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Editorial Results (free)

1. Events -

Holiday Fun in Cooper Young, hosted by the Cooper Young Business Association, will be held Thursday, Dec. 3, from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Businesses will light up their windows and outdoor displays for the annual “Unwrapped” contest; the Peabody School Choir (5:30 to 6) and Memphis Men of Harmony (6 to 6:30) will perform in the gazebo. Call 901-276-7222.

2. The Week Ahead: Nov. 23, 2015 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly rundown of local happenings you need to know about, from The Peabody’s 36-foot dessert table to your potential (fingers-crossed, maybe not) last chance to see Paxton Lynch at the Liberty Bowl…

3. Lawyers for Stewart's Family Want Special Prosecutor -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — The top prosecutor in Memphis took more than two months to review an 800-page investigative report by the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation on the shooting death of a black teen by a white police officer. Then she recommended that a grand jury charge the policeman with voluntary manslaughter.

4. Ole Miss Removes State Flag that Features Confederate Emblem -

OXFORD, Miss. (AP) — The University of Mississippi's interim chancellor watched on a rainy morning as three Ole Miss police officers lowered the Mississippi state flag — which shows the Confederate battle emblem in the upper left-hand corner — for the last time.

5. Witnesses Testify About Officer's Fatal Shooting in Memphis -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — A witness to the fatal shooting of a Memphis policeman said Friday that he saw the suspect shoot the officer during a struggle as the pair walked toward a squad car, and heard six shots altogether.

6. City Defends 2010 Police Response to First Lipscomb Allegation -

The Memphis Police Department took seriously a 2010 complaint of sexual abuse against the city’s director of Housing and Community Development, city chief administrative officer Jack Sammons said Wednesday, Sept. 2, after reviewing five-year-old emails.

7. MHA Board Suspends Lipscomb, Sammons Defends Police 2010 Response -

UPDATE: The Memphis Housing Authority board suspended Robert Lipscomb Wednesday, Sept. 2, as executive director of the agency.

MHA named the city’s deputy chief administrative officer, Maura Black Sullivan, as the interim director.

8. ‘Black Wednesday’ Inspires Commission Run -

For a military man and dedicated physician, Richard Briggs has found time for a variety of pastimes and experiences with more adventure trips on the horizon.

9. Real Deal -

They were tossing around numbers, trying to guess the win total for the 2015 University of Memphis football season.

In the not-too-distant past, the two Highland Hundred members and longtime season-ticket holders might have been able to add their guesses together and still come up short of the six victories needed for their favorite team to be bowl-eligible.

10. Welcome Back -

When Shelby County’s public schools open for the first day of the 2015-16 school year, it will mark the first time in three years that there will be no historic, structural changes to the systems themselves.

11. Wilbourn Turns Self In To Marshals -

Memphis Police officer Sean Bolton apparently saw a car parked illegally Saturday night near South Perkins and Cottonwood roads and interrupted a minor drug deal in the car, leading to a fight with a passenger in the car who shot Bolton to death.

12. Haunted History, A Story Retold -

WORRY ABOUT THE DOGS. Depending on who’s talking and when, history around Fort Pillow changes.

At the time of this story – one I shared first in a 2013 column – it was called the Cold Creek Correctional Facility, a minimum-security operation farming about 6,000 acres in Lauderdale County. Next it was called the Fort Pillow Prison and Farm, next door to something called the West Tennessee High Security Facility, now the West Tennessee State Penitentiary.

13. Sparks Fly at Cooper-Young Mayoral Forum -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. was the target of two Memphis City Council members challenging him during most of a Cooper-Young political forum Tuesday, July 28.

It’s what Wharton predicted would happen once the campaign to the Oct. 8 ballot began to throw sparks.

14. Madeline Patterson Joins Burson Campaigns -

Madeline Patterson has joined the Memphis office of Burson Campaigns, the corporate issues management unit of Burson-Marsteller, as a vice president. In her new role, Patterson will work with Burson clients on issues and crisis management, communications strategy, and integrated marketing and communications campaigns.

15. Someone Else’s Shoes -

The group of men marching in late June from the Cannon Center for the Performing Arts to FedExForum moved slowly and with some missteps and awkwardness.

The women’s shoes they wore, many with heels, made the walk difficult between two events on June 25 that signaled a new phase in the official reaction to and fall out from the city’s now nearly two-year old scandal of more than 12,000 untested rape kits.

16. Southern Heritage Defined Differently Across Tennessee -

Tennessee’s loyalty was divided in the Civil War, and 150 years later, little is changed as the debate over Confederate symbols arises in the wake of the racist-fueled South Carolina church massacre.

17. Shelby County Commission to Resolve Budget Loose Ends -

The last time Shelby County Commissioners talked as a group about a county budget for the fiscal year that begins July 1, the consensus they thought they had reached was falling apart.

That was two weeks ago and as commissioners began to part company, the body approved a stable $4.37 county property tax rate on the first of three readings.

18. Stones’ Nashville Connections Go Way Back -

While Brad Paisley lives what he calls “a bucket list item” by singing while playing his guitar in typically showy fashion as the opening act for The Rolling Stones, the most important guitarist in rock ‘n’ roll history and a man idolized by Keith Richards and Ronnie Wood will be sitting in his house on Blueberry Hill in the hills of northern Davidson County.

19. Stones Rock Music City -

Pleased to meet you, hope you guessed our name. Well, hell, Mick, if it’s puzzling you, it’s Nashville. Music City USA.

We’re the national media’s flavor of the day – the “It city,” which has gone from being a secondary concert market – remember The Beatles played Memphis, not Nashville – to one of the country’s prime touring destinations.

20. Listen for Home -

WHEN YOU’RE HOME, YOU CAN HEAR IT. I was recently reminded of a story I heard from an actor friend years ago when he was in town for a commercial I was making. His name was Robert Lansing – if you’re old enough, you’ll remember him from TV’s “12 O’Clock High.”

21. Haslam Signs Bill Requiring Racial Profiling Ban -

Gov. Bill Haslam has signed legislation that requires all of Tennessee’s law enforcement agencies to adopt written policies to ban racial profiling.

The Republican governor signed the measure earlier this week. It unanimously passed the House 93-0 and was approved 27-0 in the Senate during the recent session.

22. Coalition to Work with Shelby County Schools on Educating Black Boys and Men -

Shelby County Schools has partnered with an education reform group focused on challenges and trends in educating African-American boys and young men.

The Coalition of Schools Educating Boys of Color is working toward a different approach in educating black men and boys. COSEBOC – as it is known – is bringing Gloria Ladson-Billings, the author of the book “The Dreamkeepers: Successful Teachers of African-American Children,” to speak to Memphis educators in June.

23. Events -

Five and Five Workshop (A Wake-Up Call for Business Owners) will be held Tuesday, April 28, from 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. at The Crescent Club, 6075 Poplar Ave., suite 909. Business coach and author Bridget DiCello and business attorney Alan Crone will present “The Five Most Common Mistakes Business Owners Make (and how to avoid them)” and “The Five Things Every Small Business Owner Should Have (but generally doesn’t).” Cost is $75. RSVP to fiveandfive@levelnineservices.com or 901-410-5154.

24. Eli’s Coming -

“Once again, as Eli swung around the dark trees and onto the lawn, the children fled.” – Philip Roth, in “Eli, the Fanatic” (1959).

25. A Range of His Own -

Derrick Kindred’s longtime activity in law enforcement and self-defense stems from a key belief.

“You’re responsible for your own safety,” he said. “If you have basic skills and basic knowledge, you can get away to a safe situation.”

26. King In Context -

The Selma to Montgomery voting rights march and the Alabama town’s Bloody Sunday in 1965 happened long before London Lamar was born.

When the Memphian went with her family to Selma last month for the 50th anniversary of the civil rights-era milestone, it was important to her to walk the Edmund Petus Bridge, the site of the brutal police charge that stopped the first attempt to march to Montgomery.

27. Bill Requiring Racial Profiling Ban Passes Tennessee Senate -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The state Senate approved legislation on Monday that would require all of Tennessee's law enforcement agencies to adopt written policies to ban racial profiling.

28. Memphis Women in Business Face Low Receipts -

With a new political and civic push to improve minority business growth in Memphis’ public and private sectors, businesses owned by women are a specific part of the minority business community challenged in unique ways.

29. Dr. Phil Delivers Hockey Therapy to the Masses -

Dr. Phil toys with me as he allows me to work my center and left wing to get the puck tantalizingly close to his net.

Then that big smile erupts on the face of a man who hands out “Live With Happiness” dog-tags – like the one dangling beneath his Hawaiian shirt – as he passes through life. With a couple of cagey quick twists of his wrists, Dr. Phil clears his end of the rink and fires a slap shot past my befuddled defensemen and goalie.…

30. Old Favorites -

A few years ago, Tandy Wilson, chef and owner of City House, offered this tip about earning his respect as a diner: Don’t tell me you’re a foodie, he said, tell me you’re a “regular.”

We were having a conversation about overuse of the term “foodie,” and how even though it can be a well-meaning label to show a person’s interest in a particular topic, it also can carry the snobbish weight of those who salivate over the trendiest dishes – and then salivate over their keypads to type a Yelp review after just one visit.

31. One Percent -

Majority and minority are volatile terms in Memphis.

Using them in a context outside race requires an explanation because without that, the assumption is the terms are being used in a racial context.

32. Funeral Services Set for Former Police Director -

Walter Winfrey was part of a wave of Memphis Police officers who got their badges and hit the streets of Memphis in 1968.

33. Whitehaven Kiwanis Hosts Police Relations Forum -

The Whitehaven Kiwanis Club will host a forum on police and community relations Jan. 6 at noon at the Beratus Restaurant and Grill, 1482 E. Shelby Drive.

34. Evolving Identity -

Some of the most telling views of Memphis are the ones many of us see for only seconds at a time as we drive on viaducts that take us and our cars just above the treetops and rooftops of older neighborhoods interrupted by the roadways.

35. Social Change and Nonprofits -

Ferguson, Mo., and Staten Island, N.Y. Cleveland, Ohio. Michael Brown. Eric Garner. Tamir Rice. These cities and the deaths of these African-American males – men and boys – are in the headlines. So are people’s responses.

36. Tech Summit Addresses Industry's Lack of Diversity -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Civil rights leader Jesse Jackson spent most of this year pressuring the technology industry into facing up to the glaring scarcity of women, blacks and Latinos at companies renowned as great places to work.

37. Armstrong’s Comments Overshadow Attorney General’s Visit -

Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong had some concerns Tuesday about speaking before U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder addressed a group of 100 local leaders at Hattiloo Theatre in Overton Square.

38. Building a Framework -

Moving the needle on minority business growth in Memphis is in a phase of knitting and prodding six months after a renewed call for a larger share of business for minority businesses in a city whose population is majority African-American.

39. Black Friday Gun Buys Test Background Check System -

BRIDGEPORT, W.Va. (AP) – Black Friday isn't just when shoppers rush to stores for holiday sales. It's also one of the busiest days of the year for gun purchases.

In the U.S., there are nine guns for every 10 people. Someone is killed with a firearm every 16 minutes. And every minute, gun shops make about 40 new requests for criminal background checks on people wanting weapons.

40. After the Campaign -

The 2014 election year began in January with dissent from the floor.

At the end of the Shelby County Democratic Party’s annual Kennedy Day fundraiser in January, former Memphis City Council member and state Rep. Carol Chumney, who was not among the speakers, challenged the party establishment from her table to do more to support women running for office.

41. Exhibiting Soul -

For more than a year, award-winning photographer and New York native Thom Gilbert has been shooting portraits of oil drillers in Texas, fishermen in Alaska, coal miners, cowboys, Detroit auto assembly workers – a group of people he refers to as “iconic Americans.”

42. ’Tis the Shopping Season -

Buoyed by rising home prices and stock portfolios, Middle Tennesseans are ready to spend big again on the holidays and will be shopping earlier than ever.

In fact, they already have.

Forget Black Friday or even Thanksgiving Day as the traditional start of the holiday shopping season.

43. SchoolSeed Continues Series With Penn Professor -

University of Penn professor, Dr. Shaun Harper, will travel to Memphis, Oct. 22-23 for a visit focused on educating young men of color in an urban context. The visit is the second in a speaker series hosted by SchoolSeed, a nonprofit working to drive educational excellence and innovation in the Greater Memphis community.

44. Push for Broader Minority Business Participation Grows -

A larger share of business for minority- and women-owned local businesses should begin with an inventory that matches existing businesses with existing opportunities.

And three leaders of the recently revived effort to build that share of business say from there the local Memphis economy overall can grow.

45. This week in Memphis history: August 29-September 4 -

1972: Wattstax at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum – a concert to mark the seventh anniversary of the Watts riots in Los Angeles by Stax Records that was a high point for the Memphis-based record label and featured a day-long bill of Memphis soul and funk and gospel from the stadium stage with Isaac Hayes headlining.

46. Apple's Tech Jobs Held Mostly By White, Asian Men -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Apple primarily relies on white and Asian men for its top-paying technology jobs, feeding the perception that Silicon Valley's economic boom is largely excluding women, blacks and Hispanics.

47. Politicos Parse Early Voting Numbers -

There is a category in voter turnout statistics that has long been debated by those running for office and those who work in their campaigns.

It is the closest Shelby County has to an official category for undecided voters or voters up for grabs by either side of the partisan divide.

48. Early Voter Turnout Tops 82,000 -

More than 82,000 Shelby County voters cast early ballots in the early voting period that ended Saturday, Aug. 2, according to turnout statistics from the Shelby County Election Commission.

The 82,403 early voters in advance of the Thursday, Aug. 7, election day are 15.3 percent of the county’s 537,066 voters.

49. Early Voter Turnout Tops 82,000 -

More than 82,000 Shelby County voters cast early ballots in the early voting period that ended Saturday, Aug. 2, according to turnout statistics from the Shelby County Election Commission.

The 82,403 early voters in advance of the Thursday, Aug. 7, election day are 15.3 percent of the county’s 537,066 voters.

50. From Despair to Belief -

A July weekday afternoon, about 2:45. It’s the perfect time for just about anyone to be nodding off in class.

But in the basement of Midtown Church of Christ, where HopeWorks Inc. is housed, class is in session and a dozen men and their teacher are having a lively discussion.

51. Coalition Vows Push for Minority Business Gains -

For decades, goals and percentages have been set for minority business participation in city and county governments.

Both governments have compliance offices. Elected officials look at percentages and ask questions about participation on particular projects.

52. Ready to Work -

Could a framed photograph of the interviewer’s two children help you get the job? How about the Dallas Cowboys coffee mug on his desk? Or the diploma from the University of Memphis on her wall?

53. Black Men Make Giving Easy and Meaningful -

Part two of a two-part series. African-American men are pooling their money to create positive community change. The Ujima Legacy Fund brings together men who invest $1,100 and collectively increase their impact. Founder Reginald Gordon shares a few details so you can create a fund in your community. We pick up our interview with Gordon with a discussion about grantmaking.

54. Black Men Find New Way to Give Back -

Part one of a two-part series. Readers of our column know we are supporters and promoters of women’s philanthropy including women’s foundations and giving circles. Mel likes to joke, “what about men’s philanthropy?”

55. Museum Reopening Raises Issues About Present -

There was a moment in the April 5 two-hour reopening ceremony for the renovated National Civil Rights Museum that demonstrated the tension that still exists when it comes to the important issue of who is telling the story of history.

56. Where There’s Smoke -

DON’T WAIT FOR THE FIRE TO FIND THE WATER. Neglect and denial burns in empty buildings and blighted neighborhoods, futures are hazy, moods are dark and the smoke from all of it chokes cities and sends those able to flee to greener ground at the edges, leaving behind a bitter landscape, a smoldering threat.

57. ‘History Has Changed’ -

The headquarters for Freedom Summer is still being set up and nearby the stage is almost ready for the March on Washington.

The almost-finished exhibit on the black power movement includes an interactive media table that is as bold as the moments and cultural history it offers.

58. Wharton: City Must Target ‘Black Boy Crime’ -

As President Barack Obama talked from the East Room of the White House last week about violence and young African-American men and boys, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. was among a group of mayors meeting in New Orleans who say they are ready to back a new approach to the problem.

59. Jos. A. Bank Buying Eddie Bauer in $825 Million Deal -

After months of flirting with the idea of combining with a rival, Jos. A. Bank has decided it is better suited for another men's clothing brand.

60. Gambling Industry Fights Self on Internet Gambling -

LAS VEGAS (AP) – Many experts believe online wagering is the future of gambling, but the casino industry is increasingly divided on the issue.

The latest evidence of the split came Monday as the Coalition to Stop Internet Gambling launched the first commercial in a six-figure campaign warning of the dangers of legalized Internet gambling. The coalition is emphasizing the possibility that criminals and terrorists may use online gambling to launder money.

61. Cameraman’s Collection -

Don Newman was a photographer whose pursuit of the perfect shot once took him to the middle of one of the busiest streets in Memphis.

62. Events -

Shelby County Trustee David Lenoir and the Delta Sigma Theta Memphis Alumnae Chapter will hold “Home for the Holidays: A Housing and Economic Empowerment Collaborative” Saturday, Nov. 23, from 8 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at Hickory Ridge Mall, 6075 Winchester Road. The event will include a small-business resource center, legal clinic, Homebuyer’s Corner, H.O.M.E. financial literacy and budgeting workshop, and more. Visit memphisalumnaedst.org.

63. Small Retailers Plan to Party Till They Profit -

NEW YORK (AP) – The parades and carnivals that draw people to downtown areas across the country this holiday season will be more than big celebrations. They're part of a strategy to get shoppers into small stores.

64. Thieves Pose as Truckers to Steal Huge Cargo Loads -

WICHITA, Kan. (AP) — To steal huge shipments of valuable cargo, thieves are turning to a deceptively simple tactic: They pose as truckers, load the freight onto their own tractor-trailers and drive away with it.

65. Football Part of Planning at LeMoyne-Owen -

The new $13.5 million four-story residence hall at LeMoyne-Owen College that formally opened Friday, Oct. 18, is the latest symbol of growth on the campus of the city’s only historically black college since 2006.

66. White Ready to Take on Frayser High -

Bobby White is so close that he sometimes has to remember that the decision about who will run Frayser High School won’t be made until December.

67. More Than 300 Sites Ring Bells for MLK Speech -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Church bells were ringing out Wednesday at the National Cathedral and nationwide to answer a call from one of the most important civil rights speeches in history to "let freedom ring."

68. Obama Holds Martin Luther King as Personal Hero -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Barack Obama was 2 years old and growing up in Hawaii when Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his "I Have a Dream" speech from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. Fifty years later, the nation's first black president will stand as the most high-profile example of the racial progress King espoused, delivering remarks Wednesday at a nationwide commemoration of the 1963 demonstration for jobs, economic justice and racial equality.

69. Haunted History -

WORRY ABOUT THE DOGS. Depending on who’s talking and when, history around Fort Pillow changes.

At the time of this story, it was called the Cold Creek Correctional Facility, a minimum-security operation that included farming about 6,000 acres in Lauderdale County. Next it was called the Fort Pillow Prison and Farm, next door to something called the West Tennessee High Security Facility, now the West Tennessee State Penitentiary. Folks around there just call the whole thing the farm. When you’re driving a van full of scouts to camp at Fort Pillow State Park, you make a left off 51 at Henning and drive right by all of it.

70. Obama Nominates 3 to Appeals Court, Testing GOP -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Opening a summer showdown with Congress, a combative President Barack Obama nominated three judges to a powerful appellate court Tuesday and challenged Republicans to stop the "political obstruction" holding up his nominees.

71. Mothers Now Top Earners in 4 in 10 US Households -

WASHINGTON (AP) — America's working mothers are now the primary breadwinners in a record 40 percent of households with children — a milestone in the changing face of modern families, up from just 11 percent in 1960.

72. Civic Leader Says City Has ‘Right Stuff’ -

A little less than two years ago, Dr. Robert Ross was up for a standard performance review from the board of the foundation he leads.

73. Smith's Role Central to City's History -

Memphis civil rights icon Maxine Smith died Thursday evening at her South Memphis home at the age of 83.

74. Decades After King’s Death, Memphis Jobs in Spotlight -

MEMPHIS (AP) – Decades after Martin Luther King Jr. was shot to death here, some of the striking sanitation workers who marched with him are again fighting for their jobs.

75. Memphis Academy of Health Sciences Pays $1.1 Million for Raleigh Land -

The Memphis Academy of Health Sciences High School has paid $1.1 million for a vacant parcel at 3606 Hawkins Mill Road in Raleigh.

76. Philanthropic Black Women Taking Grant Applications -

Philanthropic Black Women of Memphis is accepting applications for grants that will be awarded in April.

The organization, which supports projects geared toward economic self-sufficiency, is accepting applications for programs focusing on, but not limited to, career development, education, entrepreneurship, scholarship and health.

77. Philanthropic Black Women Taking Grant Applications -

Philanthropic Black Women of Memphis is accepting applications for grants that will be awarded in April.

The organization, which supports projects geared toward economic self-sufficiency, is accepting applications for programs focusing on, but not limited to, career development, education, entrepreneurship, scholarship and health.

78. Funeral Services Set for Lansky -

Funeral services for Downtown clothing store owner Bernard J. Lansky will be Friday, Nov. 16, at 11 a.m. at Baron Hirsch Synagogue, 400 S. Yates Road.

79. Legal Community Seeks Access, Diversity -

Diversity and access to justice are some of the watchwords often heard around Memphis legal circles these days.

Diversity, because of the continued concern that both men and women get equal shots at advancing up the ranks from law school all the way to the corner office. Access to justice, because of everything from the recession’s grinding toll to the ever-present scars of poverty in Memphis that all combine to make legal problems harder than ever to pay for.

80. Nightmare Election Scenarios Worry Both Parties -

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. (AP) – Here in a county that knows a thing or two about Election Day meltdowns, both parties are fretting over what might go seriously wrong before, during or just after the Nov. 6 presidential election.

81. Team Mantras Usher in New Basketball Seasons -

Although the date and time are unknown, there was a point some years ago when it became mandatory for every big-time college and pro team to have a mantra.

And so it is for the Grizzlies and University of Memphis Tigers. The Grizz and local media gathered at FedExForum and coach Lionel Hollins said: “Our buzz words are sacrifice, trust and consistency.”

82. Three Generations of Judge’s Family Practice Law -

Three generations of a family in one profession is not the most common of sights. Rarer still is when those three generations find themselves working in the same field at the same time.

Such is the reality in the family of Diane Vescovo, a U.S. magistrate judge in Memphis for the Western District of Tennessee.

83. Civil Rights Icon Smith Donates Papers to Library -

Maxine Smith pointed out that the wheelchair she used to enter the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library was borrowed – and she also made a point of walking from the doorway of the Memphis and Shelby County Room at the library to her seat in the room.

84. Events -

Kiwanis Club of Memphis will meet Wednesday, May 16, from noon to 1 p.m. at The Peabody hotel, 149 Union Ave. Rabbi Micah Greenstein of Temple Israel will speak. Cost for lunch is $25 for nonmembers.

85. WLOK Celebrates 35 Years With Dinner -

WLOK 1340 AM, the first black-owned radio station in Memphis, is hosting an anniversary dinner this week to celebrate its 35th anniversary.

The dinner, which will be held May 18 at the Marriott East, 2625 Thousand Oaks Blvd., will bring together gospel celebrities, dignitaries and listeners to pay tribute to the radio station, which today is a leading source of gospel music and news.

86. Kiser Joins Volunteer Mid-South As Community Services Director -

Amanda Kiser has joined Volunteer Mid-South as community services director. Kiser’s responsibilities include mobilizing and maximizing volunteer resources, coordinating training for partner agencies, creating and leading community projects, and marketing VMS’ benefits to agencies and the public.

87. Luncheon To Honor’s City’s Cinematic Stars -

Film director Craig Brewer, “Undefeated” star Bill Courtney, and Memphis and Shelby County Film and Television Commissioner Linn Sitler are among those who’ll be honored Wednesday, May 9, as Carnival Memphis salutes the Mid-South’s movie and film industry during its annual Business & Industry Salute Luncheon.

88. Study: Black Women More Likely to Die From Breast Cancer -

African-American women in Memphis are more than twice as likely to die from breast cancer as their white counterparts, according to a study released last week.

A study conducted by the Sinai Urban Health Institute in Chicago, funded by the Avon Foundation Breast Cancer Crusade in New York and published in Cancer Epidemiology: The International Journal of Cancer Epidemiology, Detection and Prevention, is believed to be the first study to analyze the racial disparity in breast cancer deaths at the city level.

89. Voters Turn Out Today For Primary Races -

The first thing parishioners at St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church noticed before noon Mass, Sunday, March 4, was a line of black SUVs in the parking lot of the Cordova church. A back row at the church was filled with men wearing the same color suits.

90. UPDATE: Jury Hears Recording of Hit Man Talking With Petties Target -

Big drug dealers don’t count the money as soon as they make a drug deal. They wait until they leave the exchange to count it.

That was among the details offered Tuesday, Feb. 14, in the full-day of testimony by Orlando Pride, a long time member of the violent multi-state drug organization headed by Craig Petties.

91. ‘Manly’ Red Perfect for Big Game -

When all you manly men sit down to watch Super Bowl XLVI Sunday, you will of course be gorging on manly snack fare – spicy chicken wings, mile-high nachos, pigs-in-blankets, watercress sandwiches with the crusts cut off – that requires a manly wine to wash down. (I know that many of you will be drinking beer, but I promise that there’s nothing manly about Bud Light.)

92. 2011 Job Hopes Improved Most for Worst-Hit Groups -

WASHINGTON (AP) – For many people whose job prospects faded most during the recession, 2011 brought a small dose of relief.

When unemployment was surging, the youngest U.S. workers, the oldest, those without college degrees and men as a whole all suffered disproportionately. Last year, those groups – whose unemployment rates still exceed the national average – had better success than others in finding jobs, according to Labor Department data released Friday.

93. Bargain Hunters Divided Shopping Season Into 2 -

NEW YORK (AP) – The holiday shopping season turned out to be two seasons: the Black Friday binge and a last-minute surge.

Together, they added up to decent sales gains for retailers. And the doldrums in between showed how shoppers have learned to wait for the discounts they know will come.

94. Shoppers Say 'Ho-Hum' Not 'Ho-Ho-Ho' to Sales -

Sale, schmale.

Used to be, customers would come running when stores cut prices. But these days, more Americans are becoming blasé about bargains.

Jennifer Beasley recently left a Toys R Us in Cary, N.C., unimpressed by the retailer's offers that day of 50 percent discounts on things like a $150 Sylvania tablet computer and a $45 My Baby Alive Doll.

95. Philanthropic Black Women Taking Grant Applications -

The Philanthropic Black Women of Memphis is seeking grant applications through the end of January.

The group, which is focused on supporting programs and projects geared toward economic self-sufficiency, is accepting applications for programs focusing on but not limited to career development, education, entrepreneurship, scholarship and health.

96. Twitter Changes Business of Celebrity Endorsements -

NEW YORK (AP) – Rapper Snoop Dogg gave props on Twitter to an ad for the Toyota Sienna minivan. Actress Tori Spelling linked to a website for rental cars. And reality TV star Khloe Kardashian soliloquized about the brand of jeans that accentuates the famous Kardashian derriere.

97. Obama Teams Up With Wife to Finish Bus Tour -

NORTH CHESTERFIELD, Va. (AP) – President Barack Obama teamed up with his popular and personable wife Wednesday on the final leg of a three-day bus trip, seeking to use her broad appeal to rally support for elements of his jobs bill and his re-election campaign.

98. New Oct. Date Set for MLK Memorial Dedication -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Organizers have set a new date in October to dedicate the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial after Hurricane Irene forced them to postpone the event in August, days before 250,000 people were expected to attend.

99. Employers Add No Net Jobs in Aug.; Rate Unchanged -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Employers stopped adding jobs in August, an alarming setback for an economy that has struggled to grow and might be at risk of another recession.

The government also reported that the unemployment rate remained at 9.1 percent. It was the weakest jobs report since September 2010.

100. Outward Sound -

Over the next several months, Memphis music lovers will be outdoors frequently in anticipation of good company, a relaxing evening and great tunes.

And performers of all stripes and levels of success – from storytellers to Southern guitar gods to an orchestra pumping out the swinging sounds of the 1930s – will be on deck to give them all that and more.