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Editorial Results (free)

1. Late Sign-Ups Improve Outlook for Obama Health Law -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A surge of eleventh-hour enrollments has improved the outlook for President Barack Obama's health care law, with more people signing up overall and a much-needed spark of interest among young adults.

2. Ongoing Rape Kit Backlog Fallout Expands -

The ongoing fallout from the backlog of untested rape kits is beginning to develop some boundaries and dividing lines as it moves into federal court and expands outside court to include a backlog of 300 rape kits by the Shelby County Sheriff’s Department.

3. Election Commission May Move Initial Early Voting Site -

Shelby County Election Commissioners certified the ballot Wednesday, April 16, for the Aug. 7 state and federal primary elections and the nonpartisan judicial and Shelby County Schools board elections on what politicos call the “big ballot.”

4. First-Quarter Bankruptcies Remain Flat -

Bankruptcies in Shelby County were almost the same in number for the first three months of 2014 as they were for the first quarter of 2013.

There were 3,036 bankruptcies filed in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Western District of Tennessee in the first quarter, a slight increase from the 3,031 filed during the first quarter of 2013, according to The Daily News Online, www.memphisdailynews.com.

5. Yellen: Fed Stimulus Still Needed for Job Market -

NEW YORK (AP) – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said Wednesday that the U.S. job market still needs help from the Fed and that the central bank must remain intent on adjusting its policy to respond to unforeseen challenges.

6. Council Questions Five-Year Wharton Plan -

It’s usually a quick bottom line for any local government budget proposal – does it mean a property tax hike?

The $596 million operating budget submitted to the Memphis City Council Tuesday, April 15, by Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. does not include a property tax hike.

7. Wharton Outlines $596 Million Budget Plan -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. warned Tuesday, April 15, that “half measures” in converting city employees to a defined contributions benefits plan would not restore the city’s financial health and resolve an unfunded pension liability of hundreds of millions of dollars.

8. County Commission Ready for Budget Analysis -

Shelby County Commissioners begin their detailed look at the county’s consolidated budget proposal Wednesday, April 16, for the coming fiscal year.

The budget committee, chaired by commissioner Heidi Shafer, begins its hearings with a look at the budgets for the offices of Sheriff, Trustee, Register and the Juvenile Court and its Clerk’s office.

9. Wharton Takes Budget to City Council -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. takes a budget proposal to the Memphis City Council Tuesday, April 15, that is supposed to be a departure for an administration that, since 2010, has come to the council with options instead of a total budget plan.

10. Haslam Unveils $1.5B Transportation Plan -

Gov. Bill Haslam and Transportation Commissioner John Schroer have released the state’s three-year, $1.5 billion transportation program.

The Haslam administration said the plan unveiled Thursday takes a conservative approach because of uncertainty over future federal transit funding. It contains no money to pay for early engineering work on new projects.

11. Editorial: First Tennessee Bank’s Business Model Endures -

As First Tennessee Bank marks its 150th anniversary, we are reminded of the changes over that span in technology and what our financial institutions have come to offer in the way of services.

12. Milestone Year -

The day after First Tennessee Bank celebrated its 150th birthday a few weeks ago by shooting fireworks over its Downtown Memphis headquarters, with executives and bank stakeholders mingling on a nearby hotel rooftop, the bank’s chairman, president and CEO looked back with pride at his bank’s long history.

13. Average US 30-Year Mortgage Rate Down to 4.34 Percent -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Average U.S. rates on fixed mortgages declined this week, edging closer to historically low levels as the spring home-buying season begins.

Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac said Thursday that the average rate for the 30-year loan fell to 4.34 percent from 4.41 percent last week. The average for the 15-year mortgage eased to 3.38 percent from 3.47 percent.

14. Schools Leaders Outline Budget Goals -

The Shelby County Commission and Shelby County Schools leaders eased into what is likely to be the most difficult discussion of county government’s budget season – funding the county’s school district in the first academic year of the demerger.

15. Minutes Show Fed Struggled to Agree on Rate Policy -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Federal Reserve struggled last month over how to convey to investors that it will raise short-term interest rates only slowly once it increases them from record lows.

16. New Perspective -

When the U.S. Postal Service closed its branch office at 826 Mississippi Blvd. near E.H. Crump Boulevard in 2012, workers carted off an oil painting that hung there for several decades with little thought about the man portrayed in the painting.

17. Obama Signs Actions Taking Aim at Gender Pay Gap -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In a concerted election-year push to draw attention to women's wages, President Barack Obama signed directives Tuesday that would make it easier for workers of federal contractors to get information about workplace compensation. He seasoned his move with a sharp rebuke of Republicans whom he accused of "gumming up the works" on workplace fairness.

18. Mississippi Network Set for Child Medical, Mental Needs -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Mississippi officials hope that a $5 million grant will create a more seamless system to care for children's medical, mental and behavioral needs.

The partnership between the University of Mississippi Medical Center and Mississippi Children's Home Services was announced Tuesday.

19. Senate Nears Passage of Jobless-Benefits Bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Capping a three-month struggle, the Senate closed in Monday on passage of election-year legislation to restore jobless benefits for the long-term unemployed that expired late last year.

20. Lebanon’s Pody Works for Amendment Passage -

Helping people with insurance requires the ability to plan for multiple scenarios.

That’s something Rep. Mark Pody, a Republican from Lebanon, Tenn., has taken with him to the Tennessee General Assembly, and he says it helps even when everyone is in agreement on a bill’s final outcome.

21. US Finally Regains the Jobs Lost in the Recession -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy has reached a milestone: It has finally regained all the private-sector jobs it lost during the Great Recession.

Yet it took a painfully slow six years, and unemployment remains stubbornly high at 6.7 percent.

22. Report Says Blacks, Latinos Losing Economic Ground -

WASHINGTON (AP) – African-Americans and Latinos are losing economic ground when compared with whites in the areas of employment and income as the United States pulls itself out of the Great Recession, the latest State of Black America report from the National Urban League says.

23. Rape Survivors Go Public in Backlog Lawsuit -

The three rape victims who filed a federal lawsuit March 26 against city and county governments over the backlog of 12,000 untested rape kits deliberately wanted their real names used in the lawsuit, their attorney said Wednesday, April 2, as two of the three women talked with reporters about the case.

24. High Court Loosens Reins on Big Campaign Donors -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court's conservative majority voted Wednesday to free wealthy donors to give to as many political candidates and campaigns as they want, further loosening the reins on giving by big contributors as the 2014 campaign moves into high gear.

25. Deadline Brings High Interest for Health Insurance -

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) – A blizzard, jammed phone lines and unreliable websites failed to stop throngs of procrastinating Americans from trying to sign up for health coverage by the midnight Monday deadline for President Barack Obama's signature domestic policy initiative.

26. Candidates Commit as Deadline Nears -

The first day of spring was March 20, but, after months of fundraisers and petition filings, the last day of the month served as the start of this year’s political season.

With the filing deadline for the August state and federal primaries, as well as nonpartisan Shelby County Schools board and judicial positions, Thursday at noon, candidates began Monday, March 31, making the set-in-stone decisions that will point election efforts toward voters and away from the groundwork.

27. Deadline Dash: Health Care Sign-Ups Amid Glitches -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A flood of last-minute applicants rushed to sign up for health insurance on Monday, deadline day for President Barack Obama's health care law, with more than 125,000 people at a time using the fragile system despite a new spate of intermittent ills.

28. Yellen: Job Market Needs Low Rates 'For Some Time' -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen made clear Monday that she thinks the still-subpar U.S. job market will continue to need the help of low interest rates "for some time."

29. Judge Upholds Country of Origin Label for Meat -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Shoppers who want to buy American beef for dinner instead of meat from Canada or Mexico will still be able to find the country of origin on the label.

A federal appeals court ruling Friday allows the government to go forward with rules that require labels on packaged steaks, ribs and other cuts of meat to say where the animals were born, raised and slaughtered. The meat industry attempted to block the rules, which went into effect last year, saying they are costly and provide no health benefits to the consumer.

30. US Consumer Spending Up Modest 0.3 Percent -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Americans barely increased their spending in February following a weak January performance, strong evidence that the severe winter will hold back the economy in the first quarter.

31. Brown’s Contempt Hearing Reflects Political Skirmish -

Joe Brown’s bid to unseat District Attorney General Amy Weirich in the 2014 elections probably wasn’t supposed to begin this way – in a courtroom dispute with Juvenile Court that has nothing to do with Weirich.

32. Ogle Appointed County Historian -

The Shelby County Commission has appointed Jimmy Ogle, chairman of the Shelby County Historical Commission, as the new county historian.

33. Bailey Files for Circuit Court Return -

Former Shelby County Circuit Court Judge D’Army Bailey filed his qualifying petition Wednesday, March 26, to run for Circuit Court Judge Division 3 in the August judicial elections.

Bailey filed one week before the April 3 deadline for candidates in those nonpartisan races and as well as the state and federal primaries on the ballot. He also had pulled a petition to possibly run for judge of Circuit Court Division 1.

34. Haslam’s Medicaid Expansion Talks Continue -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam has walked a fine line since announcing a year ago that the state would not accept federal funding for an expansion of TennCare, Tennessee’s version of Medicaid, at least for now.

35. US Economic Growth for 4th Quarter Revised Higher -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy grew at a 2.6 percent annual rate in the October-December quarter, slightly more than previously estimated, as consumer spending rose at the fastest pace in three years.

36. Sebelius Visits Nashville to Push Health Exchange -

NASHVILLE (AP) – U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius visited Nashville on Thursday to urge Tennesseans to sign up for insurance through the federal health care exchange before a March 31 deadline.

37. Clash of Contenders -

Shelby County Commissioner Steve Mulroy says his political plans last year didn’t include running for county mayor in 2014.

He was on U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen’s short list of recommendations for an open federal judgeship, a White House appointment he said he knew he might not get “the first time.”

38. Second Rape Kit Lawsuit Names More Officials -

The second federal lawsuit since December over the Memphis Police Department’s backlog of 12,000 untested rape kits casts a wider net of defendants than the first lawsuit, including the current and former Memphis police directors and the current and former district attorneys general.

39. Second Lawsuit Filed Over Rape Kit Backlog -

Three women allegedly raped by Anthony Alliano during a string of rapes in the Cordova area covering a decade have filed suit in Memphis Federal Court over the delay in testing their rape kits.

It is the second federal lawsuit filed against the city of Memphis since December over the backlog of more than 12,000 untested rape kits police acknowledged in November after initially putting the backlog of rape kits at 2,000 in August.

40. Bailey Files for Circuit Court Return -

Former Shelby County Circuit Court Judge D’Army Bailey filed his qualifying petition Wednesday, March 26, to run for Circuit Court Judge Division 3 in the August judicial elections.

Bailey filed one week before the April 3 deadline for candidates in those nonpartisan races and as well as the state and federal primaries on the ballot.

41. Ogle Appointed Shelby County Historian -

The Shelby County Commission has appointed Jimmy Ogle, chairman of the Shelby County Historical Commission, as the new county historian.

42. Commission Votes Down Family-Planning Rebid -

Shelby County commissioners voted down a bid Monday, March 24, to rebid the county’s contract for federally funded family-planning services with Christ Community Health Services.

Some commissioners branded Commissioner Steve Mulroy’s effort to urge County Mayor Mark Luttrell’s administration to rebid the contract as a political effort. Mulroy is taking criticism from former Commissioner Deidre Malone in the three-way Democratic primary race for county mayor for his vote in favor of the contract in 2011.

43. High Court Seems Divided Over Birth Control Rule -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court seemed divided Tuesday over whether employers' religious beliefs can free them from a part of the new health care law that requires that they provide coverage of birth control for employees at no extra charge.

44. Consumer Confidence Rebounds in Sign of Optimism -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. consumer confidence has rebounded to the highest reading in six years, providing a further sign that the economy's prospects should brighten with warmer weather.

45. Common Core Spawns Widespread Political Fights -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — More than five years after U.S. governors began a bipartisan effort to set new standards in American schools, the Common Core initiative has morphed into a political tempest fueling division among Republicans.

46. Survey: Economists See US Growth Pickup This Year -

WASHINGTON, D.C. (AP) — With the pace of U.S. economic growth seen speeding up later this year and next, many business economists expect the Federal Reserve to end its bond purchases this fall or even earlier.

47. Heritage Trail Likely to Continue Despite Rejection -

The plan to demolish the last large public housing development in Memphis and use the demolition as a catalyst for a larger redevelopment of the surrounding area did not make the final cut with federal housing officials in Washington.

48. Commission Takes Up Family Planning Contract -

Shelby County commissioners Monday, March 24, take up an attempt to end the county’s contract for federally funded family planning and related health services with Christ Community Health Services.

49. Backlog Backlash -

The first thing Veronica Coleman-Davis wanted to do was take a look at where thousands of untested rape kits had been stored over the last 30 years.

The former U.S. attorney is investigating how the backlog came to be. It’s an effort that, until her appointment in February by Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr., had been pointed at clearing the backlog with no answers from any of the players in the criminal justice system about how the backlog happened in the first place.

50. Fed Foresees Slightly Slower but Steady Growth -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve officials expect the U.S. economy to grow at a slightly slower but steady pace in 2014.

The Fed on Wednesday projected growth of 2.8 percent to 3 percent this year, a bit lower than its December projection of between 2.8 percent and 3.2 percent.

51. Fed Clarifies Guidance on Short-Term Rates -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Federal Reserve sought Wednesday to clarify a question that investors have been trying to determine: When it might start to raise short-term interest rates from record lows.

52. City Pension Change Outlined for 2015 -

The administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. made its formal proposal of a “long-term solution” and change in the city’s pension plan to a 401(k) style plan this week with specific terms Wharton has long said would be included.

53. US Consumer Prices Tick Up Just 0.1 Percent -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Cheaper energy kept U.S. consumer prices in check last month, despite a big rise in the cost of food, the latest sign that inflation is tame.

The consumer price index rose 0.1 percent in February, matching January's increase, the Labor Department said Tuesday. In the past 12 months, prices have risen just 1.1 percent, down from 1.6 percent in January and the smallest yearly gain in five months.

54. Haslam Pushing Common Core Standards -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam reiterated Tuesday that Common Core education standards are crucial to continuing to improve education in Tennessee and he hopes to dismiss misconceptions about them.

55. County Commissioners Review Ethics Code -

Shelby County Commissioners take their first look Wednesday, March 19, at possible changes to county government’s ethics code.

The changes, proposed by Commissioner Steve Mulroy, touch on issues raised earlier this year when a panel of the county ethics commission considered and ultimately dismissed a complaint filed by Commissioner Terry Roland against fellow Commissioner Sidney Chism.

56. Marijuana Study in Veterans Wins Federal Backing -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The federal government has signed off on a long-delayed study looking at marijuana as a treatment for veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder, a development that drug researchers are hailing as a major shift in U.S. policy.

57. Yellen to Put Fed's New Leadership on Display -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Janet Yellen era at the Federal Reserve begins in earnest this week with a two-day meeting, a policy statement and fresh economic forecasts. Yet all that will be a prelude to the marquee event: Yellen's first news conference as Fed chair.

58. New Insurance Rights for Same-Sex Couples -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Addressing gay and lesbian concerns, the Obama administration Friday moved to expand health insurance access for same-sex couples and close a loophole that threatened to leave some HIV/AIDS patients without coverage.

59. Low-Wage Jobs Unexpectedly a Way of Life for Many -

WASHINGTON (AP) – For years, many Americans followed a simple career path: Land an entry-level job. Accept a modest wage. Gain skills. Leave eventually for a better-paying job.

The workers benefited, and so did lower-wage retailers such as Wal-Mart: When its staffers left for better-paying jobs, they could spend more at its stores. And the U.S. economy gained, too, because more consumer spending fueled growth.

60. Fresenius to Create 665 Jobs at New Knox Plant -

KNOXVILLE (AP) – Renal services provider Fresenius Medical Care has announced it will locate its East Coast manufacturing facility in Knoxville, creating 665 jobs in the coming years.

Gov. Bill Haslam said in a release that the German company plans to spend up to $140 million on the project to build the plant in the city's Panasonic building.

61. Ruling Sets School Board Membership at Nine -

No local elected body in Shelby County has changed as many times in as short a period of time as the Shelby County Schools board.

The federal court order Tuesday, March 11, by U.S. District Judge Samuel “Hardy” Mays approving the restructure of the school board to a nine-member body effective Sept. 1 will mark the third change in the school board in three years when it takes effect following August school board elections.

62. Mays Approves 9-Member County Schools Board -

With two rulings in as many days, U.S. District Judge Samuel “Hardy” Mays this week cleared his schedule of any pending matters in the reformation of public education in Shelby County.

Mays approved the restructuring of the Shelby County Schools board Tuesday, March 11, to a nine-member body with districts that include the city of Memphis and unincorporated Shelby County but not the six suburban towns and cities.

63. US House Committee Investigating GM Recall -

DETROIT (AP) – A congressional committee is investigating the way General Motors and a federal safety agency handled a deadly ignition switch problem in compact cars.

House Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Fred Upton of Michigan says the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration received a large number of complaints about the problem during the past decade. But GM didn't recall the 1.6 million cars worldwide until last month.

64. US Employers Posted More Open Jobs in January -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. employers advertised slightly more jobs in January than in December, a sign that hiring should remain steady in coming months.

The Labor Department said Tuesday that employers posted 3.9 million job openings, up 1.5 percent from December. That is still below November's nearly six-year high of 4.1 million, the first month that openings topped 4 million since March 2008.

65. Bill to Block Nashville Amp Project Worries Haslam -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam on Tuesday raised concerns about efforts by fellow Republicans in the state Legislature to block a dedicated bus lane project through Nashville.

The governor told reporters after a speech to the Nashville Chamber of Commerce that although he has not formed an opinion about whether the project – called the Amp – is a good idea, he's worried about the possible precedent of legislative committees deciding over individual transportation projects in the state.

66. Examining Numbers From Data Week -

The first week of the month always produces a torrent of economic data that is capped off by the Friday employment report from the Department of Labor. Here is a summary of the more relevant data releases from last week:

67. Durham Dives Into Legislature During First Year -

When someone first mentioned to freshman state Rep. Jeremy Durham that there would be a new seat in Williamson County, he thought he was being asked to suggest someone, not run.

68. Court Dismissal Leaves Matter of School Board Restructuring -

UPDATE: U.S. District Judge Samuel "Hardy" Mays approved Tuesday, March 11, the Shelby County Commission's plan to restructure the Shelby County Schools board to a nine-member board with the August 2014 elections.

69. Mays Accepts Suburban Schools Settlements, Dismisses Related Court Claims -

The Memphis Federal Court judge overseeing the three-year old court case over the reformation of public schools in Shelby County has dismissed the last major claim of the case, all remaining claims still pending.

70. Mays Accepts Suburban Schools Settlement, Dismisses Related Court Claims -

The Memphis Federal Court judge overseeing the three-year old court case over the reformation of public schools in Shelby County has dismissed the last major claim of the case, all remaining claims still pending.

71. Blast of Winter Weather Can't Faze US Employers -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Brutal winter weather snarled traffic, canceled flights and cut power to homes and factories in February. Yet it didn't faze U.S. employers, who added 175,000 jobs, far more than the two previous months.

72. Commission to Vote on Crosstown Funding -

Shelby County Commissioners will vote Monday, March 10, on $5 million in public infrastructure funding for the Crosstown redevelopment project.

The commission meets at 1:30 p.m. at the Vasco Smith County Administration Building, 160 N. Main St. Follow the meeting @tdnpols, www.twitter.com/tdnpols.

73. US Applications for Jobless Aid Reach 3-Month Low -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The number of people seeking U.S. unemployment benefits dropped 26,000 last week to a seasonally adjusted 323,000, the lowest level in three months as layoffs remain at pre-recession levels.

74. 2-Year Extension Offered for Canceled Health Plans -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Warding off the specter of election-year health insurance cancellations, the Obama administration Wednesday announced a two-year extension for individual policies that don't meet requirements of the new health care law.

75. Collierville Schools Prepares for Parent ‘Angst’ -

UPDATE: In a special meeting Friday, March 7, the Germantown Municipal Schools board voted 3-0 to rescind its tuition requirement for open enrollment of students living outside Germantown.

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76. Norris Finds Legislative Leadership Has its Price -

Many people who like problem solving usually tackle a tough crossword, or maybe Sudoku.

Collierville’s Mark Norris opted for politics.

77. Primaries Offer First Major Test of Voter ID Laws -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In elections that begin next week, voters in 10 states will be required to present photo identification before casting ballots – the first major test of voter ID laws after years of legal challenges arguing that the measures are designed to suppress voting.

78. Estimated Q4 Economic Growth Rate Cut to 2.4 Percent -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy grew at a 2.4 percent annual rate last quarter, sharply less than first thought, in part because consumers didn't spend as much as initially estimated.

79. Hopes Up for Sunnier US Economy Once Winter Fades -

WASHINGTON (AP) – When the weather warms up, so, too, will the U.S. economy.

That, at least, is the prevailing view of economists, who shrugged off a government report Friday that the economy was weaker last quarter than first thought.

80. Medicaid Expansion Terms Possible -

Former Tennessee Gov. Phil Bredesen says federal health officials are probably willing to talk terms on an expansion of Medicaid in Tennessee with the state’s current governor, Bill Haslam.

“The feds want us to do it badly enough that they will negotiate some things to have protections,” Bredesen said in response to a question at the Economic Club of Memphis. The question was whether he thought Haslam should accept an expansion of Medicaid that is all federally funded for the first three years of the expansion.

81. Fed: Memphis Banks Improved in 2013 -

Memphis banks ended 2013 in somewhat better shape collectively than they stood at the end of 2012, based on new numbers from the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.

82. Yellen: Fed Monitoring Recent Weaker Economic Data -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen noted Thursday that recent economic data have pointed to weaker-than-expected gains in consumer spending and job growth. She said the Fed will be watching to see whether the slowdown proves only a temporary blip caused by severe winter weather.

83. Senators Look for E-Cigarette Marketing Limits -

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) – Several U.S. senators are co-sponsoring a bill that would curb electronic cigarette marketing while the fast-growing industry awaits federal regulation.

The bill introduced Wednesday by California Sen. Barbara Boxer, Iowa Sen. Tom Harkin and others would ban marketing to children based on standards set by the Federal Trade Commission.

84. GOP Tax Plan Lowers Rates, Repeals Popular Breaks -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A sweeping House Republican plan to overhaul the nation's tax laws would wipe out a slew of popular tax breaks to help pay for lower overall tax rates, a politically risky move in an election year that drew quick opposition Wednesday.

85. Feds File Suit Against For-Profit College Chain -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau filed suit Wednesday against a large, for-profit college chain alleging that it pushed students into high-cost private student loans knowing they would likely end in default.

86. Hampline Recalls Overton Park Interstate Plans -

In a city with lots of markers and monuments showing where historic events happened, there is an increasing amount of attention to a different kind of Memphis historic event.

And it involves something that did not happen – the interstate that was supposed to go through Overton Park 50 years ago but was first delayed and then stopped for good in a U.S. Supreme Court ruling 43 years ago this coming Sunday.

87. Commission Approves Nine-District School Board -

Shelby County Commissioners approved Monday, Feb. 24, a restructuring of the Shelby County Schools board to nine districts that take in all of Memphis and all of the unincorporated areas of the county but not the six suburban towns and cities in Shelby County.

88. Supreme Court Seems Divided in Climate Case -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court appeared divided on Monday over the sole Obama administration program already in place to limit power plant and factory emissions of gases blamed for global warming.

89. Governors Erupt in Partisan Dispute at White House -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The nation's governors emerged from a meeting with President Barack Obama on Monday claiming harmony, only to immediately break into an on-camera partisan feud in front of the West Wing.

90. Economists Divided on Timing of Fed Pullback -

Business economists are almost equally divided over whether the Federal Reserve will pare its bond purchases at the current pace through year's end or pause to let the economy recover further.

The views were unveiled Monday by the National Association for Business Economics. The NABE conducted its twice-a-year survey of 230 members between Jan. 30 and Feb. 6, before Janet Yellen's first appearance before Congress as Fed chair.

91. Watson Sets Record Straight About Labor Union Views -

Tennessee Sen. Bo Watson, a Republican from Hixon, has been showing up in the national media lately, thanks to his public statements against unionization effort at the Volkswagen plant in Chattanooga.

92. FDA Looks to Reboot Nonprescription Drug System -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Food and Drug Administration is looking to revamp its system for regulating hundreds of over-the-counter drugs, saying the decades-old process is not flexible enough to keep pace with modern medical developments.

93. US Housing Construction Down 16 Percent in January -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. home construction fell in January for a second month but the weakness in both months reflected severe winter weather in many parts of the country. The expectation is that housing will deliver another year of solid gains, helped by an improving economy.

94. Fed Minutes Point to Continued Paring of Stimulus -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve officials agreed at their January meeting that further gradual reductions in their stimulus would be appropriate as long as the economy keeps improving.

95. Cold Weather Causes Factory Output to Drop -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Harsh winter weather led to a steep drop in U.S. factory output in January. Manufacturers made fewer cars and trucks, appliances, furniture and carpeting, as the recent cold spell ended five straight months of increased production

96. Yellen Debuts as Fed Chair -

For the first time since 2006, someone not named Ben Bernanke testified before the House Financial Services Committee as Chair of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. Dr. Janet Yellen officially assumed the post on Feb. 3.

97. Arkansas Lawmakers Considering 'Private Option' Bill -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — House and Senate leaders are upbeat about the prospect of continuing Arkansas' compromise Medicaid expansion, as its funding bill nears its first floor vote of this year's session.

98. Older Americans Are Early Winners Under Health Law -

CHICAGO (AP) — For many older Americans who lost jobs during the recession, the quest for health care has been one obstacle after another. They're unwanted by employers, rejected by insurers, struggling to cover rising medical costs and praying to reach Medicare age before a health crisis.

99. Few Eligible Patients Can Get Weight Loss Surgery -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Like 78 million other Americans, MaryJane Harrison is obese.

And like many critically overweight Americans, Harrison cannot afford to have weight loss surgery because her health insurance doesn't cover it. The financial burden makes it nearly impossible for her to follow the advice of three physicians who have prescribed the stomach-shrinking procedure for Harrison, who is four-feet, 10 inches and weighs 265 pounds.

100. January Insurance Sign-Ups Meet Monthly Goal -

WASHINGTON (AP) – While states are having varying success getting people to sign up, January marked the first time since new health insurance markets opened last fall that a national monthly enrollment target was met.