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Editorial Results (free)

1. Others might join Whisenhunt before it’s over -

The clock is ticking for Mike Mularkey, just as it is for most of the organization’s management team.

As the Tennessee Titans new interim coach, Mularkey has nine games now to prove himself worthy of being the team’s head coach beyond just the remainder of the team’s wrecked 2015 season.

2. US Housing Recovery Divided on Age, Race and Place -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's the most profitable time to sell a house since the Great Recession started in late 2007. But first-time buyers are increasingly scarce.

More Americans are qualifying for mortgages, yet minorities still get disproportionately rejected.

3. Conference Aims to Spark Positive Change, One ZIP Code at a Time -

The world can be a big place, even within one city or a single ZIP code. But the world also can be made smaller when the right kinds of lines are crossed.

Steve Nash founded nonprofit Advance Memphis in 1999, beginning an ambitious project without end. His goal: bring economic sustainability to the people living in and around the Cleaborn/Foote Homes public housing developments in South Memphis’ 38126 ZIP code, the poorest urban ZIP in Tennessee.

4. LendMed Wants to Track Health Care Sharing -

Through conversations with health care industry professionals, Ryan Freiden saw a need he thought he could fill.

5. Students Find Options via Tennessee Promise -

Siegel High School graduate Davione Williamson wasn’t quite sure he was college material when he entered Motlow State Community College in Smyrna this August on a Tennessee Promise scholarship.

6. Posturing Against Supreme Court Is a Waste of Money -

Legislation rejecting the U.S. Supreme Court’s same-sex marriage ruling faces major constitutional questions and, if passed, could put a financial burden on Tennessee taxpayers.

When the high court declared gay and lesbian couples have the right to be married across the United States, overturning state laws to the contrary, Tennessee’s Republican legislators started brainstorming for methods to work around the decision or to defy it. The Republican Caucus still hasn’t announced the outcome.

7. Metro Nashville’s Local-Hire Rule Gets Battered On Many Fronts -

The ink wasn’t dry on standards for Metro Nashville’s local-hire charter amendment when new Mayor Megan Barry put the measure on hold – despite sizable support in the August election.

8. Redshirting: Waiting an Extra Year to Start Kindergarten Has Its Risks -

Mary-Michael and Joe Horowitz know their son Armour, 5, can handle the academics of kindergarten. But instead of pushing him through to meet state age cutoff standards, they decided to delay his start until next year when he is older and emotionally ready.

9. Pastner, Always True to Self, Is Still Doing Things His Way -

Expectations. That’s the word that drives all sports narratives. Remember the record of Josh Pastner’s first University of Memphis team, the ragtag bunch that was left over after John Calipari exited for Kentucky?

10. Planning for Lifestyle Creep -

Ray’s take: Investopia defines lifestyle creep as a situation where people's lifestyle or standard of living improves as their discretionary income rises either through an increase in income or decrease in costs.

11. Roundhouse Revival 2 Takes Shape Outside Coliseum -

Four months after they drew thousands of people outside the Mid-South Coliseum, the group that organized the Roundhouse Revival, as it was called, is prepping for an even more ambitious show.

For the Oct. 4 event, the Coliseum Coalition has a six-hour lineup for two wrestling rings on the building’s west side. Posters for “round two” of the revival promise “roundball, rock and roll, rods, rhythm and blues, rasslin’, roller derby, rap and rally.”

12. Kosten Foundation Lifts Pancreatic Cancer Awareness -

When the Herb Kosten Foundation began in 2003, it was out of a desire to honor the man’s legacy.

Kosten passed away in June 2003, about a year after his diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. A gifted athlete in his youth – the University of Alabama named him to its All-Century Team for his play on the baseball diamond – Kosten would be 79 today.

13. Health Care Suffers As Rural Hospitals Continue Slow Fade -

Fayette County is the latest victim of hospital closings in Tennessee as many rural health care facilities continue to struggle financially.

Methodist Healthcare-Fayette Hospital closed in late March, bringing to four the number of shuttered hospitals in West Tennessee after Gibson General, Humboldt General and Haywood Park Community called it quits in 2014.

14. Tardy Tax Filers Risk Loss of Health Care Subsidies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sign-up season for President Barack Obama's health care law doesn't start for another couple of months, but the next few days are crucial for hundreds of thousands of customers at risk of losing financial aid when they renew coverage for 2016.

15. Fairgrounds’ Future -

It’s hard to imagine that a 65,000-seat stadium could be overlooked. Perhaps it’s because the Liberty Bowl wasn’t in the center of the Mid-South Fairgrounds when the stadium was built in 1965; it was on the eastern side of 155 acres of city-owned land, with a rail spur running along its eastern boundary.

16. Real Deal -

They were tossing around numbers, trying to guess the win total for the 2015 University of Memphis football season.

In the not-too-distant past, the two Highland Hundred members and longtime season-ticket holders might have been able to add their guesses together and still come up short of the six victories needed for their favorite team to be bowl-eligible.

17. US Trade Gap Widens 7 Percent in June as Imports Jump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. trade deficit increased in June as solid consumer spending pulled in more imports, while the strong dollar restrained exports.

The Commerce Department said Wednesday the trade gap jumped 7 percent to $43.8 billion in June, up from $40.9 billion in May. Imports increased 1.2 percent to $232.4 billion, while exports edged lower to $188.6 billion from $188.7 billion.

18. Wolf River Greenway Targets Raleigh Riverbend -

At the northernmost bend of the Wolf River in Shelby County, the Wolf River Conservancy has plans for a boat ramp onto the Wolf and a nature center that together promise to change the surrounding area of Raleigh where the river turns.

19. Unlikely Path -

It all started on whim. Cassius Cash was on his way to band practice at the University of Arkansas when he decided to practice his interview skills instead.

“Someone informed me the (U.S.) Forest Service was doing recruitment, but I had no intention of going in there and landing the internship,” says Cash of that interview for a wildlife biologist internship. “I thought the interview was about as far as I was going to go to chase my dreams.”

20. With No Real Rival, Tennessee Republicans Attack Their Own -

Republicans are sitting in Tennessee’s political catbird seat, but that doesn’t keep them from flying off in different directions.

Elected political leaders of the same stripe found themselves at odds this year over the Bible as a state book, Common Core education standards and Insure Tennessee, Republican Gov. Bill Haslam’s plan to catch 280,000 people in a medical coverage gap.

21. Families Face Tough Decisions as Elder-Care Cost Soars -

NEW YORK (AP) — Doris Ranzman had followed the expert advice, planning ahead in case she wound up unable to care for herself one day. But when a nursing-home bill tops $14,000 a month, the best-laid plans get tossed aside.

22. Digital Diaspora -

The ubiquitous connectivity that permeates today's workplace is having a profound effect on company cultures, most notably in the digitally-fueled diaspora unfolding in which employees can work from just about anywhere.

23. Tennessee’s ‘Fighting 26’ Democrats Work to Stay Relevant -

Sometimes Tennessee Democrats must feel like a tree that falls in the forest: Does anyone hear them?

When Democratic legislative leaders called for a special session this summer on Insure Tennessee, Gov. Bill Haslam’s market-based plan to use federal dollars to catch 280,000 working people in a health care coverage gap, they found themselves alone.

24. Senate, House Look to Update Bush-Era Education Law -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's something most Democrats and Republicans in Congress can agree on — an update to the Bush-era No Child Left Behind education law is much needed and long overdue.

25. Projects, Issues Spill into Memphis' New Fiscal Year -

On Monday, June 29, two days before the new fiscal year, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. was in the back of a house on Ridgewood Drive in Whitehaven.

Wharton was marking the start of a 90-day public works project spanning both fiscal years to build a retention pond for the Days Creek area. The $450,000 project includes removing trees and brush from the drainage area, in an effort to prevent flooding. In September 2014, some homes in the area were heavily damaged in a sudden and prolonged downpour.

26. Haslam Needs to Back Up Call for More Local Control -

If Gov. Bill Haslam is trying to build political capital, he’s making the right move by trying to light a fire under local officials.

He might also want to turn up the flame on his own game.

27. HopeWorks Workshop Aims to Help Memphis Employers Reduce Entry-Level Job Turnover -

Different experiences, different vocabularies, and a different perspective on what it means to go to work each day. The difference, really, between a “job” and a “career.”

Making sense of these differences for the benefit of entry-level employees and their employers is the mission of the free workshop “Finding Talent. Growing Profits.”

28. The Invisible Safety Net -

This week, the Internet is buzzing about the struggles of Gap Inc. and Lucky Magazine. Gap announced it will lay off 250 workers and close 175 stores. From the outside, Lucky appears to be going out of business or reducing operations considerably. At Lucky, there are rumors claiming many people were laid off without any severance. I received an email from a reader about just this issue, and what workers can do to prepare.

29. AP Analysis: More 'Phony Numbers' in Reports as Stocks Rise -

NEW YORK (AP) – Those record profits that companies are reporting may not be all they're cracked up to be.

As the stock market climbs ever higher, professional investors are warning that companies are presenting misleading versions of their results that ignore a wide variety of normal costs of running a business to make it seem like they're doing better than they really are.

30. Why a Shrinking Economy Last Quarter Isn't Cause for Fear -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Another first quarter of the year. Another reversal for the U.S. economy. Another expectation of a rebound to come.

On Friday, the government will likely estimate that the economy shrank in the January-March quarter for a second straight year, depressed by brutal weather, a reeling energy sector and an export slump caused by a higher-valued dollar.

31. Ramsey Uses ‘System’ to Reshape State’s Political Landscape -

Senate Speaker and Lieutenant Gov. Ron Ramsey laughs at the notion he’s changed since being elected to the Legislature 23 years ago, that he’s lost touch with the common man or become “arrogant” as lieutenant governor of Tennessee.

32. Media Heads Rule Ranks of Best-Paid CEOs -

NEW YORK (AP) – They're not Hollywood stars, they're not TV personalities and they don't play in a rock band, but their pay packages are in the same league.

Six of the 10 highest-paid CEOs last year worked in the media industry, according to a study carried out by executive compensation data firm Equilar and The Associated Press.

33. Daisy King Still Serving Tearoom Favorites -

Like a proper Southern hostess, Daisy King of Miss Daisy’s Tearoom had trouble turning on the “closed” sign. If guests wanted to snag a table after hours, she couldn’t help but oblige.

34. What Grads Must Do to Secure Employment -

Career counselors at many Tennessee colleges and universities say interest from corporate recruiters is higher than they’ve seen it in years.

There are more job postings, internship opportunities, pre-employment trainee classes and technology training programs for all skill levels, but if a recent graduate needs help in pursuing a career, schools want the new alums to come back to them.

35. A Hazy View of US Economy Emerges Ahead of April Jobs Report -

WASHINGTON (AP) – When the government reports Friday on job growth during April, it could help clarify an increasingly nagging question:

Just how strong is the U.S. economy?

The picture has grown hazier of late. Employers added only 126,000 jobs in March, ending a yearlong streak of monthly gains above 200,000. For April, economists predict a rebound to 222,500 added jobs.

36. US Trade Deficit Jumps to 6-Year High of $51.4 Billion -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. trade deficit in March swelled to the highest level in more than six years, propelled by a flood of imports that may have sapped the U.S. economy of any growth in the first quarter.

37. Will Tennessee Republicans Ever Be Truly Happy? -

Why aren’t Tennessee Republicans happier?

With the GOP so dominate in the Tennessee General Assembly and losses so rare – on the Hill or in elections – the party’s lawmakers should be jubilant with this year’s session. But it’s never enough.

38. Sounds Like a Hit for Neighbors -

For months, sounds of construction surrounded the Nashville Sounds’ sparkling new First Tennessee Park in Germantown.

The constant thump-thump-thump of pounding jackhammers competed with the irritating, high-pitched beeps of vehicles backing up. Ka-ching! Cranes lifted steel beams into place, keeping time with a syncopated thrumming of never-ending drilling. Ka-ching!

39. Biblical Lessons Lost in Lack of Health Care Debate -

Tennessee’s legislators spent hours this session arguing over guns and whether to pass a law making the Bible the state book of Tennessee.

In fact, the Bible bill took two days of debate in the House, where it passed, and thorough discussion in the Senate, before it died – at least until next year.

40. Walgreens Aims to Close About 200 US Stores -

Walgreens will shutter about 200 U.S. stores as part of an expanded cost reduction push, but the nation's largest drugstore chain has no plans to shrink in the wake of its combination with European health and beauty retailer Alliance Boots.

41. Legislators Not Moved by Hymns, Reason -

The words of “We Shall Overcome” and “Wade in the Water” resonate through the halls as Insure Tennessee supporters descend on the Legislative Plaza for a key vote on the plan to provide coverage to 280,000 working Tennesseans.

42. End of Robust Hiring Streak Raises Doubts About Job Market -

WASHINGTON (AP) – For months, the U.S. economy's strength has been flagging.

Manufacturing slowed. Fewer homes were built. Cheaper gas failed to ignite consumer spending. Yet month after month, employers kept on hiring vigorously.

43. Holding On -

The national outlook for traditional enclosed malls is bleak. No new enclosed mall has been built in the U.S. since 2006. More than 24 have closed since 2010, and an additional 60 are teetering on the edge, according to data from Green Street Advisors. Around 15 percent of malls nationwide are expected to close in the next decade.

44. Hard to ‘Mansplain’ Workplace Gender Issues -

“Jane felt like screaming at Dick after he manterrupted her in the staff meeting, bropropriated her idea and then spent the afternoon mansplaining it back to her.’’

That’s an actual sentence – if people are willing to use gender-specific language that’s gaining popularity to describe unwanted workplace behavior.

45. US Economic Growth in Q4 Revised Down to 2.2 Percent -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy slowed more sharply in the final three months of the year than initial estimates, reflecting weaker business stockpiling and a bigger trade deficit.

The Commerce Department said Friday that the economy as measured by the gross domestic product grew at an annual rate of 2.2 percent in the October-December quarter, weaker than the 2.6 percent first estimated last month. It marked a major slowdown from the third quarter, which had been the strongest growth in 11 years.

46. Applications for US Jobless Aid Rise to 313,000 -

WASHINGTON (AP) – More Americans sought unemployment aid last week, though the number of applications was still consistent with steady hiring.

The Labor Department said Thursday that weekly applications rose 31,000 to a seasonally adjusted 313,000, the most in six weeks. The four-week average, a less volatile measure, increased 11,500 to 294,500.

47. Harris’ Bill Faces Opposition From Memphis City Council Members -

Legislation by Sen. Lee Harris requiring local governments to hold a referendum before they take on “extraordinary” debt could run into opposition from his own City Council and municipal leaders across Tennessee.

48. Wal-Mart Raises Could Help Lift Pay in Lower-Wage Industries -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The modest raises that Wal-Mart has said it will give its lowest-paid workers provide a glimmer of hope for lower-wage workers in other companies and industries.

Other retailers and some fast food restaurants may now feel compelled to follow suit to retain their workers and attract others to fill openings, economists said.

49. Luttrell Scolds State Legislators -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell says the political forces that defeated the Insure Tennessee proposal of Gov. Bill Haslam this month in Nashville weren’t in a fight with Washington and President Barack Obama

50. Insure Tennessee Fails to Win Sound Bite Test -

Fresh off a resounding November re-election victory, Gov. Bill Haslam ran smack dab into the reality of Tennessee politics: The Republican Party abhors anything connected to President Barack Obama.

51. Wharton Calls for Outside Fairgrounds Review -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. told the Memphis Rotary Club Tuesday, Feb. 10, that the ambitious recasting of the Mid-South Fairgrounds – a project that is solely a City Hall creation at this point -- is going to get a second look from outside consultants.

52. Critical Link -

If you’re a wine lover along the East Coast – everywhere from Florida to the Mid-Atlantic and New England - chances are a Memphis-based third-party logistics provider played a significant role in getting your vino into your glass.

53. Using Creativity in Your Job Search -

It goes without saying. Applying online can be a long, difficult process. You’re often left wondering if anyone has read your resume, or if they even know you exist at all.

Earlier this week, I read a story of a creative job seeker who found work passing out resumes at a train station. This inspirational tale reminded me of my own job search years ago.

54. Both Sides Dig In for Insure Tennessee Special Session -

Battle lines have been drawn for a Feb. 2 special session of the state Legislature to determine the fate of Gov. Bill Haslam’s Insure Tennessee proposal, which would use federal funds to catch some 280,000 working people falling through a health insurance coverage gap.

55. Both Sides Dig In For Insure Tennessee Special Session -

Battle lines have been drawn for a Feb. 2 special session of the state Legislature to determine the fate of Gov. Bill Haslam’s Insure Tennessee proposal, which would use federal funds to catch some 200,000 working people falling through a health insurance coverage gap.

56. Drowning in Student Loan Debt -

Three-and-a-half years after graduating from the University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Yasameen Hoffman is still trying to land the kind of full-time job that will help her start paying off her student loan.

57. Home Services Keep Seniors Independent -

Sooner or later, most people end up caring for aging mothers and fathers or become seniors themselves, wondering who to turn to when independent daily living becomes impossible.

Both propositions are frightening and stressful.

58. Trucking Industry in ‘Desperate’ Need of Drivers -

With demand on the upswing thanks to improving economic growth and lower fuel prices, a scarcity of truck drivers could put the brakes on the trucking industry and cripple a critical piece of global supply chains.

59. Taxing Question -

With gas prices in a historic plunge, the idea of hiking state and federal gas taxes and fees to pay for transportation infrastructure improvements is gaining traction.

Democratic and Republican leaders in both chambers of Congress in recent weeks have signaled a willingness to approve an increase in the federal gas tax to help fund improvements to the nation’s crumbling roads and bridges. Meanwhile, a new statewide coalition has launched to support an increase and reform in Tennessee’s transportation fees.

60. Federal Deficit in October-December Up Slightly at $176.7 Billion -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The federal deficit for the first three months of the budget year is up slightly from the same period a year ago, reflecting the absence of a special payment from mortgage company Freddie Mac that helped narrow the gap in 2014.

61. Rudd Defends Relay Partnership For Teachers -

The University of Memphis’ College of Education produced 19 teachers last year who are teaching in the 59 lowest performing schools in the Shelby County Schools system.

University of Memphis president David Rudd wants the number to be around 600 a year and he wants the school’s College of Education to partner with the nonprofit Relay Graduate School of Education to meet that goal.

62. Tennessee’s Health Problem -

For years, the concept of “wellness” or “preventive health” measures has been the “eat your vegetables” mantra of a growing national discussion on health care that has focused primarily on the cost of such care and who should pay for it or try to control it.

63. Shrinking Foreign Oil Bill Sends US Trade Deficit Lower -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. trade deficit fell in November to the lowest level in almost a year, thanks to the country's swiftly shrinking thirst for foreign oil.

The deficit – imports minus exports – narrowed to $39 billion during the month, down 7.7 percent from a revised October deficit of $42.2 billion, the Commerce Department reported Wednesday.

64. How Wealth Gap Complicates Sibling Relationships -

NEW YORK (AP) – When Jayson Seaver thinks about why he makes so much money while some Americans can't catch a break, he thinks of the sacrifices he's made, the jobs he worked to pay for college, the 12-hour days he spends at the office now.

65. Shelby County Homebuilding Activity Continues to Slow -

Homebuilding in Shelby County was off last year’s pace again in November, with builders pulling fewer permits and selling fewer homes than in November 2013.

Shelby County homebuilders filed 43 permits last month, down 29.5 percent from 61 permits in November 2013, according to real estate information company Chandler Reports, www.chandlerreports.com. The 43 permits filed in November is down 31.7 percent from the 63 permits filed in October.

66. Why the US Will Power the World Economy in 2015 -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The United States is back, and ready to drive global growth in 2015.

After long struggling to claw its way out of the Great Recession, the world's biggest economy is on an extended win streak that is edging it closer to full health. But the new year doesn't look quite so bright in other major countries.

67. Losing Streak Ends Impressive Stretch by Grizzlies -

After the Grizzlies lost to the Chicago Bulls, their second six-game winning streak of the season coming to an end, Mike Conley made a fair point.

68. Expanding East -

Tamp & Tap, the name of the popular Downtown coffee shop and restaurant, is an allusion to both espresso – which is tamped for compression before going into the machine – and also kegs of beer, which are tapped.

69. E-Cigarette Tech Takes Off as Regulation Looms -

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) – Just a few years ago, early adopters of e-cigarettes got their fix by clumsily screwing together a small battery and a plastic cartridge containing cotton soaked with nicotine.

70. US Trade Deficit Drops to $43.4 Billion in October -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. trade deficit fell slightly in October as exports rebounded while oil imports dipped to the lowest level in five years.

The deficit edged down 0.4 percent to $43.4 billion, a drop from a revised $43.6 billion in September, the Commerce Department reported Friday.

71. Keeping Promises -

With more than 50,000 high school seniors applying for free community college tuition and fees through Gov. Bill Haslam’s Tennessee Promise, it’s reasonable to wonder if Tennessee’s community colleges have the infrastructure – including classroom space and instructors – to handle such an influx of new students.

72. Vols Unlikely to Repeat November 2013 Collapse -

KNOXVILLE – University of Tennessee football coach Butch Jones doesn’t have to remind his team about the disappointing fade last November.

UT went 0-3 to start what has historically been its best month of football. First, the Vols lost to Missouri and Auburn. Then a 14-10 loss to Vanderbilt in Neyland Stadium knocked the Vols out of bowl eligibility.

73. Dobbs Makes Strong Case for Vols Starting QB Job -

KNOXVILLE – University of Tennessee football coach Butch Jones faces a big question this week about his starting quarterback for Saturday night’s game at South Carolina.

Will it be sophomore Josh Dobbs, whose impressive debut off the bench in last Saturday’s 34-20 loss to No. 4-ranked Alabama gave UT a dual-threat QB?

74. US Economy Rallies to Solid Third-Quarter Growth -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy powered its way to a respectable growth rate of 3.5 percent from July through September, outpacing most of the developed world and on track to extend the momentum through the end of the year and beyond.

75. Commission Sets Votes on Health Insurance -

Shelby County Commissioners may not hear a whole lot new in the way of answers between now and a Thursday special meeting to settle the politically volatile issue of changes to health insurance coverage for county government employees.

76. SEC Finds Dominance at Top of Associated Press Poll -

Another week, another first in the Associated Press college football poll. For the first time, one conference – yes, the SEC – has placed four teams in the top five. Mississippi State remained No. 1 after its bye week. Florida State of the ACC stayed No. 2 after defeating Notre Dame. Ole Miss held at No. 3 after beating Tennessee, Alabama moved up three spots to No. 4 after blasting Texas A&M 59-0, and Auburn moved up a spot to fifth after its bye week.

77. Yellen: Greatly Concerned By Widening Inequality -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen sounded an alarm Friday about widening economic inequality in the United States, suggesting that America's longstanding identity as a land of opportunity was at stake.

78. Ailing Global Economy Could Lead Fed to Delay Hike -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Just as the U.S. job market has finally strengthened, the Federal Reserve now confronts a new worry: A sputtering global economy that's spooked investors across the world.

79. Unequal Pay: Must Be a Lot of Good Karma Out There -

NEW YORK (AP) – Don't ask for a raise. Keeping quiet will give you "superpowers" that will translate into employer trust and other "good karma" that will eventually come back around to your purse.

80. Wealthy Giving Less to Charity; Utah Tops States -

NEW YORK (AP) – Even as the income gap widens, the wealthiest Americans are giving a smaller share of their income to charity, while poor and middle-income people are donating a larger share, according to an extensive analysis of IRS data conducted by the Chronicle of Philanthropy.

81. Prices at the Pump Head Below $3 in Much of US -

NEW YORK (AP) – The price of a gallon of gasoline may soon start with a "2'' across much the country.

Gasoline prices typically decline in autumn, and this year they are being pulled even lower by falling global oil prices. By the end of the year, up to 30 states could have an average gasoline price of less than $3 a gallon.

82. Little Sees ‘Acceptance’ in City Insurance Drama -

City Chief Administrative Officer George Little says he hopes the city’s long debate about health insurance coverage changes will mean a shorter discussion about proposed pension changes to come.

83. US Wealth Gap Putting the Squeeze on State Revenue -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Income inequality is taking a toll on state governments.

The widening gap between the wealthiest Americans and everyone else has been matched by a slowdown in state tax revenue, according to a report being released Monday by Standard & Poor's.

84. Coverage Gap Leaves Rural Tennessee Hospitals on Life Support -

Four rural hospitals have closed and dozens are at risk of shuttering: That’s the fallout, some say, from Gov. Bill Haslam’s decision not to join the Affordable Care Act in 2013 and tap into millions in promised federal funds for Tennessee’s financially-strapped health care institutions.

85. Sex Crimes Unit Completes ‘Eye-Opening’ Training -

Memphis police officers working in the sex crimes unit have been in training this month about neurological changes in rape and sexual assault victims they work with.

The training, along with new positions specifically to handle the city’s rape kit backlog, is among the latest changes in the Memphis Police Department’s approach.

86. US Won't Reveal Records on Health Website Security -

WASHINGTON (AP) – After promising not to withhold government information over "speculative or abstract fears," the Obama administration has concluded it will not publicly disclose federal records that could shed light on the security of the government's health care website because doing so could "potentially" allow hackers to break in.

87. Google's Pivotal IPO Launched a Decade of Big Bets -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Google's IPO, a decade ago this week, launched the company on a trajectory that continues to reshape its business and much of the world in its orbit.

And CEO Larry Page is determined to push even further.

88. Pew: Split Views on Robots' Employment Benefits -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In 2025, self-driving cars could be the norm, people could have more leisure time and goods could become cheaper. Or, there could be chronic unemployment and an even wider income gap, human interaction could become a luxury and the wealthy could live in walled cities with robots serving as labor.

89. US Trade Gap Narrows to Lowest Level in 5 Months -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. trade deficit fell in June to its lowest level since January as imports dropped sharply, led by lower shipments of cellphones, petroleum, and cars.

The trade deficit fell 7 percent in June to a seasonally adjusted $41.5 billion, from $44.7 billion in May, the Commerce Department said Wednesday.

90. S&P: Wealth Gap is Slowing US Economic Growth -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Economists have long argued that a rising wealth gap has complicated the U.S. rebound from the Great Recession.

Now, an analysis by the rating agency Standard & Poor's lends its weight to the argument: The widening gap between the wealthiest Americans and everyone else has made the economy more prone to boom-bust cycles and slowed the 5-year-old recovery from the recession.

91. Fast Food Workers Prepare to Escalate Wage Demands -

CHICAGO (AP) – Fast food workers say they're prepared to escalate their campaign for higher wages and union representation, starting with a national convention in suburban Chicago where more than 1,000 workers will discuss the future of the effort that has spread to dozens of cities in less than two years.

92. Economists Lower Forecasts for US Growth -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. business economists have sharply cut their growth forecasts for the April-June quarter and 2014, though they remain optimistic that the economy will rebound from a dismal first quarter.

93. Brooks Residency Case Resumes in Court -

When Chancellor Kenny Armstrong takes the bench Thursday, July 3, to resume his hearing on the effort to unseat Shelby County Commissioner Henri Brooks, he will likely have the same basic question he had when the hearing recessed Tuesday in his courtroom.

94. New Push to Get Girls Into Computer Sciences -

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. (AP) – Diana Navarro loves to code, and she's not afraid to admit it. But the 18-year-old Rutgers University computer science major knows she's an anomaly: Writing software to run computer programs in 2014 is – more than ever – a man's world.

95. Good Medicine for the Soul -

It was one of those medication one-upmanships at a recent meeting when some attendees were discussing the number of medications they were taking to address a plethora of medical conditions.

Needed as the medications were, it seemed like a lot of information, side effects and drug interactions to manage, not to mention vitamins, herbal remedies and over-the-counter medicine. Seeing different specialists for different conditions and inconsistent communication seems to be a growing concern, a gap in patient care, particularly for those who do not have the knowledge or resources to manage their medication.

96. Editorial: MERI Helping City Address Big Problem -

In the alphabet soup of acronyms that sometimes define to the public any organization with lots of moving parts, the Medical Education and Research Institute – or MERI – may be just another set of letters to some.

97. MATA President Calls for Expanded Service -

The interim leader of the Memphis Area Transit Authority wants the city’s bus line to get more involved in “transportation management associations.”

MATA’s interim president and general manager, Tom Fox, describes the associations as “groups of employers banding together to provide some kind of services to supplement what MATA can provide.”

98. Hospitals Reach Out to Attract Affluent Immigrants -

HOUSTON (AP) – The menu includes pork or chicken dumplings, fried rice or chicken congee soup with jasmine rice and ginger. It's an enviable repast that diners take in bed – hospital beds.

99. Senate Panel Approves 6-Year Highway Bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A Senate panel on Thursday approved a bill to keep federal highway programs going for the next six years, but it remained unclear whether Congress would act in time to prevent a disruption in transportation aid to states this summer.

100. Yellen Foresees Continued Low Borrowing Rates -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said Wednesday that the U.S. economy is improving but noted that the job market remains "far from satisfactory" and inflation is still below the Fed's target rate.