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Editorial Results (free)

1. Congress is Giving States the Transportation Blues -

DAYTON, Ohio (AP) – On the road in a tour bus this week, the U.S. transportation secretary is spreading some bad news: the government's Highway Trust Fund is nearly broke. If allowed to run dry, that could set back or shut down projects across the country, force widespread layoffs of construction workers and delay needed repairs and improvements.

2. Return to Value -

Last week, we discussed that the wrestling match between stimulus and global debt deleveraging will continue to create anxiety and volatility for investors. Viewing the world through this prism helps to clarify seemingly baffling market movements.

3. A Calling Card That Speaks Volumes -

For those in marketing, there is never, ever enough time in the day to get it all done. That’s why savvy marketers seek passive marketing strategies to compliment their more active techniques. It’s like having a secret squad at work for you 24/7.

4. Is Hot Market for IPOs Cooling? -

NEW YORK (AP) – A hot market for initial public offerings may soon face a cooler reception from investors.

IPOs are having their best start to a year since 2000. Eighty-nine companies have raised $19 billion through sales of new stock so far in 2014. But demand for more offerings depends largely on the health of the broader market, and after last week's sell-off, the clamor from buyers may quiet down.

5. Thomas Relishes Homecoming in NBA Uniform -

With less than eight minutes left in a game his team was clearly going to lose, No. 7 came onto the court to audible cheers and applause.

Welcome back, Adonis Thomas, Philadelphia 76er (at least for now).

6. Wharton Takes Budget to City Council -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. takes a budget proposal to the Memphis City Council Tuesday, April 15, that is supposed to be a departure for an administration that, since 2010, has come to the council with options instead of a total budget plan.

7. Heartbleed Could Harm a Variety of Systems -

NEW YORK (AP) – It now appears that the "Heartbleed" security problem affects not just websites, but also the networking equipment that connects homes and businesses to the Internet.

A defect in the security technology used by many websites and equipment makers have put millions of passwords, credit card numbers and other personal information at risk. The extent of the damage caused by Heartbleed isn't known. The threat went undetected for more than two years, and it's difficult to tell if any attacks resulted from it because they don't leave behind distinct footprints.

8. Savers Beware: Fees May be Shrinking Your 401(k) -

WASHINGTON (AP) – It's the silent enemy in our retirement accounts: High fees.

And now a new study finds that the typical 401(k) fees – adding up to a modest-sounding 1 percent a year – would erase $70,000 from an average worker's account over a four-decade career compared with lower-cost options. To compensate for the higher fees, someone would have to work an extra three years before retiring.

9. Commission Budget Season Begins Quietly -

Shelby County Commissioners began their budget season quietly with a first look in committee sessions last week at a $1.2 billion consolidated county budget proposal by Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell.

10. Wal-Mart and Wild Oats Unveil Cheaper Organic Line -

NEW YORK (AP) – Wal-Mart is using its massive size to drive down the price of organic food items from tomato paste to chicken broth to make them more affordable for its low-income customers.

11. Family Dollar to Close Stores as Shoppers Pinched -

NEW YORK (AP) – Dollar stores are feeling the pinch from mounting financial pressures on low-income shoppers.

Family Dollar said Thursday that will cut jobs and close about 370 underperforming stores as it tries to reverse sagging sales and earnings. The discount store operator will also permanently lower prices on about 1,000 basic items.

12. The Grey Ceiling: Beating Ageism -

The unfortunate truth of today’s job searching climate is that applying for jobs is competitive – very competitive. Employers can be picky about who they hire and how much they’re willing to pay. For many job seekers over 50, the search process is a longer, harder road than they remember from years past.

13. Mississippi Network Set for Child Medical, Mental Needs -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Mississippi officials hope that a $5 million grant will create a more seamless system to care for children's medical, mental and behavioral needs.

The partnership between the University of Mississippi Medical Center and Mississippi Children's Home Services was announced Tuesday.

14. Cold Calling Gets Bad Rap -

Cold calling gets a bad rap. Sales reps dread it, due to the anxiety and rejection that too often accompany it. In reality, the make-or-break moment in most cold calls is just the initial conversation starter – that first 10-20 seconds from your first word to the point at which the prospect gives you permission to continue talking. If you can make it past that all-important hurdle, it’s all downhill from there.

15. End of Windows XP Support Spells Trouble for Some -

NEW YORK (AP) – Microsoft will end support for the persistently popular Windows XP on Tuesday, and with an estimated 30 percent of businesses and consumers still using the 12-year-old operating system, the move could put everything from the operations of heavy industry to the identities of everyday people in danger.

16. US Finally Regains the Jobs Lost in the Recession -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy has reached a milestone: It has finally regained all the private-sector jobs it lost during the Great Recession.

Yet it took a painfully slow six years, and unemployment remains stubbornly high at 6.7 percent.

17. Trustee’s Texts Reaching Tardy Taxpayers -

Shelby County Trustee David Lenoir has found a new way to reach out and touch someone – specifically, tardy taxpayers.

18. Bill Extends Tax Breaks for Wind Farms, Filmmakers -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Wind farms, NASCAR tracks and filmmakers would keep their treasured tax breaks as part of an $85 billion package of temporary tax cuts passed by a key Senate committee Thursday.

19. Report Says Blacks, Latinos Losing Economic Ground -

WASHINGTON (AP) – African-Americans and Latinos are losing economic ground when compared with whites in the areas of employment and income as the United States pulls itself out of the Great Recession, the latest State of Black America report from the National Urban League says.

20. Going Back to Graduate School -

“Should I go back to graduate school?” This is a question many professionals wonder about each day. If you’ve struggled to find a new job in the difficult economy, you may be seriously considering it.

21. High Court Loosens Reins on Big Campaign Donors -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court's conservative majority voted Wednesday to free wealthy donors to give to as many political candidates and campaigns as they want, further loosening the reins on giving by big contributors as the 2014 campaign moves into high gear.

22. Filing Frenzy -

Until Tuesday, no one was running for the District 7 seat on the Shelby County Schools board. No one had pulled a qualifying petition from the Shelby County Election Commission until just two days before the filing deadline for candidates on the August election ballot.

23. Talk Like TED in Your Sales Pitch -

TED is a nonprofit committed to spreading ideas in the form of succinct yet powerful talks that are all 18 minutes or less – the ideal length of time to connect with and persuade viewers.

TED Talks have a distinct style – a formula that often results in spectacularly high levels of viewer engagement. This style is predicated on several guiding principles asked of TED Talk presenters, as outlined by Carmine Gallo in “Talk Like TED.”

24. Jury Selection Begins in Apple-Samsung Case -

SAN JOSE, Calif. (AP) – Jury selection began Monday in the latest legal battle between the fiercest rivals in the world of smartphones, with Apple and Samsung accusing each other, once again, of ripping off designs and features.

25. Mississippi Governor Signs Criminal-Justice Overhaul Bill -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant on Monday signed a bill designed to make the criminal justice system more efficient and less expensive.

Bryant said House Bill 585, which becomes law July 1, will protect public safety and could save the state $266 million in prison expenses, spread over 10 years.

26. Council to Weigh Pension, School Funding -

Memphis City Council members take a closer look Tuesday, April 1, at recommendations to cut city spending and use the savings to devote to the city’s unfunded pension liability.

Meanwhile, the council votes on a resolution that would set aside $4.8 million a year for the next 12 years to pay the $57 million city government owes Shelby County Schools for cutting city funding to the legacy Memphis City Schools system in 2008.

27. Judge Upholds Country of Origin Label for Meat -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Shoppers who want to buy American beef for dinner instead of meat from Canada or Mexico will still be able to find the country of origin on the label.

A federal appeals court ruling Friday allows the government to go forward with rules that require labels on packaged steaks, ribs and other cuts of meat to say where the animals were born, raised and slaughtered. The meat industry attempted to block the rules, which went into effect last year, saying they are costly and provide no health benefits to the consumer.

28. Pittman Brings Love of Memphis to Yelp Role -

On a recent lunchtime visit to Mot & Ed’s, the restaurant at 1354 Madison Ave. specializing in Southern food with a popular stuffed burger, Joelle Pittman immediately got the owner’s attention after the owner introduced herself and found out Pittman works for Yelp.

29. Cleaning Off the Cobwebs -

When new jobseekers start their search for the perfect opportunity, they’re often met with one of two concerns. Either “I’m too old” or “I’m too young.” Those who are older feel their experience will be overlooked because they have too many gray hairs. Those who are young feel their lack of experience will trump their abilities.

30. Report: Digital Sites Bring Momentum to News -

NEW YORK (AP) – Growing digital outlets are bringing "a sense of momentum" to the news business even as long-term problems continue to plague the industry, a journalism think tank said on Wednesday.

31. Young Workers Change Jobs Frequently, Study Shows -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Young adults born in the early 1980s held an average of just over six jobs each from ages 18 through 26, a Labor Department survey showed Wednesday.

Since 1997, the department's Bureau of Labor Statistics has been keeping tabs on about 9,000 young men and women born in the early 1980s, surveying their educational and workplace progress. The latest survey is from interviews conducted in 2011-2012.

32. Plans Coming Together for Tennessee Brewery Untapped -

Plans are taking shape for the six-week “temporary activation” project coming to the Tennessee Brewery at 495 Tennessee St., an initiative starting in late April that will be called “Tennessee Brewery Untapped.”

33. Ambiverts Make Sales Rock Stars -

Inability to find good sales talent is a common source of frustration among business owners and hiring managers nationwide. I would contend it’s because many are simply focusing on the wrong candidate profile.

34. Brown Contempt Jailing Maps Political Challenge -

The arrest of the Democratic nominee for Shelby County district attorney general Monday, March 24, is the best indication yet of the tumult within the local Democratic Party as it attempts to win countywide offices four years after losing every race to Republicans.

35. High Court Seems Divided Over Birth Control Rule -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court seemed divided Tuesday over whether employers' religious beliefs can free them from a part of the new health care law that requires that they provide coverage of birth control for employees at no extra charge.

36. DA Candidate Brown Jailed For Contempt in Juvenile Court -

Former Shelby County Criminal Court Judge Joe Brown, who is the Democratic nominee for District Attorney General in the August county general elections, was arrested and jailed Monday, March 24, for being in contempt of court.

37. Q&A: Can't Afford Health Plan, Will I Be Fined? -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The new health care law helps some people, hurts others and confuses almost everyone. Hoping to simplify things a bit, The Associated Press asked its Twitter, Facebook and Google Plus followers for their real-life questions about the program and the problems they're running into as the March 31 deadline approaches to sign up for coverage in new insurance markets.

38. With Health Law, Workers Ponder the I-Quit Option -

CHICAGO (AP) – For uninsured people, the nation's new health care law may offer an escape from worry about unexpected, astronomical medical bills. But for Stephanie Payne of St. Louis, who already had good insurance, the law could offer another kind of escape: the chance to quit her job.

39. Commission Takes Up Family Planning Contract -

Shelby County commissioners Monday, March 24, take up an attempt to end the county’s contract for federally funded family planning and related health services with Christ Community Health Services.

40. Starbucks to Roll Out Beer, Wine to More Cafes -

NEW YORK (AP) – Starbucks plans to turn more of its cafes into a destination for beer and wine in the evenings.

The coffee company says it is looking to expand alcohol sales to "thousands of select stores" over the next several years, although it didn't provide details on an exact timeline.

41. Veterans' Unemployment Edges Down but Remains High -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The unemployment rate for veterans who served since 2001 dipped slightly in 2013 to 9 percent, the Labor Department reported Thursday. That's down from 9.9 percent the year before, but well above overall civilian unemployment levels of around 7 percent over the same period.

42. Becoming Your Own CEO -

I’ve heard the same story at least three times in the past two weeks. A high-performing worker went in for a performance review with the boss. The boss said something along the lines of, “You’ve done a great job. I appreciate you. I can’t offer you a promotion, or a raise, but please don’t leave. I need you here.”

43. IBM's Watson to Help in Brain Cancer Research -

NEW YORK (AP) – IBM is teaming up with the New York Genome Center to help fight brain cancer.

The company said Wednesday that its Watson cloud computing system will be used in partnership with a New York-based genetic research center to help develop treatments for glioblastoma, the most common type of brain cancer in U.S. adults.

44. Measurement: Holy Grail of Marketing -

Second in a two-part series. Measurement is the Holy Grail of marketing. A savvy marketer would naturally prefer to invest his dollar in a strategy with a measurable return on investment versus one without.

45. City Council Continues Pension Talks -

Memphis City Council members continue their discussions Tuesday, March 18, about the city’s unfunded pension liability as well as possible changes in city employee heath care benefits.

But there is still no action on any part of the issues on the council agenda for a vote.

46. Google Redesigns Search Results on PCs -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Web surfing through the Internet's main gateway now looks slightly different on personal computers, thanks to a few cosmetic changes to Google's search engine this week.

47. Obama Signs Memo to Strengthen Overtime Pay Rules -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Seeking to influence workers' incomes where possible, President Barack Obama signed a presidential memorandum Thursday directing the Labor Department to devise new overtime rules that would make more workers eligible for time-and-a-half pay for their extra hours of work.

48. McDonald's Hit by Lawsuits Over Worker Pay -

NEW YORK (AP) – McDonald's workers in three states filed lawsuits against the fast-food chain this week, saying the company engages in a variety of illegal practices to avoid paying them what they're owed.

49. Bill to Allow School Staff to Get Insulin Training -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Missy Gaw's 10-year-old daughter has to have a dose of insulin each time she eats. If no nurse is available to administer the dosage at the girl's Nashville elementary school, then Gaw or her husband drive there to do so.

50. Defining Luck -

Some people seem to have all the luck. From the outside, they appear to get every promotion, make more money, drive a nicer car and live in a nicer house. It’s like they are surrounded by a ray of sunshine all day. This seems especially true of celebrities, company heads and professional athletes. How do they get so lucky, and when will my luck change?

51. White House Promotes Economic Issues Facing Women -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Add pay equity to President Barack Obama's 2014 do-it-himself wish list.

The White House is launching a campaign to promote a host of economic issues facing women, a key voting bloc in this year's midterm election.

52. Low-Wage Jobs Unexpectedly a Way of Life for Many -

WASHINGTON (AP) – For years, many Americans followed a simple career path: Land an entry-level job. Accept a modest wage. Gain skills. Leave eventually for a better-paying job.

The workers benefited, and so did lower-wage retailers such as Wal-Mart: When its staffers left for better-paying jobs, they could spend more at its stores. And the U.S. economy gained, too, because more consumer spending fueled growth.

53. Reports of Email’s Death Greatly Exaggerated -

The first in a two-part series. While email marketing may have lost a bit of luster given the instant gratification of social media, it’s alive and well and is one of several digital marketing channels businesses are spending significantly more on in 2014. Why? Because compared to social media marketing, email marketing is less time intensive and easier to measure, test and optimize.

54. Americans Board Public Transit in Booming Numbers -

LOS ANGELES (AP) – Americans are boarding public buses, trains and subways in greater numbers than any time since the suburbs began booming.

Nearly 10.7 billion trips in 2013, to be precise – the highest total since 1956, according to ridership data reported by transit systems nationally and released Monday by the American Public Transportation Association.

55. Blast of Winter Weather Can't Faze US Employers -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Brutal winter weather snarled traffic, canceled flights and cut power to homes and factories in February. Yet it didn't faze U.S. employers, who added 175,000 jobs, far more than the two previous months.

56. Commission to Vote on Crosstown Funding -

Shelby County Commissioners will vote Monday, March 10, on $5 million in public infrastructure funding for the Crosstown redevelopment project.

The commission meets at 1:30 p.m. at the Vasco Smith County Administration Building, 160 N. Main St. Follow the meeting @tdnpols, www.twitter.com/tdnpols.

57. Kroger: Storm Response Helped Boost Sales -

NEW YORK (AP) – Kroger said its ability to keep its supermarkets open and well-stocked as customers rushed to hoard groceries ahead of winter storms helped boost its results in the fourth quarter.

58. Making the Most of Career Fairs -

As college graduates prepare to enter the working world in May, corporations begin to ramp up their hiring. More jobs are posted, and recruiters increase their search efforts. Even if you graduated from college years or decades ago, this can be a perfect time to look for a new opportunity.

59. Court Weighs Securities Fraud Case Changes -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court on Wednesday seemed open to the possibility of making it harder for investors to join together to sue corporations for securities fraud – but maybe not as hard as companies that have to defend such lawsuits would like.

60. Marketing Strategies On Vine -

Given the increasingly shorter attention span of today’s Web user, it’s no wonder Twitter’s looping video app – Vine – is crawling its way into brand marketing strategies across the globe. At more than 40 million users in just over a year, it’s making a run at Instagram, now over three years old with more than 150 million users.

61. Sales Pitch -

For every professional sports team, there are at least two running narratives: the one on the court or field of play and the one at the box office.

As Grizzlies fans watch the team finish out the season in pursuit of a playoff berth, everyone understands each victory is invaluable. But for the people in charge of filling the seats at FedExForum, so is every season-ticket holder.

62. Obama Admin Drives Ahead With New Cleaner Gas Rule -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Obama administration is driving ahead with a dramatic reduction in sulfur in gasoline and tailpipe emissions, declaring that cleaner air will save thousands of lives per year at little cost to consumers.

63. US Manufacturing Boosted by Orders and Stockpiles -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. manufacturing expanded more quickly last month as companies received more orders and boosted their stockpiles.

A measure of production fell to its lowest level in nearly five years, likely a casualty of severe winter weather. But the rise in orders raises the possibility that factory output will rebound in coming months, economists said.

64. Buffett Says Economy Continues to Grow Steadily -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) – Investor Warren Buffett says the economy continues the steady improvement that began in fall of 2009 and he remains optimistic despite Russia's advance into Ukraine.

65. City Council to Dig Into Pension Liability -

The road to a specific solution to the city’s unsustainable pension liability and employee benefits begins Tuesday, March 4, in detailed, technical and complex financial discussions at City Hall that will dominate the committee schedule of the Memphis City Council.

66. GAO Report: Too Few Pilots or Too Little Pay? -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The nation's regional airlines are having trouble hiring enough pilots, the government says, suggesting one reason may be that they simply don't pay enough.

A pool of qualified pilots is available, but it's unclear whether they are willing to work for low entry-level wages, the Government Accountability Office said in a report released Friday.

67. New Food Labels Aim to Make Healthy Shopping Easy -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Ice cream lovers beware: The government knows you're unlikely to stop after half a cup.

New nutrition labels proposed Thursday for many popular foods, including ice cream, aim to more accurately reflect what people actually eat. And the proposal would make calorie counts on labels more prominent, too, reflecting that nutritionists now focus more on calories than fat.

68. Latest Airline Perk: Safe Distance From the Masses -

NEW YORK (AP) – On flights from San Francisco to Hong Kong, first-class passengers can enjoy a Mesclun salad with king crab or a grilled USDA prime beef tenderloin, stretch out in a 3-foot-wide seat that converts to a bed and wash it all down with a pre-slumber Krug "Grande Cuvee" Brut Champagne.

69. Miss. Lawmakers Eye Plan to Give Viking Range $12 Million -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – The state of Mississippi is proposing to give $12 million to Middleby Corp., the owner of Greenwood's Viking Range, to help pay for an expansion.

70. Arkansas House Speaker: Medicaid Talks Continuing -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – Opponents of Arkansas' compromise Medicaid expansion on Wednesday said they're floating ideas to slow enrollment, as they began meetings with House leaders aimed at ending a legislative stalemate over the program.

71. Instagram Tips for Businesses -

For the past couple of years, more and more businesses have been communicating with their audiences through Instagram.

By definition, Instagram is an online photo-sharing and social networking service that enables its users to take pictures and videos, apply digital filters to them and share them on a variety of social networking services. I applaud the creators of Instagram for taking everyone’s favorite social media feature – photos – and using it as the core of the platform.

72. Networking With No Fear -

Last week, as I pulled toward my parking space at home, the adorable 3-year-old boy who lives next door ran up to my car. “I haven’t seen you in a while!” he exclaimed in the most excited voice I’d heard all week. “How have you been?” I rolled down my window and chatted with him until his grandmother quickly rushed over to sweep him up.

73. GOP Tax Plan Lowers Rates, Repeals Popular Breaks -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A sweeping House Republican plan to overhaul the nation's tax laws would wipe out a slew of popular tax breaks to help pay for lower overall tax rates, a politically risky move in an election year that drew quick opposition Wednesday.

74. Feds File Suit Against For-Profit College Chain -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau filed suit Wednesday against a large, for-profit college chain alleging that it pushed students into high-cost private student loans knowing they would likely end in default.

75. Big Changes Ahead for Frequent Fliers on Delta -

DALLAS (AP) – Delta Air Lines is changing its frequent-flier program to favor passengers who buy the priciest tickets instead of those who fly the most miles.

It's a bid to lure higher-spending business travelers, who often book flights on short notice and pay more than bargain-hunting leisure travelers.

76. Rules to Limit Marketing Unhealthy Food in Schools -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Even the scoreboards in high school gyms will have to advertise only healthy foods under new rules announced Tuesday by the Obama administration.

Promotion of sugary drinks and junk foods around campuses during the school day will be phased out under the rules, intended to ensure that such marketing is brought in line with health standards that already apply to school foods.

77. Stop Asking for Referrals -

Referred prospects offer one of the strongest returns of any marketing or sales strategy you can deploy. After all, a good referral costs nothing to generate and a referred prospect is much more likely to become a customer than an average lead.

78. Supreme Court Seems Divided in Climate Case -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court appeared divided on Monday over the sole Obama administration program already in place to limit power plant and factory emissions of gases blamed for global warming.

79. Governors Erupt in Partisan Dispute at White House -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The nation's governors emerged from a meeting with President Barack Obama on Monday claiming harmony, only to immediately break into an on-camera partisan feud in front of the West Wing.

80. Warren Buffett Offers Lesson in Value Investing -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) – Warren Buffett is offering a refresher course on his approach to investing in his annual letter to Berkshire Hathaway Inc. shareholders.

81. Mississippi Board of Education OKs Common Core Courses -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Mississippi's Board of Education approved new Common Core-aligned English and math courses Friday, but not before some board members objected, saying they believe teachers and students need another year to prepare.

82. Fans Welcome ‘Grindfather’ Back -

Decades from now, it might be the first story Tony Allen tells. The night Allen returned to the FedExForum court for the Grizzlies, after missing more than a month with a wrist injury, and when he checked into the game he received a standing ovation.

83. Pew Maps Twitter Conversations, Finds 6 Types -

NEW YORK (AP) – People take to Twitter to talk about everything from politics to breakfast to Justin Bieber in what feels like a chaotic stream of messages. So it may come as a surprise that the conversations on the short messaging service fit into just six distinct patterns.

84. Cellphone Calls on Planes? Don't Ask the Feds -

WASHINGTON (AP) – It looks like the government is more conflicted about cellphones on planes than most travelers. Even as one federal agency considers allowing the calls, another now wants to make sure that doesn't happen.

85. Agriculture Census Shows Boom in Farm Sales -

WASHINGTON (AP) – American agriculture has experienced a boom, with market values of crops, livestock and total agricultural products reaching record highs even as the amount of U.S. farmland declined, according to a new government survey.

86. Commission Takes Up School Board Redistricting -

A majority of Shelby County Commissioners seems to agree that the Shelby County Schools board should be smaller than the 13 members it will become with the August school board elections if the commission takes no further action.

87. Democrats Push for Mississippi State Employee Pay Raise -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Democrats say they'll keep trying to give all Mississippi government employees at least a $1,000 pay raise in the coming year, even after several attempts were blocked Wednesday in the Republican-majority House.

88. Make More Money This Year -

If you’re like most people, you created a list of new year’s resolutions at the end of December or in the beginning of January. One of your resolutions was probably related to your finances. It may have been to save more, to make more or both. Regardless of which you selected, increasing your income can achieve both goals.

89. County Primary Filing Deadline Arrives -

A couple of days before the filing deadline for candidates in the May county primaries, it looked like a political season with lots of action at the deadline itself.

The deadline is noon Thursday, Feb. 20, with another week for any candidates who meet that deadline to withdraw if they wish.

90. 2014 Search Engine Trends -

There is a complex day-to-day science to ranking consistently well with the search engines. Unless you’ve made it your life’s work to stay abreast of the ever-changing algorithms, your best bet is to stick to the basics.

91. Weather, Computer Outage Cause Flight Delays -

DALLAS (AP) — More than 600 U.S. flights were canceled and about 2,600 were running late on Tuesday as a winter storm swept across the Northeast.

Adding to travelers' woes: United Airlines experienced problems with its passenger-service computer system for much of the morning.

92. Council to Review Mall Conversions -

Memphis City Council members get a look at plans for the redevelopment of two shopping malls Tuesday, Feb. 18.

But the council’s last meeting for February apparently won’t include any presentation of a proposal to change the benefits of new city hires and city employees with less than 10 years on the job, as promised earlier by Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s administration.

93. Tweet This: Olympians Turn Medals Into Buzz, Money -

SOCHI, Russia (AP) – When Jenny Jones won Olympic bronze at the Sochi Games, her following on Twitter exploded. The audience for @jennyjonessnow has grown 10-fold, to 65,000 followers, in the three weeks since the British snowboarder tweeted: "Just found out I officially made the GB winter Olympic team. Whoop!"

94. Science, Not Muscle, Driving Many Olympic Wins -

KRASNAYA POLYANA, Russia (AP) – Nineteen-year-old Slovakian luger Josef Petrulak competed in the Sochi Olympics in a 22-year-old sled. That's right: His sled is three years older than he is. His German rivals get a new sled every year, designed by BMW and calibrated to whoosh faster, smoother and smarter every season.

95. Putting Your <3 Into Your Job -

The season of love is upon us. Is it fair to say you love what you’re doing for a living? Do you find yourself putting in your all every day, or is it a drag to get up in the morning – or worse yet, to go to bed the night before, knowing your next day’s work is looming over you?

96. White House Offers Help to Industry on Cyberattack -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Whited House on Wednesday offered to help U.S. businesses protect their computer systems from cyberattacks that President Barack Obama called "one the gravest national security dangers that the United States faces."

97. Pouring It On -

The Cash Saver store on Madison Avenue in Midtown had begun to show its age, its weather-beaten exterior presenting a less-than-inviting entrance and its dated and worn interior lacking the displays and amenities found in most modern grocery stores.

98. House Takes Step Toward Ban on In-Flight Calls -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Allowing airline passengers to make cellphone calls in-flight is asking for trouble, lawmakers said Tuesday as a House panel approved a bill to ban such calls.

The bill – passed without opposition by the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee – requires the Department of Transportation to issue regulations prohibiting such calls. The department has already said it is considering creating such a ban as part of its consumer protection role.

99. Role of Personal Branding in Business -

Many of the top-performing CEOs in the world, as determined by Harvard Business Review, are names that aren’t exactly fodder for dinner conversation. They know how to create long-term value for their companies but many focus little on creating their own personal brands.

100. Study: Media Everywhere, Bathroom Included -

LOS ANGELES (AP) – TV viewers increasingly are watching programs on their own schedule, according to a Nielsen company media study released Monday.

In the past year, time-shifting of television content grew by almost two hours, averaging 13 hours per month, the study found. Viewers averaged nearly 134 hours of live TV viewing a month in 2013, down nearly three hours from 2012.