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Editorial Results (free)

1. New Life for Old Malls -

Since 1957, when the first modern, fully enclosed shopping mall was built in Edina, Minnesota, shopping became an American pastime. New shopping malls changed the landscape in communities across the country at the rate of 140 a year.

2. Master Your Market Seminar to Examine Housing Trends -

Real estate industry professionals will have the opportunity this week to learn more about major trends in the local real estate market, including residential and commercial sales, new housing, foreclosures and lending practices.

3. AutoZone Celebrates 35th Year at First Store -

AutoZone Inc. celebrated the company’s 35th anniversary this week at the company’s Forrest City, Ark., store to thank the community where the auto parts retailer’s story began.

4. Commission Approves Houston Levee Widening -

Shelby County Commissioners approved Monday, July 21, an $18 million widening of Houston Levee Road between Walnut Grove Road and the Wolf River Bridge as well as another $10.3 million to widen Walnut Grove Road between Rocky Point Road and Houston Levee Road, both with grant money from the Tennessee Department of Transportation.

5. ‘Drive for Progress’ -

There’s a duality of meaning implied in the name of the civic organization where Nancy Coffee serves as president and CEO.

6. Civic Celebration -

Shep Wilbun describes “Frayser Day” as “MEMfix on steroids,” referring to the efforts by the Mayor’s Innovation Delivery Team to reanimate business districts or blocks in several parts of the city.

7. Supporters Still Racing to Save Brewery -

At the conclusion of the Tennessee Brewery Untapped temporary activation project, supporters of the event were greeted June 1 with a message on the group’s Facebook page that both thanked participants and bid them farewell.

8. Building Community -

Over a recent weekend, around 30 members of Grace-St. Luke’s Episcopal Church descended on a home in the Northwood Hills community just north of Raleigh.

They came armed with determination and demolition tools, spending most of the weekend ripping out old appliances, tearing away wallpaper that had seen better days and preparing the dog-eared house for a rehabilitation project that will make it a home.

9. AutoZone Celebrates 35th Year at First Store -

AutoZone Inc. celebrated the company’s 35th anniversary this week at the company’s Forrest City, Ark., store to thank the community where the auto parts retailer’s story began.

10. County Commission Approves Houston Levee Widening -

Shelby County Commissioners approved Monday, July 21, an $18 million widening of Houston Levee Road between Walnut Grove Road and the Wolf River Bridge as well as another $10.3 million to widen Walnut Grove Road between Rocky Point Road and Houston Levee Road, both with grant money from the Tennessee Department of Transportation.

11. Teach for America Leverages Start Co. Resources -

Education reform has been alive and well here in Memphis over the last few years. There have been many great initiatives established to secure dollars and establish programming to move our youth forward. As always, I am thinking of scale, sustainability and innovation to stay relevant.

12. Business Licenses Up 26 Percent in Second Quarter -

The last three months proved to be a healthy period for the local business climate.

Business licenses issued by the Shelby County Clerk’s Office in the second quarter of 2014 spiked 25.7 percent from the same period in 2013, according to The Daily News Online, www.memphisdailynews.com.

13. I Choose Memphis: Hillary Quirk -

“I Choose Memphis” spotlights Memphians who are passionate about calling this community home. New Memphis Institute provides the profiles.

Name: Hillary Quirk

Job title and company: Community Manager, Start Co.

14. Early Vote Expands as Campaigns Enter New Phase -

There is a unique and persistent part of the political process that gnaws at candidates, separating them from the voters they court and sometimes stalk. You might call it the day of the ballot.

In the weeks leading up to the start of early voting, they get hit up constantly by those putting out endorsement ballots to be distributed during early voting and on election day, most often by paid poll workers. Candidates must pay to be on a ballot, which those organizing the ballots say is necessary to cover printing and distribution costs.

15. County Commission Continues Prekindergarten Debate -

Shelby County Commissioners pick up Monday, July 21, where they left off earlier in the month about a way to fund prekindergarten programs.

The commission faces dueling resolutions, with one setting up further study on an expansion, and the other dedicating $3 million in surplus funds from the just-ended fiscal year and the first $3 million of any surplus from the current fiscal year to Shelby County Schools and the suburban school systems.

16. From Despair to Belief -

A July weekday afternoon, about 2:45. It’s the perfect time for just about anyone to be nodding off in class.

But in the basement of Midtown Church of Christ, where HopeWorks Inc. is housed, class is in session and a dozen men and their teacher are having a lively discussion.

17. Bankruptcy Filings Drop Below 3,000 -

For the first time since 2011, the number of Memphis-area bankruptcies filed in the second quarter dropped below 3,000.

Between April 1 and June 30, the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Western District of Tennessee saw 2,959 bankruptcies in which the person or business listed a Shelby County address. That’s a 6.4 percent decrease from the 3,164 filed during the second quarter of 2013, according to The Daily News Online, memphisdailynews.com.

18. Johnson Returns to Different Schools Reality -

When Carol Johnson left as superintendent of Memphis City Schools at about this time in 2007, the system was struggling with Bush-era No Child Left Behind standards and making progress at some schools.

19. Council Hears Alternatives to Health Insurance Cuts -

Memphis City Council members fielded several plans Tuesday, July 15, for alternatives to health insurance cuts approved by the council last month. But leaders of the police and fire unions were not among those making an alternative proposal at the committee session, the first in a series of what amount to public hearings.

20. States Told to Find Way to Clear Medicaid Backlog -

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) – A half-dozen states with backlogs for Medicaid enrollees were facing a federal deadline Monday to create plans for getting those low-income residents enrolled in health coverage.

21. Primacy Parkway Office Building Sells for $7 Million -

6060 Primacy Parkway
Memphis, TN 38119
Sale Amount: $6.9 million

Sale Date: June 27, 2014
Buyer: LSREF2 Newton LLC
Seller: Hub Properties Trust
Details: The 130,593-square-foot office building at 6060 Primacy Parkway in East Memphis has sold for $6.9 million.

22. City Council Turns Again to Benefits Discussions -

Memphis City Council members won’t take any major votes Tuesday, July 15, on city employee benefits.

But the controversial topic will likely dominate much of another council day at City Hall. The council is in the gap between its approval of health insurance changes in June and an October vote on the companion proposal to change city employee pension plans for new hires and those with less than 10 years of service.

23. Company Buys 30 Acres Of Land for $1.3 Million -

An affiliate of Lakeland-based real estate company WESSCORP Communities has paid $1.3 million for about 30 acres of vacant land in Northeast Memphis near Arlington.

The entity known as The Charleston HL Apartment Community LLC bought the two parcels – one totaling 29.6 acres and one totaling 0.1 acres – in a June 30 special warranty deed from First Alliance Bank.

24. Transplant Games Show True Athletic Spirit -

At the NCAA Tournament every March, it is the cliché of clichés when coaches and players say in a press conference before their first game, “We’re just happy to be here.”

But when members of the Mid-South team competing in the Transplant Games of America July 11-15 in Houston say it, the phrase rings true.

25. Dance Teacher Spreads Love of Dance From Cordova -

Arman Sahakyan, born in Armenia’s capital city of Yerevan, started taking dance classes as a 6-year-old.

Fast forward almost three decades, and today the 33-year-old remains committed to dance as an art form – only now he’s also spreading that enthusiasm to others as the owner of Dancing With Arman, a dance studio in Cordova.

26. Changing Landscape -

It’s been confusing from a distance.

The formal groundbreaking for Shelby Farms Park’s $70 million “Heart of the Park” improvements, including an expansion of Patriot Lake, came the same week last month the Memphis City Council voted to delay for one year the city’s portion of funding for the Shelby Farms Parkway.

27. Cushman & Wakefield Adds Yates to Capital Markets Team -

Alex Yates has joined the Cushman & Wakefield/Commercial Advisors Capital Markets team as vice president, assisting and executing investment sales, debt/equity placement and development advisory projects. Yates’ efforts will be heavily concentrated in multifamily and retail, but he will focus on other product types as well.

28. UTHSC College of Allied Health Sciences Gets New Name -

Come fall, nearly 600 students will be enrolled in the University of Tennessee Health Science Center’s College of Health Professions – and that will be a first because on July 1, that became the new name for what formerly was known as the College of Allied Health Sciences.

29. Odyssey Building -

It’s fitting that the word “odyssey” is included in the name of Sarah Petschonek’s program she launched in March 2013 as a volunteering platform for job seekers.

That’s because her Volunteer Odyssey effort promises participants a robust volunteering experience, one that’s already seen 25 people complete the program and which is preparing to expand even more beyond its initial concept.

30. I Choose Memphis: Airika Wallace Gigas -

“I Choose Memphis” spotlights Memphians who are passionate about calling this community home. New Memphis Institute provides the profiles.

Name: Airika Wallace Gigas

31. Tennessee Brewery Supporters Still Working to Save Building -

With an Aug. 1 demolition date looming, a group of Tennessee Brewery supporters is still working behind the scenes to save the historic structure from the wrecking ball.

Restaurateur Taylor Berger, a leader of the recent “Tennessee Brewery Untapped” temporary activation project that brought thousands of people to the brewery grounds over a six-week run, said his group has applied for a temporary use permit to launch a new version of an “Untapped”-style event at the brewery.

32. Court to Weigh Government Duty to Settle Bias Claims -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court said Monday it will consider a dispute over the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's duty to try and settle charges of job discrimination before filing lawsuits against employers.

33. Palazzolo Opens Run for Germantown Mayor -

So far, Germantown Alderman Mike Palazzolo has no opposition in his bid to become the next mayor of Germantown in the Nov. 4 elections.

And his early start campaigning door to door in March and covering about 25 percent of the city so far means he may not in the race to succeed outgoing Mayor Sharon Goldsworthy.

34. Compromise, Relationships and Faith -

Part three of a three-part series. Securing $58 million for a senior housing project is not easy. Cathy Davis, executive director of Bayview Hunters Point Multipurpose Senior Services Inc. (BHPMSS) in California speaks eloquently about compromise and engaging with the political system.

35. Timing Key Element of County Tax Rate Debate -

More funding from Shelby County government for prekindergarten classrooms is a matter of timing, say those on both sides of the property tax rate question on which the $2.8 million in additional funding hinges.

36. Tunica Roadhouse Launches Free Concert Series -

Tunica Roadhouse Casino & Hotel has announced it is hosting a free concert series starting July 5.

The first show will feature the band Fuel, with a free fireworks show immediately after the concert. Additional concerts will take place Aug. 2 and Sept. 6, with the bands being announced the first week of July.

37. Paragon Bank Celebrates Record 2013 -

At Paragon Bank’s annual shareholders’ meeting this month, the bank’s leadership team could be forgiven for brimming with confidence.

38. Events -

Hattiloo Theatre will hold a free season nine community grand opening Saturday, June 28, from 8 a.m. to midnight in its new Overton Square theater, 37 S. Cooper St. Events include performances, tours, concerts and more. Tickets to each event are on a first-come/first-served basis. Visit hattiloo.org/grand-opening-season-9.php for schedule.

39. Park Progress -

Shelby Farms Park has always seemed, in a way, like Memphis’ 4,500-acre backyard.

Venture to the park on any given day, and what’s liable to greet you is a cross section of Memphis that presents itself amid the park’s rolling hills, pastures, trails and lakes.

40. CSC Sugar to Open Plant in Covington -

CSC Sugar LLC will open a sugar processing plant Monday, June 30, in the Rialto Industrial Park in Covington, Tenn., that will hire 50 people and prompt the hiring of more drivers at Larry Bowman Trucking in nearby Ripley.

41. Obama Aims to Put Human Face on Economic Struggles -

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) – President Barack Obama said Thursday that Washington needs to stop "playing to the most fringe elements of politics" and help Americans who are fighting to make ends meet, as he spent an afternoon with a working mother who wrote to him about her struggles.

42. Events -

Stax Music Academy, Stax Museum and Memphis Public Library will host Steve Cropper, guitarist for Booker T. & the MGs, for a Soul & Blues Brown Bag Series concert and Q&A Friday, June 27, at noon in the amphitheater behind the academy, 926 E. McLemore Ave. Visit staxmuseum.com.

43. Landing Zone -

Beale Street Landing was supposed to cost far less than $43 million and be completed much sooner than the decade it took from the design competition.

But the head of the Riverfront Development Corp. overseeing the 6-acre landing and its construction says with the formal two-day opening of the landing starting Friday, June 27, the riverfront project at the foot of Beale Street and on the northern edge of Tom Lee Park should begin to counter critics of how the project has been managed.

44. Amazon, Microsoft, Boeing Lure Interns With Perks -

SEATTLE (AP) – Amazon, Microsoft and Boeing sweeten already lucrative job offers in Seattle with subsidized, furnished housing. Transportation is covered from anywhere in the country, including airport food, baggage fees and taxis. There's free breakfast and dinner, biweekly housekeeping, a private party with Macklemore and Deadmau5.

45. Events -

Sales and Marketing Society of the Mid-South will host a roundtable with executive coach and HR consultant Judy Bell titled “Emotional Intelligence, the Predictor of Success” Thursday, June 26, from 7:15 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. at Cheffie’s Cafe, 483 High Point Terrace. Cost at the door is $20. Visit sms-midsouth.org.

46. Heart of Arlington -

When Sandy Brewer and her family moved more than eight years ago from Cordova to a turn-of-the-century home just two blocks from Arlington’s Depot Square, she said it felt like taking a step back in time.

47. Hopson Contract Extension Represents Reform Mandate -

Public school superintendents in Tennessee are not elected in a popular vote anymore. They are appointed by school boards – the only hiring decision school boards make.

So when the Shelby County Schools board voted 6-0 Monday, June 23, to extend the three-year contract of superintendent Dorsey Hopson through June 2018, it was a mandate by the board for the student achievement gains Hopson and the board have set as goals.

48. Kitsinger Continues Downtown Work With The Development Studio -

As an architect and planner, Andy Kitsinger worked on large projects whose scale immediately changed areas, even as they were being built.

And he’s also worked on developments and projects that are smaller – sometimes part of the ripple effect of larger projects, but no less important or influential.

49. Koury Helps Local AIA Serve Community -

In 2010, the American Institute of Architects Memphis chapter launched lunITECTS, a non-professional group for people who have a keen interest in architecture and design.

During exclusive tours the lunITECTS visit neighborhoods, buildings and homes, all part of an effort to generate greater public discourse and involvement about architecture and design in the community.

50. New Push to Get Girls Into Computer Sciences -

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. (AP) – Diana Navarro loves to code, and she's not afraid to admit it. But the 18-year-old Rutgers University computer science major knows she's an anomaly: Writing software to run computer programs in 2014 is – more than ever – a man's world.

51. Outlasting Outdated Industries -

One result of technological advances is a change in the way we do business. Sometimes this change results in new jobs, but often, it can also result in job loss.

Have you ever had the sense your job might be going away soon? Maybe you’ve noticed your industry is declining and being replaced by another. When this happens, you should pay attention.

52. Brady: Zoo Parking Solution Difficult -

The president of the Memphis Zoo says solutions to the parking problem at Overton Park won’t be easy and likely will involve change for all of the park’s institutions.

“Overton Park is a community park. … It’s clearly not a neighborhood park,” Chuck Brady told The Daily News in his first interview since protests began in late May over the zoo’s use of the park greensward for overflow parking. “It’s easy to define the problem. But it’s difficult to carve out a solution.”

53. Long Council Day Comes With Change, Emotions -

It was apparent early in the long council day Tuesday, June 17, at City Hall that there wouldn’t be many amendments to the $600 million operating budget and $84 million capital budget the council would approve later that evening.

54. Tunica Reels as Competition, Recession Hit Casinos -

TUNICA RESORTS, Miss. (AP) – It was 3:30 p.m. on a Monday in May at Harrah's Tunica Hotel & Casino in northwestern Mississippi.

Gamblers were few in number, and dealers stood ready at idle card tables.

55. Council Approves Budgets, Stable Tax Rate, Health Insurance Changes -

Memphis City Council members approved a $600 million operating budget and an $84 million capital budget Tuesday, June 17, for the city government fiscal year that begins July 1.

And the council gave final approval to larger changes to employee and retiree health insurance plans designed to make long term changes necessary to right the city’s financial condition.

56. Partners Drive Startup Ecosystem -

Building startups is tough work that requires the engagement of money, mentorship and professional support.

Back before there were incubators, accelerators and formal platforms to systematically assist startup companies, there were critical trusted advisers in the community to help guide entrepreneurs as they started up. Those advisers were local bankers, lawyers, marketers, accountants and others where entrepreneurs could turn for support and guidance. While new startup infrastructures have sprung up to provide knowledge, capital and other resources, professionals continue to be the backbone driving entrepreneurial growth.

57. County Budget Season Not Over Yet -

The Shelby County Commission defeated two competing versions of the county property tax rate for the new fiscal year on the second of three readings Monday, June 16.

But they both advance to third and final readings when the commission meets in July.

58. Starbucks Clears College Degree Path for Workers -

NEW YORK (AP) – Starbucks is giving its baristas a shot at an online college degree, an unusual benefit in an industry where higher education is often out of reach for workers.

The coffee chain is partnering with Arizona State University to make an undergraduate degree available at a steep discount to 135,000 U.S. employees who work at least 20 hours a week.

59. Wireless Companies Put Up More 'Stealth' Towers -

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) – One might be hidden in a cross on a church lawn. Others are disguised as a cactus in the desert, a silo in farm country or a palm tree reaching into a sunny sky.

60. Career Transitions for Scientists -

I’ve recently received multiple letters from scientists in the research community with questions about their career transitions. Most likely, this is because of Memphis’ thriving medical research community. After all, Memphians are developing new technologies for things from vaccines to cancer cures.

61. Marisol’s World -

When “Marisol: Sculptures and Works on Paper” opens Saturday, June 14, at the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, sculptor Marisol Escobar will be at her New York home, where she spends much of her time, working occasionally 40 to 50 years after being in the spotlight of the art world.

62. Graceland Hotel Passes Crucial Hurdle -

A new hotel near Graceland has passed a key regulatory hurdle.

The Memphis-Shelby County Land Use Control Board approved a proposal from Elvis Presley Enterprises to build a 450-room hotel on the same side of Elvis Presley Boulevard as the historic Graceland mansion, one of the city’s top tourism sites.

63. Many Seek New Homes Near Cities But are Priced Out -

WASHINGTON (AP) – City living has been a blessing for Tim Nelson.

The Phoenix lawyer moved downtown a few months ago into a new $389,000 home with a warehouse-style floor plan, a Jacuzzi tub and kitchen counters made of Caesarstone quartz. His favorite coffee spot is three blocks away. When the Arizona Diamondbacks play on Friday nights, he can watch postgame fireworks from his deck.

64. Health Choice Selects Jones to Lead Provider Engagement -

LaTasha Jones has been named director of provider engagement at Health Choice LLC, where she will be responsible for directing and managing the implementation of a clinical integration database for Health Choice providers and practices.

65. How to Sabotage Your Fundraising -

Fundraising is about asking for money. That’s the common perception. But is it the truth?

Here’s what we have learned from our extensive work with nonprofit organizations, colleges and universities, individual donors, program officers and foundation executives: Fundraising is about much more than asking for money.

66. Yearlong Party -

It’s perhaps fitting that the Germantown Performing Arts Center celebrates its 20th anniversary this year with Paul Chandler as its executive director, a job he’s had for almost two years now.

67. I Choose Memphis: Melissa Duong -

“I Choose Memphis” spotlights Memphians who are passionate about calling this community home. New Memphis Institute provides the profiles.

Name: Melissa Duong

68. Cohen Challenges Haslam on Medicaid Expansion -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen says the city’s fair share of federal funding for rape kit backlogs is $1 million.

69. Touch of History -

For its 150th anniversary, First Tennessee Bank didn’t want to only blow out the candles, so to speak.

In addition to commemorating the enviable milestone of longevity in an industry as frequently upended as banking, the Memphis-based financial institution wanted to help customers directly feel the impact of the bank’s presence in their community. At the same time, the bank also wants to let customers literally reach out and touch the bank’s history.

70. Boyle Starts New Phase at Spring Creek Ranch -

Activity at Boyle Investment Co.’s Spring Creek Ranch has continued this year with multiple phases of construction as it develops a total of 340 lots over the next decade.

71. ‘Alive and Well’ -

The diverse crowd that typically gathers for South Main Historic Arts District Trolley Night – from hipsters in skinny jeans to residents who enjoy the monthly celebration of their neighborhood to others drawn to see what the fuss is all about – featured several hundred ghastly additions in May.

72. Online Pirates Thrive on Legitimate Ad Dollars -

LOS ANGELES (AP) – Movie and music piracy thrives online in part because crafty website operators receive advertising dollars from major companies like Comcast, Ford and McDonald's.

That's the conclusion of several recent reports that shed light on Internet piracy's funding sources.

73. What’s Up With Low Rates? -

As 2013 drew to a close, investors bid up “risky” assets and sold “safe” assets in anticipation of a robust 2014. “Risky” stocks rose 30 percent and the “safe” 10-year Treasury bond lost 4 percent.

74. Luttrell, Malone Clash on Pre-K Expansion -

The top two contenders for Shelby County mayor had the closest thing yet to a debate Monday, June 2, on budget priorities.

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell and his Democratic challenger, former County Commissioner Deidre Malone, didn’t address each other directly.

75. Southbrook Mall Concept Goes to Public Hearings -

As city Housing and Community Development Director Robert Lipscomb began talking in the gym of the Whitehaven Community Center last week, he could see the Pepper Tree Apartments on the other side of Graceland Drive.

76. New Path -

A lot has changed for Memphis-based TruGreen lawn care in the last six months.

The company behind one of the best known brands in lawn care became its own independent company at the start of 2014, spinning off from The ServiceMaster Co. in a move that meant changes for both companies.

77. Editorial: Bravo to Symphony for Changing Course -

The Memphis Symphony Orchestra has completed its season with money in the bank and ideas about how different the next season must be on several fronts.

With more stable financial footing and fundraising appeals that have raised more money than the goals set, we hope the symphony’s innovative forays across the borders of art and expression will continue.

78. Facing the Music -

Starting over is one of those tasks that requires a fresh set of eyes if it’s to be pulled off successfully.

There has to be an acceptance that what was and what will be probably are mutually exclusive and a willingness to try new things, to be different and, above all else, to keep pressing forward.

79. US Bank Earnings Decline 7.7 Percent in First Quarter -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. banks' earnings declined 7.7 percent in the January-March quarter from a year earlier, as higher interest rates dampened demand for mortgage refinancing and reduced banks' revenue from the mortgage business.

80. School Board Begins Contract Extension Talks, Approves Two Charters -

Shelby County Schools board members have authorized the board’s attorney to begin talks with attorneys for superintendent Dorsey Hopson about a possible extension of his three-year contract to lead the school system.

81. Breathing Easier -

Early screenings reduce lung cancer’s mortality rate. Dr. Benny Weksler is sure of that much.

“I don’t think there’s a debate in terms of the effectiveness; the debate is how are we going to pay for it?” said Weksler, chief of the Division of Thoracic Surgery at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center and also UTHSC’s first Eastridge-Cole Professor.

82. I Choose Memphis: Jon Alfuth -

“I Choose Memphis” spotlights Memphians who are passionate about calling this community home. New Memphis Institute provides the profiles.

Name: Jon Alfuth

Job title and company: Teacher, The Soulsville Charter School

83. Selling Memphis -

Not too long ago, Dudley Boyd, president and CEO of National Bankers Trust, entered a conference room at the Greater Memphis Chamber’s office at the Falls Building Downtown.

84. Medical Makeover -

After suffering from years of benign neglect, a new, more invigorated Memphis Medical Center is finally beginning to take shape.

A drive or walk around the area these days shows the hallmarks of a changing landscape – bulldozers, backhoes, cranes and construction crews working feverishly to forge the new urban environment.

85. Grants Prove Bioworks is Delivering Good Results -

One grant is good. Two grants are better.

In 2012, Memphis Bioworks received a grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Environmental Workforce Developmental and Job Training Program (EWDJT). The $300,000 grant issued provided training for 110 persons, 65 of whom already have been placed in full-time jobs.

86. Airport Artists -

Several years ago Richard White, vice president of properties and business development at the Memphis-Shelby County Airport Authority, noticed what he thought was a troubling trend.

87. City Budget Dispute Remains Staring Match -

It was the first thing Memphis Fire Director Alvin Benson told Memphis City Council members Tuesday, May 20, during budget committee hearings.

88. Selling to Connected Buyers -

First in a two-part series. The buying experience has been completely reinvented over the last decade, and companies slow to adapt are losing revenue and market share as a result.

A 2011 Sales Executive Council study showed 57 percent of the buying process is completed before a prospect even makes contact with a sales rep. We now live in a world built predominantly of connected buyers whose minds are almost made up before they choose to interact with a member of your team, as most of the desired information is at their fingertips, day or night. If they make contact, buyers don’t distinguish between a customer service and sales rep, as they see them as one in the same.

89. Tracy Named IMC Chief Information Officer -

Joel Tracy has been named the first chief information officer at IMC Cos., a national logistics company focused on international shipments. In his new role, Tracy will be responsible for delivering a broad range of IT initiatives in support of IMC’s logistics business.

90. 20twelve Brings Style to Broad -

There’s an energy in the Broad Avenue Arts District that Chantal Johnson insists “you just can’t bottle.”

The area, in other words, is bursting with enthusiasm from stakeholders such that it’s fast becoming a commercial and civic focal point in the city. So, in at least one sense, the location of Johnson’s new lifestyle store 20twelve, which is opening soon, was probably foreordained.

91. Graduating to a Lifetime of Giving -

Happy graduation! You did it! This column is for graduates and their families.

We salute your commitment to your education, your future and the future of your family. Graduating from high school, community college, a technical training school, or a four-year college or university is a big deal. No two ways about it. You are celebrating a milestone and the beginning of “what’s next.”

92. Events -

The Memphis and Shelby County Office of Sustainability will hold an open house about the Mid-South Regional Greenprint and Sustainability Plan Tuesday, May 20, from 3 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. at the North End Terminal, 444 N. Main St. Visit midsouthgreenprint.org.

93. Arlington, Lakeland Superintendents Discuss Smaller Systems -

The superintendents of the Lakeland Schools and Arlington Community Schools systems admit they haven’t been in the spotlight much in the coming schools demerger.

But Tammy Mason of Arlington and Ted Horrell and Lakeland lead schools systems that have a relationship just as vital as the one between Germantown and Collierville, their larger counterparts in the set of six suburban school systems.

94. Letting it Ride -

The bicycles aren’t the only thing with wheels in Jim Steffen’s new shop.

His business itself, The Bikesmith, sits on wheels and operates as a mobile bike retail and repair venture.

95. Hospitals Reach Out to Attract Affluent Immigrants -

HOUSTON (AP) – The menu includes pork or chicken dumplings, fried rice or chicken congee soup with jasmine rice and ginger. It's an enviable repast that diners take in bed – hospital beds.

96. Events -

Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital will host a ribbon cutting for its expanded and renovated emergency room Tuesday, May 20, at 10 a.m. at the hospital, 7691 Poplar Ave. Visit methodisthealth.org.

97. Prescott Earned Place in Sports Hall of Fame -

On Easter Sunday, April 17, 1960, a 13-year-old Allie Prescott and his father were sitting down the third-base line at Russwood Park watching an exhibition game between the Cleveland Indians and the Chicago White Sox.

98. Trustmark Regional President Reflects on Future -

When yours is a bank that’s traditionally had a suburban footprint, moving inside the Interstate 240 loop to open a new regional headquarters is the kind of thing that makes a statement.

Trustmark’s newly opened regional headquarters, at 5350 Poplar Ave. in East Memphis, was an attempt to do just that. It came after Gene Henson, the bank’s Memphis region president, had been hunting for such a space for years – for pretty much the entirety of his time in Memphis, actually.

99. Building Community -

The Carrington at Schilling Farms looks like an apartment community you might find in Downtown Memphis or a town square, but the development – Boyle Investment Co.’s first apartment project in more than 30 years – is in the heart of Collierville.

100. Brewery’s Fate Unchanged Despite Untapped’s Success -

Tennessee Brewery Untapped, the festival-like celebration that’s turned the long-vacant brewery structure Downtown into a packed community space, is now roughly halfway through its six-week run.

Approaching the end arguably hasn’t served to diminish the enthusiasm of the crowds that still converge on the brewery’s courtyard and connected spaces each week of Untapped.