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Editorial Results (free)

1. After Record Profits, Airlines Keep Adding Jobs -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The number of jobs at U.S. airlines keeps growing – although slowly – as some of them post record profits.

The U.S. Department of Transportation said Thursday that the nation's passenger airlines employed the equivalent of 386,243 full-time workers in July, up 1.3 percent from the same month last year. It was the eighth straight monthly gain over year-earlier numbers.

2. Drugstores, Retailers Dive Deeper Into Vaccines -

Walgreen provided enough flu shots last season to protect a population roughly twice the size of Los Angeles.

CVS doled out more than 5 million, or double its total from a few years ago. And Wal-Mart, the world's largest retailer, offers flu shots at more than 4,200 of its U.S. stores that have pharmacies.

3. Government for the Prosperity of the People -

The reporting out of the US on China is uniformly downbeat. By applying our western perspectives, China appears inhumane, politically oppressive, over-indebted and fragile.

From the American perspective, functional nations should look more ... well ... like us. They should have democracy, inalienable property rights, free and open markets, freedom of expression, apple pie, etc. Our national belief in the ideology of American exceptionalism defines our worldview.

4. ‘Swamp Rat’ Remembers Last Tennessee-Oklahoma Game -

University of Tennessee quarterback Dewey “Swamp Rat” Warren stood on the field during a timeout with a few seconds left in the Jan. 1, 1968 Orange Bowl.

Warren was the holder for UT place-kicker Karl Kremser, who lined up for a 43-yard field goal attempt against Oklahoma. The Sooners led, 26-24.

5. Unintended Consequences: ER Visits Increase -

Hospital officials have been pushing for the state to expand Medicaid health care coverage for thousands of Tennessee’s poorest citizens, despite two significant and related concerns:

Expansion will lead to increased visits to the most expensive place in America for routine health care, the emergency room.

6. Regional Airlines Not Sharing in Majors' Success -

DALLAS (AP) – For passengers traveling between smaller cities and large hub airports, the ticket may say Delta, American or United, but they're likely flying on a regional airline whose planes are painted in the major carrier's colors.

7. Electrolux to Buy GE Appliances in $3.3 Billion Deal -

STOCKHOLM (AP) – Sweden's Electrolux is buying the appliances business of General Electric for $3.3 billion, boosting its presence on the North American market, the companies said Monday.

8. Storytellers Needed -

Memphis International Airport, in the midst of reinventing itself as an origin-and-destination airport, is looking for some help telling its story.

The Memphis-Shelby County Airport Authority is seeking a marketing and public relations firm to help get the word out about the transformation.

9. Anti-UAW Workers to Form Own Union at VW Plant -

Volkswagen workers who oppose the United Auto Workers at the German automaker’s plant in Chattanooga are looking to form their own union.

The Chattanooga Times Free Press reports that the group wants to form the first chapter of what would be called the American Council of Employees.

10. Anti-UAW Workers to Form Own Union at VW Plant -

Volkswagen workers who oppose the United Auto Workers at the German automaker's plant in Chattanooga are looking to form their own union.

The Chattanooga Times Free Press reports that the group wants to form the first chapter of what would be called the American Council of Employees.

11. Southwest, Frontier Add Memphis Flights -

Frontier Airlines and Southwest Airlines are increasing service at Memphis International Airport, providing more service for local flyers and boosting the facility’s transition away from a high-priced hub airport.

12. Hard to Swallow? Burger King May Move to Canada -

NEW YORK (AP) – Some Burger King customers are finding it hard to swallow that the home of the Whopper could move to Canada.

Investors seemed to welcome the announcement by Burger King late Sunday that it was in talks to buy Canadian coffee-and-doughnut chain Tim Hortons and create the world's third-largest fast-food restaurant company. The news pushed shares of both companies up more than 20 percent.

13. Veteran’s HomeCare Franchise Aims for Place in Market -

There are always adjustments to be made, such as when a middle-school-aged boy moves from Philadelphia to Birmingham, Ala.

Brian Walker still recalls that day in gym class when the P.E. instructor was taking roll. When Walker heard his name called, he answered the way he always had in his young life: “Yo.”

14. United Lures Top Fliers With Promise of a Hot Meal -

NEW YORK (AP) – To win the hearts of frequent business travelers, United Airlines is going through their stomachs.

The carrier has been looking for ways to woo back some of its top fliers who defected to other carriers following a rocky merger with Continental Airlines. So, it's upgrading first class food options and replacing snacks with full meals on some of its shortest flights.

15. Airport Authority OKs Concourse Overhaul -

An ambitious effort to reconfigure Memphis International Airport for the future will get underway this fall, when demolition of portions of two concourses begins and a single concessions vendor takes control.

16. The Q Party -

CRISIS AVERTED. It’s all a matter of perspective.

At the height of the 1962 Cuban missile crisis, a friend’s father was in Corinth, Miss., on business. He was outside the courthouse having a cigarette and waiting for an appointment when he overheard a conversation between two old men on a bench.

17. Sentencing Changes Sought for Business Crimes -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The federal panel that sets sentencing policy eased penalties this year for potentially tens of thousands of drug dealers. Now, defense lawyers and prisoner advocates are pushing for similar treatment for an arguably less-sympathetic category of defendants: swindlers, embezzlers, insider traders and other white-collar criminals.

18. US Airlines Running Behind Schedule So Far in 2014 -

More U.S. flights arrived late in June than the month before, continuing a string of poor performances by the nation's airlines.

The government says that in the first six months of the year, the rate of late flights was the highest since 2008 and cancelations were the highest since 2000.

19. New Delta Cuts Reflect Changes at Memphis Airport -

Delta Airlines is once again cutting service at Memphis International Airport, eliminating flights from Memphis to Denver and Austin, Texas, in September.

The airline, which formerly operated a fortress hub at Memphis International, will also temporarily suspend service to Las Vegas this winter. Denver is still served by both United Airlines and Frontier Airlines.

20. Walgreen Turns Down Inversion to Cut Tax Bill -

Walgreen plans to keep its roots firmly planted in the United States, saying it will no longer pursue an overseas reorganization that would have trimmed its U.S. taxes but drew political scorn.

The nation's largest drugstore chain – which bills itself as "America's premier pharmacy" – said Wednesday that it will buy the remaining stake in Swiss health and beauty retailer Alliance Boots that it does not already own.

21. Alexander Looks to Fend Off Tennessee GOP Challengers -

LAWRENCEBURG, Tenn. (AP) – After losing his first bid for Tennessee governor 40 years ago, Republican Sen. Lamar Alexander shed his blue suit and buttoned-up appearance for a plaid shirt, hiking boots and a 1,000-mile walk around the state.

22. Early Diagnosis -

Of the approximately 7 million people in the United States that have scoliosis (curvature of the spine), most of them are teenagers and children.

Years ago, scoliosis screenings in the public schools were the norm. Today, less than 50 percent of the states require the screenings. This despite the fact that the Adam’s Forward Bend test – the initial screening for scoliosis – can be done in less than 30 seconds.

23. US Airfares on the Rise, Outpacing Inflation -

NEW YORK (AP) – Travelers, prepare to pay more for your flight.

The average roundtrip ticket within the U.S., including taxes, reached $509.15 in the first six months of this year, up nearly $14 from the same period last year. Domestic airfare continues to outpace inflation, rising 2.7 percent compared to the 2.1 percent gain in the Consumer Price Index.

24. GOP Blocks Tax Hike on Firms Moving Overseas -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican senators blocked an election-year bill Wednesday to limit tax breaks for U.S. companies that move operations overseas.

The bill would have prohibited companies from deducting expenses related to moving their operations to a foreign country. It also would have offered tax credits to companies that move operations to the U.S. from a foreign country.

25. US, Europe Impose Tough New Sanctions on Russia -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Spurred to new action by the downing of the Malaysian airliner, the European Union approved dramatically tougher economic sanctions Tuesday against Russia, followed swiftly by a new round of U.S. penalties targeting key sectors of the Russian economy.

26. Study: 35 Percent in US Face Debt Collectors -

WASHINGTON (AP) — More than 35 percent of Americans have debts and unpaid bills that have been reported to collection agencies, according to a study released Tuesday by the Urban Institute.

27. Virgin America Files Plans for IPO -

NEW YORK (AP) — Virgin America's next destination is Wall Street.

The California-based airline filed on Monday for an initial public offering of shares.

Virgin America Inc., which operates out of Los Angeles and San Francisco, flies to 22 airports in the United States and Mexico and has a fleet of 53 planes. It is known for offering a variety of perks on its jets, including live TV, movies, leather seats and purple mood lighting.

28. New Life for Old Malls -

Since 1957, when the first modern, fully enclosed shopping mall was built in Edina, Minnesota, shopping became an American pastime. New shopping malls changed the landscape in communities across the country at the rate of 140 a year.

29. US Airlines Add Jobs for 6th Straight Month -

U.S. airlines have been adding jobs for six straight months, though the gains aren’t big ones.

The U.S. Department of Transportation said Monday that the nation’s passenger airlines had the equivalent of 385,619 full-time workers in May, up 1.1 percent from May 2013. That’s the highest level since September 2012.

30. Airlines Report Big Second-Quarter Profits -

Investing in airlines has long been the butt of jokes, especially when many U.S. carriers traipsed through bankruptcy court in the past decade.

Now riding a post-merger tide of higher fares and stable fuel costs, those same airlines are piling up profits – and sharing the newfound riches with investors.

31. US Airlines Add Jobs for 6th Straight Month -

U.S. airlines have been adding jobs for six straight months, though the gains aren't big ones.

The U.S. Department of Transportation said Monday that the nation's passenger airlines had the equivalent of 385,619 full-time workers in May, up 1.1 percent from May 2013. That's the highest level since September 2012.

32. We’re All Invited -

MEMPHIS, SERVED IN THE SHELL. Following up last week’s column, this from a reader:

“We have no civic pride, half the population is intent on killing as many as they can and the other part lives behind walls or gates. There was a time in the fifties when you could leave your front door unlocked and keys in the car.”

33. US Students in Middle of Pack on Financial Knowhow -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In an increasingly global economy, just 1 in 10 teenagers around the world is able to make some key – but complex – financial decisions, including choosing among various loans or analyzing invoices and pay slips.

34. Some US-Bound Air Travelers Must Turn On Phones -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Passengers at some overseas airports that offer U.S.-bound flights will soon be required to power on their electronic devices in order to board their flights – a measure intended to enhance aviation security at a time when intelligence officials are concerned about hidden explosives, a counterterrorism official said.

35. US Trade Deficit Drops to $44.4 Billion in May -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. trade deficit fell in May as U.S. exports hit an all-time high, helped by a jump in exports of petroleum products. Imports dipped slightly.

The trade deficit narrowed 5.6 percent in May to $44.4 billion after hitting a two-year high of $47 billion in April, the Commerce Department reported Thursday.

36. A Wise Sports Fan Appreciates the Journey -

So what does Team USA’s soccer experience and the Memphis Grizzlies experience have in common?

You know, besides the obvious – playing against a bunch of floppers/whiners, be they from Portugal or Lob City?

37. 32 States Trail US as a Whole in Job Recovery -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Five years after the Great Recession officially ended, most states still haven't regained all the jobs they lost, even though the nation as a whole has.

In May, the overall economy finally recovered all 9 million jobs that vanished in the worst downturn since the 1930s. Another month of solid hiring is expected in the U.S. jobs report for June that will be released Thursday.

38. Southwest Opens New Chapter: International Flights -

DALLAS (AP) – After four decades of expanding to all corners of the lower 48 states, Southwest Airlines flies into new territory on Tuesday – Jamaica, the Bahamas and Aruba.

Southwest is taking over routes flown by AirTran Airways, which it bought in 2011. The company plans to eliminate the AirTran brand by year end.

39. US to Ask China to Restart Cyber Working Group -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The United States wants to restart a cybersecurity working group that China shut down after the U.S. indicted five Chinese military officers on charges of hacking into American companies' computers to steal trade secrets.

40. What’s in a Name? -

Let’s consider our own Memphis Grizzlies. The team kept a nickname that migrated from Vancouver because fans here have embraced it. In fact, you or someone in your family probably owns a cap or a shirt bearing the team nickname or the likeness of a grizzly bear.

41. Let’s Talk Civics -

I type in the word civics at OneLook Dictionary Search. Giving credit to “MacMillan Dictionary,” the site gives me “a school subject in which you study how government works and what people’s rights, duties, and responsibilities are as citizens.”

42. Klinsmann’s Outlook Changed in California -

SAO PAULO (AP) – Jurgen Klinsmann was 19 years old and playing for his hometown Stuttgarter Kickers in Germany’s second division when he touched down in the United States for the first time.

43. IRS to Waive Penalties for Some Overseas Accounts -

The Internal Revenue Service is offering to waive steep penalties for Americans living abroad who haven't been paying their U.S. taxes.

But there is a catch: You have to be able to show that you didn't evade U.S. taxes on purpose.

44. Tech Giants Seek to Halt Overseas Snooping by US -

NEW YORK (AP) – Microsoft Corp. and four other large American technology companies are using a Manhattan court case to draw a line in the cloud, saying the U.S. government has no right to seize computer data stored outside the country.

45. Cash Reflects on ‘Long Way Home’ -

As Graceland marks the anniversary of the death of Elvis Presley in August, another important artist from Sun Records will be remembered in Dyess, Ark.

The opening of Johnny Cash’s childhood home in Dyess as a museum is Aug. 16.

46. Training Ground -

You can’t perfectly simulate a real-life disaster. Dr. Joe Holley knows this better than most.

47. US Slower to Embrace Fanaticism of World’s Game -

Andy Marcinko has been to every World Cup since 1986, and he will be in Brazil for a good two weeks of the 2014 World Cup.

But the Rhodes College men’s soccer coach didn’t have to go beyond his own soccer camps to start putting on his game face.

48. Many Seek New Homes Near Cities But are Priced Out -

WASHINGTON (AP) – City living has been a blessing for Tim Nelson.

The Phoenix lawyer moved downtown a few months ago into a new $389,000 home with a warehouse-style floor plan, a Jacuzzi tub and kitchen counters made of Caesarstone quartz. His favorite coffee spot is three blocks away. When the Arizona Diamondbacks play on Friday nights, he can watch postgame fireworks from his deck.

49. Senate Republicans Block Student Loan Bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Senate Republicans on Wednesday blocked legislation aimed at letting people refinance their student loans at lower rates, a pre-ordained outcome that gave Democrats a fresh election-year talking point against the GOP.

50. Congress, FBI Moving on Veterans Affairs Health Care -

WASHINGTON (AP) – As Congress moves to help thousands of military veterans enduring long wait times for VA medical care, the FBI said it has opened a criminal investigation into the Department of Veterans Affairs.

51. Eye Care Deserts -

By the time students are on board SAVE’s mobile vision unit the secret is out.

They’ve failed a school eye screening and parents and teachers are catching on that they may be having trouble reading notes on the board, pages in a book, and grasping all that they should in class.

52. Obama: Power Plant Rule Will Shrink Power Prices -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In a sweeping initiative to curb pollutants blamed for global warming, the Obama administration unveiled a plan Monday aimed at cutting carbon dioxide emissions from power plants by nearly a third by 2030. But it delays the deadline for some states to begin complying until long after President Barack Obama leaves office.

53. Change on Tap for Many Local Public Companies -

Here’s a snapshot of recent news and developments at some of the publicly traded companies based in Memphis, reflecting the influence these companies have and the shadows they cast both in Memphis and beyond, in industries that range from bioscience to banking.

54. US Says Employment Up Slightly at Airlines -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. airline industry is slowly adding jobs, although not all carriers are growing.

The Transportation Department said Thursday that passenger airlines employed the equivalent of 383,610 full-time workers in March, up nearly 1 percent from a year earlier. It was the fourth straight monthly gain.

55. FBI Head: Cyber Crime Posing 'Enormous Challenge' -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Law enforcement faces an "enormous challenge" in preventing state-sponsored cyber crimes, FBI Director James Comey said Wednesday, days after the Justice Department charged five Chinese military officials with hacking into American companies to steal trade secrets.

56. Southwest Adds Flight to Houston -

Memphis International Airport is gaining another nonstop daily flight.

Southwest Airlines announced Monday, May 19, that it is adding another flight between Memphis International Airport and Houston Hobby Airport beginning Nov. 2.

57. Take Back Your Health on Memphis Kidney Action Day -

“What you don’t know won’t hurt you” is a popular saying today. While that may be true in some cases, when it comes to your health, the opposite is true. Speaking from personal experience, I can tell you that when it comes to kidney disease, what you don’t know can actually put your health in grave danger.

58. Winter Flight Cancellations Were a Record -

NEW YORK (AP) – It's official: This winter was the worst for fliers in the 20 years that the government has been collecting data.

During the first three months of this year, U.S. airlines canceled 4.6 percent of their flights, the Department of Transportation announced Tuesday.

59. US Seeks to Boost Small-Business Exports -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Seeking to boost exports, the Obama administration is launching a new initiative aimed at helping small- and medium-sized businesses sell their products in new markets overseas.

60. Frontier Airlines Adding Memphis Flights -

Frontier Airlines announced Tuesday, May 13, that it is adding four weekly flights between Memphis International Airport and Dulles Airport in Washington, D.C.

The new flights will run on Monday, Wednesday, Friday, and Sunday beginning Sept. 8 and are a result of strong passenger response to Frontier’s initial flights between Memphis and Denver, which began in March.

61. Airlines Collecting Less Money for Bag Fees -

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) – Airlines are taking in less money from bag fees than they did two years ago, but they are making up for it by adding charges for a slew of extras, including getting a decent seat.

62. Southwest CEO Vows to Fix On-Time Problem -

Southwest Airlines is falling behind other airlines when it comes to arriving on time, and the carrier plans to tinker with its flight schedule to fix that.

CEO Gary Kelly says the airline will add a few minutes between some flights, and it will be more cautious about selling itineraries with tight connections between flights.

63. Carnival Memphis Celebrates Trucking Industry -

Trucking industry representatives and employees packed the spacious Tennessee Ballroom at Hilton Memphis, the gleaming glass hotel in East Memphis, for Carnival Memphis’ salute to the trucking industry.

64. Southwest CEO Vows to Fix On-Time Problem -

Southwest Airlines is falling behind other airlines when it comes to arriving on time, and the carrier plans to tinker with its flight schedule to fix that.

CEO Gary Kelly says the airline will add a few minutes between some flights, and it will be more cautious about selling itineraries with tight connections between flights.

65. Most Airlines Report Strong First Quarter -

Even with the turbulence of severe winter storms and stubbornly high fuel prices, many of the major airlines are cruising and their stock prices are soaring.

On Thursday, American Airlines and Southwest Airlines reported record profits for the first quarter, usually the weakest time of year for the airlines. That followed a rousing report from Delta Air Lines a day earlier.

66. Most Airlines Report Strong First Quarter -

Even with the turbulence of severe winter storms and stubbornly high fuel prices, many of the major airlines are cruising and their stock prices are soaring.

On Thursday, American Airlines and Southwest Airlines reported record profits for the first quarter, usually the weakest time of year for the airlines. That followed a rousing report from Delta Air Lines a day earlier.

67. Events -

The South Main Art Trolley Tour will be held Friday, April 25, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. in the South Main Historic Arts District. Email info@southmainmemphis.net.

68. US Says Average Airfares Rising Slowly -

DALLAS (AP) – The average price of an airline ticket for travel within the U.S. rose by just $1 last year, although prices are still modestly higher than they were five years ago.

The U.S. Department of Transportation said Tuesday that the average domestic airfare rose to $381 in the fourth quarter of 2013, a 0.3 percent increase from a year earlier.

69. Ugwueke Named Methodist Le Bonheur President -

Michael O. Ugwueke has been named president and chief operating officer of Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare, as well as president and CEO of Methodist Healthcare Memphis Hospitals. In his new role, Ugwueke will be responsible for strategic management of the operations of six hospitals within the Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare system, as well as other key corporate functions.

70. Tennessee Lags in Organ Donor Registration -

Attitudes about the donation of organs for transplantation are very supportive, a recent national study found, but the percentage of people who have granted permission on their driver’s license lags behind, and this is especially true in Tennessee.

71. Report Says Blacks, Latinos Losing Economic Ground -

WASHINGTON (AP) – African-Americans and Latinos are losing economic ground when compared with whites in the areas of employment and income as the United States pulls itself out of the Great Recession, the latest State of Black America report from the National Urban League says.

72. US Trade Deficit Hits $42.3 Billion in February -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. trade deficit climbed to the highest level in five months in February as demand for American exports fell while imports increased slightly.

The deficit increased to $42.3 billion, which was 7.7 percent above the January imbalance of $39.3 billion, the Commerce Department reported Thursday.

73. Judge Upholds Country of Origin Label for Meat -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Shoppers who want to buy American beef for dinner instead of meat from Canada or Mexico will still be able to find the country of origin on the label.

A federal appeals court ruling Friday allows the government to go forward with rules that require labels on packaged steaks, ribs and other cuts of meat to say where the animals were born, raised and slaughtered. The meat industry attempted to block the rules, which went into effect last year, saying they are costly and provide no health benefits to the consumer.

74. Camp Shelby to Become Equipment Hub -

HATTIESBURG, Miss. (AP) – The Camp Shelby Joint Forces Training Center is being considered as a depot for the return, redeployment and disposal of military equipment now in Afghanistan.

75. With Health Law, Workers Ponder the I-Quit Option -

CHICAGO (AP) – For uninsured people, the nation's new health care law may offer an escape from worry about unexpected, astronomical medical bills. But for Stephanie Payne of St. Louis, who already had good insurance, the law could offer another kind of escape: the chance to quit her job.

76. Stewart Joins Metal Museum as Collections Manager -

Grace Stewart has joined the Metal Museum as collections manager/registrar. Stewart, who previously served as registrar for the National Civil Rights Museum for a year and a half, says her goals are to help grow and define the Museum’s permanent collection and facilitate greater access to the collection through exhibits and education opportunities.

77. Bill to Allow School Staff to Get Insulin Training -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Missy Gaw's 10-year-old daughter has to have a dose of insulin each time she eats. If no nurse is available to administer the dosage at the girl's Nashville elementary school, then Gaw or her husband drive there to do so.

78. White House Promotes Economic Issues Facing Women -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Add pay equity to President Barack Obama's 2014 do-it-himself wish list.

The White House is launching a campaign to promote a host of economic issues facing women, a key voting bloc in this year's midterm election.

79. Flight Cancelations Take a Toll on Airline Revenue -

DALLAS (AP) – Airlines are still tallying up the damage from this winter's storms, but solid demand for travel means they are likely to weather the rocky start to 2014 in good shape.

Reports from some of the airlines point to higher average prices, and executives say spring bookings look strong.

80. Examining Numbers From Data Week -

The first week of the month always produces a torrent of economic data that is capped off by the Friday employment report from the Department of Labor. Here is a summary of the more relevant data releases from last week:

81. Staples to Close 225 Stores as Sales Move Online -

Staples has become the second major chain to announce the mass closing of stores this week, providing the latest evidence of how the retail landscape is being remade by shifts in American shopping habits.

82. Buffett Says Economy Continues to Grow Steadily -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) – Investor Warren Buffett says the economy continues the steady improvement that began in fall of 2009 and he remains optimistic despite Russia's advance into Ukraine.

83. Wharton: City Must Target ‘Black Boy Crime’ -

As President Barack Obama talked from the East Room of the White House last week about violence and young African-American men and boys, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. was among a group of mayors meeting in New Orleans who say they are ready to back a new approach to the problem.

84. Latest Airline Perk: Safe Distance From the Masses -

NEW YORK (AP) – On flights from San Francisco to Hong Kong, first-class passengers can enjoy a Mesclun salad with king crab or a grilled USDA prime beef tenderloin, stretch out in a 3-foot-wide seat that converts to a bed and wash it all down with a pre-slumber Krug "Grande Cuvee" Brut Champagne.

85. Big Changes Ahead for Frequent Fliers on Delta -

DALLAS (AP) – Delta Air Lines is changing its frequent-flier program to favor passengers who buy the priciest tickets instead of those who fly the most miles.

It's a bid to lure higher-spending business travelers, who often book flights on short notice and pay more than bargain-hunting leisure travelers.

86. Watson Sets Record Straight About Labor Union Views -

Tennessee Sen. Bo Watson, a Republican from Hixon, has been showing up in the national media lately, thanks to his public statements against unionization effort at the Volkswagen plant in Chattanooga.

87. Transcripts Show Fed at Times Slow to Grasp Crisis -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Federal Reserve agonized in 2008 over how far to go to stop a financial crisis that threatened to cause a recession and at times struggled to recognize its speed and magnitude.

88. Breaking Through -

If it was just an abstraction or a mere theory, it wouldn’t have a definition in the dictionary or a website. It would simply be another urban myth.

But with a few keystrokes you can go right to www.glassceiling.com. And the dictionary definition of “glass ceiling” is tangible – “an unfair system or set of attitudes that prevents some people (such as women or people of a certain race) from getting the most powerful jobs.” In fact, you can almost see a woman stuck in middle management, briefcase in hand, staring up at that glass ceiling and wondering: Where do I find the ladder that gets me from here to there?

89. Improving Disparities -

Working to better understand, and thus bring down, Shelby County’s infant mortality rate would be a giant undertaking.

But that is but one of many challenges that lie ahead of a husband-and-wife team of doctors who nine months ago moved from Nashville to Memphis to set up the Research Center on Health Disparities, Equity and the Exposome.

90. Kerry Mocks Those Who Deny Climate Change -

JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry on Sunday called climate change perhaps the world's "most fearsome" destructive weapon and mocked those who deny its existence or question its causes, comparing them to people who insist the Earth is flat.

91. White House Offers Help to Industry on Cyberattack -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Whited House on Wednesday offered to help U.S. businesses protect their computer systems from cyberattacks that President Barack Obama called "one the gravest national security dangers that the United States faces."

92. Yellen to Investors: Expect Continuity at the Fed -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen sought Tuesday to reassure investors that she will embrace the approach to interest-rate policy that her predecessor, Ben Bernanke, pursued before he stepped down as chairman last month.

93. Tenn. Lawmakers: Volkswagen Incentives Threatened by UAW -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Republican lawmakers in Tennessee on Monday threatened that the state could turn off the spigot of incentives for Volkswagen if workers at the German automaker's plant decide this week to approve union representation.

94. Bourbon, Tennessee Whiskey Sales Up in US, Overseas -

FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) – Global thirst for Kentucky bourbon and Tennessee whiskey caused exports to spike beyond $1 billion for the first time ever in 2013, a distilled spirits trade group said Tuesday.

95. Big Impact on Income Gap is Health Law's New Angle -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Maybe the health care law was about wealth transfer, after all.

If the gap between haves and have-nots is the defining issue of President Barack Obama's second term, his health overhaul was its first-term counterpart.

96. Study: Climbing Income Ladder Hasn't Grown Harder -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Young Americans from low-income families are as likely to move into the ranks of the affluent today as those born in the 1970s, according to a report by several top academic experts on inequality.

97. State of the Union: Of Pledges, Pleas and Setbacks -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Here's a little secret about the State of the Union address that President Barack Obama will deliver next week: He'll give Congress a long list of requests but few likely will be approved. That's just the reality of a politically divided government.

98. Great Expectations -

The Memphis Convention & Visitors Bureau forecasts 2014 to be a banner year, thanks to increased consumer confidence with leisure travelers and a booking pace for conventions, meetings and sporting events that is easily outpacing last year.

99. Shelby County Business Licenses Decline 3 Percent -

From George’s Automotive to Uncle Floyd’s Tires, Wheel and Auto Accessories, automotive-related businesses were prominent among the 5,361 business licenses issued by the Shelby County Clerk’s Office in 2013.

100. Business Licenses Decline 3 Percent -

From George’s Automotive to Uncle Floyd’s Tires, Wheel and Auto Accessories, automotive-related businesses were prominent among the 5,361 business licenses issued by the Shelby County Clerk’s Office in 2013.