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Editorial Results (free)

1. Mayoral Contenders Differ on Economic Development -

Economic development incentives including property tax breaks look to be the real dividing line among the three contenders for Shelby County mayor in the May county primaries.

That’s where Deidre Malone, Steve Mulroy and Kenneth Whalum showed the most friction in a Thursday, April 10, forum and debate in the airport area sponsored by the Shelby County Democratic Party.

2. Obama Signs Actions Taking Aim at Gender Pay Gap -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In a concerted election-year push to draw attention to women's wages, President Barack Obama signed directives Tuesday that would make it easier for workers of federal contractors to get information about workplace compensation. He seasoned his move with a sharp rebuke of Republicans whom he accused of "gumming up the works" on workplace fairness.

3. City Blight Effort Faulted in Audit -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. came up with the anti-blight initiative 25 Square specifically to attack overgrown lots in a systematic and targeted approach.

But the city’s internal auditors concluded in a report released this week that city leaders of the “grass mitigation” program didn’t use a “targeted approach” at all.

4. Walk-In Clinics Rising as Response to ACA -

When the Affordable Care Act became law in 2010, medical providers were not sure what to expect.

But four years down the road, it’s evident the ACA has presented some opportunities – not just for patients, but for how care is delivered and, yes, marketed. And that has meant a rise in walk-in clinics nationally and locally.

5. MorGreen Shifts to Meet Changing Customer Demands -

When Mike Omar opened MorGreen in Collierville in 1987, it was as a traditional outdoor landscaping business, a garden center focused on selling items like fertilizer, mulch and sod and offering some landscaping work.

6. Obama Signs Memo to Strengthen Overtime Pay Rules -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Seeking to influence workers' incomes where possible, President Barack Obama signed a presidential memorandum Thursday directing the Labor Department to devise new overtime rules that would make more workers eligible for time-and-a-half pay for their extra hours of work.

7. Galvanizing Company Files Permit for Facility -

3328 Fite Road
Millington, TN 38053
Permit Cost: $1.9 million

Project Cost: N/A
Permit Date: Applied March 2014
Completion: N/A
Owner: 3328 Fite LLC
Tenant: 3328 Fite LLC
Architect: N/A
Contractor: N/A
Details: An affiliate of Columbus, Ohio-based “hot dip galvanizing” company Voigt & Schweitzer LLC plans to construct a 63,120-square-foot facility near Millington.

8. Firestone Files Permit For Germantown Store -

Firestone Complete Auto Care has filed a $1.3 million permit application with the city-county Office of Construction Code Enforcement for a new retail store at 9461 Poplar Ave. in Germantown.

9. Grinder Looks to Bring Energy to Associated Builders Role -

Justin Grinder knew at an early age that he wanted to be involved in the construction industry.

10. Cost Crunch -

The aftermath of the housing crash and economic recession produced a roller coaster of changes in construction costs, one with more peaks than valleys.

And local construction industry officials and homebuilders say they’re still struggling with fluctuating prices for materials.

11. Hampline Recalls Overton Park Interstate Plans -

In a city with lots of markers and monuments showing where historic events happened, there is an increasing amount of attention to a different kind of Memphis historic event.

And it involves something that did not happen – the interstate that was supposed to go through Overton Park 50 years ago but was first delayed and then stopped for good in a U.S. Supreme Court ruling 43 years ago this coming Sunday.

12. Memphis Area Loses Construction Jobs in Dec. -

The Memphis area lost construction jobs in December, according to the Associated General Contractors of America.

Local construction jobs dropped by 1,200 to 20,100 for the month, a 6 percent decline from the 21,300 jobs during the same month a year ago.

13. Women Prove Mettle in Tough CRE Industry -

When Rosemarie Fair first entered the world of commercial real estate in the early 1980s, it was still a largely male-dominated profession and she felt the biting sting of disrespect.

“When you’re in property management as a female and you’re developing a Downtown mixed-use project, when you walked into a construction site the contractors and subcontractors just assumed here comes the owner’s wife, or the secretary,” said Fair, owner of One Source Commercial Inc. “The old adage back then was you had to work twice as hard to be thought of half as much and back then it was absolutely true. I had to start below zero and prove myself. And I did, and I was successful.”

14. Reedy Thriving As Housing Investments Skyrocket -

Jim Reedy began selling real estate in 1976 while he was a student at the University of Memphis, and within three years, he moved into selling investment properties.

15. Memphis Area Loses Construction Jobs in Dec. -

The Memphis area lost construction jobs in December, according to the Associated General Contractors of America.

Local construction jobs dropped by 1,200 to 20,100 for the month, a 6 percent decline from the 21,300 jobs during the same month a year ago.

16. Competing Bidders Emerge for Ashlar Hall -

Two people that had once considered teaming up to acquire and renovate crumbling Ashlar Hall are going their separate ways.

Joe Thordarson, founder of the Memphis Comic and Fantasy Convention, and Ty Cobb, founder of the nonprofit Have a Standard Foundation, said this week that they are now pursuing separate plans to gain control of the Midtown mansion.

17. Groundbreaking Set For Local Hilton Garden Inn -

The groundbreaking for the first Hilton Garden Inn in Memphis was scheduled for Friday, Jan. 31, at 10 a.m.

Hilton Worldwide and Globus Partnership are hosting the groundbreaking at the site of the new hotel, 7955 Market Plaza Drive in Cordova.

18. Wage Hike for Federal Contract Workers Limited -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama's plan to raise the minimum wage for federally contracted workers is winning praise from unions and labor activists, but it could take a year or more before any hikes take place and the impact may not be as widespread as some advocates had hoped.

19. Groundbreaking Set for Memphis' First Hilton Garden Inn -

The groundbreaking for the first Hilton Garden Inn in Memphis is scheduled for Friday, Jan. 31, at 10 a.m.

Hilton Worldwide and Globus Partnership are hosting the groundbreaking at the site of the new hotel, 7955 Market Plaza Drive in Cordova.

20. Obama Hiking Minimum Pay for New Federal Contracts -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama will sign an executive order setting the minimum wage for workers under new federal contracts at $10.10 an hour, the White House said Tuesday. The president will announce the increase during his State of the Union address.

21. Wharton Faces Challenges in State of the City -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. may face the most challenging year of his tenure as he delivers his State of the City address Wednesday, Jan. 29.

The speech will be delivered at 10 a.m. at the University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law.

22. Court Invalidates Ashlar Hall Transfer -

Environmental Court Judge Larry Potter has invalidated Robert “Prince Mongo” Hodges’ November transfer of Ashlar Hall to acquaintance Kenny Medlin, after Medlin did not produce a plan for rehabilitating the property.

23. Council to Get Updates on City Expense Cuts -

Memphis City Council members get a closer look Tuesday, Jan. 21, at some ways the city can reallocate $80 million over the next five fiscal years to begin paying $100 million annually toward an unfunded pension liability the city estimates is at $709 million.

24. Council to Get Updates on City Expense Cuts -

Memphis City Council members get a closer look Tuesday, Jan. 21, at some ways the city can reallocate $80 million over the next five fiscal years to begin paying $100 million annually toward an unfunded pension liability the city estimates is at $709 million.

25. Competing Claims -

The future of Ashlar Hall has become nearly as unpredictable as its eccentric former proprietor, Robert “Prince Mongo” Hodges.

A Monday, Jan. 13, hearing before Environmental Court Judge Larry Potter did little to clear the air surrounding a November transfer of the 1397 Central Ave. property and competing claims over its future.

26. Feds Won't Renew Health Website's Lead Contractor -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The government's much-maligned health insurance website is getting a new outside contractor to steer the revamped portal through the remainder of open enrollment season.

27. Tenn. Prevailing Wage Law Rescinded as of Jan. 1 -

As of Jan. 1, most government building projects in Tennessee no longer have to pay the prevailing wage.

WPLN-FM reports Tennessee’s prevailing wage law was in place for nearly four decades before the General Assembly voted to repeal it last year. The idea behind the law was to make sure every electrician or plumber hired on a government-funded project got paid the going rate.

28. Tennessee Prevailing Wage Law Rescinded as of Jan. 1 -

As of Jan. 1, most government building projects in Tennessee no longer have to pay the prevailing wage.

WPLN-FM reports Tennessee’s prevailing wage law was in place for nearly four decades before the General Assembly voted to repeal it last year. The idea behind the law was to make sure every electrician or plumber hired on a government-funded project got paid the going rate.

29. Malasri Promotes Importance of Young Memphis Leaders -

Jittapong “J.T.” Malasri, a civil engineer with Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division, says his father probably knew his son would go into the engineering field long before he himself did. And his father, Siripong Malasri, should know – he was the dean of the School of Engineering at Christian Brothers University before returning to the classroom to teach and chair various departments.

30. Businesses Again Challenge Union Poster Rules -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A prominent business group filed a lawsuit Wednesday challenging government rules that require federal contractors to display posters telling workers they have a legal right to form a union.

31. Health Care Signups Pick Up but May Not Close Gap -

WASHINGTON (AP) – With time running short, the nation's health care rolls still aren't filling up fast enough.

New signup numbers Wednesday showed progress for President Barack Obama's health care law, but not enough to guarantee that Americans who want and need coverage by Jan. 1 will be able to get it. Crunch time is now, as people face a Dec. 23 deadline to sign up if they are to have coverage by New Year's.

32. Study: Labor Violations Don't Stop Government Contracts -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The federal government awards billions of dollars in contracts each year to companies that routinely violate safety, health and wage regulations, according to a report released Wednesday that calls for stricter measures to hold federal contractors accountable.

33. Government Diagnosis: HealthCare.gov on the Mend -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Computer crashes should be giving way to insurance coverage – if the government's diagnosis of its health care website is correct.

The Health and Human Services Department released a progress report Sunday on its effort get the troubled HealthCare.gov website on the mend. Administration officials said the worst of the online glitches, bugs and delays may be over.

34. Tools to Succeed -

If Memphis College of Art President Ron Jones has anything to do with it, there will be no starving artists among the ranks of the college’s future alumni.

35. Experts: HealthCare.Gov Fix Needs More Time, Money -

NEW YORK (AP) – Technology experts say healing what ails the HealthCare.gov website will be a tougher task than the Obama administration acknowledges.

36. High Court Considers Whistle-Blower Protections -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court looked back Tuesday at the collapse of energy giant Enron to determine who is protected from retaliation after blowing the whistle on a company's misdeeds.

37. Sebelius: Couple of Hundred Website Fixes Required -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Prodded to be more candid with Congress, Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius said Wednesday the administration's flawed health care website needed a couple of hundred fixes when it went online more than a month ago and conceded, "we're not there yet" in making all needed repairs.

38. Why a Spike in October Unemployment May Not be So Bad -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The jobs report for October due out Friday may be bleak. It might even be scary. The unemployment rate could jump by the most in three years. Hiring may slow from an already weak pace.

39. US Service Firms Expanded More Quickly in October -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Activity at U.S. service firms accelerated in October behind a jump in sales and more hiring, suggesting businesses largely shrugged off the partial government shutdown.

40. Air Traffic Control Modernization Hits Turbulence -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Ten years after Congress gave the go-ahead to modernize the nation's air traffic control system, one of the government's most ambitious and complex technology programs is in trouble.

41. ADP: US Companies Add 130,000 Jobs in October -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A private survey shows U.S. businesses added just 130,000 jobs in October, as the 16-day partial government shutdown slowed an already-weak job market.

Payroll processor ADP also said Wednesday that companies created just 145,000 jobs in September, far below the 166,000 it had reported earlier this month.

42. Contractors Warn of Bad Surety Bonds -

A rash of bad construction project surety bonds in three states and American Samoa landed at Memphis International Airport this summer with plans to demolish the Regency Hotel on the grounds of the airport.

43. Healthcare.gov Failures Surface at Hill Hearing -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The leading contractors on the Obama administration's troubled health insurance website told Congress Thursday that the government failed to thoroughly test the complicated system before it went live.

44. US Unemployment Aid Applications Drop to 350,000 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of people seeking U.S. unemployment benefits dropped 12,000 to a seasonally adjusted 350,000 last week, though the total was elevated for the third straight week by technical problems in California.

45. Builders of Obama's Health Website Saw Red Flags -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Crammed into conference rooms with pizza for dinner, some programmers building the Obama administration's showcase health insurance website were growing increasingly stressed. Some worked past 10 p.m., energy drinks in hand. Others rewrote computer code over and over to meet what they considered last-minute requests for changes from the government or other contractors.

46. Shutdown Over, Obama Surveys Damage and Blames GOP -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The government unlocked its doors Thursday after 16 days, with President Barack Obama saluting the resolution of Congress' bitter standoff but lambasting Republicans for the partial shutdown that he said had damaged the U.S. economy and America's credibility around the world.

47. Shutdown Puts Businesses, Foreign Workers in Limbo -

The partial government shutdown has left high-skilled immigrant workers and the companies that employ them in limbo.

The Labor Department’s Office of Foreign Labor Certification is closed and applications for job changes, new hires or any other adjustments for foreign workers are on hold until the government reopens.

48. US Jobless Claims Jump to 374,000 Due to Backlog -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The number of people applying for U.S. unemployment benefits jumped by 66,000 last week to a seasonally adjusted 374,000. But the spike was largely because California processed a huge backlog of claims and the partial government shutdown prompted some companies to cut jobs.

49. Overton Square Garage Opens -

Visitors to Overton Square know that parking has been at a premium recently, with side streets around the entertainment district filling up as quickly as the restaurants and shops there.

Parking at Overton Square should get much easier with the opening of its 451-space parking garage at the northeast corner of Monroe Avenue and Florence Street. The city-owned garage opened this weekend, and parking is free for the rest of October.

50. Weekly US Jobless Aid Applications Tick Up to 308,000 -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits rose just 1,000 last week to a seasonally adjusted 308,000, hovering near six-year lows. Companies are still cutting very few jobs, however the decline in layoffs has not been accompanied by a pickup in hiring.

51. US Businesses Worry About a Prolonged Shutdown -

NEW YORK (AP) – As the government's partial shutdown enters a second day, most companies across the country are doing business as usual. Yet concern is rising that a prolonged shutdown would cause some work at private companies to dry up and consumers to lose faith in the U.S. economy.

52. In Government Shutdown, Obamacare Just Rolls On -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Republicans pulling on the budget thread can't neatly unravel President Barack Obama's health care law.

A partial government shutdown next week would leave the major parts of the law in place and rolling along, according to former Democratic and Republican budget officials, as well as the Obama administration itself. Health care markets for the uninsured would open as scheduled on Tuesday.

53. Study: Pentagon Could Cuts Thousands of Employees -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Defense Department could shed 60,000 more troops than planned and 50,000 civilian employees without hurting U.S. fighting power, four former members of the Pentagon's Joint Chiefs of Staff said in a new report on military strategy and spending.

54. Cleanup Crew -

DeAndre Brown runs what might be the best known landscape business in areas of Memphis where the yards have brush and trees taller than the vacant houses they completely obscure.

“We operate a little differently than other contractors. Most have subcontractors that work separately,” he said. “We are one large crew of 60 men or women. We get the heavy equipment in first. Then a team of weed eaters will go in behind that, then a team of people go in behind them and clean up.”

55. 'Obamacare' Contractors Project Confidence -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Major contractors hooking up the internal plumbing of President Barack Obama's health care law projected confidence Tuesday that they will be ready to go by an Oct. 1 deadline, even though the system is still being tested.

56. Muddled US Jobs Picture to Weigh on Fed Decision -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Employers are sketching a hazy picture of the U.S. job market for the Federal Reserve to weigh in deciding this month whether to reduce its stimulus for the economy – and, if so, by how much.

57. Handful of Projects on Horizon, but Construction Still Struggling -

Commercial real estate construction activity in the Mid-South perked up modestly this year following a sluggish 2011 and 2012, and industry execs are cautiously optimistic that the positive trajectory will continue through next year.

58. Perez: Fast-Food Strikes Show Need for Wage Hike -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The recent spate of fast-food worker strikes is another sign of the need to raise the minimum wage for all workers, Labor Secretary Thomas Perez said in an interview with The Associated Press.

59. Business Leaders Make Case for Immigration Reform -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Prominent business leaders and Republicans held a forum in Nashville on Wednesday to build support for immigration reform among the public and members of Congress.

The Senate passed a far-reaching immigration measure in June that includes border security, workplace enforcement and a path to citizenship. But the majority of House Republicans remain opposed to any path to citizenship, creating concerns that legislators will be unable to craft a compromise bill.

60. Highway Construction Work Takes Holiday Friday-Monday -

NASHVILLE (AP) – TDOT has told contractors and its own crews to knock off work at noon on Friday for the Labor Day weekend.

That means there will be no road construction in the state from lunchtime on Friday until 6 a.m. Tuesday.

61. Labor Rules to Boost Employment for Vets, Disabled -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Veterans and disabled workers who often struggle to find work could have an easier time landing a job under new federal regulations.

The rules, announced Tuesday by the Labor Department, will require most government contractors to set a goal of having disabled workers make up at least 7 percent of their employees. The benchmark for veterans would be 8 percent, a rate that could change from year to year depending on the overall number of former military members in the workforce.

62. Henry Turley Co. Files Permits for South Junction -

727 E. Mann Circle; 726. E. Mann Circle; 725 W. Mann Circle; 35 W. Georgia Ave.; 649 Florida St.; 18 W. Carolina Ave.; 9 E. Carolina Ave.
Memphis, TN 38103
Permit Costs: $1.5 million; $1.5 million; $1.5 million; $1.5 million; $1.5 million; $1.5 million; $1.4 million

63. Henry Turley Co. Files Permits for South Junction -

A development group led by Henry Turley Co. has filed a series of building permits totaling $10.4 million for the 197-unit South Junction apartments Downtown.

64. Raymond James Renovating Office in Downtown Tower -

Raymond James is renovating an office near the top of the skyscraper that’s a key fixture of the Downtown Memphis skyline.

The company, which had its real estate officials in town in recent days as it moves toward a decision on its Downtown lease that expires in two years, has pulled a permit for work that’s described as “renovation of office” on the 20th floor of the 21-story tower, according to The Daily News Online, www.memphisdailynews.com.

65. Raymond James Renovating Office in Downtown Tower -

Raymond James is renovating an office near the top of the skyscraper that’s a key fixture of the Downtown Memphis skyline.

The company, which had its real estate officials in town in recent days as it moves toward a decision on its Downtown lease that expires in two years, has pulled a permit for work that’s described as “renovation of office” on the 20th floor of the 21-story tower, according to The Daily News Online, www.memphisdailynews.com.

66. Hardy Pushes Intermodal Sites for New Jobs -

Carolyn Hardy admits she pushed hard to get the intermodal container yard that opened this week in Hickory Hill completed faster than the two years many contractors told her it would take.

67. Likely Labor Rules Would Aid Veterans, Disabled, Unions -

WASHINGTON (AP) – With Thomas Perez now confirmed as head of the Labor Department, the agency is expected to unleash a flurry of new regulations that have been bottled up for months – a prospect that has business leaders worried and labor advocates cheering.

68. American Home Shield to Expand Sales Team -

American Home Shield, the home-warranty division of Memphis-based ServiceMaster Co., plans to add to its real estate field sales team by the end of 2013.

69. Execs: Feed Yourself First -

So many new business ventures die on the vine. Statistics vary, and we’ll keep the details of the debate to a minimum here. Let’s say that 1 in 20 make it. Let’s define the “Making It” as either having a profitable company after five years of existence or selling to a larger firm for a wealth-creating sum.

70. Southern Airways Adds Four Destinations -

Southern Airways Express announced Thursday, Aug. 1, it is adding four nonstop destinations from Memphis, bringing the total to eight.

Shortly after Labor Day, the Memphis-based airline will add Atlanta, Birmingham, Ala., Gulfport-Biloxi, Miss., and Knoxville, Tenn., to its list of nonstop destinations from Memphis. Southern Airways Express will continue its current routes to Destin and Panama City Beach, Fla., Gulf Shores, Ala., and New Orleans. The airline has hubs in Memphis and Destin.

71. ADP: Private Employers Add 200,000 Jobs This Month -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A private survey shows U.S. businesses created a healthy 200,000 jobs this month.

The payroll company ADP said Wednesday that companies hired in July at the fastest pace since December. And it revised up its estimate of the number of jobs the private sector created in June from 188,000 to 198,000.

72. Giles Builds Solid Career as Construction Attorney -

Justin Giles III spends his days entangled in the details of contracts and plans as a construction attorney with Evans Petree PC.

73. Detroit’s Woes Worry Wharton -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. doesn’t think Memphis has the long-term financial problems or the indifference to those problems that prompted city leaders in Detroit to file an unprecedented bankruptcy last week.

74. Mercedes-Benz Dealership Opening in Collierville -

Construction gets underway later this month on a 41,000-square-foot Mercedes-Benz dealership in Collierville that will include a 16,000-square-foot showroom and provide about 50 new jobs for the area.

75. Governor Says State Will Privatize More Work -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam says he intends to continue privatizing some state government operations.

A contract to have a Chicago-based company manage state office space created controversy. It takes effect July 1 and 126 General Services Department workers will be laid off.

76. Council Begins Action on Budget Year Items -

Memphis City Council members approved several budget items Tuesday, June 18, for the end of the current fiscal year before turning their attention to the budget for the coming fiscal year.

That includes a long promised Holmes-Tchulahoma Park in South Memphis. The council appropriated $1.5 million for the park’s construction in a contract with Wagner General Contractors Inc.

77. Council Begins Action On End Of Budget Year Items -

Memphis City Council members approved several budget items Tuesday, June 18, for the end of the current fiscal year before turning their attention to the budget for the coming fiscal year.

That includes a long promised Holmes-Tchulahoma Park in South Memphis. The council appropriated $1.5 million for the park’s construction in a contract with Wagner General Contractors Inc.

78. Sticking to Niche -

Chris Clark got into the contracting and construction business in 1975, learning the trades as he worked on them. Ryan Anderson graduated from Auburn University in 2007 with a building science degree.

79. US Wholesale Prices Rise 0.5 Percent in May -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A rise in food and gas costs drove a measure of wholesale prices up sharply in May. But outside those volatile categories, inflation was mild.

The Labor Department said Friday that the producer price index rose 0.5 percent in May from April. Gas prices rose 1.5 percent last month, and food costs increased 0.6 percent.

80. Garbage Services Weighs Collection Overhaul -

As City Hall roils in a tempestuous budget season, discussions about changing how the city collects garbage for its citizens have been making progress.

Sanitation services are part of the city’s operating budget, but they are not funded through the city’s general fund, the largest pot of revenue the city of Memphis has. They are funded with the monthly $25.05 solid waste fee paid by citizens.

81. Cates Wears Multiple Hats as Litigator, Prosecutor -

Taylor Cates, attorney with Burch, Porter & Johnson PLLC, describes himself as “an adequate rhythm guitar player.”

82. AP Survey: Economists See No Stock Market Bubble -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A debate is raging among investors and analysts: Has the Federal Reserve inflated a stock market bubble by driving interest rates to record lows?

The answer, according to economists surveyed by The Associated Press: No.

83. Removing Barriers -

While enjoying a meal near the Eiffel Tower in Paris, Terry Lynch reminisced on the wilting but salvageable Chisca Hotel in Downtown Memphis.

84. Walker Leads Trust Growth at Commercial Bank -

Emily Walker, vice president and trust officer with Commercial Bank & Trust Co., has worked in Trust for the past 16 years and feels blessed to have been a part of so many lives.

85. Arkansas Lawmakers Approve $16.5 Million for Exchange -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Arkansas lawmakers on Tuesday approved spending nearly $16.5 million in federal funds to continue setting up a marketplace where more than 500,000 people can shop for insurance under the health care law.

86. Cocktail Napkin Reality -

North Mississippi attorney Stan Little’s private plane had become so popular with friends they joked that he should start his own regional airline.

“Anybody that knows someone who owns a plane wants to borrow it,” he said. “Once you have done that once, you never want to go back through an international airport hub ever again.”

87. Commission Approves AMR Ambulance Contract -

Shelby County Commissioners approved Monday, May 20, a five-year $1.7 million contract with American Medical Response of Tennessee Inc. for emergency ambulance service in Shelby County outside Memphis.

88. Commission Approves AMR Ambulance Contract -

Shelby County Commissioners approved Monday, May 20, a five-year $1.7 million contract with American Medical Response of Tennessee Inc. for emergency ambulance service in Shelby County outside Memphis.

89. Commission Approves Certified Tax Rate As Prelude To Tax Debate -

Shelby County Commissioners established a certified county property tax rate of $4.32 Monday, May 20, after much debate about what the calculation means in a reappraisal year where reappraisal values went down instead of up or staying roughly even.

90. Thomas & Betts CEO Sees Growth Post-Acquisition -

Dominic Pileggi, the retired CEO of Thomas & Betts Corp., remembers being concerned more than a year ago when the Memphis-based maker of low voltage electrical and utility hardware was in talks with ABB Group of Zurich to buy Thomas & Betts.

91. Core Focus -

The Great Recession silenced construction crews throughout the Memphis area, and that was especially evident Downtown, where ambitious, skyline-changing projects were put on hold, reconfigured or scrapped altogether.

92. Nuclear Protester Trial Gets Underway This Week -

NASHVILLE (AP) – An octogenarian nun and two codefendants used bolt cutters to cut through fences and spent about two hours inside a Tennessee national security plant that has had a hand in making, maintaining or dismantling parts of every nuclear weapon in the country's arsenal, federal authorities allege.

93. Whole Foods Files Permit for Expansion -

5014 Poplar Ave. Memphis, TN 38117

Permit Cost: $3.1 million

Project Cost: TBA

Permit Date: Applied April 2013

94. Whole Foods Files Permit for Expansion -

Austin, Texas-based Whole Foods Market Inc. has filed a $3.1 million building permit application with the city-county Office of Construction Code Enforcement to renovate its lone local store on Poplar Avenue in East Memphis.

95. Brighter View on Jobs and Pay Lifts US Confidence -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Americans are more optimistic the job market is healing and will deliver higher pay later this year. That brighter outlook, along with rising home prices, cheaper gasoline and a surging stock market, could offset some of the drag from the recent tax increases and government spending cuts.

96. Dream Home Nightmares -

Ray’s Take As the real estate market recovers, more families are pulling out their dream home plans. They would be wise to watch that classic movie, “Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream Home.”

97. Decades After King’s Death, Memphis Jobs in Spotlight -

MEMPHIS (AP) – Decades after Martin Luther King Jr. was shot to death here, some of the striking sanitation workers who marched with him are again fighting for their jobs.

98. Automakers Report US Sales Up in March -

DETROIT (AP) – March is turning out to be the best month for auto sales in at least six years.

Major automakers including Ford, Chrysler, Toyota, General Motors and Nissan all reported increases, with some reporting their best monthly totals since the start of the Great Recession in December of 2007.

99. Easter Travelers Won’t Face Road Work -

Tennessee transportation officials are shutting down highway construction for the Easter weekend.

The Tennessee Department of Transportation has told contractors and its own crews to knock off work no later than 6 p.m. Thursday, in anticipation of increased holiday travel.

100. Scooter Ads Face Scrutiny From Government, Doctors -

WASHINGTON (AP) – TV ads show smiling seniors enjoying an "active" lifestyle on a motorized scooter, taking in the sights at the Grand Canyon, fishing on a pier and high-fiving their grandchildren at a baseball game.