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Editorial Results (free)

1. TVA Taking Closer Look at Energy Efficiency -

The Tennessee Valley Authority is taking a closer look at energy efficiency as it works on a long-range energy resources plan.

The Knoxville News Sentinel reports the federal utility is using advanced computer modeling to determine how valuable energy efficiency will be in meeting its long-term power needs.

2. TVA Taking Closer Look at Energy Efficiency -

The Tennessee Valley Authority is taking a closer look at energy efficiency as it works on a long-range energy resources plan.

The Knoxville News Sentinel reports the federal utility is using advanced computer modeling to determine how valuable energy efficiency will be in meeting its long-term power needs.

3. US Job Growth Eases but Tops 200,000 for a Sixth Month -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A sixth straight month of solid 200,000-plus job growth in July reinforced growing evidence that the U.S. economy is accelerating after five years of sluggish expansion.

4. IBM's Watson to Help in Brain Cancer Research -

NEW YORK (AP) – IBM is teaming up with the New York Genome Center to help fight brain cancer.

The company said Wednesday that its Watson cloud computing system will be used in partnership with a New York-based genetic research center to help develop treatments for glioblastoma, the most common type of brain cancer in U.S. adults.

5. If It Can Be Imagined, It Can Be Made -

The industrial revolution brought efficiency but led to the decline of human creation by hand. We stopped tinkering and started operating machines, becoming inherently less ingenious.

Over the past century, new product developed hinged on access to expensive machines out of reach for the individual. Thus, new production development and innovation became the domain of companies with the cutting edge equipment.

6. Leaders of Suburban Schools Get to Work -

Minutes after his contract as superintendent of Germantown Schools was approved, Jason Manuel was already well along with the process of contemplating the detail work that followed the milestone closely.

7. Orangetheory Fitness Signs New Lease In Stonecreek -

Orangetheory Fitness has signed a lease at Stonecreek Centre at Poplar Avenue and Forest Hill-Irene Road in Germantown.

Orangetheory Fitness will occupy 3,167 square feet at the location. Orangetheory Fitness is a workout method that is broken into intervals of cardiovascular and strength training while using heart rate monitors to keep heart rates in a targeted zone to stimulate metabolism and increases energy.

8. Council Opens Unfunded Liability Plan Talks With Questions -

Memphis City Council members again rejected Tuesday, Dec. 17, an increase in the city’s monthly solid waste fee and affirmed a 2.1 percent hike in the Memphis Light Gas and Water Division water rate hike.

9. Classroom Coding -

A movement is afoot to ensure the classroom of the future adds new science and technology-based pillars – like writing code – to traditional standbys like reading, writing and arithmetic.

10. Living Well Network Battles Depression in the Mid-South -

The Dennis H. Jones Living Well Network and Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare are seeing increased activity in the second year of helping people navigate depression, stress and the challenges of life.

11. Early Advantage -

Talk, touch, read and play.

These four words focused on early childhood development have helped to shape the mission of the Urban Child Institute for the past four years, and now they are traveling beyond the building and into the Memphis Pink Palace Museum. The important message bears repeating and repetition in creating bright young minds, and the institute is focused on spreading the word as far and wide as possible – starting with their kiosk-like exhibition, “The Early Advantage.”

12. Citrone: Logistics Not Just for Men -

It’s hard to picture Cheryl Burch Citrone, a partner at executive recruiting and consulting firm Vaco Memphis, hanging around railroad tracks or shooting the breeze about shipping lanes and trucks.

13. Pennington Chosen to Lead Boys & Girls Clubs -

Just in time for the start of the new school year, The Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Memphis has announced a change in executive leadership, as chief financial officer Larry Pennington has been chosen as acting CEO on an interim basis. He replaces Vincent Borello, who resigned as president and CEO to pursue other opportunities.

14. Grants to Boost Local ‘Precision Agriculture’ -

The local precision agriculture industry is poised to get a boost from Uncle Sam.

A top federal official will be in Memphis and Covington Wednesday, July 31, to announce funding for three regional grants that will impact counties in Tennessee, Mississippi and Arkansas.

15. Past Due -

In the last five years, the 600 computers in the Memphis Public Library & Information Center were used 1.2 million times.

In that same five years, the budget for the library system of 18 locations has been cut 21 percent and there has been a 20 percent reduction in hours over the same five years.

16. Senate Bill Lets States Tax Internet Purchases -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Attention online shoppers: The days of tax-free shopping on the Internet may soon end for many of you.

The Senate is scheduled to vote Monday on a bill that would empower states to collect sales taxes for purchases made over the Internet. The measure is expected to pass because it has already survived three procedural votes. But it faces opposition in the House, where some Republicans regard it as a tax increase. A broad coalition of retailers is lobbying in favor of it.

17. New Schools Computer System Behind Schedule -

One of the earliest items on the schools merger checklist was a new computer system that would handle the payroll and other human resources needs of Shelby County’s two school systems once they become one at the start of the new fiscal year July 1.

18. Hopson Proposes Closing 11 Schools In 2014-2015 -

Memphis-Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson is proposing the countywide school board close 11 more schools, 10 in the city of Memphis and one in Millington.

The closings which include three Memphis high schools – Northside, Carver and Westwood – would take effect in the 2014-2015 school year if approved by the school board.

19. State Info Technologists Must Apply to Keep Jobs -

Information technology employees of state government must re-apply for their jobs.

The administration of Gov. Bill Haslam has told IT workers statewide to submit applications if they want to keep the jobs they currently fill.

20. State Info Technologists Must Apply to Keep Jobs -

Information technology employees of state government must re-apply for their jobs.

The administration of Gov. Bill Haslam has told IT workers statewide to submit applications if they want to keep the jobs they currently fill.

21. Black Girls Code Coming to Memphis -

At one point when Kimberly Bryant, a native Memphian who got a degree in electrical engineering from Vanderbilt University, was still in school, Apple’s Macintosh was still new on the scene.

22. First Of Many Funding Requests Approved For Merged System -

The first Shelby County government financing of the soon to be merged public school system approved Monday, Oct. 22, was about $1 million less than expected. And it drew the support of Shelby County Commissioners opposed to the consolidation of Shelby County’s two public school systems.

23. County Commission Approves School Funding -

Shelby County Commissioners approved $13.9 million in funding for computer software and a program to handle the human resources and financial needs of the merged school system to come.

The original request was for $15 million and including contingency funding in the event the project had cost overruns.

24. Commission to Vote on Schools Payroll System -

A $15 million block of money for a single payroll finance computer system for the consolidated school system to come is the first merger-related funding recommendation from the countywide school board to reach the Shelby County Commission.

25. Local Entrepreneurs Will Soon Have ‘Urban Workspace’ -

A shared open work space, modeled after incubators in Los Angeles and New York City, is on the brink of being launched in Downtown Memphis.

Urban Workspace Powered by Cricket Wireless, located in the City House Memphis Condos at 6 W. G.E. Patterson Ave., will provide an affordable, shared working environment for freelancers, entrepreneurs, small businesses and startups eager to collaborate and share resources. The co-working facility opens Oct. 1.

26. Miss. High Court Rules Legal Fees are Public Funds -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – The Mississippi Supreme Court ruled Thursday in two cases that legal fees paid to private lawyers to represent the state are public funds.

Justices said because the money belongs to the public, it should've been paid out to the lawyers from the attorney general's contingent fund or from other money appropriated to the attorney general.

27. Cybercrime on the Rise -

Despite increased awareness of cybercrime, cyber-attacks continue to plague companies from Memphis to Brussels to Subic Bay.

Cyber attacks are typically defined as criminal activities that are conducted by means of the Internet. With more and more companies relying on the Internet to do business, the frequency of cybercrime is certain to increase. These technology-based attacks can include stealing an organization’s intellectual property, gaining access to online bank accounts, creating and distributing viruses, and posting confidential business information on the Internet.

28. Pinnacle's Chapter 11 Filing Could Mean Predictable Turnaround -

As Pinnacle Airlines Corp. moves from restructuring to bankruptcy reorganization, an already complex corporate turnaround is about to get much more complex.

29. Pinnacle NASDAQ Delisting Next Move In Reorganization -

Stock in Memphis-based Pinnacle Airlines Corp. will be delisted from the NASDAQ stock market starting at the opening on business Wednesday, April 11.

30. Insurers Speed Health Care Overhaul Preparations -

The nation's big insurers are spending millions to carry out President Barack Obama's health care overhaul even though there's a chance the wide-reaching law won't survive Supreme Court scrutiny.

It's not that health insurers want to bet big that the court will uphold the Affordable Care Act. It's that they can't afford not to. It will take at least several months and lots of resources for insurers to prepare to implement key elements of the law, which includes a controversial requirement that most Americans have health insurance by 2014.

31. Popular Small Business Bill Hits Senate Obstacles -

WASHINGTON (AP) – It might seem a recipe for success: Legislation to help small businesses raise capital passed the House last week with 95 percent of lawmakers voting for it and President Barack Obama's support. But in today's Congress, nothing comes easy.

32. ‘If Only’ Answer Is Balance -

A lot of you probably have to manage your fair share of “if only” employees. People who love to constantly and vocally proclaim, “I could do a better job if only I had this, or if only I had that. If only I had more people, or more time, or more money, or more whatever – I could make big things happen around here.”

33. Obama Promotes Job Training at Community College -

ANNANDALE, Va. (AP) – President Barack Obama called on Congress Monday to create an $8 billion fund to train community college students for high-growth industries, giving a financial incentive to schools whose graduates are getting jobs.

34. A Century of Health Care -

Memphians packed the new Dr. H. Edward Garrett Auditorium at Baptist Memorial Hospital-Memphis last month to listen to music icon Patti LaBelle discuss her struggle with diabetes and the grief she experienced after losing three sisters to cancer.

35. Negative Hits Keep Coming in 2011 -

While some of the Mid-South’s more than 3,000 nonprofit organizations received major gifts and successfully engaged new donor bases, the anemic economic recovery required others to hold a magnifying glass to their bottom lines in 2011.

36. Cagenix Grows From Startup To Successful Manufacturer -

Over the past seven years, Cagenix Inc. has grown from a research and development startup to a successful maker of new devices for dental implants that are sold to dentists and dental labs across the country.

37. Be Brave, Ask Questions -

Editor’s note: Part two in a two-part series. Sometimes the questions we don’t ask are the ones that lead us astray. In part one of this series, we discussed how today’s changing – and challenging – economic times can be a catalyst for nonprofits if we are brave enough to ask questions we might prefer to run from. Here are a few.

38. Tenn. Libraries to Share Online Library Catalog -

NASHVILLE (AP) – About 100 public libraries across Tennessee will soon be sharing an online library catalog.

The Tennessee State Library and Archives recently purchased a new electronic product, making it easier for libraries to use state-of-the-art computer technology to share resources.

39. GiVE 365 Offers ‘Fishing Lessons’ -

Last week we spotlighted Memphis Teacher Residency, a nonprofit working to recruit, equip, and retain excellent teachers to work in Memphis’ urban areas where the need for strong educators is most critical. This week let us recognize the efforts of the Community Foundation of Greater Memphis and a group of community-minded individuals who came together through GiVE 365 and recently awarded grants totaling $49,278 to nine local nonprofits.

40. Suburbs Weigh School Options -

Germantown Mayor Sharon Goldsworthy is recommending the city hire a consulting firm to research the creation of a municipal school district.

But in a written statement that is her first response to last week’s ruling in the federal court schools consolidation lawsuit, Goldsworthy said the exploration of a Germantown school district is one of several options the suburban city is weighing, including being part of a consolidated Shelby County school system.

41. Fewer Opportunities -

During a national online news conference last month, Associated Builders & Contractors chief economist Anirban Basu said although employment in the construction industry has expanded over the past four months, the nation’s construction industry recovery may be two years away.

42. Reading Celebration -

The Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library Saturday celebrated its 10th anniversary with a family-friendly blowout bash featuring artistic performances and words of support and encouragement from community leaders.

43. Companies Embracing Twitter To Spread News -

Social media experts have often described Twitter as a cocktail party – join in the many ongoing conversations as you hit up different groups in the room.

The reverse is also true. If one stands in the corner and doesn’t embrace the dialogue, no networking is accomplished, and the attendee loses relevance.

44. Keeping Families ‘FIT’ -

There are few situations as stressful as being a homeless pregnant mother, wandering weary, hungry and often hopeless from one shelter to the next with young children in tow.

But it’s not unusual in the Memphis area, which has as many as 10,000 homeless individuals, one-third of those being women and children – and two-thirds of those being children under 5.

45. New Study Tells Students the Worth of Their Majors -

PHILADELPHIA (AP) – The choice of undergraduate major in college is strongly tied to a student's future earnings, with the highest-paying majors providing salaries of about 300 percent more than the lowest-paying, according to a study released Tuesday.

46. Social Media Opens New World of Business -

Feedback is not like it used to be, says Shauna Wright. There was a time when a bad experience with a company meant telling a neighbor or a few friends, but in today’s ever-shrinking world, those friends can be a thousand miles away and number in the hundreds.

47. Local Students Design Future Record Stores -

Record stores may evolve into community gathering centers, according to middle school students and those in the business.

Students at Ridgeway Middle School made surprisingly astute predictions about the future of a product with which most are largely unfamiliar.

48. $500K Campaign Launched to Upgrade Central Library -

In honor of the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library’s 10th anniversary, Memphis Library Foundation has launched the 10 for Ten Campaign.

Money raised through the $500,000 campaign will be used to enhance collections, upgrade technology offerings and improve the overall library experience for the thousands of customers who rely on the system and its resources every year.

49. Jobs, Holidays and Kindness -

To quote The Beatles, “I read the news today, oh boy…” The jobless rate is up to 9.8 percent. I hadn’t planned to write a column about the holiday season, but here it is.

I recently attended a meeting of a Memphis Area Career Transition Group. There are a number of these in the city, comprised of volunteer facilitators, people looking for jobs and some employed people who attend out of gratitude to offer moral support. The meetings are upbeat and full of resources such as resume services, cover letter coaching and, most important, positive attitudes.

50. High Cotton -

Carol Perel points from her office to the other side of the ground-floor lobby at 65 Union Ave.

“That trading floor,” she says, “is the Graceland of cotton.”

51. Nobody Ever Washed a Rental Car -

Management philosophies are debated and written about, but I can tell you which one works best in small business: treating everyone differently.

This is the opposite of the treatment given in America in everything from airport screening to marriage rights. The only goal of that approach is to make sure nobody is slighted, that everything is “fair” for everyone, that everyone is treated the same. The problem is that businesses have a much higher performance bar than that in order to thrive.

52. Entrepreneurship Week Encourages Idea Generation -

This year’s Global Entrepreneurship Week, which runs through the weekend, is remarkable not only for all the local events it has included, but also for the fact that several features will be ongoing.

53. CT Groups Provide Support in Job Search -

For Memphians who are out of work but in the know, an organization called The CT Groups offers moral support, opportunities to network, training in technology and insight into what it takes to get hired, 2010-style.

54. Southwest Bringing $6M Facility to Fayette -

Southwest Tennessee Community College plans to build a $6 million educational institution in Fayette County. The facility will be located about two miles from downtown Somerville on U.S. 64.

TLM Associates of Jackson, Tenn., prepared initial drawings for the 26,050-square-foot building, dubbed the Fayette County Higher Educational Center.

55. 'A New Day' -

Marvell Mitchell has had it with numbers.

“I’ve read the numbers and I hear people talking about the recession but frankly, there’s an opportunity here,” said Mitchell, who owns Mitchell Technology Group LLC with his wife, Ledelle.

56. Small Investment Could Yield Big Dividends for City’s Children -

The Child Impact Statement Reporting System (CISRS) is coming to City Hall.

The Memphis City Council votes this month on a $20,000 expenditure for the computer software developed at the University of Memphis that creates the statements. Shelby County government has been using the program for several years.

57. Coury Named to Turnaround Management Association’s Board -

During Michael Coury’s 30-year career, he said his success has been based on hard work, perseverance and loving his job.

58. MED Leadership Team Takes Shape -

Dr. Reginald Coopwood is close to having his top leadership team in place three months after taking the helm at The Regional Medical Center at Memphis as chief executive officer.

59. Commission Races Hinge on Public Issues -

Two issues figure in to the 11 competitive races for the Shelby County Commission – the future of the Regional Medical Center and local government consolidation.

Any push card for a credible candidate includes either something about how to save The MED or the candidate’s opposition to consolidation – or both.

60. Rural Libraries Getting Computer Help in State -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) - Computer technology resources and training will soon be coming to as many as 76 libraries in 61 rural Tennessee counties.

The initiative is the culmination of more than a year's effort by the state Department of Economic and Community Development and the Tennessee State Library and Archives division of the Office of the Secretary of State.

61. Social Media Icons -

It’s been 46 years since Marshall McLuhan declared, “The medium is the message.”

In that time, the visionary media critic’s five-word analysis has been debated and interpreted in ways even he likely couldn’t imagine.

62. Small Businesses Could Land More Government Contracts -

Small businesses account for 11 percent of the contracts Shelby County government awards on an annual basis.

But interim Shelby County Mayor Joe Ford rolled out a report Thursday that sets a 20 percent goal along with a campaign to raise awareness among small businesses that they can get a piece of the county’s business.

63. Events -

The Shelby County Commission will hold committee meetings today beginning at 8:30 a.m. at the Shelby County Administration Building, 160 N. Main St. For more information, call 545-4301 or visit agendapub.shelbycountytn.gov.

64. American Resource Systems Keeps Communications Going -

When an important order comes due at American Resource Systems Inc., the “super-duper crew” gets the job done.

65. Wharton Ditches Three Division Directors, Retains Others -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. firmed up most of his division directors Tuesday.

He moved to reappoint seven division directors and notified three others they will not be reappointed in a possible realignment of their divisions.

66. GAO: FDA Yet to Make Safety Changes Post-Vioxx -

WASHINGTON (AP) - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration still hasn't restructured its staff to better monitor drug safety, more than three years after experts recommended key changes in the wake of the Vioxx scandal.

67. Wiggins Ready To Grab YLD Baton -

Kyle M. Wiggins is ready to get behind the wheel.

Today at the Memphis Bar Association’s Young Lawyers Division Annual Meeting and Elections, current YLD president Freeman Foster, an attorney for the Juvenile Court of Memphis and Shelby County, will pass the gavel to Wiggins.

68. Job Openings Remain Close to Record Lows -

WASHINGTON (AP) - Job openings are at rock-bottom levels, according to government and private surveys released Tuesday, a trend that could keep the unemployment rate high even as layoffs slow.

69. TennCut: Why the state Medicaid program is slashing services to thousands of disabled people -

Thyroid disease, congestive heart failure, blood clots, anemia and rheumatoid arthritis are just some of the health problems Memphian Ann B. wakes up to every day. For 11 years, she has been covered under a class of TennCare called Supplemental Social Security, or the “Daniels” class. Ann asked that her last name be kept anonymous.

70. VW to Start Accepting Applications for New Tenn. Plant -

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (AP) - Volkswagen will start accepting applications Oct. 26 for about 1,200 production jobs at its new plant in Chattanooga, with the first hiring set early next year.

Ryan Rose, a spokesman for the $1 billion plant where workers will build a new mid-sized sedan starting in 2011, said applicants from the Chattanooga area will get priority in the first phase of the screening, a day of hands-on testing that simulates the workplace.

71. Here Comes the Sun: Memphis’ cut of the state’s solar energy plan -

The Sharp Manufacturing plant in Hickory Hill has always been a symbol as much as a working part of the city’s economic infrastructure.

The plant on South Mendenhall Road represents the city’s first truly international big business presence. It opened in 1978 after Japanese executives came to Memphis to negotiate directly with city leaders. And once the deal closed, a now-legendary picket line was thrown up by local union leaders. The picketing symbolized organized labor’s determination to have a voice in local economic development.

72. STIMULUS WATCH: $25 Check May Cost You Food Stamps -

WASHINGTON (AP) - When President Barack Obama increased unemployment benefits as part of his economic stimulus, he also made some Americans ineligible for hundreds of dollars a month in food stamps.

73. Tenn. Posts Nation's Biggest Gain in HS Graduation -

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) - The national high school graduation rate remained flat at about 75 percent between 2002 and 2006, while a dozen states made substantial gains, according to a new report by researchers at Johns Hopkins University.

74. After 60 Years Circuit City Powers Down -

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) - What began 60 years ago as a humble television store in this sleepy Southern capital ended Sunday as Circuit City closed its doors for good – its 567 remaining U.S. stores to be left broom clean and vacant.

75. Is the FDA a Broken Agency? -

WASHINGTON (AP) - Every few months, the Food and Drug Administration goes into fire-brigade mode, rushing to get control over another safety crisis.

Tainted peanuts. Unsterilized syringes. Salmonella in Mexican chili peppers. A contaminated blood thinner from China that sent patients into life-threatening shock.

76. EMTs Look to Revised CDC Trauma Guidelines -

Emergency responders will make different decisions about which hospitals they send trauma patients to because of revised guidelines by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The guidelines, which were released last week, still stress the importance of taking severely injured people to a Level 1 trauma center such as the Regional Medical Center at Memphis. The CDC noted that the risk of death to a severely injured person is 25 percent lower if the patient receives care at such a center.

77. Hospitals Continue Push Toward Electronic Records -

Converting patient records from handwritten charts to an electronic database takes patience and money, but executives at Memphis hospitals say the investment pays off.

Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare and Baptist Memorial Health Care have already made the switch at some of their hospitals and plan systemwide conversions.

78. Avoiding the Ax: Where the Jobs Are -

While the employment landscape looks sparse right now, the outlook for 2009 isn't uniformly bleak – and is downright bright in some recession-resistant industries.

Employers that provide necessary products and services – hospitals and insurers, for example – tend to always need recruits. And areas employers deem critical to their survival, like accounting and information technology, rarely get cut. What's more, some fields, such as bankruptcy law and crisis-management consulting, are thriving because of the downturn.

79. Vorder-Bruegge Combines Technology Passion With Practice -

Mark Vorder-Bruegge Jr. is a partner at Wyatt, Tarrant & Combs LLP, where he heads the Intellectual Property Protection & Litigation Service team. He also is the partner in charge of firm technology.

80. Local Crime Fuels Thriving Security Sector -

The typical customer at Rangemaster firing range is not who you might think.

“About 40 percent of our customers are female, which is way above the national norm,” said owner Tom Givens. “Most are professionals of some sort. They are doctors, accountants, lawyers, service managers, sales professionals.”

81. Barnes Joins Crone & Mason’s Intellectual Property Group -

Kenneth E. Barnes recently joined Crone & Mason PLC as an attorney focusing on patent and trademark protection. He received both his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Memphis, and he graduated earlier this year with a juris doctorate from the U of M’s Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law.

82. Rhodes College’s Stuart Receives Distinguished Service Award -

Forrest Stuart, director of financial aid at Rhodes College, recently received the Distinguished Service Award at the spring conference of the Tennessee Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (TASFAA).

83. Memphis-Based CIBER Expands to Little Rock -

CIBER Inc., whose Mid-South region is based in Memphis, has expanded into Little Rock with the creation of a new office that provides commercial information technology (IT) consulting services in the Arkansas capital and surrounding area.

84. Rooker's One-Year Delay of Law School Becomes 18-Year Career at Chandler Ehrlich -

Lynne Rooker was supposed to be an attorney. At least that was the plan when she graduated from college in 1989 with a bachelor's degree in advertising.

But instead of attending law school, she took a year off from school and took a job at Chandler Ehrlich. And that's where Rooker has been ever since, spending the past 18 years at the Memphis-based marketing and communications agency.

85. Smith Pleads GuiltyTo Possession of Child Porn -      Memphis attorney Drayton Beecher Smith II, 57, has pleaded guilty to possession and receipt of child pornography in interstate commerce by means of a computer.
     Smith previously pleaded

86. $6.7M 'Cybrary' Tops List Of St. Agnes-St. Dominic Changes -

4830 Walnut Grove Road
Memphis, TN 38117
Permit Cost: $4.5 million

Project Cost: $10 million (all capital improvements)

87. 'Hello, Sunshine' -

The song "Why Does the Sun Shine?" popularly covered by alternative rock band They Might Be Giants, gives a basic rundown of the huge sphere at the center of our universe:

    "Yo ho, it's hot, the sun is not
    A place where we could live.
    But here on Earth there'd be no life
    Without the light it gives."

88. In Pursuit of L.I.F.E. -

Editor's Note: The following stories comprise the second part of a special series on the state of children in Memphis and Shelby County. To read yesterday's pieces, visit www.memphisdailynews.com.

89. Events -

The Collierville Chamber of Commerce holds a "Business Before Lunch" meeting today at 11:15 a.m. at the Ridgeway Country Club, 9800 Poplar Ave. The general membership meeting will follow at noon. Call 853-1949 for reservations.

90. Events -

The Center City Revenue Finance Corp. meets Tuesday at 9:30 a.m. at the Center City Commission, 114 N. Main St. For more information, call 575-0540.

The South Main Association holds its monthly meeting Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. at the Center for Southern Folklore, 119 S. Main St. The meeting is open to all Downtown residents and guests. Call 578-7262 or visit www.southmainmemphis.org for more information.

91. Metro Backup Helps Clients Keep Data from the Abyss -

Ryan Watt knows all about the crippling effects of data loss. In 2001, when he was a junior at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville, Watt's computer was infected with the infamous Chernobyl virus. He turned on his computer one day and the screen was black - three years of English papers and business projects had vanished.

92. Smith Looks Forward to Helping Shepherd the Small Business Chamber -

Following a divorce after 37 years of marriage, somewhere amid patching her life back together, Jan Canfield decided to spend her golden years as a businesswoman. A former teacher who's now in her early 70s, she owns The Flagpole and Banner Center, selling flags, poles and banners of all kinds.

93. Beware of Blogs: Entries Admissible in Court without Warrant -

Most lawyers don't have time to surf the Internet at work, much less post information on blogs. However, these cyber journals can be handy for finding information on a variety of legal topics.

About 8 million people have created blogs and 32 million read them, according to the Pew Internet & American Life Project, a 2005 nationwide survey.

94. Sound Files of King Assassination on Register's Web Site -

The Memphis Police Department dispatcher is calm, barking out orders even as the city outside begins to descend into chaos. It's shortly after 6 p.m. on April 4, 1968, and unconfirmed reports have begun trickling in over the radio that something terrible has happened at the Lorraine Motel in Downtown Memphis.

95. Case Management Software a Must-Have in Big Firms -

The latest survey by the American Bar Association's Technology Resource Center shows smaller firms and sole practition-ers are less likely to use case management software (CMS), and the trend appears to hold true in the Memphis area.

96. Open-Government Proponents Intensify Efforts Statewide -

Memphians could learn a lot about the way government works from an ordinary Joe.

He's Joe Saino, a former Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division commissioner-turned-tenacious public watchdog who won't take no for an answer. Like last year, for example, when he was stonewalled by municipal officials after requesting public records from the City of Memphis. A string of letters he wrote went unanswered, so he filed suit in Shelby County Chancery Court.

97. Events -

The Memphis Advertising Federation meets at 11:30 a.m. Thursday at the Holiday Inn-University of Memphis, 3700 Central Ave. Bill McCuddy, Fox News' entertainment correspondent, is the guest speaker. Cost is free for members, $25 for guests and $10 for students. For reservations, visit www.memphisadfed.org or contact Donna Smith at 767-6374.

98. Law Offices Benefit From Latest Tech Trends -

When a recent American Bar Association survey indicated that more attorneys than ever are using technology in their practice, it shouldn't have come as a surprise. It certainly wasn't for Mark Vorder-Bruegge Jr., a partner in the Memphis office of Wyatt, Tarrant & Combs LLP, who has made technology a big part of his practice throughout his career.

99. Placement Firm Helps Clients Find Perfect Fit -

One missing puzzle piece can mean the difference between a sense of accomplishment or frustration for time wasted.

Such is the case with companies searching for trained, professional workers. They can choose to undertake the search to fill available positions themselves, or they can call upon a professional placement agency to help them find the right qualified individuals.

100. More Attorneys Embrace Wireless Trend -

Legal professionals sometimes get stereotyped as reluctant to hop on the technology bandwagon. But as the years pass and technological advances add new conveniences to the practice of law, that stereotype is slowly fading away.