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Editorial Results (free)

1. FDA Tweaks Food Safety Rules Due Next Year -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The government will rewrite sweeping new food safety rules after farmers complained that earlier proposals could hurt business, the Food and Drug Administration said Friday.

2. SEC May Take Enforcement Action Against ITT -

NEW YORK (AP) – The Securities and Exchange Commission may take enforcement action against for-profit education company ITT Educational Services Inc. over its student loans.

3. Haslam Keeps Door Open to Pre-K; Ramsey Skeptical -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – While Gov. Bill Haslam is keeping the door open to an expansion of the public pre-kindergarten program in Tennessee, any such move would remain a tough sell among some fellow Republicans in the Legislature.

4. Alexander, Corker Honored by Business Association -

U.S. Sens. Lamar Alexander and Bob Corker are being honored by the nation's leading small business association.

The National Federation of Independent Business has named the Tennessee Republicans a Guardian of Small Business for their voting record on behalf of America's small-business owners.

5. Violent Crime Rises in Shelby County -

Major violent crime in Memphis was up 7.7 percent from January through August compared to the same period a year ago, according to the Memphis-Shelby County Crime Commission.

The statistics released Friday, Sept. 19, show an 8.1 percent increase in major violent crime countywide, including the city of Memphis, from the same time in 2013.

6. Ritualizing Your Parenthood -

We are people of ceremony and ritual. Every occasion of transition is cause for celebration. A prescribed formula marks our rite of passage from one status to another.

Significant milestones are pronounced by traditional words stating our readiness to take on the new responsibility. Marriage, membership initiations, military inductions, oaths of office, graduations, even citizenship, are all marked by ritual.

7. The Only Difference: Mindset -

The same truths not brought into action present themselves as lessons, on-going themes. This one rings with more truth every time I encounter it. Mindset is the real pivot point, the only true sustainable, competitive advantage (other than exclusivity, which is always temporary) for organizations that want to flourish.

8. TSA Expands PreCheck at Memphis Airport -

Pace Cooper, president and CEO of Cooper Hotels, a hospitality development and management company that owns and manages hotels in multiple states, is accustomed to flying and the hassles that sometimes accompany air travel.

9. Consumer Prices Fall 0.2 Percent in August -

U.S. consumer prices edged down in August, the first monthly drop since the spring of 2013, as gasoline, airline tickets and clothing prices all fell. It was the latest evidence that inflation remains under control.

10. Singing Mechanic’s Life Much Like the Songs He Sings -

The Singing Mechanic – “I’ve got that name. Nobody else can use it,” says Billy Devereaux – sits by his worn, 1,200-square-foot, two-room cottage and looks down at Boots, his Dutch Shepherd.

“He’s a possum killer and he runs security,” says Billy, 55, gazing across the swath of remote land separated by a long gravel trail from Smith Springs Road in Antioch.

11. Road to Better Mass Transit -

Picking a new transit chief is critical for a city in transition.

Next year, Nashville residents will elect a new mayor and turn over its large Metro Council.

Davidson County also expects some 200,000 new residents over the next 20 years, and much of the success of future development will depend on the ease of navigating around Nashville – already the nation’s second-worst area for sprawl, according to Smart Growth America.

12. Prep Coaches, Players Sold on Jones the Recruiter -

Nothing surprises Murfreesboro Blackman High School football coach Philip Shadowens when it comes to college recruiting.

Shadowens has seen it all – including the flurry of activity created by Blackman senior quarterback and safety Jauan Jennings, rated the No. 18 athlete in the nation by Rivals.com.

13. Jones’ Wide Net Gathers Old Friends, Top Prospects -

Butch Jones was sitting in the office of Knoxville’s South-Doyle High School athletic director and football coach Clark Duncan during a visit to see recruit Jocquez Bruce last winter.

14. Teacher Surplus Count Drops to Only Four -

Every school year the first estimates come in high in the count of how many school teachers will be surplused – declared excess because of the number of students that are counted at the start of the school year and then reassigned based on the final student head count.

15. Editorial: Growing Rape Kit Backlog Raises More Concern -

The backlog gets bigger. And with the recent news that 196 rape kits dating back to 1976 have been found by Memphis Police, questions never fully answered about the rape kit backlog that surfaced about a year ago become more urgent.

16. ‘Cutting Edge’ -

The first thing to understand about the task that Opera Memphis general director Ned Canty feels is before him is that he’s not leading a music organization that competes only with other music outlets and venues for audiences’ attention.

17. Brighter Economy Driving Up Holiday Hiring Plans -

NEW YORK (AP) – UPS will hire up to 95,000. Kohl's plans to take on 67,000 and FedEx 50,000. Wal-Mart will add 60,000.

One after the other, a flurry of major U.S. retail and transportation companies announced sharp increases this week in the number of temporary workers they plan to hire for the holiday season. Collectively, such hiring could reach its highest point this year for stores since 1999, when the economy was roaring and the Great Recession was still eight years away.

18. Volatile Apartment Sector Reduces US Home Building -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. home construction plunged in August, led by steep decline in the volatile apartment category. But single-family house construction, a larger and more stable portion of the market, fell only modestly.

19. Fed Keeps Rates Low, But Brace for the Inevitable -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Record-low interest rates will be around for at least a few more months, the Federal Reserve made clear Wednesday.

Enjoy the easy money while it lasts.

By mid-2015, economists expect the Fed to abandon a nearly 6-year-old policy of keeping short-term rates at record lows. Those rates have helped support the economy, cheered the stock market and shrunk mortgage rates. A Fed rate increase could potentially reverse those trends.

20. After Record Profits, Airlines Keep Adding Jobs -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The number of jobs at U.S. airlines keeps growing – although slowly – as some of them post record profits.

The U.S. Department of Transportation said Thursday that the nation's passenger airlines employed the equivalent of 386,243 full-time workers in July, up 1.3 percent from the same month last year. It was the eighth straight monthly gain over year-earlier numbers.

21. Are You Sharing Too Much? -

When it comes to job seeking, sometimes less is more. Everything we do – from the clothes we wear to our resumes to our social media accounts – says something about us. These things are pieces of our personal brands.

22. 100 Percent Sure -

IF A PROGRAM IS 100 PERCENT SUCCESSFUL, GET WITH THE PROGRAM. I wrote something three years ago when President Obama visited Booker T. Washington High School. In light of recent events, I’d like to visit those words again.

23. Little Sees ‘Acceptance’ in City Insurance Drama -

City Chief Administrative Officer George Little says he hopes the city’s long debate about health insurance coverage changes will mean a shorter discussion about proposed pension changes to come.

24. Community Advocates Seek Crime Solutions -

In mid-August, Memphis Police brass realized they had a crime problem in different parts of the city.

“We realized we had a spike in crime,” is how Deputy Police Chief Clete Knight put it Wednesday, Sept. 17, to a neighborhood group in East Memphis.

25. Airport Authority Approves RedRover Contract -

Memphis International Airport should have a new team of storytellers on board.

The Memphis-Shelby County Airport Authority board voted Thursday, Sept. 18, to engage Memphis-based RedRover Co. LLC to help craft a multi-platform communications and image campaign for Memphis International, which is transitioning from a Delta Airlines hub to an origin-and-destination airport.

26. Michelle's Message -

First Lady Michelle Obama’s visit to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Wednesday, Sept. 18, was a tightly scripted affair that afforded her an up-close look at the world-renowned hospital and a cross-section of its precocious patients, who she met with in an activity room as they worked on a project.

27. Consumer Prices Fall 0.2 Percent in August -

U.S. consumer prices edged down in August, the first monthly drop since the spring of 2013, as gasoline, airline tickets and clothing prices all fell. It was the latest evidence that inflation remains under control.

28. Clueing THEA -

THEA crops up in crosswords occasionally. In an easy puzzle, it’ll be clued as “Ellington’s ‘Take ___ Train’.” Or “Mr. T’s ‘___ Team’.” In more challenging grids, THEA’s clues include “Actress Gill,” “German author von Harbou,” or “Mother of Eos.” Snobby solvers don’t like any of these clues; thus, they don’t like THEA. That’s about to change. Henceforth, a new clue for THEA will be available. I predict a change of attitude toward the answer.

29. Target Date Mutual Funds – Should You Go With the Flow? -

Ray's take: Target date funds take their name from the year in which an investor plans to retire or stop contributing to savings and is increasingly the default choice for 401K plan contributions.

30. Door Remains Open on City Health Insurance Changes -

The political struggle to close the door and lock in changes to city health insurance coverage is proving to be a challenge for the Memphis City Council.

The council voted Tuesday, Sept. 16, to adjust the health insurance changes it approved in June to grandfather in for a year approximately 300 retirees and their spouses when it comes to the 70 percent subsidy on insurance premiums they currently get from the city.

31. City Employees Return to Court Over Benefits -

The basic elements of an overhaul of city health insurance and pension benefits got some changes this week at the Memphis City Council. And it looks like the council might put off a vote on pension benefit changes originally set for a vote in October.

32. Debt of Gratitude -

Robert Wright began working as a truck driver for Intermodal Cartage Co. in March 2006, making runs to cities across the Southeast.

33. Retirees Sue As Council Adjusts Health Insurance Changes -

Three retired Memphis Police officers and the widow of a Memphis Police officer filed suit Tuesday, Sept. 16, against the city of Memphis seeking a temporary restraining order to stop changes in city government health insurance benefits by the time the open enrollment period begins next month.

34. Social Security Resumes Mailing Benefit Statements -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Social Security Administration has resumed mailing statements to workers letting them know the estimated benefits they will get when they retire, the agency announced Tuesday.

35. Seeking Long-Term Outcomes -

Long-term outcomes, such as improved high school graduation rates and reduced dropout rates, are the ultimate objectives of the Memphis Athletic Ministries’ still-young Academic Diligence program.

36. Memphis Police Discover More Rape Kits -

Memphis Police have found in recent weeks 196 more rape kits in previously unsearched areas where police store evidence, Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong told Memphis City Council members Tuesday, Sept. 16.

37. Meritan’s Branch Named Among Top Nurses -

Cindy Branch, Meritan’s associate vice president for health services, has been selected to represent Tennessee as one of the nation’s top 50 home care and hospice nurses by the National Association for Home Care & Hospice and the Home Healthcare Nurses Association. Branch, a registered nurse, has oversight of Meritan’s nursing programs, including home health, private duty nursing and medical residential homes. She will be recognized at NACH’s annual meeting in October.

38. Ball Targets Carr's Tea Party Supporters -

Gordon Ball, the Democratic challenger to Republican U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander, is basing his uphill challenge of Alexander on his specific definition of being a moderate Democrat and where that intersects with tea party followers.

39. Apple: Record 4 Million Orders of iPhones on First Day -

NEW YORK (AP) – Apple had more than 4 million advance orders of its new, larger iPhones in the first 24 hours, exceeding its initial supply, the company said Monday.

The iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus will be delivered to customers starting Friday and throughout September, but many won't be delivered until October, Apple said. Phones will still be available Friday on a walk-in basis at Apple retail stores and from various wireless carriers and authorized Apple resellers.

40. Olive Garden Defends Breadstick Policy -

NEW YORK (AP) – Olive Garden is defending its practice of giving customers as many breadsticks as they want, saying the policy conveys "Italian generosity."

The remark is part of a response by the chain's parent company, Darden Restaurants Inc., to a nearly 300-page criticism released by hedge fund Starboard Value last week. Starboard took Olive Garden and its management to task for a litany of issues, including its liberal distribution of breadsticks, its failure to salt the water used to boil its pasta and even the length of the asparagus it serves.

41. Speculation Swirls Over Fed Language on Rate Hike -

WASHINGTON (AP) – When the Federal Reserve issues a policy statement after it meets this week, the financial world will be on high alert for two words:

"Considerable time."

The presence or absence of that phrase will trigger a rush to assess the likely timing of the Fed's first increase in interest rates since it cut them to record lows in 2008.

42. Third Parties Still Fighting for Ballot Access -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Four years after the Libertarian Party of Tennessee filed its first lawsuit to get on the ballot, the group is still fighting for access in a state that has some of the most restrictive rules in the country for smaller political parties.

43. Tennessee Voters to Decide Ban on Income Tax -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennesseans are just weeks away from voting on a constitutional amendment to bar lawmakers from ever imposing a state income tax. The November vote approaches as a new study from ratings agency Standard & Poor's suggests that rising income inequality has a stronger negative effect on the states most reliant on sales tax revenues compared with those with those more dependent on income taxes.

44. US Factory Output Drops 0.4 Percent in August -

U.S. manufacturing output declined in August for the first time in seven months, reflecting a sharp fall in production at auto plants that was due mainly to seasonal adjustment problems.

Output at manufacturing plants fell 0.4 percent in August after a 0.7 percent rise in July, the Federal Reserve reported Monday. Total industrial production was down 0.1 percent in August, also the first setback for the overall figure since January. Output was up in mining and utility production but these gains were not enough to offset the decline in manufacturing.

45. South Carolina Back in SEC East Race -

The South Carolina defense still has improvement to make, but in beating Georgia 38-35 last Saturday the Gamecocks made a fourth-quarter goal-line stand and reasserted their presence in the SEC East Division.

46. Raising Concerns Over Education Coverage -

With just one person reporting on schools in a metropolitan area of more than 1.3 million people, The Commercial Appeal is forging ahead with a relationship with a nonprofit journalism organization dedicated to covering education.

47. Olive Garden Investor: Back Off on the Breadsticks -

NEW YORK (AP) – Maybe there is such a thing as too many breadsticks.

In a nearly 300-page treatise on what's wrong with Olive Garden and its management, investor Starboard Value suggests the Italian restaurant chain is being reckless with its unlimited breadsticks. The hedge fund notes the chain's official policy is to bring out one breadstick per customer at a time, plus an extra for the table.

48. Plans for Site of Closing International Paper Mill are Uncertain -

COURTLAND, Ala. (AP) – A year after International Paper announced that it would close a north Alabama mill because of declining demand, there's much uncertainty about the site's future.

49. Allow Innovation to Expand Business Model -

As your innovation efforts begin to move from the ideation to the testing phase, or the co-creation with consumers or customers, outlandish and disruptive concepts present themselves. As messy as children arriving, they show up, saying, "Feed me, let me scream at the top of my lungs, I’m uncivilized,” all without speaking.

50. Latino Political Profile Continues Rise -

When Latino Memphis held its first annual Leadership Luncheon last week in East Memphis, the ballroom at the Holiday Inn University of Memphis included political and business leaders among the group of 800 people.

51. Titans Buying What New Coaches Selling -

NASHVILLE – The Tennessee Titans did what few believed they could do when they went into Kansas City and dominated the Chiefs on Sunday.

And while one win is hardly enough for Titans fans to start making Super Bowl reservations, there is the sense that something is vastly different about this organization from the past few years.

52. Young Volunteers Face Long Odds at Oklahoma -

Two games into the 2014 season, and it’s time for the University of Tennessee to play some big-boy football.

The Vols (2-0) took care of business at Neyland Stadium in the first two games against Utah State and Arkansas State.

53. ‘Swamp Rat’ Remembers Last Tennessee-Oklahoma Game -

University of Tennessee quarterback Dewey “Swamp Rat” Warren stood on the field during a timeout with a few seconds left in the Jan. 1, 1968 Orange Bowl.

Warren was the holder for UT place-kicker Karl Kremser, who lined up for a 43-yard field goal attempt against Oklahoma. The Sooners led, 26-24.

54. Asking for Moon Might Leave You Grounded -

There were 3,226 closings in August, Greater Nashville Association of Realtors numbers show, up 4.6 percent from last August. It could have increased 24.6 percent if there were more listings.

“Inventory is continuing to decrease,” GNAR president Hagan Stone notes. “There is demand from buyers.”

55. Unintended Consequences: ER Visits Increase -

Hospital officials have been pushing for the state to expand Medicaid health care coverage for thousands of Tennessee’s poorest citizens, despite two significant and related concerns:

Expansion will lead to increased visits to the most expensive place in America for routine health care, the emergency room.

56. Coverage Gap Leaves Rural Tennessee Hospitals on Life Support -

Four rural hospitals have closed and dozens are at risk of shuttering: That’s the fallout, some say, from Gov. Bill Haslam’s decision not to join the Affordable Care Act in 2013 and tap into millions in promised federal funds for Tennessee’s financially-strapped health care institutions.

57. Candidates Seek State Attorney General Post -

Eight candidates are making their case to become state attorney general.

The candidates spoke at a public hearing on Monday and were interviewed by Tennessee Supreme Court justices, who will appoint one of them to the eight-year term. Tennessee is the only state where the high court appoints the attorney general.

58. Southern Security Expands Collierville Location -

Southern Security Federal Credit Union is planning an expansion to its Collierville location at 765 W. Poplar Ave.

59. Mid-South Fair Opens Sept. 19 in Southaven -

The Mid-South Fair will open at Landers Center in Southaven Sept. 19 through Sept. 28.

And this year the annual event will have free parking for the first time since its move to Southaven.

New features at the fair will include FARMtastic, an educational exhibit for children about agriculture, and cooking and baking contests that had been a regular feature of the fair during its decades in Memphis.

60. Lillard to Be President of Treasurers Group -

Tennessee State Treasurer David H. Lillard Jr. has been elected president of the National Association of State Treasurers.

The association provides advocacy and support for state treasurers and treasury staff throughout the United States and its territories.

61. This week in Memphis history: September 12-18 -

2004: Usher at FedExForum, the first show at the new arena followed days later by Alan Jackson and Martin McBride.

62. Legal Issues Await Mob Attack Investigation -

Memphis police could make more arrests in the Poplar Plaza mob attack, but investigators believe they have the teenagers who started the riot on the parking lot of the Kroger supermarket Saturday, Sept. 6, that injured three people.

63. Editorial: Same Old Response Still Not Working -

We need a new response to an old problem in our city.

And in the week since the mob attack at Poplar Plaza, we feel there has been a beginning. It’s not one that has satisfied many citizens and it will surely be tested in the coming weeks and beyond.

64. Sharpe, HealthNet Find Success in Changing Industry -

As banking has changed in recent years, it’s caused consumers to take another look at the conventional wisdom – including coming to the realization that banking is not limited to, well, banks.

Credit unions tend to be overshadowed by their more traditional brethren, but they generally provide the same services in a way that consumers probably couldn’t even spot the differences between those firms and larger, traditional banks.

65. Memphis Banks Expanding Without Actually Moving -

In banking, growth and expansion don’t have to mean scouting other cities and markets for ideal spots on which to set up new brick-and-mortar locations.

Such locations, in fact, are particularly costly propositions at a time when customers are visiting the drive-thrus and bank tellers at such locations increasingly less as mobile options proliferate. But just because a bank’s physical location doesn’t expand outside of its core market, it doesn’t mean the bank’s deal flow is confined to the same area.

66. Legacy Building -

2014 is shaping up to be a banner year for Legacy Wealth Management, an independent financial planning and portfolio management firm that’s moved into a prominent new space, continued staffing up over the last several months and is preparing to launch a seminar series.

67. US Budget Deficit Dips to $128.7 Billion in August -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The federal government ran a lower budget deficit this August than a year ago, remaining on track to record the lowest deficit for the entire year since 2008.

The August deficit was $128.7 billion, down 13 percent from the $147.9 billion deficit recorded in August 2013, the Treasury Department said Thursday in its monthly budget report.

68. Applications for US Unemployment Rise to 315,000 -

WASHINGTON (AP) – More people sought U.S. unemployment benefits last week, though the trend in benefit applications in the past month remained low.

The Labor Department says that weekly applications for unemployment aid rose 11,000 to a seasonally adjusted 315,000, the most since late June. Still, the four-week average of applications, a less volatile measure, rose just 750 to 304,000. The average is 7.1 percent lower than it was a year ago.

69. Silicon Valley Struggles to Speak FDA's Language -

WASHINGTON (AP) – From Apple's new smartwatch that tracks heartbeats to contact lenses that measure blood sugar – Silicon Valley is pouring billions into gadgets and apps designed to transform health care. But the tech giants that have famously disrupted so many industries are now facing their own unexpected disruption: regulation.

70. Lillard to Be President of State Treasurers Group -

Tennessee State Treasurer David H. Lillard Jr. has been elected president of the National Association of State Treasurers.

The association provides advocacy and support for state treasurers and treasury staff throughout the United States and its territories.

71. Door Opener or Doorstop -

When I talk with millennials who have recently graduated from college, one thing is clear: They’re struggling to figure out what exactly to do next.

A common theme is they’re taking jobs that would normally be considered beneath their skill level.

72. At the Counter -

THE COLLEGE INN, FULL CIRCLE. The future was in my hands. My parents had set me free and I sat there all by myself for the very first time, my own stool at the counter, my own menu in front of me and a cool new show on the TV above. It was 1957. I was eight. The show was Perry Mason. And I was in control.

73. Wade: NFL Has Addiction Problem -

Wading in with thoughts on several topics … So a former FBI director will investigate how the NFL handled evidence in the Ray Rice domestic violence case – the tape that commissioner Roger Goodell says he never saw until recently – and here’s what I wonder about the state of our society:

74. Education Secretary Calls for System-Wide Reforms -

U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan saw much that he liked in Memphis Wednesday, Sept. 10, at the end of his three-day “back to school” bus tour of schools in three states.

The last stop was Cornerstone Prep Elementary School in Binghampton.

75. Mob Effect -

For much of the week after the Saturday, Sept. 6, mob attack at the Poplar Plaza shopping center, Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong has resolutely kept his focus on the incident.

But the larger issues of violence in Memphis and specifically youth violence – and the criminal justice system response to both – have never been far away.

76. Authors, Readers Converge for Book Festival -

Earlier this year, interest in the first Mid-South Book Festival, scheduled to take place later this month, began to reach what seemed like a fever pitch, according to Literacy Mid-South executive director Kevin Dean.

77. Duncan Bus Tour Ends With Binghampton Kudos -

U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan wrapped up a three-day “back to school” bus tour of schools in several states Wednesday, Sept. 10, at Cornerstone Prep Elementary School in Binghampton.

78. Senior Americans Burdened With Student Debt -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Rosemary Anderson could be 81 by the time she pays off her student loans. After struggling with divorce, health problems and an underwater home mortgage, the 57-year-old anticipates there could come a day when her Social Security benefits will be docked to make the payments.

79. US Airlines Improve On-Time Performance -

At the height of this summer's travel season, airline flights were more likely to arrive on time and less likely to be canceled.

The improvement in airline performance was a welcome break for travelers, who had seen a spike in delays and cancelations during the first half of this year.

80. Regional Airlines Not Sharing in Majors' Success -

DALLAS (AP) – For passengers traveling between smaller cities and large hub airports, the ticket may say Delta, American or United, but they're likely flying on a regional airline whose planes are painted in the major carrier's colors.

81. Southern Security Credit Union Expands Collierville Location -

Southern Security Federal Credit Union is planning an expansion to its Collierville location at 765 W. Poplar Ave.

82. Mid-South Fair Opens Sept. 19 in Southaven -

The Mid-South Fair will open at Landers Center in Southaven Sept. 19 through Sept. 28.

And this year the annual event will have free parking for the first time since its move to Southaven.

New features at the fair will include FARMtastic, an educational exhibit for children about agriculture, and cooking and baking contests that had been a regular feature of the fair during its decades in Memphis.

83. Woeful Period for US Markets -

September 8, 2014, S&P 2000 = 11 + 4 percent + 11 percent + 1.5 percent + 2.5 percent. The last five years have been consistently wonderful for the U.S. markets. Over the time period, the S&P 500 has advanced more than 17 percent annually. Only four bull markets (advances uninterrupted by a 20 percent decline) have lasted longer and returned more. What has this bull been eating?

84. Seniors and Student Loan Co-Signatures – Should You? -

Ray’s take: Your grandchild has been accepted to his or her college of choice. Great news! But now that the celebration of acceptance is over, it’s time to do a realistic budget and figure out where the money will come from to pay for tuition and all the other expenses associated with attending college.

85. Heart Foundation’s Novick Prepares for Ukraine Work -

Dr. William Novick isn’t real big on taking orders – especially from his doctors. Four weeks ago, he had his second hip replacement surgery since the first of the year.

86. Going Home -

Steve Brown, Crye-Leike Realtors Inc. Memphis general manager, and other Realtors remember a time when the headquarters for the Memphis Area Association of Realtors had a bank of telephones along a wall that Realtors in the field flocked to in order to check in with the office.

87. ‘Love Mob’ Responds to Poplar Plaza Attack -

The amount of traffic that comes through the intersection of Highland Street and Poplar Avenue has made it a favorite of causes through the years – from war protestors and advocates to those on both sides of the death penalty, and, more recently, city employees upset over benefit changes.

88. Apple Reveals Larger iPhones and Smartwatch -

CUPERTINO, Calif. (AP) – For the first time in years, Apple's iPhones weren't the star of the show. Apple unveiled a smartwatch on Tuesday, a wearable device that marks the company's first major entry in a new product category since the iPad's debut in 2010.

89. Watchdog: VA Managers Lied About Delays -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Managers at more than a dozen Veterans Affairs medical facilities lied to investigators about scheduling practices and other issues, the department's inspector general said Tuesday.

90. American Recovery Drives the Dollar Sharply Higher -

NEW YORK (AP) – In the world of currencies, the dollar is starting to look like a safe home in a tough neighborhood.

A strengthening American economy, combined with a gloomy outlook for growth elsewhere, is pushing the U.S. currency sharply higher.

91. Home Depot Confirms Breach in US, Canada Stores -

NEW YORK (AP) – Shares of Home Depot sank before the opening bell Tuesday after confirming that its payment systems had been hacked, potentially exposing millions of shoppers who used credit and debit cards at its more than 2,000 U.S. and Canadian stores.

92. College Savings on the Rise as Plans Average $20,000 -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The good news is that Americans are saving more than ever for college. The bad news is that the average amount wouldn't come close to getting a person a degree.

In a report released Tuesday, the College Savings Plans Network found that the average college savings or prepaid tuition account known as a "529" plan is now worth about $20,671 – almost double what these accounts were worth during the dog-days of the recession.

93. Governor Gets Report on Tennessee Juvenile Jails -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A security audit will be performed on all three of the state's youth development centers after a recent breakout and violence at the facility in Middle Tennessee, according to a preliminary report sent to the governor.

94. Three Secrets to Closing More Business -

Considering how hard salespeople have to work to land a meeting with a prospective customer, it’s surprising how little effort is typically put into the follow-up with that prospect after the meeting. The result is a lost opportunity and the need to work harder than necessary to meet sales targets.

95. Lee Joins MOGA’s DeSoto Office -

Dr. Daniel Lee has joined the DeSoto office of Memphis Obstetrics & Gynecological Association PC. Lee provides comprehensive women’s health services, including office gynecology, obstetrics and surgical management, to women of all ages.

96. Ford Chairmanship Continues Commission Tumult -

The Democratic Shelby County commissioner considered a swing vote on controversial items during his first term on the commission won the chairmanship of the body Monday, Sept. 8, for the next year in a decidedly non-party line vote – at least in terms of those in his own party voting for him.

97. Shelby County Mortgage Market Down 19 Percent in August -

BankTennessee president and CEO Jim Rout sees new home sales and resales “fairly steady” at the moment.

But, in a common refrain among many local bankers looking at their recent numbers, the activity is not at the level that might be expected, considering still-historic low interest rates.

98. Road Show -

In about a week the Grizzlies’ Quincy Pondexter will deliver the ceremonial first pitch before a St. Louis Cardinals game at Busch Stadium.

If his throw is bad enough, the Grizzlies actually might get more exposure because it’ll make ESPN’s SportsCenter and get shown again and again.

99. City Leaders Face Mixed Reaction to Poplar Plaza Attack -

Memphis police had arrested and charged 11 juveniles by the end of the day Monday, Sept. 8, in the mob attack Saturday at the Poplar Plaza shopping center.

Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong said several parents had followed the advice he and Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. gave Sunday and turned in their children after learning they may have been involved in the attack that injured two other teenagers working at the Kroger supermarket at Poplar Plaza.

100. About That Raise... US Executives Feeling Tight-Fisted -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The corporate executives who decide whether U.S. workers get meaningful raises have looked at the broader economy and have a message: Don't expect a pay increase anytime soon.