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Editorial Results (free)

1. US Economy Rallies to Solid Third-Quarter Growth -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy powered its way to a respectable growth rate of 3.5 percent from July through September, outpacing most of the developed world and on track to extend the momentum through the end of the year and beyond.

2. US New-Home Sales Soar in August -

U.S. sales of new homes surged in August, led by a wave of buying in the West and Northeast.

The Commerce Department said Wednesday that new-home sales climbed 18 percent last month to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 504,000. The report also revised up the July sales rate to 427,000 from 412,000.

3. US New-Home Sales Soar in August -

U.S. sales of new homes surged in August, led by a wave of buying in the West and Northeast.

The Commerce Department said Wednesday that new-home sales climbed 18 percent last month to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 504,000. The report also revised up the July sales rate to 427,000 from 412,000.

4. US Employers Add 217,000 Jobs; Rate Stays at 6.3 Percent -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. employers added 217,000 jobs in May, a substantial gain for a fourth straight month, fueling hopes that the economy will accelerate after a grim start to the year.

5. Economy Set for Rebound After First Quarter Contraction -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy took a beating from an especially harsh winter during the January-March quarter, skidding into reverse for the first time in three years. But spring has arrived and along with it, signs that the chill was just a temporary setback in the long road to recovery.

6. US Economy Slows to 0.1 Percent Growth Rate -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy slowed sharply in the first three months of the year as a harsh winter exacted a toll on business activity. The slowdown, while worse than expected, is likely to be temporary as growth rebounds with warmer weather.

7. Fed to Reduce Pace of Bond Buying by Another $10 Billion -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Federal Reserve is pushing ahead with a plan to shrink its bond-buying program because of a strengthening U.S. economy. It's doing so even though the prospect of reduced Fed stimulus and higher U.S. interest rates has rattled global markets.

8. Outside Drop in Autos, US Retail Spending Rises -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A sharp drop in auto sales caused largely by a calendar quirk lowered U.S. retail spending in September. But Americans spent more on most other goods, showing some confidence in the economy before much of the government shut down.

9. Computer Upgrades Cut US Jobless Claims to 292,000 -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits plummeted last week 31,000 to a seasonally adjusted 292,000. But the drop was mostly because of technical issues in two states that delayed the processing of applications.

10. US Builders Broke Ground on More Homes in July -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. developers broke ground on homes at a faster pace in July. But the rise was all due to apartment construction, which is typically volatile. By contrast, builders began work on fewer single-family homes – the bulk of the market – and sought fewer permits to build them.

11. Pending Sales of US Homes Slip From 6-Year High -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The number of Americans who signed contracts to buy homes dipped in June from a six-year high in May, a sign that sales could stabilize over the next few months.

The National Association of Realtors said Monday that its seasonally adjusted index for pending home sales ticked down 0.4 percent to 110.9 in June. The May reading was revised lower by a percentage point to 111.3, but it was still the highest since December 2006.

12. US Home Sales Dip But Remain Near 3.5-Year High -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. sales of previously occupied homes slipped in June to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.08 million but remain near a 3.5-year high.

The National Association of Realtors said Monday that sales fell 1.2 percent last month from an annual rate of 5.14 million in May. The NAR revised down May's sales, but they were still the highest since November 2009.

13. Housing, Manufacturing Give US Economy Lift -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Gains in housing and manufacturing propelled the U.S. economy over the winter, according to reports released Tuesday, and analysts say they point to the resilience of consumers and businesses as government spending cuts kick in.

14. US Housing Starts Dip but Remain at Solid Pace -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. homebuilders began work at a slower pace in January than in December. But all of the drop occurred in the volatile area of apartment construction, which sank 24 percent. By contrast, the rate of single-family homebuilding rose 0.8 percent.

15. US New-Home Sales Rise to Match 2-Year High -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Sales of new homes in the United States rose 3.6 percent in July to match a two-year high reached in May, the latest sign of a steady recovery in the housing market.

The Commerce Department said Thursday that new-home sales reached a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 372,000. That's the same as in May, which was the highest since April 2010.

16. US Applications for Unemployment Aid Fall by 6,000 -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The number of Americans applying for unemployment benefits fell by 6,000 last week to a seasonally adjusted 361,000, a level consistent with modest gains in hiring.

The Labor Department said Thursday that the less volatile four-week average rose by 2,250 to 368,250 in the week that ended Aug. 4.

17. Unemployment Could Stay High as US Economy Slows -

WASHINGTON (AP) – High unemployment isn't going away – not as long as the economy grows as slowly as it did in the April-June quarter.

Weak consumer spending held growth to an annual rate of just 1.5 percent, even less than the 2 percent rate in the first quarter. And few expect the economy to accelerate in the second half of the year as Europe's financial woes and a U.S. budget crisis restrain businesses and consumers.

18. US New-Home Sales Fall to 350K, 5-Month Low -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Americans bought fewer new homes in June after sales jumped to a two-year high in May. The steep decline suggests a weaker job market and slower growth could make the housing recovery uneven.

19. US Manufacturing Shrinks for First Time in 3 Years -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. manufacturing shrank in June for the first time in nearly three years, adding to signs that economic growth is weakening.

Production declined, and the number of new orders plunged, according to a monthly report released Monday by the Institute for Supply Management.

20. US Housing Starts Rose to 717,000 in April -

U.S. builders started work on more homes and apartments last month and requested more permits to build single-family homes. The increases suggest the battered housing market is healing.

The Commerce Department said Wednesday that builders broke ground in April at a seasonally adjusted annual pace of 717,000 homes. That’s a 2.6 percent increase from an upwardly revised March figure and near January’s three-year high of 720,000. Construction rose for both single-family homes and apartments.

21. US Consumers Hold Back, Even as Gas Prices Fall -

Lower gas prices in April weren’t enough to embolden U.S. consumers to spend much more elsewhere.

The Commerce Department said retail sales rose only 0.1 percent last month. After excluding gasoline station sales, consumers increased their spending on retail goods by just 0.2 percent.

22. Unemployment Apps Decline -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The number of people applying for U.S. unemployment benefits ticked down last week following a sharp drop the previous week.

Applications are falling again after rising for most of April, suggesting hiring could pick up this month.

23. Fed to Release More Interest-Rate Forecasts -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In a major shift, the Federal Reserve will start updating the public four times a year on how long it plans to keep short-term interest rates at record lows, according to minutes from its December policy meeting.

24. Unemployment Claims Lowest Since '08 -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In in the latest sign that the U.S. economy is surging at year's end, unemployment claims have dropped to the lowest level since April 2008, long before anyone realized that the nation was in a recession.

25. US Factory Output Declined Sharply in November -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. manufacturing output fell in November for the first time in seven months.

The decline was largely because factories made fewer autos. But production of home electronics, appliances and business equipment also dropped.

26. Hiring Outlook Brightens as Jobless Claims Fall -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A steady decline in the number of Americans applying for weekly unemployment benefits is the latest signal that the U.S. economy has strengthened and businesses may be poised to step up hiring.

27. Survey: Home Prices Up in Half of Major US Cities -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Home prices rose in August in half of major cities measured by a private survey, a sign that prices are stabilizing in some hard-hit portions of the country.

The Standard & Poor's/Case-Shiller index showed Tuesday that prices increased in August from July in 10 of the 20 cities tracked. That marked the fifth straight month that at least half of the cities in the survey showed monthly gains.

28. Just in Time for Holidays, a Bad Economic Mood -

NEW YORK (AP) — Americans say they feel worse about the economy than they have since the depths of the Great Recession. And it's a bad time for a bad mood because households are starting to make their holiday budgets.