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Editorial Results (free)

1. Evolving Identity -

Some of the most telling views of Memphis are the ones many of us see for only seconds at a time as we drive on viaducts that take us and our cars just above the treetops and rooftops of older neighborhoods interrupted by the roadways.

2. Social Change and Nonprofits -

Ferguson, Mo., and Staten Island, N.Y. Cleveland, Ohio. Michael Brown. Eric Garner. Tamir Rice. These cities and the deaths of these African-American males – men and boys – are in the headlines. So are people’s responses.

3. Tech Summit Addresses Industry's Lack of Diversity -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Civil rights leader Jesse Jackson spent most of this year pressuring the technology industry into facing up to the glaring scarcity of women, blacks and Latinos at companies renowned as great places to work.

4. Armstrong’s Comments Overshadow Attorney General’s Visit -

Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong had some concerns Tuesday about speaking before U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder addressed a group of 100 local leaders at Hattiloo Theatre in Overton Square.

5. Building a Framework -

Moving the needle on minority business growth in Memphis is in a phase of knitting and prodding six months after a renewed call for a larger share of business for minority businesses in a city whose population is majority African-American.

6. Black Friday Gun Buys Test Background Check System -

BRIDGEPORT, W.Va. (AP) – Black Friday isn't just when shoppers rush to stores for holiday sales. It's also one of the busiest days of the year for gun purchases.

In the U.S., there are nine guns for every 10 people. Someone is killed with a firearm every 16 minutes. And every minute, gun shops make about 40 new requests for criminal background checks on people wanting weapons.

7. After the Campaign -

The 2014 election year began in January with dissent from the floor.

At the end of the Shelby County Democratic Party’s annual Kennedy Day fundraiser in January, former Memphis City Council member and state Rep. Carol Chumney, who was not among the speakers, challenged the party establishment from her table to do more to support women running for office.

8. Exhibiting Soul -

For more than a year, award-winning photographer and New York native Thom Gilbert has been shooting portraits of oil drillers in Texas, fishermen in Alaska, coal miners, cowboys, Detroit auto assembly workers – a group of people he refers to as “iconic Americans.”

9. ’Tis the Shopping Season -

Buoyed by rising home prices and stock portfolios, Middle Tennesseans are ready to spend big again on the holidays and will be shopping earlier than ever.

In fact, they already have.

Forget Black Friday or even Thanksgiving Day as the traditional start of the holiday shopping season.

10. SchoolSeed Continues Series With Penn Professor -

University of Penn professor, Dr. Shaun Harper, will travel to Memphis, Oct. 22-23 for a visit focused on educating young men of color in an urban context. The visit is the second in a speaker series hosted by SchoolSeed, a nonprofit working to drive educational excellence and innovation in the Greater Memphis community.

11. Push for Broader Minority Business Participation Grows -

A larger share of business for minority- and women-owned local businesses should begin with an inventory that matches existing businesses with existing opportunities.

And three leaders of the recently revived effort to build that share of business say from there the local Memphis economy overall can grow.

12. This week in Memphis history: August 29-September 4 -

1972: Wattstax at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum – a concert to mark the seventh anniversary of the Watts riots in Los Angeles by Stax Records that was a high point for the Memphis-based record label and featured a day-long bill of Memphis soul and funk and gospel from the stadium stage with Isaac Hayes headlining.

13. Apple's Tech Jobs Held Mostly By White, Asian Men -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Apple primarily relies on white and Asian men for its top-paying technology jobs, feeding the perception that Silicon Valley's economic boom is largely excluding women, blacks and Hispanics.

14. Politicos Parse Early Voting Numbers -

There is a category in voter turnout statistics that has long been debated by those running for office and those who work in their campaigns.

It is the closest Shelby County has to an official category for undecided voters or voters up for grabs by either side of the partisan divide.

15. Early Voter Turnout Tops 82,000 -

More than 82,000 Shelby County voters cast early ballots in the early voting period that ended Saturday, Aug. 2, according to turnout statistics from the Shelby County Election Commission.

The 82,403 early voters in advance of the Thursday, Aug. 7, election day are 15.3 percent of the county’s 537,066 voters.

16. Early Voter Turnout Tops 82,000 -

More than 82,000 Shelby County voters cast early ballots in the early voting period that ended Saturday, Aug. 2, according to turnout statistics from the Shelby County Election Commission.

The 82,403 early voters in advance of the Thursday, Aug. 7, election day are 15.3 percent of the county’s 537,066 voters.

17. From Despair to Belief -

A July weekday afternoon, about 2:45. It’s the perfect time for just about anyone to be nodding off in class.

But in the basement of Midtown Church of Christ, where HopeWorks Inc. is housed, class is in session and a dozen men and their teacher are having a lively discussion.

18. Coalition Vows Push for Minority Business Gains -

For decades, goals and percentages have been set for minority business participation in city and county governments.

Both governments have compliance offices. Elected officials look at percentages and ask questions about participation on particular projects.

19. Ready to Work -

Could a framed photograph of the interviewer’s two children help you get the job? How about the Dallas Cowboys coffee mug on his desk? Or the diploma from the University of Memphis on her wall?

20. Black Men Make Giving Easy and Meaningful -

Part two of a two-part series. African-American men are pooling their money to create positive community change. The Ujima Legacy Fund brings together men who invest $1,100 and collectively increase their impact. Founder Reginald Gordon shares a few details so you can create a fund in your community. We pick up our interview with Gordon with a discussion about grantmaking.

21. Black Men Find New Way to Give Back -

Part one of a two-part series. Readers of our column know we are supporters and promoters of women’s philanthropy including women’s foundations and giving circles. Mel likes to joke, “what about men’s philanthropy?”

22. Museum Reopening Raises Issues About Present -

There was a moment in the April 5 two-hour reopening ceremony for the renovated National Civil Rights Museum that demonstrated the tension that still exists when it comes to the important issue of who is telling the story of history.

23. Where There’s Smoke -

DON’T WAIT FOR THE FIRE TO FIND THE WATER. Neglect and denial burns in empty buildings and blighted neighborhoods, futures are hazy, moods are dark and the smoke from all of it chokes cities and sends those able to flee to greener ground at the edges, leaving behind a bitter landscape, a smoldering threat.

24. ‘History Has Changed’ -

The headquarters for Freedom Summer is still being set up and nearby the stage is almost ready for the March on Washington.

The almost-finished exhibit on the black power movement includes an interactive media table that is as bold as the moments and cultural history it offers.

25. Wharton: City Must Target ‘Black Boy Crime’ -

As President Barack Obama talked from the East Room of the White House last week about violence and young African-American men and boys, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. was among a group of mayors meeting in New Orleans who say they are ready to back a new approach to the problem.

26. Jos. A. Bank Buying Eddie Bauer in $825 Million Deal -

After months of flirting with the idea of combining with a rival, Jos. A. Bank has decided it is better suited for another men's clothing brand.

27. Gambling Industry Fights Self on Internet Gambling -

LAS VEGAS (AP) – Many experts believe online wagering is the future of gambling, but the casino industry is increasingly divided on the issue.

The latest evidence of the split came Monday as the Coalition to Stop Internet Gambling launched the first commercial in a six-figure campaign warning of the dangers of legalized Internet gambling. The coalition is emphasizing the possibility that criminals and terrorists may use online gambling to launder money.

28. Cameraman’s Collection -

Don Newman was a photographer whose pursuit of the perfect shot once took him to the middle of one of the busiest streets in Memphis.

29. Events -

Shelby County Trustee David Lenoir and the Delta Sigma Theta Memphis Alumnae Chapter will hold “Home for the Holidays: A Housing and Economic Empowerment Collaborative” Saturday, Nov. 23, from 8 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at Hickory Ridge Mall, 6075 Winchester Road. The event will include a small-business resource center, legal clinic, Homebuyer’s Corner, H.O.M.E. financial literacy and budgeting workshop, and more. Visit memphisalumnaedst.org.

30. Small Retailers Plan to Party Till They Profit -

NEW YORK (AP) – The parades and carnivals that draw people to downtown areas across the country this holiday season will be more than big celebrations. They're part of a strategy to get shoppers into small stores.

31. Thieves Pose as Truckers to Steal Huge Cargo Loads -

WICHITA, Kan. (AP) — To steal huge shipments of valuable cargo, thieves are turning to a deceptively simple tactic: They pose as truckers, load the freight onto their own tractor-trailers and drive away with it.

32. Football Part of Planning at LeMoyne-Owen -

The new $13.5 million four-story residence hall at LeMoyne-Owen College that formally opened Friday, Oct. 18, is the latest symbol of growth on the campus of the city’s only historically black college since 2006.

33. White Ready to Take on Frayser High -

Bobby White is so close that he sometimes has to remember that the decision about who will run Frayser High School won’t be made until December.

34. More Than 300 Sites Ring Bells for MLK Speech -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Church bells were ringing out Wednesday at the National Cathedral and nationwide to answer a call from one of the most important civil rights speeches in history to "let freedom ring."

35. Obama Holds Martin Luther King as Personal Hero -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Barack Obama was 2 years old and growing up in Hawaii when Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his "I Have a Dream" speech from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. Fifty years later, the nation's first black president will stand as the most high-profile example of the racial progress King espoused, delivering remarks Wednesday at a nationwide commemoration of the 1963 demonstration for jobs, economic justice and racial equality.

36. Haunted History -

WORRY ABOUT THE DOGS. Depending on who’s talking and when, history around Fort Pillow changes.

At the time of this story, it was called the Cold Creek Correctional Facility, a minimum-security operation that included farming about 6,000 acres in Lauderdale County. Next it was called the Fort Pillow Prison and Farm, next door to something called the West Tennessee High Security Facility, now the West Tennessee State Penitentiary. Folks around there just call the whole thing the farm. When you’re driving a van full of scouts to camp at Fort Pillow State Park, you make a left off 51 at Henning and drive right by all of it.

37. Obama Nominates 3 to Appeals Court, Testing GOP -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Opening a summer showdown with Congress, a combative President Barack Obama nominated three judges to a powerful appellate court Tuesday and challenged Republicans to stop the "political obstruction" holding up his nominees.

38. Mothers Now Top Earners in 4 in 10 US Households -

WASHINGTON (AP) — America's working mothers are now the primary breadwinners in a record 40 percent of households with children — a milestone in the changing face of modern families, up from just 11 percent in 1960.

39. Civic Leader Says City Has ‘Right Stuff’ -

A little less than two years ago, Dr. Robert Ross was up for a standard performance review from the board of the foundation he leads.

40. Smith's Role Central to City's History -

Memphis civil rights icon Maxine Smith died Thursday evening at her South Memphis home at the age of 83.

41. Decades After King’s Death, Memphis Jobs in Spotlight -

MEMPHIS (AP) – Decades after Martin Luther King Jr. was shot to death here, some of the striking sanitation workers who marched with him are again fighting for their jobs.

42. Memphis Academy of Health Sciences Pays $1.1 Million for Raleigh Land -

The Memphis Academy of Health Sciences High School has paid $1.1 million for a vacant parcel at 3606 Hawkins Mill Road in Raleigh.

43. Philanthropic Black Women Taking Grant Applications -

Philanthropic Black Women of Memphis is accepting applications for grants that will be awarded in April.

The organization, which supports projects geared toward economic self-sufficiency, is accepting applications for programs focusing on, but not limited to, career development, education, entrepreneurship, scholarship and health.

44. Philanthropic Black Women Taking Grant Applications -

Philanthropic Black Women of Memphis is accepting applications for grants that will be awarded in April.

The organization, which supports projects geared toward economic self-sufficiency, is accepting applications for programs focusing on, but not limited to, career development, education, entrepreneurship, scholarship and health.

45. Funeral Services Set for Lansky -

Funeral services for Downtown clothing store owner Bernard J. Lansky will be Friday, Nov. 16, at 11 a.m. at Baron Hirsch Synagogue, 400 S. Yates Road.

46. Legal Community Seeks Access, Diversity -

Diversity and access to justice are some of the watchwords often heard around Memphis legal circles these days.

Diversity, because of the continued concern that both men and women get equal shots at advancing up the ranks from law school all the way to the corner office. Access to justice, because of everything from the recession’s grinding toll to the ever-present scars of poverty in Memphis that all combine to make legal problems harder than ever to pay for.

47. Nightmare Election Scenarios Worry Both Parties -

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. (AP) – Here in a county that knows a thing or two about Election Day meltdowns, both parties are fretting over what might go seriously wrong before, during or just after the Nov. 6 presidential election.

48. Team Mantras Usher in New Basketball Seasons -

Although the date and time are unknown, there was a point some years ago when it became mandatory for every big-time college and pro team to have a mantra.

And so it is for the Grizzlies and University of Memphis Tigers. The Grizz and local media gathered at FedExForum and coach Lionel Hollins said: “Our buzz words are sacrifice, trust and consistency.”

49. Three Generations of Judge’s Family Practice Law -

Three generations of a family in one profession is not the most common of sights. Rarer still is when those three generations find themselves working in the same field at the same time.

Such is the reality in the family of Diane Vescovo, a U.S. magistrate judge in Memphis for the Western District of Tennessee.

50. Civil Rights Icon Smith Donates Papers to Library -

Maxine Smith pointed out that the wheelchair she used to enter the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library was borrowed – and she also made a point of walking from the doorway of the Memphis and Shelby County Room at the library to her seat in the room.

51. Events -

Kiwanis Club of Memphis will meet Wednesday, May 16, from noon to 1 p.m. at The Peabody hotel, 149 Union Ave. Rabbi Micah Greenstein of Temple Israel will speak. Cost for lunch is $25 for nonmembers.

52. WLOK Celebrates 35 Years With Dinner -

WLOK 1340 AM, the first black-owned radio station in Memphis, is hosting an anniversary dinner this week to celebrate its 35th anniversary.

The dinner, which will be held May 18 at the Marriott East, 2625 Thousand Oaks Blvd., will bring together gospel celebrities, dignitaries and listeners to pay tribute to the radio station, which today is a leading source of gospel music and news.

53. Kiser Joins Volunteer Mid-South As Community Services Director -

Amanda Kiser has joined Volunteer Mid-South as community services director. Kiser’s responsibilities include mobilizing and maximizing volunteer resources, coordinating training for partner agencies, creating and leading community projects, and marketing VMS’ benefits to agencies and the public.

54. Luncheon To Honor’s City’s Cinematic Stars -

Film director Craig Brewer, “Undefeated” star Bill Courtney, and Memphis and Shelby County Film and Television Commissioner Linn Sitler are among those who’ll be honored Wednesday, May 9, as Carnival Memphis salutes the Mid-South’s movie and film industry during its annual Business & Industry Salute Luncheon.

55. Study: Black Women More Likely to Die From Breast Cancer -

African-American women in Memphis are more than twice as likely to die from breast cancer as their white counterparts, according to a study released last week.

A study conducted by the Sinai Urban Health Institute in Chicago, funded by the Avon Foundation Breast Cancer Crusade in New York and published in Cancer Epidemiology: The International Journal of Cancer Epidemiology, Detection and Prevention, is believed to be the first study to analyze the racial disparity in breast cancer deaths at the city level.

56. Voters Turn Out Today For Primary Races -

The first thing parishioners at St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church noticed before noon Mass, Sunday, March 4, was a line of black SUVs in the parking lot of the Cordova church. A back row at the church was filled with men wearing the same color suits.

57. UPDATE: Jury Hears Recording of Hit Man Talking With Petties Target -

Big drug dealers don’t count the money as soon as they make a drug deal. They wait until they leave the exchange to count it.

That was among the details offered Tuesday, Feb. 14, in the full-day of testimony by Orlando Pride, a long time member of the violent multi-state drug organization headed by Craig Petties.

58. ‘Manly’ Red Perfect for Big Game -

When all you manly men sit down to watch Super Bowl XLVI Sunday, you will of course be gorging on manly snack fare – spicy chicken wings, mile-high nachos, pigs-in-blankets, watercress sandwiches with the crusts cut off – that requires a manly wine to wash down. (I know that many of you will be drinking beer, but I promise that there’s nothing manly about Bud Light.)

59. 2011 Job Hopes Improved Most for Worst-Hit Groups -

WASHINGTON (AP) – For many people whose job prospects faded most during the recession, 2011 brought a small dose of relief.

When unemployment was surging, the youngest U.S. workers, the oldest, those without college degrees and men as a whole all suffered disproportionately. Last year, those groups – whose unemployment rates still exceed the national average – had better success than others in finding jobs, according to Labor Department data released Friday.

60. Bargain Hunters Divided Shopping Season Into 2 -

NEW YORK (AP) – The holiday shopping season turned out to be two seasons: the Black Friday binge and a last-minute surge.

Together, they added up to decent sales gains for retailers. And the doldrums in between showed how shoppers have learned to wait for the discounts they know will come.

61. Shoppers Say 'Ho-Hum' Not 'Ho-Ho-Ho' to Sales -

Sale, schmale.

Used to be, customers would come running when stores cut prices. But these days, more Americans are becoming blasé about bargains.

Jennifer Beasley recently left a Toys R Us in Cary, N.C., unimpressed by the retailer's offers that day of 50 percent discounts on things like a $150 Sylvania tablet computer and a $45 My Baby Alive Doll.

62. Philanthropic Black Women Taking Grant Applications -

The Philanthropic Black Women of Memphis is seeking grant applications through the end of January.

The group, which is focused on supporting programs and projects geared toward economic self-sufficiency, is accepting applications for programs focusing on but not limited to career development, education, entrepreneurship, scholarship and health.

63. Twitter Changes Business of Celebrity Endorsements -

NEW YORK (AP) – Rapper Snoop Dogg gave props on Twitter to an ad for the Toyota Sienna minivan. Actress Tori Spelling linked to a website for rental cars. And reality TV star Khloe Kardashian soliloquized about the brand of jeans that accentuates the famous Kardashian derriere.

64. Obama Teams Up With Wife to Finish Bus Tour -

NORTH CHESTERFIELD, Va. (AP) – President Barack Obama teamed up with his popular and personable wife Wednesday on the final leg of a three-day bus trip, seeking to use her broad appeal to rally support for elements of his jobs bill and his re-election campaign.

65. New Oct. Date Set for MLK Memorial Dedication -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Organizers have set a new date in October to dedicate the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial after Hurricane Irene forced them to postpone the event in August, days before 250,000 people were expected to attend.

66. Employers Add No Net Jobs in Aug.; Rate Unchanged -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Employers stopped adding jobs in August, an alarming setback for an economy that has struggled to grow and might be at risk of another recession.

The government also reported that the unemployment rate remained at 9.1 percent. It was the weakest jobs report since September 2010.

67. Outward Sound -

Over the next several months, Memphis music lovers will be outdoors frequently in anticipation of good company, a relaxing evening and great tunes.

And performers of all stripes and levels of success – from storytellers to Southern guitar gods to an orchestra pumping out the swinging sounds of the 1930s – will be on deck to give them all that and more.

68. Dem Luckett Touts Economic Record in Miss Gov's Race -

CLARKSDALE, Miss. (AP) — Bill Luckett still vividly remembers his first work in helping renovate buildings. He was a ninth grader, and he sanded walls for house painters in his hometown of Clarksdale.

69. Events -

The Levitt Shell will hold two free concerts as part of its summer kids concert series Tuesday, June 14, at 10:30 a.m. and 7 p.m. at the Levitt Shell in Overton Park, 1930 Poplar Ave. Trout Fishing in America will perform.

70. Breaking Bread -

A diverse cross-section of Memphians broke bread together this week at Caritas Village, a community cultural center in the heart of Binghampton, while participating in meaningful dialogue centered on the future of health care, particularly as it affects those living in poverty.

71. Friends Launch Joy Magazine Memphis -

Much of the friendship forged between Anthony Milan and Henry Nelson stems from a continual exchange of ideas.

72. Revenue Up, Jobs Down at US Casinos in 2010 -

ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) – After two bad years in which gamblers either stayed home or held onto their wallets more tightly, the nation's casinos began to slowly rebound last year, with revenue increasing slightly even as the number of jobs declined.

73. The Right Manager Can Make or Break Restaurant -

Here’s why restaurants need good managers to be there on the spot, to watch what’s going on, to keep everything smooth and proper and comfortable.

This occurred at dinner recently:

The waiter, a young woman, approached our table and said, “Oh, I just got health insurance. And dental! I’m so happy I think I might cry.”

74. Telling the Story -

As Miriam DeCosta-Willis spoke in the Memphis Room of the Memphis Public Library and Information Center, a set of 19 gray file boxes was neatly lined up near the podium.

The files, containing manuscripts, notes, photographs and other items, are “parts of our history that never would be known” without DeCosta-Willis donating them to a growing archive in The Memphis Room, said library director Keenon McCloy.

75. Former U.S. Attorney Greenlee Discusses Big Cases -

The former U.S. Attorney for North Mississippi during the prosecution of North Mississippi attorney Dickie Scruggs for bribing a judge says there were some fears the powerful attorney or his friends might destroy the government’s case by talking some key witnesses out of cooperating.

76. Salt: How Much Is Too Much in Our Food? -

It’s not that the salt has lost its savor but that it has been keeping company with pretty unsavory characters, like high blood pressure, heart disease and a host of other ills.

Coming under more scrutiny by the federal government because of those associations, salt was a prominent feature of new dietary guidelines issued by the Agriculture and Health and Human Services Department on Jan. 31, part of an every-five-year review of America’s (mostly bad) eating habits.

77. Bearden’s Legacy Project Archives Present-Day Memphis -

The Memphis & Shelby County Room at the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library is a treasure trove of information about the area and its people.

Among the library’s catacombs of flat files, cabinets, boxes and shelves are hundreds of thousands of newspapers and magazine articles, maps, oral histories, school yearbooks and pamphlets.

78. MPI Brings Old School Approach to Photo Business -

C. M. Neal of C. M. Neal Photography, a professional photography business in Memphis, uses MPI, Memphis Professional Imaging, as his photo lab.

“I can get anything I need from MPI – from a small print for a wallet to a billboard,” Neal said.

79. Shoppers Crowd the Malls in Christmas Countdown -

NEW YORK (AP) – Packed malls? Healthy gains in holiday spending? It's beginning to look at least a little like a pre-recession Christmas.

Americans spent more on clothing, luxury goods and even furniture, delivering healthy gains across the board, according to MasterCard Advisors' SpendingPulse, which tracks spending across all transactions including cash. The online category continued to be a bright spot. The big exception was consumer electronics, dragged down by deep discounting of TVs amid a glut. That area was virtually unchanged from a year ago.

80. Life Expectancy Slips, Stroke Dips to No. 4 Killer -

NEW YORK (AP) – U.S. life expectancy has dropped slightly – by about a month – after mostly inching up for many years, the government reported Thursday.

The preliminary report indicates that a baby born in 2008 can expect to live to 77.8 years if current trends continue. That's down a bit from an all-time high of 77.9 years for 2007. A similar dip occurred in 2005, and life expectancy also dropped in 1993.

81. Americans Likely Took Retail Breather in October -

NEW YORK (AP) – After a last-minute back-to-school buying spree, Americans appeared to have taken a shopping pause in October, resulting in a mixed retail sales picture.

That lull could continue until the day after Thanksgiving, the unofficial start of the Christmas season, as shoppers wait for big bargains, many analysts say.

82. Bill Clinton Races to Help Democratic Candidates -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Bill Clinton, out of the Oval Office for nearly a decade and once considered a political liability, is campaigning for Democratic candidates at a pace no one can match, drawing big crowds and going to states that President Barack Obama avoids.

83. Inexperience No Hurdle for Tri-State Defender’s Smith -

When Bernal Smith was asked to be president and publisher of the Tri-State Defender, he was concerned that he did not have ink on his hands or the newspaper business in his blood. In other words, he had little to no relevant experience.

84. Solving Economic Disparity Difficult -

The racial disparity that has been a fact of life in the Memphis economy for decades has not and will not be solved by simplistic solutions.

The reasons for the disparity are complex and calcified by the long years they have stood unchallenged. When there are clear differences in median income, unemployment and business failure that fall along racial lines, it is imperative that those differences be examined rigorously to find the real reasons – in black and white.

85. Enjoying the Ride -

From Audrey Hepburn and Gregory Peck zipping past the Colosseum in “Roman Holiday” to vintage photographs of suit-wearing mods cruising the streets of 1960s London, the word ‘Vespa” evokes a stream of iconic pop culture images.

86. Law Takes Ruby Wharton On Interesting Journey -

She brings to the table more than 40 years of law experience in areas that include contract disputes, domestic relations, employment discrimination, personal injury and probate matters. She has practiced extensively in the Chancery, Circuit, Probate and Federal courts.

87. High Court Reins in Prosecutors' Use of Fraud Law -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Thursday sharply curtailed prosecutors' use of an anti-fraud law that was central in convicting politicians and corporate executives in many of the nation's most prominent corruption cases. The ex-CEO of disgraced energy giant Enron and a Canadian media mogul, both in prison, are among the figures who could benefit from the ruling.

88. Events -

Friends of the Library will hold a two-day book sale Friday and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library, 3030 Poplar Ave. More than 15,000 books and materials will be on sale. For more information, call 415-2700.

89. Year of the Political Woman Redux? Looks That Way -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's looking like a new "year of the woman" in politics.

Eighteen years after a few glass ceilings were broken, hundreds of female candidates have set their sights on Congress, governorships and state legislatures, and a significant number racked up big wins in Tuesday's primaries. Republican women, in particular, served notice to the old boys of the party.

90. Change in Dining Apparel Evident Over the Years -

Hey, pal, when was the last time you wore a tie to eat at a restaurant? A suit? A jacket? Consented to take off your baseball cap?

Not that men are required to look like Don Draper when dining out nor women to wear cocktail dresses, but things have changed radically in the realms of fine dining, and indeed, any kind of dining, over the past 20 or 30 years, coincident with a great sea-change in American culture.

91. GPAC Announces Eclectic Lineup for New Season -

Life-size marionettes, men in tutus and Betty Boop herself are among the diverse musical, dance and novelty acts on their way to the Mid-South in the coming months.

Germantown Performing Arts Centre (GPAC) has announced its 2010-2011 season of concerts to the delight of lovers of jazz, ballet and family entertainment.

92. Ex-Klansman Convicted in '64 Slayings Sues FBI -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) - A former Ku Klux Klansman convicted in the 1964 slayings of three civil rights workers has sued the FBI, claiming the government used a mafia hit man to pistol-whip and intimidate witnesses for information in the case.

93. Black Farmers Leader Stumps for Equitable Treatment – and Money -

A week from a planned political rally in Washington, the founder of the National Black Farmers Association was in Memphis Monday to rally farmers for the political cause.

The Presidents Day rally is the latest chapter in John W. Boyd Jr.’s eight-year fight to make good on a 1999 legal settlement by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for denying loans and credit to black farmers.

94. No Room at the Inn -

The bed came with a view of a sparkling Mississippi River on a winter day that was about 10 degrees on the warm side of crisp. The trees were bare and no one appeared to be at home near the concrete floodwall that ends just south of The Pyramid.

95. Bornblum Honored with New Southwest Library -

The Bert Bornblum Library, a new 69,300-square-foot building at Southwest Tennessee Community College’s Macon Cove campus, was named in a ceremony earlier this month.

Among the speakers was John Farris of the Tennessee Board of Regents, who explained that the naming of Board of Regents-governed facilities is a serious matter.  

96. FBI Wants Public’s Help in Civil Rights Killings -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Over the past three years, the FBI scoured faded documents, interviewed aging lawmen and tracked down witnesses from killings that occurred decades ago, many of them involving white police officers who shot black men or teenagers.

97. Out of Bounds -

The August report from the NCAA calls him “student-athlete 1.” Everyone but the NCAA and the University of Memphis calls him Derrick Rose.

98. A City in Transition -

Just before sunrise on a rainy Tuesday morning, the armed officers raided the city office. They didn’t make any arrests, but they took files, interviewed employees and served search warrants. And they temporarily closed the Memphis Animal Shelter.

99. Former NFL Coach Dungy To Speak at The Peabody -

Tony Dungy, former head coach of the NFL’s Indianapolis Colts and Tampa Bay Buccaneers, will address members of the local business community at a lunch presented by the Greater Memphis Chamber Tuesday.

100. Blacks, Women Strongest Early Voters -

Early voting in the special election for Memphis mayor cracked the 25,000 mark over the weekend.

The total through Saturday was 6 percent of the 432,770 eligible voters in Memphis as well as those in parts of suburban Shelby County who will be voting in the special election primaries for state Senate District 31.