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Editorial Results (free)

1. Record-Setting Freshman Class Settles in at UT Knoxville -

Murfreesboro’s Madison Underwood, 18, admits the University of Tennessee-Knoxville was not her first choice after graduating Siegel High School this spring.

But it soon became a serious contender – and ultimate winner – thanks to a combination of value, community and programming.

2. U of M Teams with City on Smart Technologies -

The University of Memphis and the city of Memphis are expected signed an agreement Monday, Aug. 24, to collaborate on using smart technologies.

The Smart Cities Innovation Program specifically involves research to use technology on such challenges as transportation systems, water and sewer systems and other basic public services.

3. Should Citizens Have to Pay to Look at Public Records? -

Lots is happening in the area of open government lately. In recent columns I’ve talked about legislation that would control access to police videos and about a proposed Supreme Court rule that would limit reporters’ use of electronic devices in courtrooms.

4. Former Tennessee Rep., GOP Operative Decry Dark Money -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A former Democratic congressman and a prominent Republican political operative on Tuesday called for ending untraceable spending for and against candidates in Tennessee and around the country.

5. Appeals Court Keeps Alive Confederate Parks Renaming Challenge -

The Tennessee Court of Appeals has revived a legal challenge to the city’s renaming of three Confederate-themed parks with a Friday, Aug. 21, ruling that keeps only one of the 15 plaintiffs intact.

6. Porter-Leath, Memphis Health Center Get Grants -

Porter-Leath and the Memphis Health Center are getting federal funding boosts.

Porter-Leath was awarded $1.1 million for its Early Head Start programs, which provide early, comprehensive child development and family support services to low-income infants, toddlers, pregnant women and their families.

7. Shelby County Tourism Spending Tops $3 Billion -

Tourists coming to Memphis and surrounding Shelby County spent $3.1 billion in 2014, up 4.6 percent from 2013, according to Tennessee tourism figures released Tuesday, Aug. 18.

The state total of direct domestic and international travel expenditures was $17.1 billion last year, a 6.3 percent increase from the prior year and a record Tennessee tourism.

8. Affordable Homes in an Unaffordable Market -

The gold rush of residential development throughout Middle Tennessee conceals what some in the region say is a growing crisis in affordable housing.

New homes and condos come on to the market every day, and even more are under construction or still in the planning stage, but those homes are often on the higher end of the price scale.

9. U of M Teams With City On Smart Technologies -

The University of Memphis and the city of Memphis are expected to sign an agreement Monday, Aug. 24, to collaborate on using smart technologies.

The Smart Cities Innovation Program specifically involves research to use technology on such challenges as transportation systems, water and sewer systems and other basic public services.

10. Church, Nashville Justice System Urge Fugitives to Confess, Repent -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Non-violent fugitives in Middle Tennessee are being given the chance to attend church, confess and repent in a special safe surrender event in which they could see a judge and return home on the same day.

11. Nashville Hotel Cancels Reservations for Supremacist Group -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A Nashville hotel has canceled reservations for a white supremacist organization this weekend.

Guesthouse Inn director of sales Michelle Jameson told The Tennessean the hotel made the decision three days ago after learning about the Council of Conservative Citizens.

12. Cohen Announces Grants For Porter-Leath, Memphis Health -

Porter-Leath and the Memphis Health Center are getting federal funding boosts.

Porter-Leath was awarded $1.1 million for its Early Head Start programs, which provide early, comprehensive child development and family support services to low-income infants, toddlers, pregnant women and their families. The program offers home- and center-based services.

13. Lenoir: ‘Is It Time for a Tax Decrease?’ -

Shelby County Trustee David Lenoir says the $22 million extra in property tax revenue his office collected during the past fiscal year appears to be a trend of improving health in the local economy.

14. Mayoral Debate Clash Focuses on City Finances -

Memphis city government’s financial problems and how those problems happened was the flashpoint for the latest meeting of the top mayoral contenders on the Oct. 8 ballot.

The Wednesday, Aug. 19, forum sponsored by The Commercial Appeal at the University of Memphis saw incumbent Mayor A C Wharton Jr. clash with challengers and city council members Jim Strickland and Harold Collins. The fourth debate contender, Memphis Police Association president Mike Williams, argued for different city priorities and a slower move toward economic development goals.

15. Democrats Criticize Haslam for Exploring More Outsourcing -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Democrats claimed on Tuesday that Republican Gov. Bill Haslam is displaying hostility toward state workers by looking to outsource the management of more government functions to the private sector, but Haslam dismissed the allegation as politics.

16. Shelby County Tourism Spending Tops $3 Billion -

Tourists coming to Memphis and surrounding Shelby County spent $3.2 billion in 2014, up 4.6 percent from 2013, according to Tennessee tourism figures released Tuesday, Aug. 18.

The state total of direct domestic and international travel expenditures was $17.1 billion last year, a 6.3 percent increase from the prior year and a record Tennessee tourism.

17. Tennessee Highway Patrol Creates Protective Services Bureau -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The Tennessee Highway Patrol is creating a new protective services bureau responsible for the safety of citizens, elected officials, state workers and state buildings.

18. Collins Knocks 'Puller, Pusher and Picker' Jobs In Whitehaven Opening -

Memphis Mayoral contender Harold Collins opened his Whitehaven campaign headquarters Saturday, Aug. 15, by saying incumbent mayor A C Wharton Jr. has “rendered us a puller, pusher and picker city.”

19. Collins Knocks 'Puller, Pusher and Picker' Jobs In Whitehaven Opening -

Memphis Mayoral contender Harold Collins opened his Whitehaven campaign headquarters Saturday, Aug. 15, by saying incumbent mayor A C Wharton Jr. has “rendered us a puller, pusher and picker city.”

20. State Office Seeks Input On Charge for Records Inspection -

State officials are seeking input on whether government offices should be able to charge citizens to inspect public records.

Current state law allows charges for copying records, but inspection is generally free.

21. Today’s Schools Need to Operate Like Independent Businesses -

“If you always do what you always did, then you always get what you always got.”

It is one of those truisms that seems to fit perfectly into the ongoing debate on the effectiveness of education in the United States. There is a multitude of critics who want schools to do what they did 50 years ago and get better results. The problem with that is that everything has changed.

22. Explore Bike Share Builds Community Support -

The effort to build a bike-sharing system in Memphis is seeking public support at various community events.

The move by Explore Bike Share includes street teams asking citizens to sign statements supporting the concept and make other calls for public support.

23. Emergency Fix -

Memphis is making non-emergency calls a top priority. The Mayor’s Innovation Delivery Team, Memphis Fire Department and area health care providers are working in conjunction with IBM consultants to streamline emergency services.

24. Campaign Strategies Shift As Mayoral Debates Begin -

It’s been a scrap from the start.

But with the first televised debate in the 2015 race for Memphis Mayor Monday, Aug. 10, more citizens got a first-hand look at what the top contenders have agreed is a milestone political race.

25. Memphis Public Transportation Grants Top $5 Million -

The city of Memphis’ efforts at improving public transportation options for its citizens received two chunks of funding recently that collectively total more than $5 million.

The Memphis Area Transit Authority was awarded last week $4.7 million in federal Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality funding through the Tennessee Department of Transportation.

26. First Mayoral TV Debate Features Aggressive Contenders -

The first televised debate of the 2015 race of Memphis Mayor Monday, Aug. 10, saw incumbent Mayor A C Wharton Jr. and city council member Jim Strickland clash repeatedly while fellow council member and mayoral challenger Harold Collins said Strickland and Wharton were “acting like Tom and Jerry.”

27. Explore Bike Share Builds Community Support -

The effort to build a bike-sharing system in Memphis is seeking public support at various community events and through explorebikeshare.com online.

The move by Explore Bike Share includes street teams asking citizens to sign statements supporting the concept and make other calls for public support.

28. Armstrong Finds Voice In Volatile Times -

Four years ago, when Toney Armstrong became the youngest Memphis Police director from the ranks since the position was created in the 1970s, critics were quick to point out that the one-time homicide detective had a lot to learn about the job’s public face.

29. Strickland, Collins Clash on DROP Freeze -

Two political challengers to Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. clashed Tuesday, Aug. 4, over a plan by his administration to keep the city’s police ranks above the 2,000 mark.

City chief administrative officer Jack Sammons approached the council Tuesday in executive session about a plan to freeze the deferred retirement option plan (DROP) for city employees who have set their retirement date up to three years ahead of schedule.

30. Coliseum Group Mobilizes With Eye on Memphis Elections -

Leaders of the effort to reopen the Mid-South Coliseum are planning another “revival” outside the Fairgrounds arena with political timing and a political purpose.

The “Roundhouse Revival” – being planned for Oct. 4 – comes between the end of early voting in Memphis elections and the Oct. 8 election day.

31. Highway Patrol Taking Applications for Citizens' Academy -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The Tennessee Highway Patrol is accepting applications for its Citizens' Trooper Academy.

Classes start Sept. 15 and will be held at the Department of Safety and Homeland Security's training center in Nashville.

32. TDOT Delays I-55 Roundabout To Reconsider Bridge Closing -

The Tennessee Department of Transportation has put on hold plans for an Interstate 55 roundabout on the Memphis side of the Memphis-Arkansas bridge citing a review of its plans to close the bridge for nine months during the construction process.

33. I Choose Memphis: Kenneth Burnett -

“I Choose Memphis” spotlights Memphians who are passionate about calling this community home. New Memphis Institute provides the profiles.

Name: Kenneth Burnett

34. Editorial: Changes to Redistricting Laws Are Long Overdue -

For the second time in four years, Memphis City Council members are redrawing the boundaries of their districts.

Seven of the 13 council incumbents are running for re-election, each with opposition on the Oct. 8 ballot.

35. East of Cleveland -

Consultants for the Memphis Area Transit Authority are exploring an extension of the Madison Avenue trolley line east of Cleveland Street to Overton Square and North Cooper Street.

It is one of seven Midtown routes the transit authority might change or enhance with a bus rapid transit concept that involves fewer stops, fewer turns off main thoroughfares and shorter travel times.

36. City Ballot List Comes in Below 100 -

The tally of political hopefuls for the Oct. 8 Memphis ballot who filed a qualifying petition with the Shelby County Election Commission didn’t quite reach 100.

A total of 98 citizens gathered signatures on their petitions, paid $100 and filed their paperwork by the July 16 deadline for one of the 15 offices – Mayor, City Court Clerk and 13 seats of the Memphis City Council.

37. Setting the Standard: Social Entrepreneurs With Heart -

The greatness of a city does not lie in the size of its budget; rather, it is revealed by the size of the hearts of those who work to make it great for all citizens.

Entrepreneurship has long been a hallmark of that Memphis “can do” spirit. Every city on the move needs that to stimulate the economy, grow the marketplace and get to the next level. But there is more. Those with a heart for improving the quality of life for all citizens, a passion to make things better, to lift up others are the social entrepreneurs whose purpose in life contributes so much to making Memphis a great city.

38. Memphis Filing Deadline Features Last-Minute Shifts, Intrigue -

The decision Tuesday, July 14, by a sixth Memphis City Council member to pass up a place on the Oct. 8 ballot has added some intrigue on the way to the noon Thursday, July 16, filing deadline for the Memphis elections.

39. Credit Unions See Fertile Ground in Memphis -

In one sense, the newly opened credit union branch across the street from East High School reflects a company adjusting its Memphis footprint.

But InTouch Credit Union’s relocation from 5100 Poplar Ave. to 3245 Poplar Ave. also brings some extra touches, like a drive-thru teller window and an ATM. And while it’s not an expansion, its opening comes at a time when local credit union officials say customer interest in their offerings is high, with membership rolls that keep getting longer.

40. Cooper Wants Citizenship Restored to Run for Council -

Joe Cooper is already running for Memphis City Council this year. He’s campaigning for the Super District 9 Position 2 seat on the October ballot.

41. Televised Memphis Mayoral Forum Set for September -

There could be a lot of candidates for Memphis Mayor in the Oct. 8 city elections. And much of the attention in the run up to active campaigning has focused on the field’s size.

But as campaigning begins the focus will shift to issues at play in the mayor’s race, from the city’s path to economic growth and the efficiency and fiscal health of city government to the perennial issues of crime and blight.

42. After 52 Years, SRVS Closes Workshop -

After 52 years, a Memphis nonprofit that offers residential, educational and employment services to those with disabilities has closed its sheltered occupational workshop at 3592 Knight Arnold Road.

43. Cardwell a Link to Metro’s Past, Present -

Metro Trustee Charlie Cardwell definitely is a member of the “good old boys” network that ran Nashville for decades.

44. Boner, Fate and the Summer of Shame -

Phil Bredesen knew what he was trying to do. He just didn’t know if he could accomplish it.

“I had this sense that Nashville was ready for change,” says the former Metro mayor and Tennessee governor, reflecting on his early motivation for taking on the system that had run Nashville for decades.

45. It’s the Law -

THE LAW, AND I QUOTE. Oh, the outrage! Across the nation, people have reacted to the laws passed and validated by the courts, their liberty threatened, the Constitution violated, the republic at risk.

46. Strickland Files for Mayor One Week From Deadline -

A week before the filing deadline for candidates on Memphis’ October ballot, city councilman Jim Strickland filed his qualifying petition for mayor and said he has a campaign war chest of approximately $400,000.

47. Council Approves Moratorium on Pinch Building Permits -

Memphis City Council members approved a 120-day moratorium Tuesday, July 7, on new building permits in the Pinch District as they also approved a planned development Downtown.

The moratorium proposed by councilman Berlin Boyd allows the council to grant waivers on a case-by-case basis during the four-month period. During that time, the Memphis-Shelby County Office of Planning and Development will come up with suggested guidelines for future development of the district bordering The Pyramid.

48. Civilian Review Board Debate Flares Before Council Delay -

After years of give and take, negotiations over legal terms and the rise of police misconduct as a national issue, it appeared the Memphis City Council was ready Tuesday, July 7, to take a final vote on new rules for the long-dormant Civilian Law Enforcement Review Board.

49. Special Action on Same-Sex Nuptials a Waste of Time -

With Republican lawmakers scrambling for a response to the U.S. Supreme Court’s gay-marriage ruling, Tennesseans on both sides of the issue say they are seeking "equality."

Immediately after the court’s decision on Obergefell v. Hodges, Democratic U.S. Rep. Jim Cooper of Nashville said, "Love and equality won. I’m glad the Supreme Court ruled on the right side of history."

50. Council Approves Pinch Moratorium, Delays Vote On Civilian Police Review Board -

Memphis City Council members approved a 120-day moratorium Tuesday, July 7, on new building permits in the Pinch district as they also approved a planned development in the Downtown district.

The moratorium proposed by council member Berlin Boyd allows the council to grant waivers on a case-by-case basis during the four-month period. During the fourth months, the Memphis-Shelby County Office of Planning and Development will come up with some suggested guidelines for future development of the district that borders the reactivated Pyramid.

51. Council Approves Pinch Moratorium, Delays Vote On Civilian Police Review Board -

Memphis City Council members approved a 120-day moratorium Tuesday, July 7, on new building permits in the Pinch district as they also approved a planned development in the Downtown district.

The moratorium proposed by council member Berlin Boyd allows the council to grant waivers on a case-by-case basis during the four-month period. During the fourth months, the Memphis-Shelby County Office of Planning and Development will come up with some suggested guidelines for future development of the district that borders the reactivated Pyramid.

52. Council Approves Pinch Moratorium, Delays Vote On Civilian Police Review Board -

Memphis City Council members approved a 120-day moratorium Tuesday, July 7, on new building permits in the Pinch district as they also approved a planned development in the Downtown district.

The moratorium proposed by council member Berlin Boyd allows the council to grant waivers on a case-by-case basis during the four-month period. During the fourth months, the Memphis-Shelby County Office of Planning and Development will come up with some suggested guidelines for future development of the district that borders the reactivated Pyramid.

53. Insure Tennessee Path Still Facing Many Turns -

There’s a move in Nashville for a special session of the Tennessee General Assembly, but it would have nothing to do with the February special session on Gov. Bill Haslam’s Insure Tennessee proposal.

54. Cycling Ahead -

Unless you've seen the ubiquitous stations in cities like Knoxville and Nashville, it's difficult to imagine how bike sharing could connect Memphis.

Tourists and citizens can check out a bike on a per-ride or membership basis and return it to a separate station when they've reached their destination.

55. After 52 Years, SRVS Closes Workshop -

After 52 years, a Memphis nonprofit that offers residential, educational and employment services to those with disabilities has closed its sheltered occupational workshop at 3592 Knight Arnold Road.

56. Memphis Election Fundraising Deadline Prompts Flurry of Appeals -

For the last week, candidates in the October Memphis elections have had fundraising fever.

The campaign finance reports for the period that ended Tuesday, June 30, are due at the Shelby County Election Commission by July 10. That’s followed by the noon July 16 filing deadline for candidates in the races for Memphis Mayor, City Council and City Court Clerk.

57. New Forrest Front -

The political battle over an equestrian statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest and the park that houses it has opened a new front.

58. Southern Heritage Defined Differently Across Tennessee -

Tennessee’s loyalty was divided in the Civil War, and 150 years later, little is changed as the debate over Confederate symbols arises in the wake of the racist-fueled South Carolina church massacre.

59. Methodist South Expands to Meet Whitehaven’s Needs -

Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare’s Whitehaven facility is a small, 156-bed "community hospital," but its emergency department is the third-busiest ER in Memphis.

To that end, the health care system is planning an $8.7 million emergency department expansion at Methodist South Hospital.

60. After Denying Records, Tennessee Sheriff to Pay Attorney Fees -

The Tennessee Court of Appeals has ruled that the Marshall County Sheriff’s Office owes attorneys’ fees to a man who had to sue in order to obtain public records.

Alex Friedmann requested several public records from the sheriff’s office in February 2014. They included policies relating to prisoners’ medical care and contracts. The sheriff’s office refused to provide the records, insisting that Friedmann make his request in person. After months of back-and-forth, with Friedmann pointing out that citizens are not required to make requests in person, Friedmann sued.

61. Knoxville’s Amazing Network of Trails, Parks and Waterways -

With the Great Smoky Mountains looming in the distance, and no shortage of ball fields and other outdoor recreation sites closer at hand, Knoxville and its surrounding communities don’t lack for recreational opportunities.

62. React: Supreme Court’s Gay Marriage Ruling -

A divided U.S. Supreme Court voted 5-4 that same-sex couples have a right to marry anywhere in the United States. Here is a roundup of local reaction to the landmark ruling.

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam:

63. Memphis Ends Budget Season, But the Arguments Aren't Over -

The end of the budget season at City Hall can be a festive occasion.

Weeks of line-item detail and swapping one amount with another in the budget, as well as the pressure of revenue and other projections that amount to moving targets in the fiscal year, give way to approved operating and capital budgets as well as a property tax rate.

64. Collierville Aldermen Approve 25-Cent Property Tax Hike for New School -

The Collierville Board of Mayor and Aldermen approved Monday, June 22, a 25-cent property tax hike to partially finance construction of a new, $99 million Collierville High School.

The approval on third reading came two weeks after the board tentatively approved a 20-cent property tax hike. At the time, they believed local sales tax revenue dedicated to the suburban school district could get the project the rest of the way to financing or at least close to the $99 million amount at a rate of $6 million in debt a year for 20 years.

65. Senior Stature -

Sprawling across 37 acres of Collierville land, posh retirement community The Farms at Bailey Station will serve more than 500 senior residents when the final phase of construction is completed in 2016.

66. Panel Alters Wharton’s Plan for Memphis Fairgrounds -

The Mid-South Coliseum becomes a pavilion with a grove next to a multi-purpose sports center. A 10-acre water park fronts on Central Avenue where a high school gym now stands.

A second north-south Tiger Lane intersects with the current east-west version.

67. Panel Alters Wharton’s Plan for Memphis Fairgrounds -

The Mid-South Coliseum becomes a pavilion with a grove next to a multi-purpose sports center. A 10-acre water park fronts on Central Avenue where a high school gym now stands.

A second north-south Tiger Lane intersects with the current east-west version.

68. Collierville Commits -

Right after the Collierville Board of Mayor and Aldermen voted Monday, June 8, to raise the town’s property tax rate by 20 cents, a flash of lightning flared outside the town hall chamber’s windows.

69. Collierville Schools Proposal Goes To Aldermen -

A proposed comprehensive new high school for the Collierville School system moves to the Collierville Mayor and Board of Aldermen Monday, June 8, three days after the Collierville Schools board recommended a $99 million project to build the school on land south of Shelby Drive and east of Sycamore Road.

70. Lakeland Explores Plan to Build Middle School -

The Lakeland School System is considering a plan to build a $20 million middle school on the 94 acres it looked at earlier this year for a $50 million grades 6-12 school.

The new plan was recommended to the Lakeland school board Monday, June 1, by Southern Educational Strategies LLC.

71. Beale Street Sweep Court Order Rips Police Practices -

The Beale Street Sweep is over.

It’s not the end of a song. It is the end of an 8-year-old police policy that has ordered those on the street after 3 a.m. to leave the district, go into a nightclub or be arrested.

72. ULI Fairgrounds Panel Has Busy Schedule -

A team of eight out-of-town planning experts has a busy week ahead as it wades into the simmering local debate about plans to recast the Mid-South Fairgrounds.

And the first hard copy of something the Urban Land Institute-assembled group is likely to get are the comments from four town hall meetings held in different parts of Memphis over two evenings last week.

73. Beale Authority Wants to Talk Fee Simple Ownership Of District -

The newly appointed Beale Street Tourism Development Authority wants to talk to Memphis City Council members about a fee simple arrangement for how it would govern the entertainment district for the city.

74. Love of Learning -

Porter-Leath’s recent donation of a few thousand books to its preschool students serves as one of the latest examples of how the nonprofit is exposing infants and toddlers to the written word in a larger push to prepare children for long-term learning success.

75. Lakeland Explores Plan to Build Middle School -

The Lakeland School System is considering a plan to build a $20 million middle school on the 94 acres it looked at earlier this year for a $50 million grades 6-12 school.

The new plan was recommended to the Lakeland school board Monday, June 1, by Southern Educational Strategies LLC.

76. Lakeland School Idea Resurfaces -

The Lakeland Schools system is considering a plan to build a new $20 million middle school on the 94 acres of land the school system had looked at earlier this year as the site for a $50 million grades 6-12 school.

77. Lakeland School Idea Resurfaces -

The Lakeland Schools system is considering a plan to build a new $20 million middle school on the 94 acres of land the school system had looked at earlier this year as the site for a $50 million grades 6-12 school.

78. County Commission Tax-Rate Debate Picks Up Volume -

Shelby County Commissioners hit a big political divide Monday, June 1, and as a result will discuss in two weeks that most volatile of political topics – the property tax rate.

Commissioners approved on the first of three readings an ordinance to keep the property tax rate at the current $4.37.

79. Coliseum Fans Push for Roundhouse Reconsideration -

The city’s effort to either restart or reconfigure its plan for the Mid-South Fairgrounds began Saturday, May 23, on the steps of the south entrance to the Mid-South Coliseum.

And it continues Monday and Tuesday, June 1-2, with a set of four town hall meetings – two each evening.

80. Deloitte Promotes Vince DeGutis -

Vince DeGutis, a partner in Deloitte Tax LLP, has been named Deloitte’s Memphis managing partner.
In his new role, DeGutis is responsible for overseeing the Memphis office, enhancing Deloitte’s brand and reputation in the business and civic community, and facilitating revenue growth by advancing targeting and growth activities. He is also responsible for the development and implementation strategies to attract and retain the next generation of leaders within Deloitte.

81. Memphis City Council Appointment Reflects Political Urgency -

Attorney Alan Crone is the newest member of the Memphis City Council.

The former chairman of the Shelby County Republican Party – who said he’s traded politics for nonprofits over the last decade – was the choice of city council members Tuesday, May 19.

82. Crone Joins Council, City Buys State Office Building -

Attorney Alan Crone is the newest member of the Memphis City Council.

The former chairman of the Shelby County Republican Party who has worked in the nonprofit sector for the last decade was the choice of city council members Tuesday, May 19, to fill the vacancy.

83. Council to Fill Vacancy, Consider Buying State Office Building -

Memphis City Council members appoint a new council member Tuesday, May 18, and consider spending more than $8 million to purchase, renovate and relocate workers to the Donnelley J. Hill state office building that stands near City Hall in Civic Center Plaza.

84. Eden Square Breaks Ground in Memphis' Hickory Hill -

Marina Cove apartments was known in its 1980s prime for its water features – a set of canals.

And when a crowd of 300 gathered Saturday, May 16, to break ground there for the first phase of the $40 million Eden Square development, a small pond that isn’t in the plans had formed by the tent.

85. Southbrook Tests Wharton Administration Shake-Up -

It didn’t take very long for the city of Memphis’ new chief administrative officer to make a tough call.

And when Jack Sammons came down on the side of pulling back city funding for Southbrook Mall, political allies and foes of Mayor A C Wharton Jr. watched to see if he would go along with the decision.

86. Council Vacancy Draws Eight Applicants -

Eight citizens have applied for a vacancy on the Memphis City Council, some with no intention of serving beyond the end of 2015 and others with plans to seek a full, four-year term in the October elections.

87. Technology Revolutionizes Voter Registration for 2016 -

WASHINGTON (AP) – When President Barack Obama was first elected in 2008, only two states offered a website where citizens could register to vote.

By the 2016 presidential election, it's possible that a majority of states will offer that service, helping to cut down on errors resulting from bad handwriting and reducing time spent by voters in line on Election Day, according to data released Wednesday by the Pew Charitable Trusts.

88. Legislative Speakers Disavow 'Mandate' for Tennessee Security Group -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A private group called the Tennessee Task Force on National and Homeland Security is marketing itself with an official-looking logo and a claimed "mandate" from state lawmakers. But legislative leaders say the group has no official endorsement from the General Assembly.

89. Council Questions Administration's Intent on Southbrook Mall -

Memphis City Council members questioned Tuesday, May 5, whether the Wharton administration’s plan for a town center at the Southbrook Mall site in Whitehaven was set up to fail.

The reaction came as citizens on the board of the nonprofit organization that owns the mall complained that the terms of $2.1 million in bond money they got for HVAC and roof repairs changed.

90. ULI Gathering Puts Numbers to Poverty Challenge -

The way Steve Guinn sees it, there are two ways for Memphis to reduce its poverty rate by 10 percentage points.

91. Greenprint Guru -

When John Michels was a kid going to nature camps with his family and hiking with his brother and cousins, he was taking the first steps along his career path.

“We’d sort of learn how to survive in the woods and build shelters, learn about ecosystems,” Michels said of his days growing up in New Jersey, and then later trips to upstate New York by Lake George. “I started doing a lot of hiking in the Adirondack Mountains.

92. 1 in 4 US Renters Must Use Half Their Pay for Housing Costs -

WASHINGTON (AP) – More than one in four U.S. renters have to use at least half their family income to pay for housing and utilities.

That's the finding of an analysis of Census data by Enterprise Community Partners, a nonprofit that helps finance affordable housing. The number of such households has jumped 26 percent to 11.25 million since 2007.

93. Editorial: Baltimore's Trauma Should Give Memphis Pause -

All around us in Memphis this season are signs of new life and promise. The view offered from the top of The Pyramid this week shows a city in bloom with lots to offer.

With such an abundance of comfort, this is also probably the best time to consider what is beyond the horizon and how it is connected to who we are and what we aspire to be.

94. Students Not Giving Up on Tuition Equality -

Tennessee students without citizenship say they’ll continue the battle for in-state tuition in 2016 after a measure to help them overcome the financial hurdle of out-of-state tuition barely failed on the House floor.

95. Making Memphis Clean by 2019 -

Editor’s Note: This column will appear weekly throughout April in honor of Memphis and Shelby County’s Sustainability Month.

When guests are expected, one of the first things we do is clean up our home. We want our home to feel safe, warm and inviting. After all, our home directly reflects what we think about ourselves, and how others formulate their opinions about us.

96. Foote Homes Effort Gets Rebrand, New Details -

With Bass Pro Shops formally opening this week, the next big project on City Hall’s drawing board is a remake of Foote Homes.

The ambitious plan to demolish and rebuild the city’s last large public housing project, using it as a catalyst for redevelopment of the much larger south Downtown into South Memphis area, has been on the books longer than The Pyramid. That’s if you start the timeline with the demolition of the first large housing project, LeMoyne Gardens, in the late 1990s.

97. Memphis & The Law -

Over the long life of the city’s legal community, Court Square has been a place where attorneys and judges come together outside the courtroom and their law practices.

In many cases, it’s a chance encounter since no court has ever met in Court Square – despite its name and the intent of those who drew up the plan for Memphis nearly 200 years ago.

98. Nashville Sounds Owner, Players Marvel at New Park -

Ten days before the Nashville Sounds’ scheduled home opener at their palatial new digs, First Tennessee Park in Germantown was still very much a work in progress.

Frank Ward, owner of the Class AAA Pacific League team, was strutting around like a proud father, all but ready to pass out cigars to an expectant media as workmen painted, pounded and pushed to make everything ready in preparation for opening of the 10,000-seat facility.

99. Editorial: Law Week Highlights Changing Nature of Freedom’s Challenge -

Something so integral to freedom must be an immovable force that is rigid in its consistency and unyielding to the elements and the passage of time.

Or so you would think if you regarded freedom as being kept in some sort of bastion for its own protection.

100. Memphis & The Law -

Before there was Law Week, there was Law Day.

The observance by the Memphis Bar Association as well as bar associations and attorneys across the country was created in the mid-1950s as a way of promoting the legal community and its impact.