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Editorial Results (free)

1. HopeWorks Starts Series Aimed at Fighting Poverty -

HopeWorks is initiating a new educational series that aims to educate and equip community members actively seeking to join in the fight against poverty.

The “Understanding Poverty” series will feature a variety of guest speakers who are specially trained in particular levels of poverty and will lend advice on developing individual worth and becoming financially independent.

2. Shelby County Inmate to be Honored for Rescue -

A Shelby County jail inmate will be honored for rescuing a woman who was involved in a car crash.

County officials say Tyteaddis Johnson was serving jail time for aggravated burglary when he was assigned to a grass-cutting crew near Memphis International Airport on July 21.

3. HopeWorks Starts Series Aimed at Fighting Poverty -

HopeWorks is initiating a new educational series that aims to educate and equip community members actively seeking to join in the fight against poverty.

The “Understanding Poverty” series will feature a variety of guest speakers who are trained in particular levels of poverty and will lend advice on developing individual worth and becoming financially independent. The first HopeWorks UP session, which is free and open to the public, will feature Larry James, president and CEO of CitySquare in Dallas, Oct. 26 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at White Station Church of Christ, 1106 Colonial Road.

4. Probate Court Trio Returns for New Terms -

The two judges and clerk whose court is at the center of the practice of estate law in Shelby County were returned to their offices by Shelby County voters in the August county general elections.

Probate Court Judges Karen D. Webster and Kathleen N. Gomes as well as Probate Court Clerk Paul Boyd each faced challengers in the election that drew a 27 percent voter turnout overall.

5. Commission Confirms Luttrell Appointees -

In the first voting meeting of the new four-year term of office, the Shelby County Commission approved Monday, Sept. 8, County Mayor Mark Luttrell’s reappointment of Harvey Kennedy as chief administrative officer, Mike Swift as finance director, Yvonne Matlock as health services director, John Halbert as chief information officer, Tom Needham as public works director and Richard Copeland as director of the city-county Office of Planning and Development. The commission also approved William Gupton as the new director of the county’s corrections division.

6. County Commission Confirms Luttrell Appointees -

In the first voting meeting of the new four-year term of office, the Shelby County Commission approved Monday, Sept. 8, County Mayor Mark Luttrell’s reappointment of Harvey Kennedy as chief administrative officer, Mike Swift as finance director, Yvonne Matlock as health services director, John Halbert as chief information officer, Tom Needham as public works director and Richard Copeland as director of the city-county Office of Planning and Development. The commission also approved William Gupton as the new director of the county’s corrections division.

7. Ford Is New County Commission Chairman In Latest Crossover Trend -

Shelby County Commissioners elected a Democratic chairman Monday, Sept. 8, but for a second consecutive year, that chairman was elected with the support of a majority of the Republicans on the body.

8. County Commission Begins New Term -

Shelby County Commissioners elect a new chairman Monday, Sept. 8, for the next year at the first voting meeting of their four-year term of office.

And their agenda includes votes on appointments by Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell to his second-term team of division directors and administrators.

9. Medtronic Launches Pediatric Spine Product -

Medtronic Inc. on Thursday, Aug. 28, announced the 510(k) clearance and launch of a product designed for treatment of skeletally immature pediatric patients younger than 10 years of age diagnosed with severe, progressive, life-threatening, early-onset spinal deformities.

10. Medtronic Launches Pediatric Scoliosis Treatment -

Medtronic Inc. on Thursday, Aug. 28, announced the 510(k) clearance and launch of a product designed for treatment of skeletally immature pediatric patients younger than 10 years of age diagnosed with severe, progressive, life-threatening, early-onset spinal deformities.

11. City Mulls Plan to Buy Former State Building -

It would be cheaper and more efficient for the city of Memphis to lease and then buy the vacant Donnelley J. Hill state office building across Main Street from Memphis City Hall than to continue leasing multiple properties spread across town, consultants and city officials told City Council members Tuesday.

12. Local Projects Win State Grant Money -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam handed out five oversized grant checks Wednesday, July 23, on the University of Memphis campus for a total of $1.4 million in grants funding for various pedestrian, park and recreation projects across Shelby County.

13. Sheriff’s Race Reflects Different Law Enforcement Cultures -

Bennie Cobb remembers how he got his first job in the local criminal justice system.

It was 1980, and Cobb – then 19 years old – went to apply for a job at the old City Jail.

14. Tennessee ‘Ready’ to Use Electric Chair -

Tennessee’s top prisons official says the state is “ready as needed” to use the electric chair if it can’t get the drugs used for lethal injections.

A corrections spokeswoman said Friday that the state doesn’t have a supply of the drugs but authorities are confident they could acquire some. The chemicals have become scarcer following a European-led boycott of drug sales for executions.

15. Tennessee 'Ready' to Use Electric Chair If Needed -

Tennessee's top prisons official says the state is "ready as needed" to use the electric chair if it can't get the drugs used for lethal injections.

A corrections spokeswoman said Friday that the state doesn't have a supply of the drugs but authorities are confident they could acquire some. The chemicals have become scarcer following a European-led boycott of drug sales for executions.

16. County Commission Ready for Budget Analysis -

Shelby County Commissioners begin their detailed look at the county’s consolidated budget proposal Wednesday, April 16, for the coming fiscal year.

The budget committee, chaired by commissioner Heidi Shafer, begins its hearings with a look at the budgets for the offices of Sheriff, Trustee, Register and the Juvenile Court and its Clerk’s office.

17. Commission Budget Season Begins Quietly -

Shelby County Commissioners began their budget season quietly with a first look in committee sessions last week at a $1.2 billion consolidated county budget proposal by Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell.

18. Mississippi Governor Signs Criminal-Justice Overhaul Bill -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant on Monday signed a bill designed to make the criminal justice system more efficient and less expensive.

Bryant said House Bill 585, which becomes law July 1, will protect public safety and could save the state $266 million in prison expenses, spread over 10 years.

19. Sustainability is a Win for All -

Editor’s Note: This column will appear Tuesdays through April in honor of Sustainability Month for Memphis and Shelby County.

This April marks the third annual Sustainability Month for Memphis and Shelby County. It has been remarkable and rewarding to watch the growth in activity and awareness around this important issue.

20. Coleman Resigns as County Corrections Head -

Shelby County Corrections Division director James Coleman has resigned effective immediately, citing “personal reasons.”

21. Coleman Resigns as County Corrections Head -

Shelby County Corrections Division director James Coleman has resigned effective immediately, citing “personal reasons.”

22. Coleman Resigns As County Corrections Head -

Shelby County Corrections Division director James Coleman has resigned effective immediately citing “personal reasons.”

23. ‘Champion of Working Man’ Rep. Turner Set to Retire -

State Rep. and Nashville Democrat Mike Turner is retiring from the General Assembly and considering a run for mayor.

24. Miss. Bill Would Increase Repeat Offenders’ Time -

Old habits are hard to break when it comes to Mississippi lawmakers’ desire to lock up criminals.

Two days after the state House passed House Bill 585, which aims to cut the number of state prisoners to save money, representatives voted 79-41 Wednesday to pass House Bill 63. It would limit the ability of violent offenders to get time off prison sentences after a second conviction.

25. Mississippi Bill Would Increase Repeat Offenders’ Sentence -

Old habits are hard to break when it comes to Mississippi lawmakers' desire to lock up criminals.

Two days after the state House passed House Bill 585, which aims to cut the number of state prisoners to save money, representatives voted 79-41 Wednesday to pass House Bill 63. It would limit the ability of violent offenders to get time off prison sentences after a second conviction.

26. Tennessee Supreme Court Rules on Defamation Claims -

The Tennessee Supreme Court has ruled that cabinet-level state commissioners have absolute immunity from defamation claims for what they say when they are performing their official duties.

The court ruled Monday, Dec. 23, in the case of Zoyle Jones, a state Department of Corrections employee demoted for allegedly double-billing the state and a private organization for travel expenses.

27. Tenn. Supreme Court Rules on Defamation Claims -

The Tennessee Supreme Court has ruled that cabinet-level state commissioners have absolute immunity from defamation claims for what they say when they are performing their official duties.

The court ruled Monday, Dec. 23, in the case of Zoyle Jones, a state Department of Corrections employee demoted for allegedly double-billing the state and a private organization for travel expenses.

28. Commission Approves Prison Medical Contract -

The Shelby County Commission approved Monday, Oct. 14, an $18.2 million annual contract with Correct Care Solutions LLC to provide medical services to prisoners at the Shelby County jail and inmates at the county corrections center. The contract includes four one-year renewal periods and is the highest-dollar contract on which the commission votes.

29. Commission Approves Prison Medical Contract -

The Shelby County Commission approved Monday, Oct. 14, an $18.2 million annual contract with Correct Care Solutions LLC to provide medical services to prisoners at the Shelby County jail and inmates at the county corrections center. The contract includes four one-year renewal periods and is the highest-dollar contract on which the commission votes.

30. Shelby County Schools To Apply For Head Start Funding -

Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson said Monday, Oct. 14, the school system will apply for $23 million in federal Head Start funding that now goes to Shelby County government.

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell said Monday, Oct. 14, Porter-Leath children’s service will also make a bid for the Head Start contract county government now operates.

31. Head Start Funding Deadline Looms for County -

Shelby County Commissioners will probably talk again Monday, Oct. 14, about who should apply for $23 million in federal funding for the Head Start program.

Last month the commission approved a resolution urging Shelby County Schools to apply for the early childhood development program now administered by Shelby County government.

32. County Commission Sees Calmer Session -

Ruffled feelings on the Shelby County Commission earlier this month were smoothed for the most part Monday, Sept. 23, as James Harvey chaired the second meeting of his yearlong term as commission chairman.

33. Shelby Farms Parkway Hearings Continue -

Tennessee transportation officials return Tuesday, Sept. 24, to the topic of a parkway through Shelby Farms Park.

34. County Commission to Vote on Head Start Push to Schools -

Shelby County Commissioners consider a resolution Monday, Sept. 23, that encourages the countywide school system to apply to take over the $23 million federal government grant county government now gets to operate a Head Start program.

35. Cleanup Crew -

DeAndre Brown runs what might be the best known landscape business in areas of Memphis where the yards have brush and trees taller than the vacant houses they completely obscure.

“We operate a little differently than other contractors. Most have subcontractors that work separately,” he said. “We are one large crew of 60 men or women. We get the heavy equipment in first. Then a team of weed eaters will go in behind that, then a team of people go in behind them and clean up.”

36. Questions Raised About Criminal Justice System -

Shelby County’s public defender and the head of the Shelby County Corrections division say courts and prisons are changing and evolving as views about crime and punishment begin to change.

But Public Defender Stephen Bush and County Corrections Division director James Coleman said the intervention needs to start before citizens come into contact with the criminal justice system.

37. Prosecutors: Federal Shift Underway in County -

The historic shift in criminal justice philosophy by U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder and President Barack Obama’s administration reflects the direction in which state and federal prosecutors in Shelby County already have been heading for several years.

38. State Court Administrator to Retire by End of Year -

The head of the Tennessee Administrative Office of the Courts is retiring by the end of the year.

Libby Sykes made the announcement this week. She has held the court position for seven years, and spent 27 years in state government.

39. City Council Approves Civil Service Referendum -

The Memphis City Council approved Tuesday, Aug. 20, a 2014 city referendum on a charter change that would change the city’s civil service board system.

Part of the proposal by council member Kemp Conrad is aimed at better staffing the review board, which decides employee appeals, to hear a current backlog of cases and resolve them more quickly. Under another change in the proposal, employees could be cited for – and appeal – performance issues, in addition to violations of policies.

40. City Council Approves Civil Service Referendum -

The Memphis City Council approved Tuesday, Aug. 20, a 2014 city referendum on a charter change that would change the city’s civil service board system.

Part of the proposal by council member Kemp Conrad is aimed at better staffing the review board, which decides employee appeals, to hear a current backlog of cases and resolve them more quickly. Under another change in the proposal, employees could be cited for – and appeal – performance issues, in addition to violations of policies.

41. Council Approves Smart Meters, Delays Vote on Solid Waste Fee and Plan -

Memphis City Council members approved a $10.1 million contract Tuesday, Aug. 20, for Memphis Light Gas and Water Division to buy 60,000 Smart Meters.

And the council delayed a final vote on setting a solid waste fee that is the starting point for changes over several years to the way the city collects garbage. The two-week delay in setting the fee also delays acting on a plan to provide sanitation workers with a retirement supplement of up to $1,000 a month funded with the savings from the changes in the services.

42. City Council to Consider Smart Meters -

The Memphis City Council’s long-running debate over the use of Smart Meters by Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division with time-of-use rates is expected to reach a critical phase at the council’s Tuesday, Aug. 20, session.

43. Corrections Corp. of America Closes on $36 Million Buyout -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Corrections Corp. of America, one of the largest prison operators in the country, has completed its approximately $36 million acquisition of the privately held Correctional Alternatives Inc.

44. Company Creates Nashville Exchange-Traded Fund -

NASHVILLE (AP) – A Nashville company has developed the nation's first city-based exchange-traded fund that follows an index of companies based in Nashville and the surrounding counties.

45. School Board Vacancy to be Filled in August -

Shelby County Commissioners plan to fill the vacancy on the countywide school board from the resignation of Reginald Porter at the Aug. 19 meeting.

46. School Board Vacancy to Be Filled in August -

Shelby County Commissioners plan to fill the vacancy on the countywide school board from the resignation of Reginald Porter at the Aug. 19 meeting.

47. Commission Approves $4.38 Property Tax Rate -

Shelby County Commissioners approved a $4.38 county property tax rate Monday, July 22, ending a budget season that spilled into the first 22 days of the new fiscal year.

The key to the 7-5 vote on third and final reading of the ordinance was Commissioner Justin Ford changing his “no” vote earlier this month back to a “yes” vote and Commissioner Sidney Chism announcing he would no longer abstain from voting on the matter because of a day care center his family operates.

48. Balancing Act -

It’s past time to rethink the old 60/40 notion of investing, say a wide range of Memphis financial professionals, as the ground continues to shift beneath the feet of investors in this low-yield world of investing dominated by unprecedented action from the Federal Reserve.

49. Growing Push to Halt Workplace Bullying -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Margaret Fiester is no shrinking violet, but she says working for her former boss was a nightmare.

"One day I didn't do something right and she actually laid her hands on me and got up in my face and started yelling, 'Why did you do that?'" said Fiester, who worked as a legal assistant for an attorney.

50. Message from the DOC -

The voice mail message on my private office line went like this: “This is (name omitted) at (address omitted). Recycling gave me this number. I’m trying to get a trash barrel for my house. It’s been three months since we had one, and I’m using my neighbor’s. Someone get in touch with me as soon as possible at (phone number omitted).”

51. Filmmakers Tap Public for Documentary Funding -

Two independent Memphis filmmakers are days away from their deadline to crowd-fund a portion of the $50,000 budget for “The Keepers,” their documentary that takes viewers behind the scenes at the Memphis Zoo.

52. Commission Debates Post-Hostess Bread Prices -

Shelby County Commissioners approved a $251,958 contract with a Batesville, Ark., bakery that at least for now has a perceived monopoly on baking and distributing large amounts of bread in the region.

53. Due Process -

One at a time. That is the most noticeable change so far at Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court as a result of a landmark settlement in November with the U.S. Justice Department. The children before the court come before the court magistrates one at a time. No more groups of juvenile defendants waiting for their case to come up as other cases are being heard.

54. Jobs Push Made for State’s Veterans -

Hundreds of thousands of veterans will be coming home in the near future, as the U.S. downsizes its presence in the Middle East.

Many of those veterans will need jobs. And employers across Tennessee, with help from state government, are going on a major hiring push to put them to work.

55. Commission Tries Again at Redistricting -

Shelby County Commissioners will see if they have all 13 commissioners present before they see if there are nine votes to pass a redistricting plan.

Third and final reading of a redistricting ordinance is on the commission’s agenda for Monday, June 11. The commission meeting begins at 1:30 p.m. at the Vasco Smith County Administration Building, 160 N. Main St.

56. Gov't Watchdog Urges Stronger Air Safety Oversight -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Federal Aviation Administration has repeatedly lagged in responding to whistleblower complaints about urgent safety problems, including takeoff and landing procedures at one airport that have caused planes to nearly collide, a government watchdog said Tuesday in an unusually harsh public rebuke.

57. A Look at Bills Passed by Tenn. Lawmakers in 2012 -

Here is a list of some of the legislation that has been approved by the Legislature this year:

ABORTION DOCTORS: Requires physicians to have hospital privileges in the home or adjacent county of woman seeking abortion. HB3808.

58. Fresh Approach -

The days of mystery meat, syrupy fruit cups and rubbery cheese pizza are a thing of the past at Memphis City Schools Nutrition Services, where, each school day, 20,000 salads are prepared from scratch using fresh, locally grown, mixed field greens.

59. Conspiracy Theory -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Tennessee joined 14 other states along with the U.S. Justice Department in suing Apple Inc. and major book publishers Wednesday, alleging a conspiracy to raise the price of electronic books they said cost consumers more than $100 million in the past two years by adding $2 to $5 to the price of each e-book.

60. 100 Years of Design -

Evans Taylor Foster Childress, which celebrates its centennial in March, can trace its origins to two distinguished Memphis architectural firms.

61. Commission’s Redistrict Debate Moves to Chancery -

It is now up to a court to decide on a new set of district lines for the Shelby County Commission.

And Chancellor Arnold Goldin is not being asked to approve a simple tweaking of district boundaries that will essentially keep the commission as it is.

62. Petties Case Court Documents Suggest Post Conviction Plans -

Toward the end of the prosecution’s case last week in the Craig Petties drug organization trial, jurors heard a corrections officers say that Clinton Lewis, one of the two defendants, told Carlos Whitelow, another member of the organization, to keep quiet and not tell prosecutors anything about the organization.

63. Prosecution Rests in Fed Drug Trial -

The prosecution in the Craig Petties drug organization trial rested in case in chief Thursday, March 8, after four weeks of testimony.

64. Petties Jury Hears of 2007 Arrests of Defendants and Plea Talks -

When they were arrested separately within months of each in 2007, neither Clinton Lewis nor Martin Lewis went quietly.

65. Chancery Court Clerk Job Takes Russell ‘Full Circle’ -

The new clerk and master of Shelby County Chancery Court is returning to the world of court administration.

Donna Russell was appointed to the position late last year by the court’s three chancellors following the sudden resignation of clerk and master Dewun Settle in September.

66. Fed Drug Case Defendant Wants New Atty. -

Just two and a half weeks before he goes on trial for racketeering, drug conspiracy and murder-for-hire charges, Clinton Lewis wants a new attorney.

67. Holiday Shopping Season is Strong -

NEW YORK (AP) – The holiday shopping season is wrapping up to be bigger than anyone expected. Now, retailers are holding their breath and hoping consumers will keep spending in the final days before Christmas.

68. Rules for Federal Drug Case Still Being Formed -

The words “inordinate” and “extraordinary” keep coming up in the court documents for the largest drug case ever brought in Memphis federal court, even though the case is now down to two defendants who are scheduled to go to trial next month.

69. Prison Stories Lends Ear to Women Behind Bars -

Elaine Blanchard has a reputation in the Memphis community as a gifted storyteller, but her greatest gift seems to lie in her willingness to listen, particularly to those who are listened to least.

70. A Primer on Recessionary Market Behavior -

Counterpoint A few positive countertrend economic data points, a big Buffet Bank of America buy and a Bernanke bounce inspired markets last week, moving the S&P 500 higher by over 4 percent. The durability of the move warrants skepticism, but the rally appeared amidst oppressive pessimism. Who’s buying?

71. County Commission Approves City Convention Center Buyout -

Shelby County Commissioners have approved selling county government’s share of the Memphis Cook Convention Center to the city of Memphis for $75 million.

The commission vote Monday, Aug. 22, came after city Housing and Community Development director Robert Lipscomb fielded a lot of questions from several commissioners about the Bass Pro Shops renovation of The Pyramid.

72. The Burger Joint Joins Ridgeway Trace -

Another national burger chain is setting up shop locally, except this one selected Memphis as its entrance into the Tennessee market.

BGR The Burger Joint is the latest tenant to join Ridgeway Trace Center, the 347,358-square-foot development at Poplar Avenue and Interstate 240 anchored by Target, Best Buy, PetSmart and Sports Authority.

73. Literacy Mid-South Aims to Combat Local Illiteracy -

Literacy Mid-South executive director Kevin Dean and his staff stay busy spreading the word about the identity and mission of the nonprofit organization, the result of a merger last year between Memphis Literacy Council and Mid-South Reads.

74. Pondering Procrastination -

I have been putting off addressing this topic for quite a while for some reason. Just kidding! Technically, to procrastinate means to postpone doing something. Procrastination is not all bad. Sometimes it is a good idea to postpone certain things. For example, it is usually beneficial to postpone making a snap judgment about something or someone. And sometimes when you postpone so-called important things, they miraculously disappear or no longer matter. Procrastination only becomes dysfunctional behavior when it begins to negatively impact your life – when it prevents you from living the life you desire.

75. AP EXCLUSIVE: Power Grid Change May Disrupt Clocks -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Our power supply has been so precise that we've set our clocks by it. But time may be running out on that idea.

A yearlong experiment with the electric grid may make plug-in clocks and devices like coffeemakers with programmable timers run up to 20 minutes fast.

76. New Green Jail Opening in Nashville -

NASHVILLE (AP) – A new detention center being built to house female inmates in Nashville will be Tennessee's first green jail.

The facility will hold 256 beds when it opens in September and features solar panels, a geothermal heat pump system, parking for alternative fuel vehicles, low-flow plumbing fixtures and a recycling program.

77. Commission Delays Final County Budget Vote -

Shelby County Commissioners cut several million dollars across county government Monday June 6 with a resolution suggesting all county employees making over $100,000 a year take a 10 percent pay cut. They also slashed $300,000 from the county’s office of early childhood and youth and moved $250,000 in funding for a sickle cell clinic from the general fund to the fund balance.

78. County Commission to Decide New Budget -

Shelby County commissioners reach the World Series of their annual budget season Monday, June 6, with a final vote scheduled on a county government operating budget.

The budget is for the new fiscal year that begins July 1.

79. Luttrell, Weirich Win Dunavant Awards -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell and Shelby County District Attorney General Amy Weirich are the winners of the eighth annual Bobby Dunavant Public Service Awards.

80. Agricenter Gives Region’s Ag Biz Place to Call Home -

In the daily hustle and bustle of city life, it’s easy for Memphians to forget that the urban pocket they call home sits amid one of the nation’s richest agricultural regions.

And the world’s largest urban farm, nonprofit Agricenter International at 7777 Walnut Grove Road, is continually working to create more awareness about farming through educational programs and to advance agricultural technologies through research and trials.

81. Haslam Finds Money for Private Prison Amid Cuts -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Republican Gov. Bill Haslam has found nearly $31 million in recurring money to keep open a privately run prison in West Tennessee while making deep cuts to other areas like TennCare and higher education.

82. Bill to Cut Certain Oversight Committees -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A proposal to streamline the Tennessee General Assembly's legislative process is advancing in the Senate.

The measure sponsored by Republican Senate Speaker Ron Ramsey of Blountville passed the Senate State and Local Government Committee 6-3 on Tuesday. The companion bill is scheduled to be heard this week by the same committee in the House.

83. Architecture Report Brings Cautious Optimism -

For two years, architects have dealt with a sluggish construction market that’s kept projects from moving off the boards and employees in a constant struggle for their jobs.

A recent industry report paints a more hopeful picture for the profession as it moves through 2011 and into 2012.

84. Wharton and Luttrell Revamp Programs as Crime Rate Drops -

There were 93 homicides in the city of Memphis in 2010, the lowest murder rate in 30 years.

And Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. is attributing the drop to more citizens reporting crimes overall to Memphis police. Wharton was careful in talking about the drop in the most violent of crimes and the drop in the city’s overall crime rate for 2010 to emphasize that his administration is not declaring an end to crime problems.

85. Gibbons Tapped for Haslam’s Cabinet -

Bill Gibbons began his political journey as an aide to Lamar Alexander when Alexander was governor.

Thirty years later, Gibbons is returning to Nashville again to work for another Republican governor – Bill Haslam.

86. Rotary Seeks Nominations for Dunavant Award -

The Rotary Club of Memphis East is seeking nominees for its 8th annual Bobby Dunavant Public Service Award, an event that honors distinguished work by public officials.

87. Lifeblood Elects Board Members -

Lifeblood has elected new members to its board of directors.

New board members include Bill Appling, president of Watkins Uiberall Healthcare Consulting Group; Al Bright Jr., attorney at Butler, Snow, O’Mara, Stevens and Cannada PLLC; Sam Cole, attorney; Dr. Lawrence Madlock, medical director at University Health Services; Jim Martin, retired from the Shelby County Division of Corrections; Kem Mullins, chief executive officer at St. Francis Hospital Bartlett; and Dr. Ted Strom, blood bank medical director and director of the hematology section, pathology and laboratory medicine services at the Memphis Veteran Affairs Medical Center.

88. What Remains: Grab Bag of Charter Provisions -

Writing a government charter isn’t simply creating a new government out of thin air. In drafting the consolidation charter on the Nov. 2 ballot, the Metro Charter Commission had to weigh the impact of state law, court rulings on state law and the Tennessee constitution as well as what exists now.

89. Oldham Fills Top Sheriff's Positions -

Shelby County Sheriff Bill Oldham has named William S. Cash as his chief deputy and Robert L. Moore as interim director of the Shelby County Jail.

90. New County Commission, Mayor Go to Work -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell took his first batch of appointees to the Shelby County Commission Wednesday in the first committee sessions of the commission’s new term of office.

91. Charter 411 -

The metro government charter, to be voted on Nov. 2, would combine the Memphis and Shelby County governments into one new local government.

The 49-page charter is the work of the 15-member Metro Charter Commission, which began in November and completed its work just weeks ago.

92. Luttrell’s Staff Filled With Familiar Faces -

Shelby County Mayor-elect Mark Luttrell is taking some of his team from the sheriff’s department with him when he switches offices Sept. 1

93. Luttrell Assembles Team - As interim Shelby County mayor Joe Ford attended his last County Commission meeting, county mayor elect Mark Luttrell began naming the team he will go into office with on Sept. 1.

94. County’s Top Cop Eyes Top Spot -

Outgoing Shelby County Sheriff Mark Luttrell arrives this week at the pinnacle of a political rise that began eight years ago.

95. Tenn. Prisons to Use Dogs to Find Contraband Cell Phones -

NASHVILLE (AP) – The Tennessee prison system is turning to man's best friend for some help sniffing out mobile phones that have been smuggled in to inmates.

Tennessee corrections officers have confiscated 1,684 cell phones at 12 state prisons in the past year. Regularly searching inmates, their cells and their visitors hasn't been enough to stop the contraband.

96. Commission Grants Deputies 1 Percent Pay Raise -

Now that Shelby County Sheriff’s deputies have secured an extra 1 percent pay raise from the Shelby County Commission, other unions representing county employees are making noise about a similar pay hike.

97. YouthBuild to Hold Groundbreaking Event -

Interim Shelby County Mayor Joe Ford and officials with the Shelby County Division of Community Services and the Division of Corrections will break ground on a new one-room vocational training facility constructed by incarcerated participants of YouthBuild.

98. Armed Robbery Legislation Among New Tenn. Laws -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Legislation that requires people convicted of armed robbery to serve most of their sentences in prison is among a number of measures that became law Thursday.

The measure increases the minimum time served for aggravated robbery with a weapon from 30 percent of the sentence to 70 percent.

99. Confiscated Cell Phones Go to Domestic Violence Victims -

Shelby County Interim Mayor Joe Ford and officials with the Shelby County Division of Corrections on Thursday donated more than 100 cell phones that had been confiscated from inmates to the YWCA of Greater Memphis Abused Women’s Services Program.

100. Vermont Inmates on Lockdown in Tenn. Prison -

MASON, Tenn. (AP) — Correctional officials say 35 inmates from Vermont being held in a West Tennessee prison are on lockdown after refusing to get into their cells and damaging property.

Corrections Corporation of America, which runs the West Tennessee Detention Facility in Mason, about 35 miles northeast of Memphis, said in a news release that around 10:30 p.m. on Wednesday the male inmates refused to return to their cells for the night and began damaging property inside their housing unit.