» Subscribe Today!
More of what you want to know.
The Daily News
X

Forgot your password?
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search
Search results for 'Able Moving' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:0
Shelby Public Records:1
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:0
Middle Tennessee:0
East Tennessee:0
Other:0

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

The Daily News subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. Senate Reprieve for Highly Contested Border Bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A bill to deal with the immigration surge on the U.S.-Mexico border won a temporary reprieve in the Senate Wednesday as lawmakers maneuvered to offer some response to the crisis before adjourning for the summer.

2. School Year Brings New Lessons for Teachers -

When the school year begins on Aug. 4 for Shelby County Schools and the six suburban public school systems, the learning process will begin not only for students but for teachers.

As the larger system-wide changes of the demerger have played out, teachers across the county have been preparing for the world inside classrooms that always offers change at the beginning of a new school year.

3. TheGRIND Evolves as First Anniversary Approaches -

The one-year anniversary is approaching for theGRIND, a digital publication that launched in January to bring its own take on covering the people, places and events of Memphis.

Leading up to that milestone, the publication has several things in the works that collectively showcase how it’s evolved quickly from an idea to the reality of an ambitious media startup. Editor in chief Kendra Lyons, for example, says plans in the works include a print version of the digital-only outlet, as well as a coffee table-style book that would feature the best photography and stories from theGRIND.

4. Building Community -

Over a recent weekend, around 30 members of Grace-St. Luke’s Episcopal Church descended on a home in the Northwood Hills community just north of Raleigh.

They came armed with determination and demolition tools, spending most of the weekend ripping out old appliances, tearing away wallpaper that had seen better days and preparing the dog-eared house for a rehabilitation project that will make it a home.

5. Busy Street -

Evidence for the attractiveness of Downtown’s South Main neighborhood can be found in any of several corners.

One example is at 314 S. Main St., where Café Pontotoc opened its doors about two weeks ago. Owners Milton and Cherie Lamb wanted to establish a comfortable neighborhood bar that serves wine, local beers and small plates in a setting where patrons get used to coming in to unwind.

6. Pathmark Inks Lease at I-Bank Tower -

A longtime third-party logistics company is on the move.

Pathmark Transportation Co., which was started in 1984 as a subsidiary of petroleum marketing company Pathmark International before becoming a national logistics provider, has signed a new lease for 3,800 square feet at the i-bank Tower on Poplar Avenue in East Memphis.

7. I Choose Memphis: Airika Wallace Gigas -

“I Choose Memphis” spotlights Memphians who are passionate about calling this community home. New Memphis Institute provides the profiles.

Name: Airika Wallace Gigas

8. Real Estate Veteran Jan Phillips Rejoins Crye-Leike -

Jan O’Kelly Phillips has joined Crye-Leike Realtors’ Germantown-Poplar branch office, marking her return to real estate sales.

9. Back on Track -

Two major Downtown projects that suffered setbacks after the real estate market seized up when the recession battered the economy are poised for a comeback.

Real estate experts and Downtown officials say the prospects for the Horizon on the southern end of Downtown and One Beale at Beale Street and Riverside Drive appear promising.

10. Many Seek New Homes Near Cities But are Priced Out -

WASHINGTON (AP) – City living has been a blessing for Tim Nelson.

The Phoenix lawyer moved downtown a few months ago into a new $389,000 home with a warehouse-style floor plan, a Jacuzzi tub and kitchen counters made of Caesarstone quartz. His favorite coffee spot is three blocks away. When the Arizona Diamondbacks play on Friday nights, he can watch postgame fireworks from his deck.

11. Nashville Mayor Maps Issues Similar to Memphis -

The Nashville mayor who was once Davidson County's public defender says schools in his city aren’t meeting his test for success in public education.

He is concerned with attracting talent to the city and touts diversity as a key component of that. And his city has a critical need for a “more robust” mass transit system, he said last week.

12. Editorial: Lessons Remain With Schools Transformation -

When enough time has passed, the story of the historic changes in public education underway in Shelby County will let us know what worked out and what didn’t.

We suspect those reading the account may not see what was so radical or unprecedented about some of the changes because they appear to be the direction public education is taking. The really compelling story may be what public education in our county was like before the changes simply because it may seem so unfamiliar.

13. Trustmark Regional President Reflects on Future -

When yours is a bank that’s traditionally had a suburban footprint, moving inside the Interstate 240 loop to open a new regional headquarters is the kind of thing that makes a statement.

Trustmark’s newly opened regional headquarters, at 5350 Poplar Ave. in East Memphis, was an attempt to do just that. It came after Gene Henson, the bank’s Memphis region president, had been hunting for such a space for years – for pretty much the entirety of his time in Memphis, actually.

14. Debt: Prepay or Let It Ride? -

Ray’s take: There was a time when debt was something to be proud of. It was the badge of progress and a good credit rating. 2008 made us all rethink the place of debt in our lives.

If you have debt, you should think carefully about keeping it or prepaying it.

15. Airlines Ask Congress to Roll Back Airfare Rule -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Airlines tried and failed to block a federal rule making them tell passengers up front the full cost of airfare, including government taxes and fees. So they're trying another route, asking Congress to do what the Obama administration and the courts refused to do: roll back the law.

16. Armstrong Relocation Owner Shares ‘Only in America’ Story -

When Tom Watson was a child, his father and uncle bought what was then known as Armstrong Transfer and Storage Co.

17. New Bicycle Trails at Heart of Transit Changes -

The formal dedication of the Overton Park Bike Gate Saturday, April 19, begins a new season of bike and pedestrian trails, including an ambitious experiment with Riverside Drive once the monthlong Memphis in May International Festival comes to an end with the Sunset Symphony.

18. 108th General Assembly Adjourns for Year -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — State lawmakers concluded a session Thursday in which they approved measures to allow folks to buy wine in grocery stores, fight methamphetamine production and give high school graduates free tuition at community colleges.

19. 108th General Assembly Adjourns for the Year -

NASHVILLE (AP) – State lawmakers concluded a session Thursday in which they approved measures to allow folks to buy wine in grocery stores, fight methamphetamine production and give high school graduates free tuition at community colleges.

20. End of Windows XP Support Spells Trouble for Some -

NEW YORK (AP) – Microsoft will end support for the persistently popular Windows XP on Tuesday, and with an estimated 30 percent of businesses and consumers still using the 12-year-old operating system, the move could put everything from the operations of heavy industry to the identities of everyday people in danger.

21. Judge Upholds Country of Origin Label for Meat -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Shoppers who want to buy American beef for dinner instead of meat from Canada or Mexico will still be able to find the country of origin on the label.

A federal appeals court ruling Friday allows the government to go forward with rules that require labels on packaged steaks, ribs and other cuts of meat to say where the animals were born, raised and slaughtered. The meat industry attempted to block the rules, which went into effect last year, saying they are costly and provide no health benefits to the consumer.

22. Moore Scratched From May Ballot On Second Look -

Scratch former Shelby County Commission Edith Ann Moore from the May 6 Democratic primary for commission District 6.

23. Five Tax Deductions, Credits to Consider -

If you ask Benjamin Franklin, two things in life are certain: death and taxes.

April 15 comes every year, but you don’t have to dread it. The tax code is full of credits and deductions to help reduce your tax burden. There are so many that you should consider engaging a professional to help you file, especially as your taxes become more complicated.

24. Low-Wage Jobs Unexpectedly a Way of Life for Many -

WASHINGTON (AP) – For years, many Americans followed a simple career path: Land an entry-level job. Accept a modest wage. Gain skills. Leave eventually for a better-paying job.

The workers benefited, and so did lower-wage retailers such as Wal-Mart: When its staffers left for better-paying jobs, they could spend more at its stores. And the U.S. economy gained, too, because more consumer spending fueled growth.

25. Demerger Debate -

In five months, a new school year will begin in Shelby County. And for a second straight academic year, many parents will be able to say it is unlike any in their lifetimes.

The first and last school year of the unified Memphis City and Shelby County Schools systems will be followed by what educators are calling the “demerger.”

26. GOP Tax Plan Lowers Rates, Repeals Popular Breaks -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A sweeping House Republican plan to overhaul the nation's tax laws would wipe out a slew of popular tax breaks to help pay for lower overall tax rates, a politically risky move in an election year that drew quick opposition Wednesday.

27. The Sweet Spot -

Gary Wilkes usually doesn’t notice the smell at the family business, Wayne’s Candy Co. Inc., unless he has just returned from vacation.

28. RBCC Law Firm Moving to iBank Tower -

The law firm of Rogers, Berry, Chesney & Cannon PLLC, owner of 1713 Kirby Parkway since 2006, recently sold its office building and will relocate to the iBank building on Poplar Avenue in East Memphis.

29. Southbrook Mall Plan Headed to City Council -

What began as a plan last year for $1.5 million in city funding to fix the roof and make other repairs at Whitehaven’s Southbrook Mall has now become a larger and probably more expensive plan for development in a broad area of Whitehaven.

30. Forgiveness Lessons From the Heart -

It is said that when everything changes, change everything. It’s quick advice, but a long-term process, especially if holding on to the past is easier than moving on. So what makes the difference in being stuck in a negative situation and being able to discover what lies ahead on the other side of change?

31. Obama Tightens Reins on Surveillance Programs -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Tightening the reins on the nation's sweeping surveillance operations, President Barack Obama on Friday ordered new limits on the way intelligence officials access phone records from hundreds of millions of Americans – and moved toward eventually stripping the massive data collection from the government's hands.

32. Your Biggest Competitor is Indecision -

Ask about anyone in business about their biggest competition, and they’ll likely offer up the name of a rival company. I’d argue that for most companies, the fiercest of all competitors is prospect indecision and apathy – the predominant deal-killers faced by sales teams day in and day out.

33. Editorial: Memphis Must Provide Bedrock for Great Ideas -

For every Holiday Inn and Piggly Wiggly and FedEx, there are hundreds – maybe thousands – of ideas in Memphis that don't make the cut.

Sometimes it is the idea. Other times it is the timing. Often it’s money.

34. Electrolux Cooks -

Executives at Electrolux Major Appliances North America formally opened their Memphis plant Thursday, Jan. 9, at Frank C. Pidgeon Industrial Park.

But as Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam and local elected leaders toured the facility, there were plenty of indications the $266 million plant has been turning out ovens and stoves for a couple of months.

35. New Year, New You -

January is the perfect time to begin working on your 2014 plan. As you prioritize your New Year’s resolutions, consider a career cleanup along with your plans to go to the gym more often. If you’ve been thinking of a career change, whether it’s an internal promotion or moving to a new company or field altogether, this is the perfect time.

36. Retirement Unlikely for Some Blue-Collar Americans -

Tom Edwards grew up in a family that's been cutting trees and hauling timber in the Pacific Northwest for more than a century. The Spanaway, Wash., resident says he has worked as a logger since he was a kid – it's just what an able-bodied youngster was expected to do.

37. Childhood Inspiration Leads Jambor to Fulfilling Career -

Like many children of the 1970s, Erik Jambor’s interest in film began with scrolling words on the big screen: “A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away … .”

For Jambor, it wasn’t so far away in Birmingham, Ala., where he nurtured a passion for film with a Super 8 video camera in his backyard.

38. Building Capacities -

Major road and highway projects like the Interstate 269 loop, I-40/240 and the Mallory Road interchange near Frank Pigeon Industrial Park made substantial progress during 2013, with several phases of important transportation corridors wrapping up and new projects planned for 2014 and beyond.

39. Start Co. Joins Global Accelerator Network -

Start Co., the Memphis-based venture development group focused on grooming startup companies and their founders, is itself about to do some starting anew.

40. Call to Nursing Led Burnett to Form Staffing Agency -

Denise Burnett entered Evangel University in Springfield, Mo., to major in journalism and minor in political science with dreams of joining the Fourth Estate.

41. Health Care Signups Pick Up but May Not Close Gap -

WASHINGTON (AP) – With time running short, the nation's health care rolls still aren't filling up fast enough.

New signup numbers Wednesday showed progress for President Barack Obama's health care law, but not enough to guarantee that Americans who want and need coverage by Jan. 1 will be able to get it. Crunch time is now, as people face a Dec. 23 deadline to sign up if they are to have coverage by New Year's.

42. Crosstown Effort Shines as Development Example -

Construction documents for the $180 million revitalization of the Crosstown building were scheduled to be finished Friday, Dec. 6, with the project moving toward closing and construction in the next months.

43. Government Diagnosis: HealthCare.gov on the Mend -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Computer crashes should be giving way to insurance coverage – if the government's diagnosis of its health care website is correct.

The Health and Human Services Department released a progress report Sunday on its effort get the troubled HealthCare.gov website on the mend. Administration officials said the worst of the online glitches, bugs and delays may be over.

44. Robertson to Retire National Civil Rights Museum Post -

Beverly Robertson, president of the National Civil Rights Museum for 16 of its 22 years, will guide the institution through its first major renovation that debuts in March and will retire from the museum’s leadership in July.

45. As Elections End, New Campaigns Begin -

The day after the last elections of 2013 in Shelby County were decided, candidates for the Shelby County offices on the ballot in 2014 could begin pulling qualifying petitions to run.

And many of them had already held kickoff fundraisers for the political year to come.

46. Flipping the Switch -

Tim Bolding, executive director of United Housing Inc., had become increasingly interested over the years in energy efficiency, sustainability and alternate energy sources when he saw homes in New Orleans being rebuilt with solar panels.

47. In Reversal, Obama to Allow Canceled Health Plans -

WASHINGTON (AP) – His personal and political credibility on the line, President Barack Obama reversed course Thursday and said millions of Americans should be allowed to renew individual coverage plans now ticketed for cancellation under the health care law that is likely to be at the heart of the 2014 elections.

48. Mechatronics -

“Mechatronics.” Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam said the word so fast that it got lost in the echo of the large aircraft hangar at the Tennessee College of Applied Technology near Memphis International Airport.

49. East Memphis Office Market Continues To Tighten -

Class A office space in East Memphis continues to be a strong performer thanks to the convenience and quality of buildings radiating from the Poplar/Interstate 240 intersection.

“East Memphis is a real bright spot regionally because if you look at the overall Memphis market it is a bit flat,” said Kemp Conrad, president of Cushman & Wakefield/Commercial Advisors Asset Services. “The East submarket, especially with Class A space, is very strong and dynamic, with strong tenants and strong institutional ownership.”

50. East Memphis Office Market Continues to Tighten -

Class A office space in East Memphis continues to be a strong performer thanks to the convenience and quality of buildings radiating from the Poplar/Interstate 240 intersection.

“East Memphis is a real bright spot regionally because if you look at the overall Memphis market it is a bit flat,” said Kemp Conrad, president of Cushman & Wakefield/Commercial Advisors Asset Services. “The East submarket, especially with Class A space, is very strong and dynamic, with strong tenants and strong institutional ownership.”

51. Campus Connections -

The University of Memphis is in the early stages of updating its campus master plan, and it will seek input from its neighbors as it moves into its next century of higher education.

The U of M has hired the Smith Group JJR of Ann Arbor, Mich., to lead the effort with Memphis-based LRK Inc. serving as the local partner.

52. Air Traffic Control Modernization Hits Turbulence -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Ten years after Congress gave the go-ahead to modernize the nation's air traffic control system, one of the government's most ambitious and complex technology programs is in trouble.

53. New in Rural Tennessee: Discovery Park of America -

UNION CITY, Tenn. (AP) – The gleaming white building with curved exteriors and a spaceship-like tower emerges from the flat landscape of West Tennessee like something out of science fiction, but it's not a villain's lair or superhero's headquarters.

54. Race for the Cure Ready at New Home -

Participants in Saturday’s Komen Memphis-MidSouth Race for the Cure will see some significant changes this year.

One of them will be a change of scenery. After 20 years at The Shops of Saddle Creek in Germantown, the race is moving to Carriage Crossing in Collierville.

55. Mobile Health Clinic Hits Streets to Help Homeless -

Baptist Memorial Health Care and Christ Community Health Services rolled out a new state-of-the-art mobile health clinic earlier this month, and the larger, modernized vehicle will give Baptist Operation Outreach the ability to treat more of the area’s homeless population in need of medical care.

56. McCullough Blends Right Ingredients With ‘Chef Jenn’ -

Jennifer McCullough, the white chef’s coat behind the brand Chef Jenn, began cooking up a dream in her home kitchen.

57. MBI Anticipates Little Change Under New Owner -

With a new owner in place, Memphis Business Interiors (MBI) anticipates little change to its operations – but it does expect to grow.

New owner Rhonda Bradley said the only changes she has in sight for the 18-year-old office design firm are “adding new areas, strengthening service in areas we cover currently and growing in training and development of current employees.”

58. Hanging Around -

The Pickering Firm Inc. is the architect and engineer of record for Nike’s massive, 1.7 million-square-foot facility expansion in Frayser.

59. FAA to Weigh Easing Limits on Electronic Devices -

WASHINGTON (AP) – With the blessing of an influential advisory panel, federal regulators are closer to letting airline passengers use their smartphones, tablets, e-readers and other electronic gadgets during takeoffs and landings.

60. Holding Court -

As has been reported in national newspapers and business magazines for months, the fall’s law school enrollment nationally is down from this time last year and beyond.

The American Bar Association’s ABA Journal reported in August that “Law school applications for the fall of 2013 have dropped 17.9 percent and applicants are down 12.3 percent.”

61. Citrone: Logistics Not Just for Men -

It’s hard to picture Cheryl Burch Citrone, a partner at executive recruiting and consulting firm Vaco Memphis, hanging around railroad tracks or shooting the breeze about shipping lanes and trucks.

62. Surprise From Fed: No Pullback in Bond Purchases -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In a surprise, the Federal Reserve has decided against reducing its stimulus for the U.S. economy because its outlook for growth has dimmed in the past three months.

The Fed said it will continue to buy $85 billion a month in bonds while it awaits conclusive evidence that the economy is strengthening. The Fed's bond purchases are intended to keep long-term borrowing rates low to boost spending and economic growth.

63. FedEx Posts 7 Percent Earnings Increase -

Memphis-based FedEx Corp. posted a quarterly profit 7 percent higher than a year ago for its fiscal first quarter, ended Aug. 31.

64. Independent Growth -

The Jones Clinic is taking steps this summer to accommodate growing patient referrals, with recent hires at key positions and an operational overhaul involving conversion to electronic medical record systems.

65. Sci-Fi Moment Sparked Career Ambition for Bell -

For many children coming of age in the 1970s and 1980s, a viewing of the “Star Wars” trilogy led to afternoons of battling make-believe Stormtroopers with homemade light sabers in a backyard re-imagined as the Death Star.

66. Mary Carter Decorating Center to Grow, Relocate -

A venerable Memphis cake decorating and supply store is moving to a new location on Summer Avenue.

Mary Carter Decorating Center signed a 4,800-square-foot lease in Cloverleaf Shopping Center at 733 N. White Station Road.

67. Examine Pros, Cons of IT Leasing Carefully -

Every business from time to time has to consider a potentially expensive information technology equipment replacement or upgrade. For example, a start-up business often has to make an initial investment in servers, workstations, software packages or other technologies. Sometimes, even the most well established businesses don’t plan appropriately for hardware or software upgrades, and can be surprised by the amount of capital needed.

68. Principal Intervention Teaches Teachers -

Talethia Harris sometimes has to intervene at Cromwell Elementary School to have a talk with those whose performance is not showing progress in academic achievement. And the intervention has to be the right mix of compassion and firmness.

69. Laufer Bolsters Third-Party Logistics Service With Memphis Office -

Laufer Group International Ltd. has continued its Southeast expansion by making an entry into the Memphis logistics market with a Downtown office.

The third-party logistics (3PL) provider is focused on providing highly sophisticated value-added solutions to importers at competitive prices, and establishing a presence a key distribution hub like Memphis made sense.

70. O-Line’s Job: Keeping the Star Players Clean -

Of all the talented yet anonymous offensive linemen in the country, Vanderbilt senior Wesley Johnson might be the closest thing to a 6-5, 295-pound invisible man as there can be. Johnson has made 38 straight starts and was expected to make his 39th on Thursday, Aug. 29, against Ole Miss.

71. Schools Transportation Director Retires -

The director of transportation for the countywide school system, Debbie Rike, resigned Wednesday, Aug. 14, capping a week and a half of significant transportation problems for the new school district.

72. Mortgage Market Rises 22 Percent in July -

The month of July may help buoy expectations among optimistic participants in the mortgage industry that a housing recovery is taking hold in Shelby County.

Mortgage volume for the month was up almost 22 percent in July, climbing to almost $173 million last month from $142.2 million in July 2012, according to real estate information company Chandler Reports, www.chandlerreports.com.

73. Strategic Change Bolsters Flashlight Media -

John Haun was happy working for Memphis-based sports agent Jimmy Sexton.

While Sexton focused on representing clients in contract negotiations, Haun was responsible for lining up marketing and endorsement deals for the company’s clients, including University of Alabama football coach Nick Saban.

74. Industrial Readiness -

Laura Hine remembers her first week at the Workforce Investment Network office in Memphis.

She specifically recalls a table filled with job applications for Blues City Brewing and how few of those applying were ready for one of the first signs of new life in Memphis’ manufacturing sector.

75. Midtown Mix -

Go by Overton Square during lunch or at night, and the place is usually overflowing with visitors – some who want lunch, dinner or a libation, and some who come just to enjoy the simple pleasure of people-watching.

76. Moving the Pack -

RedRover Sales & Marketing is a few months away from starting a new chapter in the firm’s more-than-seven-year existence because of having arrived at what’s arguably a good problem to have.

77. Medical Mergers -

In January, The Medical Group, an adult internal medicine practice in Germantown with seven physicians: Drs. Todd Overby, Alison Pomykala, Richard Jordan, Terinell Beaver, Steven Wener, Mark Castellaw and Dana Wright sold to Baptist Memorial Health Care Corp. after being independent since 1956.

78. Election Aftermath -

At least one suburban leader wants to explore the idea of a shared superintendent for several of the municipal school districts to come.

Arlington Mayor Mike Wissman raised the possibility the day after voters in all six suburban cities and towns approved in special elections the formation of separate suburban school systems.

79. 5 New Features That Could Be on Your Next Car -

DETROIT (AP) – Cameras that check around the car for pedestrians. Radar that stops you from drifting out of your lane. An engine able to turn off automatically at traffic lights to conserve fuel.

80. Notes on Freedom -

“AMONG THESE ARE LIFE, LIBERTY AND THE PURSUIT OF HAPPINESS” There were no fireworks or moving speeches but there were a few original works and classical movements. There were no marching bands or patriotic songs, but there was a chamber orchestra and a soaring aria or two. There was no Thomas Jefferson or a hot Philadelphia afternoon in 1776, but there was Mohammad Amin Sharifi and a hot Memphis afternoon in 2013.

81. Fed Approves Higher Bank Capital Standards -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Federal Reserve approved higher requirements for the amount of capital reserves banks must hold to cushion against unexpected losses. The change is aimed at preventing a repeat of the 2008 financial crisis.

82. MAAR Ranks Improving With Housing Market -

After the housing bubble popped and the recession roiled the economy, the orientation classes Melanie Blakeney taught to new members of the Memphis Area Association of Realtors kept getting smaller and smaller.

83. Congressional Delegation Tours Presidents Island -

The International Port of Memphis played host to a handful of influential guests Friday, June 21, just as the city and its partners are seeking a large federal grant to help expand the industrial area.

84. Educators Stress Consistency Amid Change -

Three educators who have led schools inside and outside the conventional public school system locally say consistency at the school level will be important in a school year that will see a lot of change.

85. Self-Tucker Focused on Designs to Inspire -

Self-Tucker Architects wants to lift the aspirations of the community through great architecture and design.

The firm is currently involved with a variety of high-profile projects across the area, including the National Civil Rights Museum and the new ground transportation center at Memphis International Airport, and past work includes the Stax Museum, Stax Music Academy and the FedExForum.

86. Overton Park Playground Comes With Risk -

The new playground near Rainbow Lake in Overton Park features something not seen on modern playgrounds in awhile – a metal merry-go-round or roundabout.

The playground, parts of which are still being built, got a good test Saturday, June 8, during what the Overton Park Conservancy billed as a “day of merrymaking.” It was a test of the playground, the renovation around Rainbow Lake and the one-year anniversary of the opening of the nearby Overton Bark dog park.

87. New EmergeMemphis Head Brings Big Ambitions -

On his first day as the new president and CEO of EmergeMemphis, Carlton Crothers talked about a grand vision of “creating an innovation ecosystem” in Memphis.

Crothers is the new head of an organization formed in 2001 that serves as an incubator for high-growth companies. He comes to Emerge from Innovation Ecosystem Design in Dallas, with a long career of entrepreneurship-related endeavors behind him.

88. Wharton Points to Decisions Beyond Budget Dilemma -

The city of Memphis debt issues that prompted a critical report from the Tennessee comptroller’s office stem from the city’s 2010 decision to refinance the city’s debt and push it further out instead of dealing with it then, says city finance director Brian Collins.

89. City’s Scarboro Passionate About Sharing Memphis -

Born and raised in Fayetteville, N.C., Douglas Scarboro has chosen to make Memphis his home. As the executive director of the Office of Talent and Human Capital for the City of Memphis, his job is to help others realize the opportunities and recognize the same assets that he has found here.

90. Love of Public Service Drives Caldwell to Law School Role -

In 2008, the Tennessee Supreme Court laid out a strategic plan to get attorneys more involved in pro bono work.

Though it isn’t required of the state’s professionals, there is an inspirational goal of 50 hours per year of public service that is heavily encouraged by the justices.

91. Another Round for the House on 'Obamacare' -

WASHINGTON (AP) – There they go again: The House is moving toward a vote on yet another Republican bill to repeal President Barack Obama's health care law.

Only months away from the rollout of coverage for uninsured Americans, Republicans on Thursday were making their 37th attempt in a little more than two years to eliminate, defund or partly scale back the Affordable Care Act.

92. A Fond Farewell for Now -

Hard to believe, but almost three years has passed since I wrote the first “Giving Back” column in 2010. Credit goes to James Overstreet, associate publisher of The Daily News, who pulled me aside one day and asked if I had ever thought about sharing my ideas and some of our Lipscomb Pitts Breakfast Club philanthropic efforts with a broader audience. What started as an idea to share helpful tips, quickly evolved into a pipeline for positive stories, a spotlight for local nonprofits, and an avenue to provide easy ways to get more engaged in our community.

93. Post Office Had $1.9 Billion Second Quarter Loss -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. Postal Service said Friday it lost $1.9 billion over the last three months and warned that losses would continue to mount without help from Congress.

The loss for the financial quarter ending March 31 was narrower than a $3.2-billion loss for the same period last year, thanks to slightly higher revenues and lower payments towards health benefits for workers who will retire in the future.

94. Earles’ Company Helps Homeowners ‘From A to Z’ -

Working as a Realtor for the first 19 years of her career, Paige Earles learned the value of home staging.

“Research shows a property spends about 78 percent less time on the market if it is staged versus not staged,” said Earles, owner of Pearle Staging & Design, which recently expanded into Memphis. “The benefits of staging are pretty tremendous.”

95. Workshop Will Teach Business Fundamentals -

Steve Jobs could do it. Fred Smith did it. So do the chief executives of businesses large and small, from retail to technology to medicine.

96. Just Cause -

The concept of environmental justice is joining the issue of sustainability in new discussions about planning and the way cities like Memphis should work.

Local and regional planners meet Friday, April 19, at the University of Memphis to talk about “just sustainability” with the Tufts University planner who has been writing about it for the last decade.

97. Selling Homes Becomes ‘Forever Job’ for Dacus -

Ashley Dacus got started as a Realtor in the worst possible economic climate, but with residential sales beginning to show signs of life, her optimism has been renewed.

98. Commercial Practitioners Have Voice With Council -

The Memphis Area Association of Realtors Commercial Council has grown and evolved over the past nine years since its inception, with membership increasing from 150 members in 2004 to more than 350 members this year.

99. Crosstown Leaders Discuss Ambitious Project -

Leaders of the Crosstown Development Project talked this month with The Memphis News editorial board about their plans for the adaptive reuse of the 1.5 million-square-foot, circa-1927 Sears Crosstown building.

100. Hopson Takes Over Public Schools Leadership -

Since Dorsey Hopson became general counsel for Memphis City Schools in 2008, he has experienced a whirlwind of change.

The Memphis City Council cut funding to the school system triggering a landmark court case, city and county school systems have been on a fast and rocky path to a merger, and the countywide board ballooned to 23 members. And then Hopson found himself in January serving as the interim superintendent of Memphis City Schools.