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Editorial Results (free)

1. Competition, Cooperation Part of Regionalism Mix -

When a group of mayors with common borders get together, it is usually a sympathetic gathering of chief executives where there is much comparing of notes.

The items range from sewer projects and common problems to relationships with legislative bodies from aldermen to council members.

2. Harahan Boardwalk Construction Begins -

It was about four years ago that a group of Memphians flew to Omaha, Neb., to talk with Union Pacific railroad executives about building a bicycle and pedestrian boardwalk on the northern side of the Harahan Railroad Bridge across the Mississippi River.

3. US Officials Unveil Plan to Test Ebola Drugs -

NEW ORLEANS (AP) – The quest for an Ebola treatment is picking up speed. Federal officials have unveiled a plan to test multiple drugs at once, in an umbrella study with a single comparison group to give fast answers on what works.

4. Local Ebola Response Rolls With Changes -

The medical and public health response to Ebola has changed since the disease came to America because the science around the disease has changed in that time, says the infectious disease consultant to Baptist Memorial Health Care.

5. Real Estate Experts Look at Impact of North Mississippi -

Six years after the real estate bubble burst nationally, the recovery of the commercial and residential sectors in Memphis is slower than in other parts of the country. But they are recovering on their own new terms, say the incoming president of the Memphis Area Association of Realtors, the president of the West Tennessee Home Builders Association and a mortgage lender.

6. Roxul Opening 17 Years in Making -

U.S Sen. Roger Wicker of Mississippi searched the 1997 Congressional Record this week before he arrived in Marshall County for the formal opening of the Roxul Inc. plant.

7. French Fort Plan Calls for $150 Million Development -

What would begin as 67 apartments in the former U.S. Marine Hospital and nurses’ quarters on the northern edge of the French Fort neighborhood would grow in phases to a $150 million development south of E.H. Crump Boulevard, according to a plan unveiled over the weekend.

8. Membership Rises Again for Indie Bookstores -

NEW YORK (AP) – Independent booksellers may never regain the stature of the pre-digital, pre-superstore era, but their presence continues to grow.

The American Booksellers Association, the independents' trade group, told The Associated Press on Tuesday that core membership has increased to 1,664, up from 1,632 last year and more than 200 higher since 2009. It's the fifth straight increase for an organization that was losing members for decades and seemed in danger of permanent shrinkage under the combined pressures of Amazon.com, Barnes & Noble Inc. and Borders, discount clubs and a weak economy.

9. Where There’s Smoke -

DON’T WAIT FOR THE FIRE TO FIND THE WATER. Neglect and denial burns in empty buildings and blighted neighborhoods, futures are hazy, moods are dark and the smoke from all of it chokes cities and sends those able to flee to greener ground at the edges, leaving behind a bitter landscape, a smoldering threat.

10. Rardin Takes Trial Advocacy Training to Liberia -

Assistant Shelby County District Attorney General Kevin Rardin is leaving for Liberia next month for a week of trial advocacy training in the African nation.

For Rardin it is his latest venture in parts of the world with different criminal justice systems or systems that are just forming.

11. Demerger Debate -

In five months, a new school year will begin in Shelby County. And for a second straight academic year, many parents will be able to say it is unlike any in their lifetimes.

The first and last school year of the unified Memphis City and Shelby County Schools systems will be followed by what educators are calling the “demerger.”

12. SCS Attendance Zone Proposal Affects 7,000 Students -

Shelby County Schools board members got their first detailed look Wednesday, Feb. 19, at a set of more than two dozen changes in student attendance zones in the 2014-2015 school year that could affect nearly 7,000 students in the school system.

13. On the Border -

The first attendance zone maps and details about where school children in Cordova might go to school this coming August was the dominant topic of discussion when the Cordova Leadership Council held a town hall meeting late last year.

14. Saddle Creek Growth Sign of Future for City -

The Shops of Saddle Creek is in store for a multimillion-dollar makeover and expansion, a project that will likely be the first of several development dominoes to fall in Germantown.

Texas-based Trademark Property Co., which has operated the retail center since 2011, will expand the portion of the 148,000-square-foot lifestyle center on the southwest side of Poplar Avenue and West Street in Germantown.

15. Bunker, Ritz Differ on Tax Hike Afterlife -

Two Shelby County Commissioners with about a year left in office see an afterlife of issues with the county budget and $4.38 property tax rate the commission approved earlier this month.

But Wyatt Bunker and commission Chairman Mike Ritz differ on what the tax rate decision in particular says about the financial direction of county government and what taxpayers can bear.

16. Entry Point -

The city of Germantown is embarking on an effort to guide growth and development of the city’s western gateway corridor for the next 20 years.

The planning area encompasses the Poplar Avenue corridor at the city’s western gateway, paying special attention to proposed development opportunities, improvements to Poplar Avenue and Kirby and a new set of regulations designed to guide development.

17. The New Beale -

Over the last four years, the next chapter in the development of Beale Street has been a stop-and-go affair. First would come announcements followed by silence from official channels.

Along with that silence, though, was quiet activity on the side, a movement that culminated with the March announcement of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s strategic planning committee’s report, “A Framework for Beale Street.”

18. Crosstown Project Has $15 Million City "Ask" -

Leaders of the Crosstown Development Project are asking the city of Memphis for $15 million toward a $175 million project.

Memphis City Council members got a look Tuesday, March 19, at the “ask” as well as the finances and goals of the project centered on the old 1.5 million square foot Sears Crosstown building.

19. Riverfront Report Highlights Quick Fixes -

With a set of 20 Memphis riverfront plans and reports spanning several decades, urban planner and designer Jeff Speck’s mission wasn’t to add to the stack of documents, maps and renderings.

20. Barnes & Noble Chair Wants to Buy Retail Business -

NEW YORK (AP) – The last remaining national bookstore chain is being taken off the shelf and dusted off for sale.

Founder Barnes & Noble's founder Leonard Riggio disclosed in a regulatory filing Monday that he wants to acquire the company's stores and website, but not the business that makes the Nook e-reader or the company's college bookstores. No price was disclosed.

21. Schools Security Plan Emphasizes Consistency -

While many of the most controversial issues of the coming merger of Memphis City Schools and Shelby County Schools are still to be decided, the issue of how to handle school security appears to be settled.

22. Nonprofit Tech Innovators Inspire New Philanthropy -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Scott Harrison knows his charity has funded nearly 7,000 clean water projects in some of the poorest areas of the world in the past six years. How many of those wells are still flowing with drinking water months or years later, though? That's a tough question to answer.

23. Public Hearings Begin On Main to Main Connector -

Downtown Memphis Commission president Paul Morris calls it “Main Street to Main Street Over The Harahan.”

The unofficial name for the $30 million project linking Main Street Memphis to Broadway Street in West Memphis via a bicycle and pedestrian boardwalk on the Harahan rail bridge across the Mississippi River draws fewer questions than the title that involves the term “intermodal connector.”

24. Soul Map -

The Soulsville arrows beneath the Bellevue Boulevard railroad overpasses near Walker Avenue point north and south. It is the first indication that you are in an area where several possibilities can coexist.

25. Trash Concerns -

The idea of a county government garbage collection service for no more than $25 a month to residents in unincorporated Shelby County was dead as soon as the first of four public hearings on it was held.

26. Ambassador Stresses Singapore’s Trade Importance -

When David Adelman, the U.S. ambassador to Singapore came to Memphis this month, there was more than a little interest from FedEx Corp. in his visit.

27. Leaders Lay Ground Work for Municipal Districts -

With the Aug. 2 referendums behind them, most of the suburban leaders in Shelby County are moving toward a rapid transition to establishing school districts. And it has gone largely unnoticed.

There are plenty of distractions. The transition to the merger of the Memphis City Schools and Shelby County Schools has cast a long shadow. There is also the ongoing legal battle in Memphis federal court where a possible outcome includes voiding the results of the suburban referendums and at least delaying the start date of the municipal schools.

28. After the Vote -

As 400 supporters of municipal school districts rallied just off the Arlington town square in July, conversations about the ballot outcome turned to one question – how Federal Judge Hardy Mays would rule in the legal challenge to the state law governing the establishment of a municipal school district.

29. Big-Box Vacancies Prove Hard To Fill -

The closing of big-box stores in recent years belonging to the likes of Borders Group Inc., Circuit City Inc. and others has left suburban shopping centers around the country with lots of space to fill.

30. Mtg. Could Produce Schools Draft -

The group drafting the blueprint for the merged Shelby County public school system will go longer than its normal two-hour session Thursday, June 14.

The 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. session is an important milestone for the schools consolidation planning commission that began its work in September.

31. Schools: Effective Planning Begins With Data -

Before we can achieve our vision of establishing a world-class education system, we must first understand the conditions of the two school districts and develop the capacity to remove any inconsistencies that exist between the current conditions and our overall goal.

32. Consolidation Planning Remains in Flux -

The way some on the schools consolidation planning commission see it, the group has some momentum going in its goal of selling a still-forming consolidated school system plan to parents – urban and suburban.

33. Global Media Watchdog Names Enemies of Internet -

The Arab Spring is changing the face of Internet freedom, according to Reporters Without Borders, which released its latest “Enemies of the Internet” list Monday, March 12.

The annual report classifies as “enemies” countries that severely curtail freedom of expression on and access to the Web. It also draws up a list of states “under surveillance.”

34. Security Measures -

One of the legacies of the 9/11 terrorist attacks a decade ago was a tightening of security in supply chain and logistics businesses.

That means knowing who is handling the cargo at all times, where it is going, why it is being shipped and who is receiving it. The tightening has evolved in that time to a move toward self-regulation among logistics and supply chain companies with an international reach.

35. 100 Years of Higher Learning -

You can find the origins of the University of Memphis in the 19th century – the 19th Century Club, that is.

It’s because the idea for the institution took root more than 100 years ago among a group of women who were members of the service and philanthropy group that still exists today.

36. Barnes & Noble's Nook Tablet Starts Shipping Wed -

NEW YORK (AP) – Barnes & Noble Inc.'s Nook Tablet electronic device began arriving in stores and homes on Wednesday, one day ahead of schedule.

37. Barnes & Noble Unveils $249 Nook Tablet -

NEW YORK (AP) – Barnes & Noble unveiled a $249 Nook Tablet Monday just ahead of the crucial holiday shopping season as the book retailer fights for a larger share of the lucrative e-book market.

38. Overton Park Conservancy Delivers Tentative Plan -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. and City Attorney Herman Morris are examining a tentative management agreement for an Overton Park Conservancy to run the Midtown landmark that would remain under city of Memphis ownership.

39. Borders Customers Can Opt Not to Share Their Info With BN -

NEW YORK (AP) – Customers of the now defunct Borders bookstores may want to take action if they don't want their personal information shared with Barnes & Noble.

Depending on their specific circumstance, the Federal Trade Commission is reminding consumers that they have until either Oct. 15 or Oct. 29 to opt out of having their contact information and purchasing histories transferred over to Barnes and Noble.

40. Barnes & Noble to Sell Nook at RadioShack -

NEW YORK (AP) – Barnes & Noble Inc. said Wednesday that it will add RadioShack Corp. to the list of retailers that sell its electronic reader, the Nook.

41. ‘We’re OK’ -

For decades, a residential area called French Fort, near the Metal Museum and Interstate 55, has thrived in isolation and anonymity.

The larger area is now poised to return to its one-time role as a gateway. But the owner of two key pieces of property told homeowners not to expect much movement for several years.

42. Liberty Drops Barnes & Noble Bid, Plans to Invest $204M -

NEW YORK (AP) – Barnes & Noble Inc. said Thursday that Liberty Media, the conglomerate controlled by John Malone, has dropped its $1 billion bid to buy the bookseller and instead will invest $204 million in the company.

43. Endpapers -

As the market for brick-and-mortar bookstores lessens, the space that once housed big-box retailers could very well be snatched up faster than a paperback at a liquidation sale.

It was 40 years ago that the first Borders opened its doors in Ann Arbor, Mich., as one of the originators of the big-box bookseller concept. But much to local bookworms’ dismay, Borders will now be known as yet another bookseller to be defeated by the ever-increasing eReader revolution.

44. Bankruptcy Judge Approves Borders Liquidation -

Borders Group's liquidation plan is set to proceed after receiving approval from a bankruptcy judge.

A judge on Thursday approved the 40-year-old booksellers' plan to appoint liquidators led by Hilco Merchant Resources and Gordon Brothers Group to sell off its assets. Going-out-of-business sales are set to begin at some stores Friday.

45. Borders' Seeks Approval to Liquidate -

There will be no storybook ending for Borders. The 40-year old book seller could start liquidating its 399 remaining stores as early as Friday.

The chain, which helped pioneer the big-box bookseller concept, is seeking court approval to liquidate its stores after it failed to receive any bids that would keep it in business. The move adds Borders to the list of retailers that failed to adapt to changing consumers' shopping habits and survive the recession, including Circuit City Stores Inc., Mervyn's and Linens 'N Things.

46. Judge OK’s Borders Auction, Liquidators Open Bid -

NEW YORK (AP) – Borders Group, the second largest U.S. book store chain that once operated over 1,000 stores, appears headed for liquidation after a judge on Thursday approved its motion to auction itself off with a team of liquidators as its opening bid.

47. Retail Trade Group Spends $490,000 in Q1 Lobbying -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Retail Industry Leaders Association spent $490,000 in the first quarter to lobby the federal government on a variety of issues from unemployment insurance and consumer credit to banking reform and Chinese currency valuation, according to a recent disclosure report.

48. Study Session -

By the end of this week, the fate of Lambuth University in Jackson, Tenn., should be known. Thursday, June 30, is the day the private United Methodist Church-affiliated institution is scheduled to close.

49. Barnes & Noble Q4 Loss Larger Than Expected -

NEW YORK (AP) – Barnes & Noble reported a larger fourth-quarter loss than analysts expected Tuesday as the bookseller continues to invest in its e-book reader Nook and as liquidation sales by rival Borders hurt its revenue.

50. Borders Says Sale Likely by End of July -

NEW YORK (AP) – Borders Group Inc. hopes to name a bidder by July 1 and sell itself by the end of that month, according to bankruptcy court filings. Forty stores previously targeted for closing are also getting a temporary reprieve.

51. Borders Could Close 51 Stores; Memphis Store Not on List -

NEW YORK (AP) – Borders Group Inc. says it may have to close dozens of its best-performing stores due to a requirement of its bankruptcy financing if their landlords don't agree to extend a lease-negotiation period.

52. Judge Extends Deadline for Borders, Sale Expected -

NEW YORK (AP) – A judge granted Borders an extension to file its reorganization plan under bankruptcy protection, but a sale of some of its stores appears more likely.

A Borders lawyer confirmed Thursday that a bankruptcy judge granted the extension at hearing in New York.

53. Liberty Media Execs Discuss Barnes & Noble Offer -

NEW YORK (AP) – Executives with online company Liberty Media say the "interesting interplay" between Barnes & Noble's Nook e-reader and its retail stores is one reason they have bid for the book seller, but Barnes & Noble executives launching the device's latest version Tuesday were mum on the $1 billion offer.

54. Malone's Barnes & Noble Bid a Bet on the Nook -

NEW YORK (AP) – Why buy a bookstore?

John Malone, who made a fortune in cable television, is offering $1 billion for Barnes & Noble – trying to jump into a business so sick that its No. 2 competitor, Borders Group Inc., is on life support.

55. After Bankruptcy Auction, Davis-Kidd Likely To Close -

Attorneys for The Joseph-Beth Group, parent company of Davis-Kidd Booksellers, have filed a notice with the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Eastern District of Kentucky giving a brief run-down of Wednesday’s auction of the bankrupt book chain.

56. Imagine Memphis Seeks to Foster New Leaders -

It’s long been part of the trappings of politics to honor a group of young people who have competed and won various honors for their schools.

The proclamations and accolades are an established part of the meetings of our school boards, legislative bodies and other government groups.

57. Nashville Borders Among 28 Additional to Close -

A Nashville Borders store is among 28 that Borders Group Inc. plans to close as it tries to reorganize in bankruptcy protection. The additional closures bring the total closures to 228.

58. Davis-Kidd Going Up for Sale -

A group of creditors thinks the parent company of Davis-Kidd Booksellers in Memphis chose the wrong path in bankruptcy court.

The Joseph-Beth Group has apparently conceded that fact. In a filing this week, the book store chain said it wouldn’t be able to submit a reorganization plan that meets the approval of lenders, creditors and the bankruptcy court.

59. Davis-Kidd Parent’s Bankruptcy Draws Ire -

A group of creditors thinks the parent company of Davis-Kidd Booksellers in Memphis chose the wrong path in bankruptcy court.

The Joseph-Beth Group chose a reorganization track, which thus far has included store closures and other cost cutting. But the creditor group thinks liquidation might be a more appropriate path for the bookstore chain, the footprint of which includes the venerable East Memphis bookstore, 387 Perkins Road Extended.

60. Barnes & Noble 3Q Net Income Falls -

NEW YORK (AP) – Book seller Barnes & Noble's third-quarter revenue rose, but its net income fell 25 percent as it continued to invest in its online operations and Nook e-readers, the company said Tuesday.

61. Judge OKs Borders Financing, Gift Card Program -

NEW YORK (AP) – A judge has granted Borders Group approval on an interim basis to use $400 million of the $505 million in financing it has been offered to pay its vendors back and keep its business going, including honoring its loyalty program and gift cards.

62. Borders Files for Chapter 11 Bankruptcy -

Borders Group Inc. filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy Wednesday and will be closing about 200 stores, but no Memphis stores will be affected for now. Borders has the option of closing 75 more of its 622 currently operating stores, though those locations have not yet been announced.

63. Report: Borders Bankruptcy Filing Likely Next Week -

NEW YORK (AP) – Borders Group may file for bankruptcy reorganization as early as Monday or Tuesday, according to a report in the Wall Street Journal.

The No. 2 traditional bookstore in the U.S. also plans to close about 200 of its 674 stores and cut thousands of jobs, the newspaper reported, citing sources it did not name.

64. Borders to Close Distribution Center, Cut 310 Jobs -

ANN ARBOR, Mich. (AP) – Troubled book seller Borders Group Inc. said Wednesday that it will close one of three distribution centers in mid-July and eliminate the LaVergne, Tenn., facility's 310 jobs.

65. Latest Tenn. Report Shows 163 Jobs Ending -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Tennessee labor officials say the state is losing 163 jobs – none in Shelby County – with planned cuts reported by companies.

The Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development reported Monday that Borders Group Inc. reported it would lay off 96 workers by Dec. 23 in Rutherford County.

66. Kohl's Boosts Holiday Hiring by 21 Percent in 2010 -

MENOMONEE FALLS, Wis. (AP) — Kohl's Corp. is increasing its holiday hiring this season by 21 percent, another major retailer to boost its employee count this winter.

The department store chain said Wednesday it expects to hire more than 40,000 people this season, up from 33,000 last year.

67. Service Sector Growth Accelerates in September -

NEW YORK (AP) – The U.S. service sector, the nation's predominant employer, expanded in September for a ninth straight month, although the growth has not been consistent enough to dent the high unemployment rate.

68. Holiday Hiring Picture Gets a Bit Merrier -

NEW YORK (AP) – The holiday hiring picture looks a bit merrier this year.

Macy's, Toys R Us, Pier 1, American Eagle Outfitters and Borders all plan to hire more temporary holiday workers this year than last, emboldened by several months of sales gains and a slowly improving economy.

69. Murdoch, Bloomberg Embrace Immigration Reform -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Media mogul Rupert Murdoch, a man with his own immigration story, told Congress Thursday that securing the U.S. borders must be matched with efforts to ensure that employers can't hire people who are here illegally.

70. Blockbuster’s Chap. 11 Won’t Impact Memphis -

NEW YORK (AP) – Blockbuster Inc., once the dominant movie rental company in the U.S., filed for bankruptcy protection on Thursday, reeling from mounting losses, rising debt and competitors that have better catered to Americans' changed media habits.

71. Bredesen Signs Illegal Immigrants Bill -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Gov. Phil Bredesen has signed into law a measure that would require the state’s jailers to determine whether inmates are in the country illegally and report them if they are.

72. Businesses to Learn Social Media Voice at Approaching Conference -

One could argue that the number of followers defines a successful Twitter account and that the number of friends defines a successful Facebook account.

But the true measure of success for any social media format – especially in the business world – is the quality, not the quantity, of relationships created.

73. Is 9th District Really Black? Maybe, Expert Says -  

One of the most hotly contested issues of the Democratic congressional primary race between Willie Herenton and Steve Cohen may be why the district lines are drawn the way they are.

The 9th Congressional District has been predominantly in Memphis for decades. In recent years it has grown to take in small parts of the suburbs. The lines could change again after the 2010 Census, when the Tennessee Legislature begins its usual reapportioning process.

Herenton and his supporters have repeatedly said the district’s borders were drawn to enhance the possibility of black representation in a congressional delegation that’s all white.

“I want you ... to help us to retrieve for our children what we lost in representation,” Herenton told a predominantly black crowd of 300 people Saturday at an East Memphis campaign rally.

To make the point even plainer, Herenton quoted radio talk show host and political blogger Thaddeus Matthews.

“Think about that. White folks, y’all got all 11. We just want one,” Herenton said to cheers from the crowd.

The legal concept and practice of drawing districts that reflect a majority black population, however, is not that simple. It’s rooted in the 1965 Voting Rights Act.

Section II of the act requires that, in certain circumstances, districts be drawn to “give effect to the political preferences of the minority population.”

“This is actually a fairly technical area and it’s been the subject of a lot of litigation over the years, trying to interpret how Section II applies,” said attorney John Ryder.

Ryder is a Republican National Committeeman and chairman of the RNC’s redistricting committee. He is also the most experienced attorney locally of either party in the law and political effect of drawing district boundaries.

The clearest guideline for the creation of such a district is the 1986 Gingles case from North Carolina, which established three criteria or preconditions to create such a district:

  • The minority population must be compact and contiguous.
  • The minority population usually votes as a bloc.
  • The white population usually votes as a bloc in such a way as to defeat the minority population’s candidate of choice.

Tennessee meets the first condition, Ryder said.

“The problem with the second two … conditions is that it’s hard to argue that the white majority votes in such a way as to defeat the preferred candidate of the minority population’s choice when we’ve elected Barack Obama as president,” he said, adding the 2006 U.S. Senate race in Tennessee in which Harold Ford Jr. got 49 percent of the vote in a statewide race won by Bob Corker.

“You just don’t see the kind of racial bloc voting that existed in 1965 when the Voting Rights Act was originally passed,” Ryder said.

The first black political leader to claim what is now the 9th District seat did so in the 1974 midterm congressional elections, in a district drawn with no overt racial considerations.

Harold Ford Sr. was a Democratic state representative at the time, seeking to unseat Dan Kuykendall, the white Republican congressman from Memphis in what was then the 8th Congressional District.

After the 1970 census, the majority Democrat Tennessee Legislature redrew congressional district lines to cede to Republicans seats in the majority GOP eastern end of the state, Ryder said. They also moved to create more Democratic districts in West Tennessee by splitting the Republicans outside Memphis between the 8th and 7th districts.

“As a result in 1972, those seats elected Republicans,” Ryder said. “They got a little too clever and overreached. What was then the 8th district was drawn to be a Democrat district, not necessarily a black district.”

Ford upset Kuykendall in the year of Watergate, when Republican incumbents were imperiled by the scandal and the tarnished presidency of Richard Nixon. Kuykendall also underestimated Ford, who held the seat for 22 years. His son, Harold Ford Jr., continued for another 10 years.

By then, black voters were considered the majority of registered voters in Memphis. The official numbers from the Shelby County Election Commission by themselves are less conclusive.

Voter registration statistics as of Jan. 31 show there are 412,433 voters in the city of Memphis. Of that number, 183,443 are black and 96,686 are white. Another 132,304 are listed as “other,” meaning they are of another racial group or did not indicate their race on voter registration forms.

The 2000 U.S Census puts the city’s population at 670,902 with 61.4 percent black and 34.4 percent white. Of the total population counted, 27.9 percent were younger than 18.

Ryder said the central question that was already present when Cohen was elected in 2006 and re-elected in 2008 is who is the preferred candidate of the black population.

“Steve Cohen has obviously been successful in obtaining votes from the black population. I think he can make a legitimate claim to be the preferred candidate of choice,” Ryder added. “What it means is the Voting Rights Act certainly led to the creation of a majority black district, and that means that the black population in the 9th District has the opportunity to elect its preferred candidate of choice. In our political system, all players are free to compete to become that preferred candidate.”

Herenton and those putting together his campaign strategy point out that Cohen won the Democratic primary the first time in a large field with numerous black contenders. In 2008, Nikki Tinker returned from that pack for a second try in a smaller field of four challengers. Cohen won easily and Tinker later expressed regret over a controversial campaign strategy that stressed race.

The message to black voters from Herenton’s camp is a tacit admission that Cohen was elected with black votes.

“It’s the only place in Tennessee that you can elect somebody that looks like you,” Shelby County Commissioner Sidney Chism said at Saturday’s rally. “We’ve got to clean up what we messed up. … You should want the same, and if you don’t, something’s wrong.”

...

74. Adoption Support Center’s McDonald Honored for Successful Work -

Michael McDonald knows some of the biggest hurdles in adopting a child come after the deed is done.

75. Ashby Brings Immigration Knowledge To Donati Firm -

Bryce W. Ashby recently rejoined the Donati Law Firm LLP after clerking for Judge Bernice Donald in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Tennessee. Ashby, who is fluent in Spanish and has worked extensively as an advocate and organizer in Latino and immigrant communities, practices in labor and employment law and civil rights law.

76. Law Firm Alliances on the Rise -

Law firms locally and nationally are more frequently forming partnerships with other firms or joining networks to help better serve their clients and use every attorney’s base of knowledge to improve overall performance.

77. Highland Hip -

The Highland strip is growing a skyline. The Stratum on Highland Street, a five-story apartment complex, was the first new structure west of the University of Memphis to sprout last August on the storied commercial strip itself.

78. There Goes the Neighborhood: New hope emerges in one of Memphis’ roughest areas -

Hope and despair have co-existed for a long time along the stretch of Poplar Avenue between Danny Thomas Boulevard and Decatur Street. And for the past two years, the area has seen more change than just about any other inner-city avenue in Memphis.

79. Williams Election Completes NE Tenn. Power Shift -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) - The Republican takeover of the General Assembly has been accompanied by a geographical power shift that may finally put to rest the old saying that Tennessee ends in Knoxville.

80. Service Sector Shrinks as New Orders Fall in Nov. -

NEW YORK (AP) - The U.S. service sector contracted dramatically in November, as employment, new orders and prices fell precipitously, hurting retailers, hotels and other industries.

The Institute for Supply Management, a trade group of purchasing executives, said Wednesday that its services sector index fell to 37.3 in November from 44.4 in October. It was far below the reading of 42 expected by Wall Street economists surveyed by Thomson Reuters.

81. Volkswagen Selects Tennessee for US Auto Plant -

CHATTANOOGA (AP) - Volkswagen picked Chattanooga over rival sites in two other states for a new U.S. assembly plant expected to create about 2,000 jobs.

Volkswagen Group of America Inc. will produce a new midsize sedan designed specifically for the North American consumer and invest $1 billion in the economy, the company has announced.

82. Fairgrounds Planning to Begin For Turley’s Group -

Improvements to Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium probably will be the first indication of a Mid-South Fairgrounds makeover. The improvements have been on the drawing board for some time.

The rest of the fairgrounds redevelopment project, however, still is taking shape with the naming this week of Henry Turley’s Fair Ground LLC as the developer of the site.

83. Study: Government Must do Better Job Protecting Mississippi River -

WASHINGTON (AP) - States and the federal government need to coordinate their efforts to monitor and protect the water of the Mississippi River, a new analysis urges.

The study released Tuesday by the National Research Council calls on the Environmental Protection Agency to coordinate the efforts affecting the river and the northern Gulf of Mexico where its water is discharged.

84. Germantown Leaders Position Town For Smarter Growth -

If you can't grow outward, grow upward.That's the tack Germantown has chosen for "Vision 2020," an ambitious redevelopment initiative centered on Smart Growth, a movement designed to transform the city's commercial core and put the "urban back into suburban."

85. Change of Face -

Editor's Note: This is the last in The Daily News' five-part Retail Reinvented series about the past - and future - of the local shopping landscape.

Most shoppers only vaguely remember the days when Carrefour at Kirby Woods, Germantown Village Square and Park Place Mall were enclosed shopping centers. Most of the malls opened in the late 1970s or early 1980s, and all had converted to outdoor malls by 1999.

86. Broken Records -

Shoppers shuffled through the decimated music selection at Tower Records' Memphis location near the end of the chain's 46-year run last month.

Shelves that used to be brimming with Elvis, The Beatles, Cat Power and Sonic Youth were reduced to a grab-bag of no-name bands and overstocked "best-of" compilations.

87. Inner-City Scouts Get a Taste of Nature Through Great Outdoors University -

A new program is helping inner-city boys get out of Memphis and into the country.

The Tennessee Wildlife Federation (TWF) and the local council of the Boy Scouts of America formed the Great Outdoors University (GOU) earlier this year to give scouts from inner-city troops an opportunity to take field trips to some of the Mid-South's most pristine natural areas.

88. Archived Article: Daily Digest - University Tower Condo Units

University Tower Condos

Sell for $3.7 Million

Cameron LC has purchased 149 units in University Tower Condominiums from Larry and Merrel Durham for $3.7 million, according to The Daily News Public Records Databas...

89. Archived Article: Law Focus - Law

Statewide Program Develops Law Leaders

LANCE ALLAN

The Daily News

Seeing a need to develop leaders in the law field, John Tarpley also felt the need to do something about it.

As 2004 president of the Tennessee Bar Association, Tar...

90. Archived Article: Comm Focus - Watch Groups Help Prevent Downtown Crime

Watch Groups Help Prevent Downtown Crime

JANE ALDINGER

The Daily News

Criminals beware: Downtown Neighborhood Watch groups are on patrol and have their eyes peeled for suspicious activity.

Insp...

91. Archived Article: Gragg (lead) - Rural project tests facets of countys growth plan

Rural project tests facets of countys growth plan

By BRYAN MASSEY

The Daily News

Standing before Shelby County Commission committee members last week, Dr. Barret Matthews projected a conc...

92. Archived Article: Law Focus - Shelby county plans to keep it green Shelby County planning to keep it green By MARY DANDO The Daily News Although no longer the hardwood capital of the world, Memphis still has an abundance of trees along the avenues and boulevards of the city. Bey...

93. Archived Article: Comm Focus - Memphis not alone in consolidation fervor Memphis not alone in consolidation fervor By KATHLEEN BURT The Daily News At times, being stuck in the southwest corner of a large state puts Memphis in a vast wasteland, forgotten by those outside its city ...

94. Archived Article: Market Briefs - The Memphis Convention & Visitors Bureau received a gold award from Hospitality Sales and Marketing Association International The Memphis Convention & Visitors Bureau received a gold award from Hospitality Sales and Marketing Association Int...

95. Archived Article: Focus (dogs) - Its a Dogs Life Dogs lives improve with a little help from friends By MARY DANDO The Daily News Some small businesses in the Memphis area are going to the dogs, but for good reason. Wagging Tails, 6685 Poplar Ave., a specialty store selling gifts an...

96. Archived Article: Market Briefs - The Cotton Belles chapter of The America Business Womens Association meets at 5:45 p The Cotton Belles chapter of The America Business Womens Association meets at 5:45 p.m. Tuesday at the Racquet Club of Memphis, 5111 Sanderlin Ave. Carolyn Cates, d...

97. Archived Article: Comm Briefs - The Whistlebinkies, a Scottish group utilizing three national instruments of Scotland the fiddle, bagpipes and clarsach in regular performance, will perform at Evergreen Presbyterian Church, 613 University Ave The Whistlebinkies, a Scottish group ut...

98. Archived Article: Calendar - Calendar Feb April 10 The Shelby County Republican Women will meet at 10:45 a.m. at the Adams Mark Hotel. For reservations, call 758-2755. Consumer Credit Counseling Service will host a free "Get Creditable" seminar from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., ...

99. Archived Article: Desoto Mall Lj - DeSoto Co DeSoto Co. takes steps toward regional mall By LAURIE JOHNSON The Daily News A DeSoto County town took a major step this week toward developing the areas first regional mall. The Southaven Board of Aldermen has approved a $11.5 million tax...

100. Archived Article: Tech Focus - Location, location, location Location, location, location Two major economic development players form a new team By KATHLEEN BURT The Daily News Two heavyweights in the business site location industry have joined forces. One has roots in Memphis. Th...