrest without first getting search warrants.

41. Why a Grim US Economic Picture is Brightening -

WASHINGTON (AP) – When the government updates its estimate Wednesday of how the U.S. economy fared last quarter, the number is pretty sure to be ugly. Horrible even.

The economy likely shrank at an annual rate of nearly 2 percent in the January-March quarter, economists estimate. That would be its bleakest performance since early 2009 in the depths of the Great Recession.

42. Ni Hao, Y'all: US Hinterlands Woo Chinese Firms -

PINE HILL, Ala. (AP) – Burdened with Alabama's highest unemployment rate, long abandoned by textile mills and furniture plants, Wilcox County desperately needs jobs.

They're coming, and from a most unlikely place: Henan Province, China, 7,600 miles away.

43. Congress Probes How IRS Emails Could Go Missing -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Internal Revenue Service commissioner said Friday the agency will not share with Congress additional details about its lost emails related to the ongoing tea party investigation until its own review is finished because he said Republicans are releasing inaccurate, interim information.

44. New Health Chief Moves to Put Stamp on Overhaul -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Aiming to avoid more insurance chaos this fall, the nation's new health care chief announced Friday she's revamping the management of President Barack Obama's health overhaul.

45. This week in Memphis history: June 20-26 -

2013: FedEx Corp. executives watched as a 727 landed at Memphis International Airport, completing the last flight by a 727 for the company ending the use of the jets by the pioneering Memphis company after 35 years.

46. New Push to Get Girls Into Computer Sciences -

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. (AP) – Diana Navarro loves to code, and she's not afraid to admit it. But the 18-year-old Rutgers University computer science major knows she's an anomaly: Writing software to run computer programs in 2014 is – more than ever – a man's world.

47. Starbucks Contribution to Scholarship Overstated -

NEW YORK (AP) – It turns out Starbucks isn't contributing any upfront scholarship money to an online college degree program it introduced this week.

The Seattle-based company unveiled a program Monday that included a scholarship it described as "an investment" between Starbucks and Arizona State University. The program is designed to allow Starbucks workers to earn an online degree at the school at a steeply discounted rate.

48. Heart of Park Advances as Shelby Farms Parkway Stalls -

Within the space of a few days this month, the Shelby Farms Park Conservancy formally broke ground on the park’s $70 million Heart of the Park project and then its leaders watched as the Memphis City Council delayed the Shelby Farms Parkway project for a year.

49. Long Council Day Comes With Change, Emotions -

It was apparent early in the long council day Tuesday, June 17, at City Hall that there wouldn’t be many amendments to the $600 million operating budget and $84 million capital budget the council would approve later that evening.

50. $1,000-a-Pill Sovaldi Jolts US Health Care System -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Your money or your life?

Sovaldi, a new pill for hepatitis C, cures the liver-wasting disease in 9 of 10 patients, but treatment can cost more than $90,000.

Leading medical societies recommend the drug as a first-line treatment, and patients are clamoring for it. But insurance companies and state Medicaid programs are gagging on the price. In Oregon, officials propose to limit how many low-income patients can get Sovaldi.

51. Partners Drive Startup Ecosystem -

Building startups is tough work that requires the engagement of money, mentorship and professional support.

Back before there were incubators, accelerators and formal platforms to systematically assist startup companies, there were critical trusted advisers in the community to help guide entrepreneurs as they started up. Those advisers were local bankers, lawyers, marketers, accountants and others where entrepreneurs could turn for support and guidance. While new startup infrastructures have sprung up to provide knowledge, capital and other resources, professionals continue to be the backbone driving entrepreneurial growth.

52. Starbucks Clears College Degree Path for Workers -

NEW YORK (AP) – Starbucks is giving its baristas a shot at an online college degree, an unusual benefit in an industry where higher education is often out of reach for workers.

The coffee chain is partnering with Arizona State University to make an undergraduate degree available at a steep discount to 135,000 U.S. employees who work at least 20 hours a week.

53. IMF Lowers Estimate of US Economic Growth in 2014 -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy is poised to accelerate after a dismal start to the year even though the job market won't return to full employment until 2017.

That was the forecast offered Monday in a report by the International Monetary Fund.

54. Fed Unlikely to Shift Course This Week -

When Federal Reserve officials gather this week and Fed Chair Janet Yellen speaks with reporters, investors will be seeking clues to two big questions:

When will the Fed finally start raising short-term interest rates?

55. FAA Controllers Still Working 'Rattler' Schedules -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Air traffic controllers are still working schedules known as "rattlers" that make it likely they'll get little or no sleep before overnight shifts, more than three years after a series of incidents involving controllers sleeping on the job, according to a government-sponsored report released Friday.

56. Survey: Economic Growth to Pick Up -

U.S. economic growth should accelerate in the second quarter and remain healthy for the rest of this year, according to a forecast by a group of U.S. business economists. Still, growth for the full year will likely come in lower than they previously estimated.

57. Pay Raises Go Mainly to Those in Select Industries -

NEW YORK (AP) – If you hope to get a raise that finally feels like one, it helps to work in the right industry.

Historically, at this stage in the economy's recovery, pay would be rising in most sectors. But five years after the Great Recession officially ended, raises remain sharply uneven across industries and, as a whole, have barely kept up with prices. Overall pay has been rising about 2 percent a year, roughly equal to inflation.

58. Graceland Hotel Passes Crucial Hurdle -

A new hotel near Graceland has passed a key regulatory hurdle.

The Memphis-Shelby County Land Use Control Board approved a proposal from Elvis Presley Enterprises to build a 450-room hotel on the same side of Elvis Presley Boulevard as the historic Graceland mansion, one of the city’s top tourism sites.

59. FAA OKs Commercial Drone Flights Over Land -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Federal Aviation Administration said Tuesday it has granted the first permission for commercial drone flights over land, the latest effort by the agency to show it is loosening restrictions on commercial uses of the unmanned aircraft.

60. Survey: Growth to Pick Up, Hiring Steady -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. economic growth should accelerate in the second quarter and remain healthy for the rest of this year, according to a forecast by a group of U.S. business economists. Still, growth for the full year will likely come in lower than they previously estimated.

61. Engineer's 'Switch From Hell' Began GM Recall Woes -

DETROIT (AP) – Inside General Motors, they called it "the switch from hell."

The ignition switch on the steering column of the Chevrolet Cobalt and other small cars was so poorly designed that it easily slipped out of the run position, causing engines to stall. Engineers knew it; as early as 2004, a Cobalt stalled on a GM test track when the driver's knee grazed the key fob. By GM's admission, the defective switches caused over 50 crashes and at least 13 deaths.

62. Cohen Challenges Haslam on Medicaid Expansion -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen says the city’s fair share of federal funding for rape kit backlogs is $1 million.

63. Editorial: Lessons Remain With Schools Transformation -

When enough time has passed, the story of the historic changes in public education underway in Shelby County will let us know what worked out and what didn’t.

We suspect those reading the account may not see what was so radical or unprecedented about some of the changes because they appear to be the direction public education is taking. The really compelling story may be what public education in our county was like before the changes simply because it may seem so unfamiliar.

64. Touch of History -

For its 150th anniversary, First Tennessee Bank didn’t want to only blow out the candles, so to speak.

In addition to commemorating the enviable milestone of longevity in an industry as frequently upended as banking, the Memphis-based financial institution wanted to help customers directly feel the impact of the bank’s presence in their community. At the same time, the bank also wants to let customers literally reach out and touch the bank’s history.

65. Game Changer -

One educator’s reform is another educator’s wrong move.

Dorsey Hopson doesn’t use the word “reform” as often as he uses the term “game changer.”

But the superintendent of Shelby County Schools has himself become a game changer as the school board that signed him to a three-year contract last September weighs a further extension of his three-year contract that for now runs through September 2016.

66. GM: Incompetence, Negligence Led to Delayed Recall -

WARREN, Mich. (AP) – General Motors says a pattern of incompetence and neglect, not a larger conspiracy or cover-up, is to blame for a long-delayed recall of defective ignition switches.

67. Report: Children’s Services Rebounding Under New Leadership -

NASHVILLE (AP) – An expert panel tasked with monitoring the Tennessee Department of Children's Services says the agency has flourished under new leadership.

According to The Tennessean, the report by the federal monitors credits new top leaders for getting the state's foster care system "back on track."

68. What’s Up With Low Rates? -

As 2013 drew to a close, investors bid up “risky” assets and sold “safe” assets in anticipation of a robust 2014. “Risky” stocks rose 30 percent and the “safe” 10-year Treasury bond lost 4 percent.

69. Commission Approves Budgets and Dueling Tax Rates Without PreK Amendment -

Shelby County Commissioners signed off Monday, June 2, on a $1.1 billion consolidated operating budget for all of Shelby County government as well as a $75 million capital budget, both for the fiscal year that begins July 1.

70. US Construction Spending Up 0.2 Percent in April -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. construction spending posted modest gains in April, driven by an uptick in home building and government construction that lifted total activity to the highest level in five years.

71. Justices Reject Reporter's Bid to Protect Source -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A reporter who has been ordered to divulge the identity of the source of classified information lost his bid Monday to get the Supreme Court to clarify whether journalists have a right to protect their confidential sources.

72. College Presidents Promote Community Connections -

The president of Christian Brothers University says the time to discuss with college students whether they should see the world or build a life here is when they are still in college, not as they are graduating.

73. Commission to Vote on Budget, Tax Rate -

Shelby County Commissioners take final votes Monday, June 2, on a $1.1 billion operating budget and a $75 million capital budget for Shelby County government, and the first of three votes on a new property tax rate for the fiscal year that begins July 1.

74. Judge: East Tennessee City Can Change Name to Rocky Top -

NASHVILLE (AP) – A federal judge has given a former coal mining town in East Tennessee the go-ahead to change its name to Rocky Top – a move that developers have said is needed to entice them to build a massive tourist complex in the town of 1,800 people.

75. Plough Foundation Makes Challenge Grant on Rape Kit Backlog -

The Plough Foundation has made a $750,000 challenge grant toward the estimated $6 million in funding the city of Memphis says it needs to clear the city backlog of more than 12,000 untested rape kits.

76. US Bank Earnings Decline 7.7 Percent in First Quarter -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. banks' earnings declined 7.7 percent in the January-March quarter from a year earlier, as higher interest rates dampened demand for mortgage refinancing and reduced banks' revenue from the mortgage business.

77. Michael Meets Resistance in Juvenile Court Campaign -

Dan Michael has worked for the last two Juvenile Court judges and hopes to succeed the latest, Curtis Person Jr., with the August election results.

78. US Home Sales Rose 1.3 Percent in April -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Sales of existing U.S. homes rebounded slightly in April, but the pace of buying remained below last year's level.

The National Association of Realtors said Thursday that sales rose 1.3 percent from March to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 4.65 million. Purchases of homes over the past 12 months have dropped 6.8 percent.

79. Minutes: Fed Began Weighing Options for Rate Rise -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Federal Reserve has begun to discuss the tools it could use to finally pull back the extraordinary stimulus it's provided the U.S. economy since 2008. But Fed officials plan further discussions and have set no timetable for any increase in interest rates.

80. Cleaner Air Could Mean Higher Electric Bills -

NEW YORK (AP) – Electricity prices are probably on their way up across much of the U.S. as coal-fired plants, the dominant source of cheap power, shut down in response to environmental regulations and economic forces.

81. Mississippi Approves $8.4 Million for Common Core Tests -

Mississippi's state Board of Education has approved spending about $8.4 million on standardized tests aligned with the new Common Core state standards.

The board voted May 16 for the first year of what could be a four-year contract with a division of the British firm Pearson PLC. The money is Mississippi's share of the cost of a multistate testing group called the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers, or PARCC.

82. AT&T Aims for TV's Future With $48.5 Billion DirecTV Deal -

LOS ANGELES (AP) – AT&T says it views its planned $48.5 billion purchase of DirecTV as a way to help redefine the video entertainment industry, giving it opportunities to bundle services and tap into growing Latin American markets.

83. Study: Political TV Ads on Health Law Total $445 Million -

CHICAGO (AP) – A new analysis finds the nation's health care overhaul deserves a place in advertising history as the focus of extraordinarily high spending on negative political TV ads that have gone largely unanswered by the law's supporters.

84. Economic Experts Offer Analysis, Forecast -

A report from Fitch Ratings May 14 declared that going forward the U.S. economy will have to grow without the help it has enjoyed in recent years from things such as low interest rates and government spending.

85. Schools Merger ‘Closeout’ Underway -

The first and only year of a single public school system in Shelby County comes to an end May 23 with the last day of school.

And the legal details of the demerger are quickly taking shape.

Leaders of Shelby County’s seven public school systems met Tuesday, May 13, to discuss the closeout procedures starting June 2 that will begin the actual demerger of public education in Shelby County.

86. Consumers Losing Doctors With New Insurance Plans -

MIAMI (AP) – Some consumers who bought insurance under President Barack Obama's health care law are experiencing buyer's remorse after realizing that their longtime doctors aren't accepting the new plans.

87. US Retail Sales Rise a Scant 0.1 Percent in April -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. retail sales growth slowed in April, with consumers shopping less online and cutting back on purchases of furniture and electronics.

The Commerce Department said Tuesday that seasonally adjusted retail sales rose just 0.1 percent last month, after surging 1.5 percent in March following a harsh winter that had curtailed shopping.

88. Seat for Federal Judge Opening in Chattanooga -

A decision by a federal judge in Chattanooga to take senior status later this year means his seat will be open.

Curtis L. Collier sent a letter to President Barack Obama to say he will move into semi-retirement in October on his 65th birthday. Under senior status, judges work part-time, usually taking on about 20 percent of a normal caseload.

89. Council Approves Music Hall of Fame Funding -

Memphis City Council members have approved $250,000 in funding for a Memphis Music Hall of Fame at Hard Rock Cafe’s new location at Beale and Second streets.

The funding from the federal money turned over to the city when federal officials abandoned plans for Interstate 40 through Overton Park is the first of two funding requests organizers of the Hall of Fame plan to make of the city for the $1.2 million project, which will also include private funding.

90. Financial Federal Sees Progress, Prepares for New Digs -

A business that handles client money and assets naturally occupies an ideal perch from which to survey the financial landscape and general economic conditions.

And the Memphis-based bank Financial Federal is one such institution in a position to do that.

91. The Market Whisperer -

When economic analysis gets reduced to a binary choice between opposites like bullish or bearish, up or down, strong or weak, the complexity that helps explain the way things are gets lost in a thicket of sound byte-ready oversimplification.

92. Average US 30-Year Mortgage Rate Falls to 4.21 Percent -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Average U.S. rates on fixed mortgages fell this week for a second straight week as the spring home-buying season has gotten off to a slow start.

Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac said Thursday the average rate for the 30-year loan declined to 4.21 percent from 4.29 percent last week. The average for the 15-year mortgage eased to 3.32 percent from 3.38 percent.

93. Fannie, Freddie Post Solid Earnings for First Quarter -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Government-controlled mortgage financers Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac posted solid earnings for the January-March period as the U.S. housing market continued to recover. Gains over recent quarters have enabled the companies to fully repay their taxpayer aid after being rescued by the government in 2008.

94. Airlines Ask Congress to Roll Back Airfare Rule -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Airlines tried and failed to block a federal rule making them tell passengers up front the full cost of airfare, including government taxes and fees. So they're trying another route, asking Congress to do what the Obama administration and the courts refused to do: roll back the law.

95. City Council Approves Music Hall of Fame Funding -

Memphis City Council members have approved $250,000 in funding for a Memphis Music Hall of Fame at Hard Rock Cafe’s new location at Beale and Second streets.

The funding from the federal money turned over to the city when federal officials abandoned plans for Interstate 40 through Overton Park is the first of two funding requests organizers of the Hall of Fame plan to make of the city for the $1.2 million project, which will also include private funding.

96. US Consumer Borrowing Rose $17.5 Billion in March -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Consumers increased their borrowing in March by the largest amount in more than a year, using their credit cards and taking out more auto and student loans.

Consumer borrowing increased $17.5 billion in March, up from a gain of $13 billion in February, the Federal Reserve reported Wednesday. It was the biggest monthly increase since a $19.3 billion advance in February 2013.

97. Congress Considers Bill for Women's History Museum -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Citing history textbooks, national parks and landmarks that mostly leave women out, lawmakers Wednesday are reviving a long-stalled effort to create a National Women's History Museum in the nation's capital.

98. Yellen Foresees Continued Low Borrowing Rates -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said Wednesday that the U.S. economy is improving but noted that the job market remains "far from satisfactory" and inflation is still below the Fed's target rate.

99. Seat for Federal Judge Opening in Chattanooga -

A decision by a federal judge in Chattanooga to take senior status later this year means his seat will be open.

Curtis L. Collier sent a letter to President Barack Obama to say he will move into semi-retirement in October on his 65th birthday. Under senior status, judges work part-time, usually taking on about 20 percent of a normal caseload.

100. News Media Challenge Ban on Journalism Drones -

WASHINGTON (AP) – More than a dozen media organizations challenged the government's ban on the use of drones by journalists Tuesday, saying the Federal Aviation Administration's position violates First Amendment protections for news gathering.