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Editorial Results (free)

1. Shelby County Building Permits Rise 3.4 Percent -

Shelby County’s homebuilding industry showed slight improvement in the third quarter, with builders filing 3.4 percent more permits in the quarter than in the same three-month period a year ago.

2. Despite Rules, Nursing Homes Still Lack Sprinklers -

Tens of thousands of the country's most vulnerable people are living in nursing homes without adequate sprinklers or that are missing them altogether, according to government data.

Despite a history of deadly nursing home fires and a five-year lead-up to an August 2013 deadline to install sprinklers, 385 facilities in 39 states fail to meet requirements set by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the federal agency whose duties include regulating nursing homes. Together, those facilities are licensed to house more than 52,000 people, according to data from the agency known as CMS.

3. Real Estate Experts Look at Impact of North Mississippi -

Six years after the real estate bubble burst nationally, the recovery of the commercial and residential sectors in Memphis is slower than in other parts of the country. But they are recovering on their own new terms, say the incoming president of the Memphis Area Association of Realtors, the president of the West Tennessee Home Builders Association and a mortgage lender.

4. Shelby County New-Home Permits Drop 7.8 Percent in July -

The local homebuilding industry can still mystify a veteran builder and developer like David Goodwin Jr.

Goodwin and other homebuilders expected 2014 to be a healthy year for the industry, especially entering the spring and early summer.

5. Blueprint for the Future -

It was 1992, and architect Joey Hagan was searching high and low for space for his own office.

He turned to his friend David Schuermann – the two had previously worked together at Bologna and Associates – whose firm at the time, DMS Architects, had an office at 88 Union Center Downtown.

6. Hampline Recalls Overton Park Interstate Plans -

In a city with lots of markers and monuments showing where historic events happened, there is an increasing amount of attention to a different kind of Memphis historic event.

And it involves something that did not happen – the interstate that was supposed to go through Overton Park 50 years ago but was first delayed and then stopped for good in a U.S. Supreme Court ruling 43 years ago this coming Sunday.

7. New Home Permits See Slight Bump -

Despite bitterly cold temperatures that plagued the Memphis area last month, homebuilders pulled slightly more housing permits in January when compared to the same month last year.

Shelby County homebuilders filed 64 permits in January, up from 57 permits filed in January 2013 and 53 permits in December 2013, according to real estate information company Chandler Reports, www.chandlerreports.com.

8. Pioneering Woman -

It was 2004 and Kim Grant Brown had just finished her junior year at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville.

During the break from her studies, Grant Brown, then 20 years old, acquired a loan and built her first house in Arlington.

9. Permits Up 89 Percent in October -

Local homebuilders filed 89 percent more new home permits during October compared to October of last year.

Shelby County homebuilders filed 83 permits last month, a healthy boost from the 44 filed during October 2011, according to real estate information company Chandler Reports, www.chandlerreports.com. October permits also posted a 6 percent increase from the 78 permits filed during September.

10. Residential Greening -

There was a time not so long ago when potential homebuyers had to demand energy efficiency in new homes.

Nowadays, green features are more of an expectation than an extra.

“I would venture to say that just about everybody asks about energy efficiency,” said Martha Fondren, director of sales and marketing for Grant & Co. “They may not say it in those words, but they ask us about what kind of furnaces we are using, what kind of faucets, what kind of insulation. What are the standard things that people can expect when they walk in the home in order to save them money on the utility bills because that’s a huge expense.”

11. Citizens Express Budget Concerns -

Memphis City Council members heard from and saw a lot of opponents of plans to close five Memphis public libraries Tuesday, May 22, during an hour and a half of comments from the public.

“I was going to suggest instead of cutting libraries that you improve them,” said Kaye Veazey.

12. $1.5 Million Loan Filed For Future Vantage Point Golf -

Future Vantage Point Golf Center

Loan Amount: $1.5 million

Loan Date: Feb. 28, 2012

Maturity Date: March 1, 2037

Borrower: Vantage Point Holdings LLC

13. Parkview Apartments Sells for $2.6 Million -

Collierville-based Parkview Memphis Apartments LP has bought Parkview Apartments at 4616 Scott Crossing Drive from Los Angeles-based City National Bank for $2.6 million.

14. Tennessee Solar Study Says Need to Stay Aggressive -

KNOXVILLE (AP) – Tennessee's solar and related industries provide more than 6,400 jobs in a growing green economic sector, but the state needs to stay aggressive in supporting and pursuing the ventures, a report released Thursday shows.

15. Moore Takes Reins of Home Builders Association -

As a homebuilder, philanthropist and body builder, Jimmy Moore is a well-rounded individual.

And as the newly installed president of the Memphis Area Home Builders Association, he is poised to lead the trade organization by example and with empathy for its members.

16. Home Permits Up 91 Percent In October -

Local homebuilders filed 91 percent more new home permits during October compared with the same month last year, thanks to an out-of-town builder’s work in a Whitehaven subdivision.

Shelby County homebuilders filed 107 permits last month, up significantly from 56 in October 2010, according to real estate information company Chandler Reports, www.chandlerreports.com.

17. Grant Installed as State Homebuilders Prez -

Keith Grant of Keith & David Grant Homes LLC was inducted Saturday, Nov. 5, as 2012 president of the Tennessee Homebuilders Association Inc. – more than 50 years after his grandfather called the first meeting in Nashville.

18. Grant Named President of TN Home Builders Assn. -

Keith Grant of Keith & David Grant Homes will be inducted as 2012 president of the Home Builders Association of Tennessee Inc. in a ceremony Nov. 5 at the Memphis Hilton, 939 Ridge Lake Blvd.

19. Sneed Promoted At Humane Society -

Kerry Sneed has been promoted to community outreach and humane education coordinator at the Humane Society of Memphis.

20. Architecture Inc.’s Schuermann Receives Chairman Appointment -

David M. Schuermann, AIA, NCARB, principal at Architecture Inc., has been named chairman of the Tennessee Board of Architectural and Engineering Examiners.

21. $8M Apt. Project on Tap for Mud Island -

The developers of a roughly $8 million apartment development planned for Mud Island are scheduled to go before the Center City Revenue Finance Corp. Tuesday, Sept. 13, to apply for a nine-year tax freeze for the project.

22. New Apartment Development Planned for Mud Island -

The developers of a roughly $8 million apartment development planned for Mud Island are scheduled to go before the Center City Revenue Finance Corp. Tuesday to apply for a 9-year tax freeze for the project.

23. MC Ionic Solutions US Begins Work on Fite Rd. Site -

2665 Fite Road
Memphis, TN 38127
Permit Amount: $1.3 million

Permit Date: Applied July 2011

24. Grants Buy Lots in Kensington PD -

Three companies related to the Grant family of homebuilders have bought the remaining 105 lots in Arlington’s Kensington Planned Development for a combined $2.6 million from BancorpSouth Bank. Kensington was approved for 109 lots on 45.4 acres.

25. Builder Struggles Continue Into Spring -

As permits decline and construction costs rise, local builders urge prospective buyers to act now before the price of new homes continues to climb.

Shelby County builders filed 46 new home permits in April, a 58 percent decrease from 111 permits in April 2010, according to the latest data from real estate information company Chandler Reports, www.chandlerreports.com.

26. Clark Carries on Family Tradition -

David Clark comes from a long line of construction industry professionals.

His grandfather, John C. Clark Jr., started building homes back in 1942, and his cousin, Ben Clark, has been involved in the subdivision business for more than 20 years.

27. Building Blocks -

Shelby County builders filed 681 new home permits last year, a 13.8 percent increase from 587 permits in 2009 according to the latest data from real estate information company Chandler Reports, www.chandlerreports.com.

28. Nonprofit Necessity -

Something had to change.

In mid-2008, Sallie Johnson became executive director of Memphis Literacy Council, a 30-year-old nonprofit literacy organization with a strong reputation for programming that was facing funding issues caused by a rapidly disintegrating economy.

29. Kroger to Build Store In Poplar Plaza -

3444 Plaza Ave.
Memphis, TN 38111
Permit Amount: $10 Million

Project Cost: n/a
Permit Date: Applied September 2010
Completion: n/a
Owner: Kroger, Delta Division
Tenant: Kroger
Contractor: n/a
Architect: n/a

30. Material Costs Shift With Weaker Demand -

The federal first-time buyer tax credit that prompted an increase in home sales – and to a lesser extent, new home construction – earlier this year had a similar impact on the price of building materials.

31. 23 Lots in Maple Grove Sell for $805,000 -

Twenty-three lots in Arlington’s Maple Grove Planned Development have sold for $805,000. L1 Properties LLC bought the lots, which are in phase two of the development, from Maple Grove Partners.

32. Taking Care of Business -

A diverse mix of Memphis businesses is defying the odds and finding success spanning multiple family generations. Grant & Co., Champion Awards, Jim’s Place East, Barden Stone and Broadway Pizza are among the Memphis institutions thriving under second- and third-generation ownership and management.

33. Springdale Fights Back -

In the mile of Springdale Street between Chelsea and Jackson avenues there are five churches. That’s not counting the churches on side streets.

On Eldridge Avenue, one of those side streets, between two tiny churches is a pair of identical small houses – both boarded up.

The one closest to the corner has faded blue spray paint stenciled across the plywood.

In inner-city Memphis, the stenciling is as familiar as gang graffiti. It’s the mark of the Memphis Police Department’s Blue CRUSH campaign.

Five years into the crackdown guided by a devotion to crime statistics, crime is down in Memphis.

But the statistical drop in crime has come with lingering questions and concerns in Springdale and other neighborhoods with Blue CRUSH houses.

“Once we board them up, we really have to depend on the community to let us know if drug dealers have broken back into them,” Shelby County District Attorney General Bill Gibbons said. “If we don’t know about it, sometimes drug dealers can get right back in there.”

In the neighborhoods, homeowners lament that street level dealers are easily replaced and soon released from jail to resume their place in the neighborhoods – now with a criminal record that makes a move away from drug dealing even more unlikely.

Last year, a team from Memphis that included a police officer, a state prosecutor, a federal prosecutor, a University of Memphis researcher, the head of the Memphis Leadership Foundation and the pastor of one of those five churches along Springdale went to several cities to get training in a new anti-drug strategy.

“We were really interested in changing people’s lives, not locking them up,” Springdale Baptist Pastor Derrick Hughes told The Memphis News. Hughes wasn’t sure at first if he would be part of the Drug Market Intervention (DMI) program.

“It sounded as if possibly it was just another program that was going to possibly just put criminals in jail without rehabilitation,” he said. “And I wanted to make sure that if we were going to be a part of something that it was going to look at rehabilitating the person, changing lives, changing them from a holistic point of view as well as a spiritual point of view.”

Gibbons said some of his prosecutors and some police brass also had their doubts as they looked for an area to test out DMI Memphis style.

“It was based primarily on looking at crime patterns and in particular drug activity in that area,” he told The Memphis News. There was plenty of open drug dealing in the Springdale area.

Drug Market Intervention is picking several street level drug dealers in a community, confronting them with the evidence against them and telling them they have one more chance to get out of the business. The police are involved in making a decision not to prosecute a few as they target dozens of others in an area.

Others on the team are community leaders from the neighborhood. And some are with proven programs to provide job training and other help in getting a legitimate job.

High Point, N.C., was the first stop for the Memphis group because it is the birthplace of DMI. It seems an unlikely example for Memphis with a population of fewer than 100,000. But in 2003, High Point had several open air drug markets. The city’s new police chief, James Fealy, attacked them using what became the DMI strategy.

David Kennedy, director of the Center for Crime Control and Prevention at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, replicated DMI in other cities with money from the federal Bureau of Justice Assistance. The BJA funded the training of the Memphis team and came here.

Kennedy’s philosophy is specific to open air drug markets. It doesn’t pretend to eliminate all drug dealing.

“Open air drug markets are found primarily in our cities and in African-American neighborhoods,” Kennedy wrote in a 2008 article for the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) Journal. “Although we are loathe to admit it, this issue is soaked in race.”

Kennedy said police complained to him that the families of the drug dealers and others in the surrounding communities knew they were selling drugs, did nothing to stop it and profited from it.

But Kennedy said those living in the communities countered that police were only interested in locking up as many people as they could as part of a conspiracy to destroy the community.

Kennedy said each side had a point and each side was wrong.

“The crime is real and overwhelmingly the arrests are legitimate. But we are destroying the village in order to save it,” he wrote. “And none of this gets rid of the crime. The drug markets and violence continue to exist.”

Kennedy didn’t try to tackle the long-standing racial issues and their lengthy back story. The conversations that formed the basis for the DMI strategy were about drug markets.

It was hard for some on the Memphis team to believe that hardened drug dealers would respond when the threat of arrest, prison time, drive-by shootings and gang turf tripwires hadn’t discouraged them from the life.

Nevertheless, when they returned to Memphis, the planning began for several months of undercover drug buys in the Springdale area by the police Organized Crime Unit. For months, the officers bought repeatedly from dozens of street dealers in a two-mile radius of Springdale. And they recorded the drug buys on video – not just one buy but multiple buys.

Prosecutors reviewed the cases against more than 60 men and women and prosecuted 51 of them. Five were indicted on federal drug charges. Six others – five men and a woman – were the first candidates for the Memphis DMI program.

“It was taking a look at individuals who obviously were involved in drug trafficking, but a little more on the periphery – not an extensive drug record,” Gibbons said.

A few days after New Year’s Day, police descended on the Springdale area serving the arrest warrants and putting up a fresh crop of plywood with blue stenciling on the drug houses in the area. The neighborhood grapevine buzzed anew about the heavy police presence.

It was still buzzing when on the coldest day of the year – Jan. 8 – the Memphis group knocked on six doors in the Springdale area. The temperature never got near freezing and was in single digits part of the day.

No one inside the six houses knew they were coming. No one approaching the doorsteps knew what the reaction inside would be.

It was the first indication the six people involved and inside those homes had that they had sold drugs to undercover Memphis police officers and had been recorded on video making multiple drug sales to the officers.

The father of one of the six was among those who had been arrested.

When the DMI team knocked on his door, his grandmother answered.

“He did not want his grandmother to know why we were standing at the door,” Peggie Russell, the DMI coordinator and a University of Memphis researcher and community resource specialist, said. “He said, ‘It’s OK grandmother.’”

Howard Eddings, president of the Memphis Leadership Foundation, said the young man didn’t deny he was a drug dealer.

“He wanted to basically shut the door,” Eddings told The Memphis News. “She might not have known exactly what he was doing. She was an older lady. He didn’t like the fact that we were knocking on her door.”

He and the other five got a letter asking them to come to Springdale Baptist Church a few days later. If they came, the letter from Police Director Larry Godwin said they would not be prosecuted this time.

For Hughes the pledge was crucial. He wanted to be able to say, “I give you my word, you will not be arrested,” with certainty and conviction.

Five of the six showed up at Hughes’ church where the congregation and other community leaders were waiting in the sanctuary. On the walls were posters of the 51 defendants who weren’t getting the chance they were about to get. The posters included the possible prison sentences those defendants faced.

The five “guests” sat in a reserved front row with a friend or family member.

Their faces blurred in a video of the event, they listened as Assistant District Attorney Amy Weirich told them, “We’ve had it,” and called their names individually. “The Memphis Police Department is tired of picking up dead bodies in the street.”

Russell remembers some denying they had done anything wrong. Then police showed the video.

They watched video of themselves selling drugs numerous times to undercover police officers.

The woman’s denials stopped.

“She got caught during the first time. I don’t necessarily know that we believed it was the first time,” Eddings remembered. “But she was so embarrassed as a mom who had small kids who was put in the spotlight. … All of her junk is coming to the forefront.”

Russell said some of the others were telling those who came with them that they had no idea why they were summoned to the church.

“You’re sitting there and you’re telling your family member, ‘No, I didn’t do it,’” Russell said. “Then the tape started rolling … and you see yourself. It’s reality. You can’t hide it. I think that was a turning point for most of them.”

Hughes told the group of five that the church cared about them and was willing to help.

Some of his congregants spoke up too.

“Our congregants said, ‘Listen, we’re tired of watching you sell drugs. We’re tired of being afraid of coming in and out of our communities. We want our community back,’” Hughes recalled. “During the call in, some of our residents had an opportunity to look in their faces and say, ‘We are tired of the way you’ve been running down our communities. This used to be a wonderful community where people had pride, where people had hope. … Now a lot of us are afraid.’”

After the tough talk and the confrontation came a commitment to work with the five DMI candidates. Eddings emphasized there are no guarantees.

“We were careful not to promise them that we were going to get them jobs or that even if we could get them a job that it was going to pay them something comparable to what they were making on the street,” he said. ”We said the opposite. We can’t do that at all. But one thing we do know for sure. If you stop doing what you’re doing, you don’t go to jail.”

Russell, who gets much of the credit for pushing to give DMI a try and has become the program’s de facto coordinator, described the response as “something totally new.”

“It’s not about those five,” she said. “They are supposed to stay out of trouble for two years to make the necessary transition in their lives. But it’s really about the Hollywood Springdale community, changing the response of the community to open air drug sales.”

Eddings was surprised by the response.

“Most of these guys’ mamas know what they’re doing. But to know now that other mamas and other grandparents and other church leaders and the community have their eye on you, it has a different motivation,” he said. “Some of these guys are hardened. They’ve been doing it for a while and they’ve been out there on the streets. So, not much embarrasses them. But I could tell by looking at them and even some of the denials.”

The Memphis Leadership Foundation already works with convicted felons trying to make the difficult transition after prison. There are even fewer guarantees for those with a substantial prison record.

Marcus, who didn’t want his last name used, vented about how hard it’s been to find a legitimate job since he did prison time in 2006 for felony drug dealing.

“It’s not like people want to sell drugs,” he began. “On a lot of applications they are saying they don’t discriminate. They’re lying. … They’re ready to end the session right then. They might tear up the application in your face.”

If drug dealers like him bring blight to areas like Springdale and violence and a hard life for law-abiding citizens, Marcus said society has responded with its own brand of hardness.

“They ain’t reaching out anymore,” he said. “They expect for the world to be better because we’re building more jails. We’re putting more cops out. If somebody killed me today – the person who killed me, they want to put him in jail. But why put him in jail when y’all treating this man he killed like he’s a nobody anyway.”

Eddings said with criminal records or without, street level drug dealers have problems as they get older because they have no legitimate work history. He started to say there aren’t transferable skills before thinking about it.

“Actually, some of the skills do transfer. They’ve just got to get access,” he said. “It’s really a reshaping, a little bit more recognition that they need to deal with in terms of how they see themselves and how they can use those skills that they utilize on the streets to do something positive and pursue a legitimate way of life.”

The young man Eddings is working with seems not to have hit the wall that Marcus is at yet.

“He is simply trying to figure out how to put one foot in front of the other. They go from having some source of income to having no source of income,” Eddings told The Memphis News. “We’re convincing him now that getting his GED ought to be a decision that he ought to make. He’s been a little slow in that.”

Hughes said he would get the occasional dope boy showing up at his church before DMI.

“Very rarely. I did hear one or two stragglers you come across who say, ‘Yes, I do want to change.’ Often times, it’s usually because of a pending trial or they are in trouble,” he said. “Since that time, we’ve had a lot of people coming, wanting to change their lives.”

Gibbons is reviewing some neighborhoods where DMI might go next but he’s not saying where because of the undercover police work involved. He wants to see it replicated based on lessons learned in Memphis and he hopes to get a federal grant to hire a full-time coordinator.

The sixth man given a chance in the DMI program didn’t come to the church and was prosecuted. He pleaded guilty to five counts of selling drugs and was sentenced to four years in prison and fined $10,000. But the sentence was suspended and he was put on a diversion program.

Weirich recalled Criminal Court Judge John Fowlkes asking the man why he didn’t respond. He told Fowlkes, “It sounded too good to be true.”

...

34. 2010 -

Is it over yet? That may be the most frequently asked question in the New Year. “It” is the worst national economic recession since the Great Depression.

Accurately reading the indicators will not be easy. Some will predict the recession is about to end, just as new indicators point to continuing economic agony for thousands of Memphians.

35. Byrnes to Take MAHBA Reins -

Tommy Byrnes of Byrnes Ostner Investments Inc. will serve as 2010 president of the Memphis Area Home Builders Association, the group’s executive director, Don Glays, said this week.

36. Grand Island Files Permit For Mud Island Apartment Complex -

300 Grand Island Drive
Memphis, TN 38103
Permit Amount: $12.1 Million

Project Cost: $19 million
Permit Date: Applied November 2009
Completion: 2012
Owner: Grand Island Partners
Tenant: Grand Island
Contractor: Keith and David Grant Homes LLC
Architect: MMH Hall Architects and Planners Inc.

37. Arlington Subdivision Coughs to Life -

After a few years of starts and stops, a host of liens and other financial woes, the Cambridge Manor Planned Development in Arlington is finally getting under way.

Grant & Co. paid almost $1.9 million for all 45 lots of the subdivision’s first phase and plans to bring a model home plus six speculative homes to the development within the next 90 to 100 days, said company president Keith Grant.

38. Goddard School Planned For Winchester Road in Collierville -

2.5 Acres
Collierville, TN 38017
Loan Amount: $1.3 Million

Loan Date: Feb. 13, 2009
Maturity Date: N/A
Borrower: R.S. Harris LLC
Lender: First Citizens National Bank

39. City Council To Consider Frayser Foreclosure Woes -

Steve Lockwood, executive director of the Frayser Community Development Corp., offers a nine-digit figure when quantifying the pain of the housing slump in Frayser, the epicenter of foreclosure activity in Shelby County.

40. Bank of Bartlett Extends Its Reach to Downtown -

Bartlett and Downtown Memphis are separated by about 15 miles, what could be perceived as a political and cultural divide and different economic centers of gravity.

All of which are reasons why the millions of dollars pumped into the Downtown economy over at least the past decade by Bank of Bartlett, which was established in the small town of the same name in 1980, might be easy to overlook. But those reasons also put into context the bank’s consistent and generous investment in Downtown projects of all stripes.

41. Keith and David Grant HomesFinances Lots in Two Devs. -      Memphis homebuilder Keith and David Grant Homes LLC has taken out a $3.2 million construction loan and a $3.2 million revolving line of credit, both through SunTrust Bank, secured by property in Bartlett and Lakeland sub

42. Down Time -

It was the year the Cordova headquarters of Shelby County's largest homebuilder was foreclosed and sold at auction.

Yet 2007 was the same year that four homebuilders broke ground on the massive six-phase Villages at White Oaks development near Arlington.

43. Builders Hand OutAwards at Gala -      The Memphis Area Home Builders Association (MAHBA) closed the year - and began looking toward 2008 - late last week at its inaugural gala and awards ceremony, held in the ballroom of the association's Cordova headquarter

44. Numbers Confirm That '07 Construction Went From High-Octane to Running on Fumes -

As president of one of Memphis' largest homebuilders and a 35-year industry veteran, Jerry Gillis of FaxonGillis Homes had no trouble summing up construction activity during the past year: "It started out with a bang and ended with a whimper." Indeed it did.

45. Collins to ServeAs 2008 MAHBA President -      Doug Collins of Sovereign Homes LLC and Prudential Collins-Maury Realtors will serve as president of the Memphis Area Home Builders Association for 2008.
     He has been a member of the asso

46. Archived Article -

Vacant land
In Collierville
Sale Amount: $ 2 million; $2.1 million ($4.1 million total)

Sale Date: Sept. 27, 2007

47. Local Investment CompanyBuys Collierville Property -      Local investor Grant Properties LLC has bought vacant lots in Collierville's The Villages at Porter Farms in Collierville. Two sales deeds for $2 million and $2.1 million were signed Sept. 27.
   &nbs

48. Slippery Slope -

For numerous homebuilders, the Mid-South Parade of Homes can't come soon enough.

As home sales continue to slide, the buzz created by the debut of this four-county, 161-home bonanza - with its wide variety of builders, locales and price points - could be the shot in the arm that many companies need to finish the year strong.

49. Down But Not Out -

When reached by cell phone while traveling in Florida last week, Jerry Gillis was asked to comment on the sharp decline in Shelby County residential building permits during second quarter 2007.

Gillis, president of FaxonGillis Homes and a 35-year industry veteran, wasn't overly concerned about the downward spiral that resulted in 56.9 percent fewer permits filed between April 1 and June 30 than in the same period last year, according to Chandler Reports, www.chandlerreports.com.

50. Message is Clear: Buy Houses Now -

"Buy Now." The message is simple, succinct and straight to the point.

And its messenger hopes those two little words will inspire anyone considering a home purchase to follow through.

The Memphis Area Home Builders Association (MAHBA) launched its "Buy Now" campaign earlier this month with hopes of generating new interest in home buying, which has slumped of late nationwide, even in Shelby County.

51. Age-Restricted Subdivision In Lakeland Points To Growing Trend -

Keith and David Grant Homes LLC, a division of Grant & Co. Builders, is in the midst of completing the final phase of a development designed for people older than 55.

Sterling Place is an age-restricted community in Lakeland. When it's completed within the next year, the development will have 120 lots, 69 of which already have been sold.

52. End of the 'Flywheel Effect' -

First-quarter residential building permits in Shelby County tumbled for the second consecutive year, according to Chandler Reports, www.chandlerreports.com.

In the first quarter of 2007, 720 residential permits were filed. That's down 20 percent from the 901 filed in first quarter 2006, which is down 24.1 percent from the 1,187 filed in first quarter 2005.

53. Home Building, Industry Leadership Runs in Keith Grant's Blood -

You could say Keith Grant was born to build homes. You also could say he was born to become president of the Memphis Area Home Builders Association (MAHBA).

Grant is a third-generation home builder who became association president in January. His father, Richard, served in that role in 1979, and his grandfather, Carl, started the family tradition by serving as president in 1959.

54. Paradise Out East -

Lifelong Arlington resident Russell Wiseman is not surprised by the growth his eastern Shelby County community has been experiencing.

Wiseman, vice president and commercial lender at First Capital Bank in Germantown, also happens to be mayor of Arlington.

55. Builders, Developers Could Pay Hefty Fines For Not Following New Erosion Rules -

April showers bring May flowers, but rain throughout the year brings the potential for tainted waterways.

Without protective measures, rainwater can flow through a construction site and carry dirt and other debris into storm drains. The muddied water then can enter rivers and streams, contaminating drinking water and wildlife habitats.

56. Ready to Roll -

With the help of one generous donation, the Shelby Residential and Vocational Services (SRVS) agency is able to address one of its most crucial needs.

Thanks in part to a nearly $150,000 grant from the Plough Foundation, the agency bought nine brand-new vans this month. The one-time grant allowed SRVS to replace outdated vans to cater to new clients.

57. Family Ties: Bartlett subdivision brings together four building companies under the Grant family umbrella -

Lots in
Elpine Gray Estates
Loan Amount: $2.6 million

Loan Date: Jan. 9, 2007

Maturity Date: Jan. 9, 2008

58. Wassmer Captures Account Exec Spot at Thompson & Berry -

Katie Wassmer has been promoted to account executive at Thompson & Berry Public Relations, a division of Thompson & Co. Wassmer has been with Thompson & Berry for two years. She joined the company as an intern. Wassmer graduated from the University of Memphis in 2004 with a bachelor's degree in journalism/public relations.

59. Events -

Friends of the Poplar-White Station Branch Library presents Tom Nenon, assistant provost of undergraduate programs at the University of Memphis, today at 11:30 a.m. at the library, 5094 Poplar Ave. Nenon speaks about "New Ways to Think About Ethical Decision-Making." Call 682-1616.

60. Keith and David Grant HomesPlans Wellsgate Construction - Keith and David Grant Homes LLC has filed a $2 million mortgage through First Tennessee Bank NA for 10 lots in Wellsgate Subdivision. The developers bought the lots May 2 from Beazer Homes Corp. for $531,500. South of Old Brownsville Road and west of

61. Archived Article -

3475 Steve Road
and 1747 Morlye Place
Cost: $5.3 million

Buyer: Prescott Place Apartments LP

Seller: Prescott Place LP

62. Archived Article: Real Recap - STACEY On the second one down, I used the term Peabody Place Centre Condominium etc

Greystar Refinances Preserve at Southwind 7991 Capilano Drive

Memphis, TN 38125

Cost: $17.1 million

Borrower: Southwind Multifamily LP

Lender: Metropo...

63. Archived Article: Real Recap - 1089 Vollentine Ave

Investment Trust Finances Land Near Raines Two tracts in

Raines developments

Cost: $12.5 million

Borrower: US Industrial REIT, a Texas real estate investment trust

Lender: Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Co. 64. Archived Article: Real Review - (03165883) The Shops of Chickasaw Gardens LLC financed $4

Keith and David Grant Homes LLC financed $1.5 million through First Tennessee Bank National Association, securing the loan with 10 lots in the Arlington Trace Subdivision, according to a t...

65. Archived Article: Fire Grants - Local firehouses get federal funds

Local firehouses get federal funds

By STACEY WIEDOWER

The Daily News

Three area fire departments recently received federal money to purchase equipment and implement new programs that will improve safety...

66. Archived Article: Real Focus - Margaret Barr-Myers, managing attorney with Fair Housing Center

MALS study focuses on predatory lenders, prevention

By DAVID LYONS

The Daily News

Memphis Area Legal Services or MALS, is in the process of collecting information from homeo...

67. Archived Article: Comm Focus (hom) - Hands on Memphis promotes community activism Hands On Memphis promotes community activism By MARY DANDO The Daily News Hands On Memphis is leading the way in community activism by offering its sponsors and volunteers a chance to find out more about ...

68. Archived Article: Real Focus - Home Builders Association elects 2000 volunteer leadership team and sets goals for the new year Real Focus Home Builders elects volunteer leadership team, sets goals for 2000 The Memphis Area Home Builders Association is preparing to enter the new c...

69. Archived Article: Real Briefs - Rosemarie Fair Stack was confirmed as the 1998 president of the Memphis Area Association of Realtors Rosemarie Fair Stack was confirmed as the 1998 president of the Memphis Area Association of Realtors. Robin Hyde and Doug Collins were chosen secret...

70. Archived Article: Real Analys - THDA mortgage funds available THDA mortgage funds available A bond sale by the Tennessee Housing Development Agency will provide nearly $64 million in affordable mortgage funds for home buyers across Tennessee. Based on recent average purchase price...

71. Archived Article: Real Analys - 04-23 Real analys THDAs START program: "The Heart of our Mission" An interim report on the Tennessee Housing Development Agencys three-year pilot mortgage program for low-income families has concluded that low income home buyers, especiall...

72. Archived Article: Govt Focus Lj - lj 10/5 cates "Child" of FmHA growing up in Shelby County Millingtons elderly housing renovation project latest recipient of RECD funds By LAURIE JOHNSON The Daily News When Millington city officials decided to begin a program to help elde...