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Editorial Results (free)

1. Credit Unions See Fertile Ground in Memphis -

In one sense, the newly opened credit union branch across the street from East High School reflects a company adjusting its Memphis footprint.

But InTouch Credit Union’s relocation from 5100 Poplar Ave. to 3245 Poplar Ave. also brings some extra touches, like a drive-thru teller window and an ATM. And while it’s not an expansion, its opening comes at a time when local credit union officials say customer interest in their offerings is high, with membership rolls that keep getting longer.

2. Cardwell a Link to Metro’s Past, Present -

Metro Trustee Charlie Cardwell definitely is a member of the “good old boys” network that ran Nashville for decades.

3. Boner, Fate and the Summer of Shame -

Phil Bredesen knew what he was trying to do. He just didn’t know if he could accomplish it.

“I had this sense that Nashville was ready for change,” says the former Metro mayor and Tennessee governor, reflecting on his early motivation for taking on the system that had run Nashville for decades.

4. It’s the Law -

THE LAW, AND I QUOTE. Oh, the outrage! Across the nation, people have reacted to the laws passed and validated by the courts, their liberty threatened, the Constitution violated, the republic at risk.

5. Special Action on Same-Sex Nuptials a Waste of Time -

With Republican lawmakers scrambling for a response to the U.S. Supreme Court’s gay-marriage ruling, Tennesseans on both sides of the issue say they are seeking "equality."

Immediately after the court’s decision on Obergefell v. Hodges, Democratic U.S. Rep. Jim Cooper of Nashville said, "Love and equality won. I’m glad the Supreme Court ruled on the right side of history."

6. Insure Tennessee Path Still Facing Many Turns -

There’s a move in Nashville for a special session of the Tennessee General Assembly, but it would have nothing to do with the February special session on Gov. Bill Haslam’s Insure Tennessee proposal.

7. Cycling Ahead -

Unless you've seen the ubiquitous stations in cities like Knoxville and Nashville, it's difficult to imagine how bike sharing could connect Memphis.

Tourists and citizens can check out a bike on a per-ride or membership basis and return it to a separate station when they've reached their destination.

8. Memphis Election Fundraising Deadline Prompts Flurry of Appeals -

For the last week, candidates in the October Memphis elections have had fundraising fever.

The campaign finance reports for the period that ended Tuesday, June 30, are due at the Shelby County Election Commission by July 10. That’s followed by the noon July 16 filing deadline for candidates in the races for Memphis Mayor, City Council and City Court Clerk.

9. New Forrest Front -

The political battle over an equestrian statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest and the park that houses it has opened a new front.

10. Southern Heritage Defined Differently Across Tennessee -

Tennessee’s loyalty was divided in the Civil War, and 150 years later, little is changed as the debate over Confederate symbols arises in the wake of the racist-fueled South Carolina church massacre.

11. Methodist South Expands to Meet Whitehaven’s Needs -

Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare’s Whitehaven facility is a small, 156-bed "community hospital," but its emergency department is the third-busiest ER in Memphis.

To that end, the health care system is planning an $8.7 million emergency department expansion at Methodist South Hospital.

12. Knoxville’s Amazing Network of Trails, Parks and Waterways -

With the Great Smoky Mountains looming in the distance, and no shortage of ball fields and other outdoor recreation sites closer at hand, Knoxville and its surrounding communities don’t lack for recreational opportunities.

13. Memphis Ends Budget Season, But the Arguments Aren't Over -

The end of the budget season at City Hall can be a festive occasion.

Weeks of line-item detail and swapping one amount with another in the budget, as well as the pressure of revenue and other projections that amount to moving targets in the fiscal year, give way to approved operating and capital budgets as well as a property tax rate.

14. Collierville Commits -

Right after the Collierville Board of Mayor and Aldermen voted Monday, June 8, to raise the town’s property tax rate by 20 cents, a flash of lightning flared outside the town hall chamber’s windows.

15. Collierville Schools Proposal Goes To Aldermen -

A proposed comprehensive new high school for the Collierville School system moves to the Collierville Mayor and Board of Aldermen Monday, June 8, three days after the Collierville Schools board recommended a $99 million project to build the school on land south of Shelby Drive and east of Sycamore Road.

16. Beale Street Sweep Court Order Rips Police Practices -

The Beale Street Sweep is over.

It’s not the end of a song. It is the end of an 8-year-old police policy that has ordered those on the street after 3 a.m. to leave the district, go into a nightclub or be arrested.

17. ULI Fairgrounds Panel Has Busy Schedule -

A team of eight out-of-town planning experts has a busy week ahead as it wades into the simmering local debate about plans to recast the Mid-South Fairgrounds.

And the first hard copy of something the Urban Land Institute-assembled group is likely to get are the comments from four town hall meetings held in different parts of Memphis over two evenings last week.

18. Beale Authority Wants to Talk Fee Simple Ownership Of District -

The newly appointed Beale Street Tourism Development Authority wants to talk to Memphis City Council members about a fee simple arrangement for how it would govern the entertainment district for the city.

19. County Commission Tax-Rate Debate Picks Up Volume -

Shelby County Commissioners hit a big political divide Monday, June 1, and as a result will discuss in two weeks that most volatile of political topics – the property tax rate.

Commissioners approved on the first of three readings an ordinance to keep the property tax rate at the current $4.37.

20. Eden Square Breaks Ground in Memphis' Hickory Hill -

Marina Cove apartments was known in its 1980s prime for its water features – a set of canals.

And when a crowd of 300 gathered Saturday, May 16, to break ground there for the first phase of the $40 million Eden Square development, a small pond that isn’t in the plans had formed by the tent.

21. Southbrook Tests Wharton Administration Shake-Up -

It didn’t take very long for the city of Memphis’ new chief administrative officer to make a tough call.

And when Jack Sammons came down on the side of pulling back city funding for Southbrook Mall, political allies and foes of Mayor A C Wharton Jr. watched to see if he would go along with the decision.

22. Technology Revolutionizes Voter Registration for 2016 -

WASHINGTON (AP) – When President Barack Obama was first elected in 2008, only two states offered a website where citizens could register to vote.

By the 2016 presidential election, it's possible that a majority of states will offer that service, helping to cut down on errors resulting from bad handwriting and reducing time spent by voters in line on Election Day, according to data released Wednesday by the Pew Charitable Trusts.

23. Greenprint Guru -

When John Michels was a kid going to nature camps with his family and hiking with his brother and cousins, he was taking the first steps along his career path.

“We’d sort of learn how to survive in the woods and build shelters, learn about ecosystems,” Michels said of his days growing up in New Jersey, and then later trips to upstate New York by Lake George. “I started doing a lot of hiking in the Adirondack Mountains.

24. Editorial: Baltimore's Trauma Should Give Memphis Pause -

All around us in Memphis this season are signs of new life and promise. The view offered from the top of The Pyramid this week shows a city in bloom with lots to offer.

With such an abundance of comfort, this is also probably the best time to consider what is beyond the horizon and how it is connected to who we are and what we aspire to be.

25. Making Memphis Clean by 2019 -

Editor’s Note: This column will appear weekly throughout April in honor of Memphis and Shelby County’s Sustainability Month.

When guests are expected, one of the first things we do is clean up our home. We want our home to feel safe, warm and inviting. After all, our home directly reflects what we think about ourselves, and how others formulate their opinions about us.

26. Foote Homes Effort Gets Rebrand, New Details -

With Bass Pro Shops formally opening this week, the next big project on City Hall’s drawing board is a remake of Foote Homes.

The ambitious plan to demolish and rebuild the city’s last large public housing project, using it as a catalyst for redevelopment of the much larger south Downtown into South Memphis area, has been on the books longer than The Pyramid. That’s if you start the timeline with the demolition of the first large housing project, LeMoyne Gardens, in the late 1990s.

27. Memphis & The Law -

Over the long life of the city’s legal community, Court Square has been a place where attorneys and judges come together outside the courtroom and their law practices.

In many cases, it’s a chance encounter since no court has ever met in Court Square – despite its name and the intent of those who drew up the plan for Memphis nearly 200 years ago.

28. Nashville Sounds Owner, Players Marvel at New Park -

Ten days before the Nashville Sounds’ scheduled home opener at their palatial new digs, First Tennessee Park in Germantown was still very much a work in progress.

Frank Ward, owner of the Class AAA Pacific League team, was strutting around like a proud father, all but ready to pass out cigars to an expectant media as workmen painted, pounded and pushed to make everything ready in preparation for opening of the 10,000-seat facility.

29. Memphis & The Law -

Before there was Law Week, there was Law Day.

The observance by the Memphis Bar Association as well as bar associations and attorneys across the country was created in the mid-1950s as a way of promoting the legal community and its impact.

30. Roundup: Defeat of Insure Tennessee Proposal Set Tone in 2015 Session -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The defeat of Gov. Bill Haslam's proposal to extend health coverage to 280,000 low-income Tennesseans set the tone for the 2015 session of the state Legislature.

31. Memphis Aims to Expand Recycling Efforts -

Editor’s Note: This column will appear weekly throughout April in honor of Memphis and Shelby County’s Sustainability Month.

This Earth Day, the City of Memphis has much to celebrate. Over the last several years, we have seen a growing demand for walkable, healthy neighborhoods, vibrant public spaces, access to fresh foods, and energy efficient buildings. As mayor, I have worked to meet this demand and position Memphis to lead by example in environmental sustainability. This work is being recognized nationally as Memphis-Shelby County was recently designated a 4-STAR sustainable community, in the same company as places like Austin, Texas, and Portland, Ore.

32. School Dialogue Won’t End With Lakeland Voting ‘No’ -

Lakeland city leaders likely will continue looking for ways to expand the Lakeland Schools system beyond its single elementary school.

They just won’t be talking about a grades 6-12 school after Lakeland voters last week rejected a $50 million school bond issue key to building the proposed Lakeland Prep.

33. Lakeland Prep School Bond Issue Rejected By Voters -

Voters in Lakeland rejected a $50 million school bond issue Thursday, April 16, in the first election of 2015 in Shelby County.

The unofficial vote count from the Shelby County Election Commission with all precincts reporting was:

34. Lakeland Election Decides New School’s Fate -

If every voter in Lakeland votes in the Thursday, April 16, school bond issue referendum, it will be fewer than 9,000 citizens.

More people voted in some of the one-candidate state House district primaries last August in Shelby County.

35. Wharton's Way -

City elections in Memphis begin unadorned.

Yard signs don’t bloom until mid- to late summer, when the strategic use of television ads and the much higher cycle of radio advertising kick in.

36. Bill Would Make Bible Official State Book of Tennessee -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Despite concerns that giving the holy Bible the same status as a salamander is a little tawdry and could be unconstitutional, Tennessee lawmakers are forging ahead with plans to make it the official state book – something at least two other states have failed to do.

37. City Council to Hear Plan for New Police Strategy -

Memphis City Council members get their first look Tuesday, April 7, at a new strategy for the Memphis Police Department as well as Memphis Mayor A C Wharton’s choices for the new Beale Street Tourism Development Authority.

38. Early Voting Total in Lakeland Bond Issue Tops 1,200 -

Early voting in Lakeland’s $50 million school bond issue referendum topped 1,200 through April 2.

Turnout numbers from the Shelby County Election Commission show 1,223 Lakeland citizens had voted early through Thursday.

39. What Better Place for an NRA Convention? -

When the National Rifle Association announced that it would hold its 2015 convention in Nashville, the timing was propitious.

In 2010, gun sales and handgun permits were booming, and Tennessee had just enacted a controversial and contested new “guns in bars” law that allowed people with handgun permits to carry concealed firearms into bars and restaurants that serve alcohol.

40. Lakeland Early Voting Count Tops 800 -

More than 800 citizens have voted early in the Lakeland referendum on a $50 million school bond issue.

The 822 early voters cast ballots over the first three days of the early voting period that began March 27.

41. Early Voting Underway in Lakeland On Bond Issue -

The first election of 2015 began Friday, March 27, as the early voting period opens in the Lakeland referendum on a $50 million school bond issue.

Early voting at Lakeland Elementary School, 10050 Oakseed Lane, is from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday through April 11.

42. Lakeland Opens Early Voting On $50M School Bond Issue -

The first election of 2015 begins Friday, March 27, as the early voting period opens in the Lakeland referendum on a $50 million school bond issue.

Early voting at Lakeland Elementary School, 10050 Oakseed Lane, is from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday through April 11.

43. Orgel, Shular Honored With Dunavant Awards -

Shelby County Schools board member Billy Orgel and Shelby County government public affairs officer Steve Shular receive the annual Bobby Dunavant Public Servant Awards Wednesday, March 25, from the Rotary Club of Memphis East.

44. Overton Park Protests Challenge Parking Pact -

On the first Saturday of spring, a group of eight protesters blocked overflow Memphis Zoo parking on the Overton Park greensward for several hours.

The group of University of Memphis students stood at the gravel path onto the greensward as well as at another greensward car entrance in the first challenge to an agreement announced earlier this year between the city of Memphis, the zoo and the Overton Park Conservancy.

45. Love Song to a City -

As the story goes, Al Green wrote the lyrics to “Let’s Stay Together” in about five minutes. In 1972, the song – which spans just three minutes and 13 seconds – reached No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100.

46. Orgel Traces Path to School Board -

The first chairman of the consolidated Shelby County Schools board judges how well the school board is performing its duties by how mundane its monthly voting meeting is.

“It’s almost boring to come to a school board meeting,” said Billy Orgel, who was appointed to the 23-member board in 2011 and has been re-elected twice. “There’s not theatrics by anybody and we genuinely all like each other. There’s not a backstory. And there are not factions. I think it’s a good model for other bodies.”

47. Daily News Names Managing Editor -

Jane A. Donahoe has joined The Daily News Publishing Co. as managing editor. In her new role, she oversees award-winning coverage of business and government news for both The Daily News and The Memphis News.

48. State Legislators Misfire In Rush to Impress NRA Attendees -

With the National Rifle Association bringing 75,000 people to Nashville for its April 10-12 convention, the timing is seemingly right for the General Assembly to impress by passing a bevy of gun bills.

49. Wyatt Tarrant, Medtronic Honored for Pro Bono Work -

The Memphis office of the law firm Wy- att Tarrant & Combs and the regional legal department of Medtronic were honored this month in Nashville by the Tennessee Bar Association for their commitments to providing free legal service.

50. Battle of the Band(width) -

Joyce Coltrin’s business is wandering in Bradley County’s technological wilderness. And it’s likely to remain there – because of legal threats – until the General Assembly changes state law.

51. Shular, Orgel to Receive Dunavant Awards -

The public affairs officer for Shelby County government with a reach beyond the media and a Shelby County Schools board member whose elected service began at a time of historic change in local public education are the recipients of the 2015 Bobby Dunavant Public Servant Awards.

52. Wyatt Tarrant and Medtronic Honored For Pro Bono Work -

The Memphis office of the law firm Wyatt Tarrant & Combs and the regional legal department of Medtronic were honored this month in Nashville by the Tennessee Bar Association for their commitments to providing free legal service.

53. Memphis Part of Federal TechHire Job Training Effort -

Memphis is one of 21 cities involved in a commitment to improve training for workers in the technology sector, and the city will compete for $100 million in federal grant money for tech job training programs.

54. The Ransom Note on Tennessee Public Records -

The fastest way to shut down access to government records is to charge fees people can’t afford to pay.

Another way is to simply ignore or delay responding to citizens or media who make requests under the Tennessee Public Records Act.

55. Ryan: Be Flexible On Location For More Office Space Options -

After 22 years heading up the Metro Housing and Development Authority for Nashville, Phil Ryan certainly knows the Middle Tennessee housing market.

He left MDHA in 2013, and in his current role as an affiliate broker with Cherry & Associates, he’s taking a look at the local real-estate mix from the corporate side.

56. Wharton's City Hall Shake-Up Has Ripples -

The political timing of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton’s shake-up of his leadership team could have been worse – closer to the October city elections in which he is seeking a second full term.

57. Point in Time -

About three years ago, what amounts to a very informal census of the city’s homeless – those without shelter – counted 259 people, with 135 of them being deemed the most vulnerable for harm if they remained homeless.

58. Harris’ Bill Faces Opposition From Memphis City Council Members -

Legislation by Sen. Lee Harris requiring local governments to hold a referendum before they take on “extraordinary” debt could run into opposition from his own City Council and municipal leaders across Tennessee.

59. Greenprint Maps Plan for 25-Year Development -

Open a trail or bike lane in the Memphis area and one of the first questions will be about how it links up to other trails or greenlines or bike lanes.

The Mid-South Regional Greenprint Plan is the answer and the guide to those questions with a long-term 25-year plan that maps out a proposed regional trail system to be built in pieces over the quarter of a century scope of the plan.

60. Insure Tennessee: Failure by Politics and Procedure -

The momentum that killed the Insure Tennessee proposal and ended the special session of the Tennessee legislature Wednesday, Feb. 4, was fueled by ideological opposition to the Affordable Care Act and President Barack Obama.

61. US to Destroy Its Largest Remaining Chemical Weapons Cache -

PUEBLO, Colo. (AP) – The United States is about to begin destroying its largest remaining stockpile of chemical-laden artillery shells, marking a milestone in the global campaign to eradicate a debilitating weapon that still creeps into modern wars.

62. Both Sides Dig In for Insure Tennessee Special Session -

Battle lines have been drawn for a Feb. 2 special session of the state Legislature to determine the fate of Gov. Bill Haslam’s Insure Tennessee proposal, which would use federal funds to catch some 280,000 working people falling through a health insurance coverage gap.

63. Both Sides Dig In For Insure Tennessee Special Session -

Battle lines have been drawn for a Feb. 2 special session of the state Legislature to determine the fate of Gov. Bill Haslam’s Insure Tennessee proposal, which would use federal funds to catch some 200,000 working people falling through a health insurance coverage gap.

64. Drowning in Student Loan Debt -

Three-and-a-half years after graduating from the University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Yasameen Hoffman is still trying to land the kind of full-time job that will help her start paying off her student loan.

65. Wharton Defends, Touts Record at State of the City -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. defended and touted Thursday, Jan. 29, his administration’s pursuit of the economic development projects that his challengers in the October city elections will likely use to make their case.

66. Tax Breaks for Ikea Prompt Calls for Changes -

When the board of the Economic Development Growth Engine approved a $9.5 million, 11-year tax abatement incentive last week for the new Ikea furniture store planned for Cordova, the decision set in motion the next wave in an already robust political discussion about such incentives.

67. Government to Overhaul Medicare Payments to Doctors, Hospitals -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Medicare will change the way it pays hospitals and doctors to reward quality over volume, the Obama administration said Monday, in a shift that officials hope will be a catalyst for the nation's $3-trillion health care system.

68. Home Services Keep Seniors Independent -

Sooner or later, most people end up caring for aging mothers and fathers or become seniors themselves, wondering who to turn to when independent daily living becomes impossible.

Both propositions are frightening and stressful.

69. Haslam on Statewide Tour to Tout Insure Tennessee -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam says he isn’t counting votes in the Tennessee legislature just yet for his Insure Tennessee Medicaid expansion proposal.

At least he’s not counting hard votes for the upcoming Feb. 2 special legislative session as he holds a series of nine public forums across the state.

70. Events -

National Black MBA Association, Memphis chapter will host its 2015 kickoff meeting, “Reaching Your Financial Goals: How Fit is Your Plan?” Thursday, Jan. 22, from 6 p.m. to 7:15 p.m. at International Paper headquarters, Tower 3, 6400 Poplar Ave. The guest speaker is Roland Cole, financial adviser with Duncan-Williams’ Private Client Group. Visit nbmbaamemphis.org.

71. Council Approves Schools Deal, Appoints Boyd -

Two weeks after they ignored a proposed $43.1 million settlement of the six-year old schools funding legal standoff, Memphis City Council members Tuesday, Jan. 20, approved a $41.8 million settlement with Shelby County Schools.

72. Shelby County's School Systems Prepare to Build -

Shelby County government will have $110 million in bonds over the next two years to finance school construction projects across the seven public school systems.

And just from the early plans on the drawing board, there is no shortage of projects. Some of them are also to be funded by property tax revenue from the suburban municipalities that formed their own six separate school districts that opened for classes this past August.

73. Tennessee’s Health Problem -

For years, the concept of “wellness” or “preventive health” measures has been the “eat your vegetables” mantra of a growing national discussion on health care that has focused primarily on the cost of such care and who should pay for it or try to control it.

74. Harris Goes to Nashville -

At his last Memphis City Council session, Lee Harris reflected this week on his three years on the council and the group of politicians he joined.

75. Greenline Bike Repair Stations Open -

For most bike riders on the Shelby Farms Greenline it’s what might be called the offseason, which makes this the perfect time for the soft opening of four bike repair stations by the Shelby Farms Park Conservancy and Conway Services, which is sponsoring the stations.

76. Council Signals Return to Schools Funding Mediation -

It’s back to mediation Thursday, Jan. 8, in the six-year long schools funding deadlock between the city of Memphis and Shelby County Schools.

That was the next step several Memphis City Council members pointed to after more than an hour behind closed doors at City Hall Tuesday with their attorney as well as city Chief Administrative Officer George Little.

77. Proposed Lakeland Prep Site Considered -

The proposed site for the new Lakeland Prep school is 94 acres of land north of U.S. 70, east of Canada Road.

Members of the Lakeland School System board got their first look at the details Monday, Jan. 5, during a school board work session in which the site was recommended by Southern Educational Strategies LLC, a consultant to the school system on the matter.

78. Political Back Pages -

Even in the best of times, the relationship between any Memphis mayor and any group of 13 on the Memphis City Council is adversarial. That has been the intent of the structure of city government since the mayor-council form of government took effect in 1968.

79. Local Charities' Needs Visible During Holidays -

Local charities get a lot of attention during the holiday season. But those running the nonprofits are quick to point out that their work goes on year-round. And the holiday season can be a time of great stress for those who rely on their programs, despite the extra attention.

80. A Long And Winding Road -

Pennsylvania Hospital, the first hospital, was founded in 1751 by Dr. Thomas Bond and Benjamin Franklin in order to “care for the sick-poor and insane who were wandering the streets of Philadelphia.”

81. US Companies Eager to Embrace Cuba Face Hurdles -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Cargill aims to sell more corn and soybeans. MasterCard covets another site for Americans to swipe credit cards. Marriott sees beachfront property that needs hotels.

And outside Orlando, Florida, Danny Howell just knows there would be demand for his classic Chevrolet parts.

82. Armstrong’s Comments Overshadow Attorney General’s Visit -

Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong had some concerns Tuesday about speaking before U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder addressed a group of 100 local leaders at Hattiloo Theatre in Overton Square.

83. Pickard Joins Explorations on Tentative 2015 Ballot -

The contingency plans and other political maneuvering for the city of Memphis elections are well underway.

And a key part of the calculation is making plans for a change in plans.

Architect and planner Charles “Chooch” Pickard is one of several citizens running “exploratory” campaigns at this point.

84. Pension ‘Concept’ Flips Council Script -

For most of her seven years on the Memphis City Council, Wanda Halbert has been the most outspoken member when it comes to last-minute items added to the council’s agenda for a vote.

So, when Halbert rolled out a compromise plan on the city’s pension changes Tuesday, Dec. 2, she took some heat from other council members.

85. Greenline Part of Larger Changes to Shelby Farms -

The visitors center at Shelby Farms Park is about to come down, the latest sign of the transformation of the park.

86. Rogero Talks ‘Smart Growth,’ Democratic Politics -

Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero became the first woman to hold that office when she won the election in 2011.

She’s been actively involved in a number of local issues since her election, from urban-core revitalization and business recruitment to broader social issues such as marriage equality.

87. City Council to Consider Police Funding -

Memphis City Council members will consider Tuesday, Nov. 18, taking $1 million from city reserves to fully fund an additional Memphis police recruit class in the current fiscal year.

The $1 million from reserves would go with $2 million the council approved at the start of the fiscal year for a new recruit class.

88. Law Says ‘Promptly’ Address Public Records Requests -

A news reporter in Nashville called me recently when a public information officer with the Metropolitan Development and Housing Agency refused to release a document that had been voted upon a few days earlier by a subcommittee of the public agency’s board of directors.

89. Palazzolo Prepares to Lead Germantown -

Germantown Mayor-elect Mike Palazzolo was surprised that the mayor’s race became as hard-fought as it was.

But after beating former city division director George Brogdon last week, Palazzolo prepares to take the oath of office Dec. 15, assemble his administration and start work on a new economic development plan.

90. Early Vote Turnout Lags Behind 2010 -

Early voting turnout in advance of the Nov. 4 Election Day was running about 17,000 voters behind the early vote turnout four years ago for the same election cycle through the second and final weekend in the early voting period.

91. Ebola Screening Measures Rest on Federal Law -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Obama administration's plans to screen certain airline passengers for exposure to Ebola are based on the Constitution and long-established legal authority that would almost certainly stand up in court if challenged, public health experts say.

92. Tennessee Voters to Decide on Abortion Amendment -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee voters will have a chance this November to decide whether they want to give the state Legislature more power to regulate abortions.

In 2000, the Tennessee Supreme Court struck down laws requiring a two-day waiting period and mandatory physician-only counseling and preventing second-trimester abortions from taking place anywhere but in a hospital.

93. Real Estate Experts Look at Impact of North Mississippi -

Six years after the real estate bubble burst nationally, the recovery of the commercial and residential sectors in Memphis is slower than in other parts of the country. But they are recovering on their own new terms, say the incoming president of the Memphis Area Association of Realtors, the president of the West Tennessee Home Builders Association and a mortgage lender.

94. University of Tennessee Students Help Design Nashville’s Future -

Nashville may be a city on the rise, attracting new residents by the droves. But it’s also a laboratory for students at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville’s College of Architecture and Design, where they are designing the communities of the future in partnership with the Nashville Civic Design Center.

95. Viability of Black Creative Districts Explored -

Several weeks ago, Eric Robertson, the president of the neighborhood revitalization intermediary Community LIFT, was showing a group of visitors around the city’s various creative and entertainment districts.

96. County Commission Starts School Bond Process -

Shelby County Commissioners vote Monday, Sept. 22, on a resolution that is the first step in issuing $120 million in general obligation bonds over the next two years to finance “public works projects, including schools,” according to the resolution.

97. Road to Better Mass Transit -

Picking a new transit chief is critical for a city in transition.

Next year, Nashville residents will elect a new mayor and turn over its large Metro Council.

Davidson County also expects some 200,000 new residents over the next 20 years, and much of the success of future development will depend on the ease of navigating around Nashville – already the nation’s second-worst area for sprawl, according to Smart Growth America.

98. Unintended Consequences: ER Visits Increase -

Hospital officials have been pushing for the state to expand Medicaid health care coverage for thousands of Tennessee’s poorest citizens, despite two significant and related concerns:

Expansion will lead to increased visits to the most expensive place in America for routine health care, the emergency room.

99. Heart Foundation’s Novick Prepares for Ukraine Work -

Dr. William Novick isn’t real big on taking orders – especially from his doctors. Four weeks ago, he had his second hip replacement surgery since the first of the year.

100. Appeals Panel Weighing Occupy Nashville Suit -

CINCINNATI (AP) – A special three-judge panel focused on issues of camping, protests, free speech and executive power on Monday during arguments in an appeal of a lawsuit brought by Occupy Nashville protesters arrested on War Memorial Plaza in October 2011.