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Editorial Results (free)

1. Germantown Mayor-Elect Discusses Revenue, Schools -

The incoming mayor of Germantown wants to grow the city’s sales tax base to make its government a bit less reliant on property tax revenue.

Property taxes fund about 60 percent of Germantown city services, said mayor-elect Mike Palazzolo, who takes office Dec. 16. Sales tax revenue funds another 16 percent, with the rest coming from fees and state and federal funding.

2. Hillsboro High Land Sale: New School, Big Profit -

Merritt Rowe knows her children will never personally benefit from any changes to Hillsboro High School in Green Hills, but as the parent of two current students and another starting next year, it is something she is willing to fight for and encourages other parents – especially those of future students – to do the same.

3. After the Campaign -

The 2014 election year began in January with dissent from the floor.

At the end of the Shelby County Democratic Party’s annual Kennedy Day fundraiser in January, former Memphis City Council member and state Rep. Carol Chumney, who was not among the speakers, challenged the party establishment from her table to do more to support women running for office.

4. Master Plan -

Progress is usually expensive and seldom convenient. But the alternative?

Regression, at an ultimately higher cost, and eventually the realization that an opportunity slipped by.

Such was the mindset as University of Tennessee Health Science Center leaders launched a campus master plan designed to enhance UTHSC’s position as an urban academic medical center at the core of a larger revitalization of the Memphis Medical Center District.

5. Fairgrounds Project Linked to Schools Lawsuits -

Attorneys for the city of Memphis and for Shelby County Schools are trying another round of court-ordered mediation before the Thanksgiving holiday in the six-year-old lawsuit over school funding.

And if the mediation doesn’t resolve the legal stalemate on claim and counterclaim, the Shelby County Commission might make a settlement of the lawsuit a condition for endorsing the city’s plans for financing a renovation of the Mid-South Fairgrounds.

6. Expedient Data Centers Expands Into Memphis -

Expedient Data Centers, a leading provider of cloud computing and other related services, is expanding into the Memphis market.

The company is getting its latest state-of-the-art data center ready to open by July 1 at 3180 Players Lane, close to the TPC Southwind Golf Course and FedEx headquarters. That will be Expedient’s first data center in Tennessee and the 11th facility Expedient operates across seven markets.

7. Expedient Data Centers Expands Into Memphis -

Expedient Data Centers, a leading provider of cloud computing and other related services, is expanding into the Memphis market.

The company is getting its latest state-of-the-art data center ready to open by July 1 at 3180 Players Lane, close to the TPC Southwind Golf Course and FedEx headquarters. That will be Expedient’s first data center in Tennessee and the 11th facility Expedient operates across seven markets.

8. Dyer Appointed to Shelby County Attorney Post -

The lead Memphis attorney for the Tennessee Attorney General’s office is the new Shelby County Attorney effective Dec. 1.

Ross Dyer’s appointment was announced Thursday, Nov. 6, by Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell, subject to confirmation by the Shelby County Commission.

9. Inclinator Remains Elusive at The Pyramid -

In the 23 years since The Pyramid was built and opened as an arena, some of the frustrations of developing the building for more than one use remain.

Its brief life as an arena now gone, The Pyramid is being converted to a Bass Pro Shops superstore with a hotel and other attractions inside, including restaurants and an aquarium at the top of the structure. There are also glass extensions at the top to view the city and the Mississippi River.

10. Churchill Joins Gateway Group -

Natalie Churchill has joined Gateway Group Personnel as recruiting assistant for the temporary staffing division. In her new role, Churchill will source, qualify and interview candidates to place in positions ranging from accounting, administration (receptionists to executive administrative assistants), medical office, human resources and customer service.

11. $2.4 Million Spent on TV Ads For Ballot Measures -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Supporters and opponents of a proposed amendment to the Tennessee Constitution to give lawmakers more power to regulate abortion are flooding the television airwaves to try to influence voters ahead next month's election.

12. Obama Announces Plan to Tighten Card Security -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Saying more must be done to stop data breaches affecting consumers, President Barack Obama announced on Friday a government plan to tighten security for the debit cards that transmit federal benefits like Social Security to millions of Americans.

13. Whole Foods to Roll Out Rankings for Produce -

Whole Foods plans to start rolling out a system that ranks fruits and vegetables as "good," ''better" or "best" based on the supplier's farming practices.

Most notably, the supermarket chain says its "responsibly grown" labeling system for produce and flowers will prohibit the use of several common pesticides. The rankings will also take into account factors such as water and energy use.

14. Whole Foods to Roll Out Rankings for Produce -

Whole Foods plans to start rolling out a system that ranks fruits and vegetables as "good," ''better" or "best" based on the supplier's farming practices.

Most notably, the supermarket chain says its "responsibly grown" labeling system for produce and flowers will prohibit the use of several common pesticides. The rankings will also take into account factors such as water and energy use.

15. Plans for Lakeland Prep Start to Move -

Some of the six suburban school systems were already looking ahead to building new schools before they opened for their inaugural year this past August.

This week, the Lakeland Board of Commissioners became the first of the suburban governments to move toward financing new school construction for what would be called Lakeland Prep.

16. Maryville City Schools Wants Another Win -

Maryville City Schools doesn’t rest on its laurels.

After being named a finalist three out of four years for the State Collaborative on Reforming Education [SCORE] Prize and winning recognition as the top Tennessee district for student learning in 2011, it could claim another victory this year.

17. Does Maryville Have Tennessee’s Best Schools? -

Three school systems, Maryville City Schools, Kingsport City School and Williamson County Schools are vying to earn SCORE’s top prize as Tennessee’s No. 1 district for 2014.

The winning district receives a $25,000 prize.

18. Despite Rules, Nursing Homes Still Lack Sprinklers -

Tens of thousands of the country's most vulnerable people are living in nursing homes without adequate sprinklers or that are missing them altogether, according to government data.

Despite a history of deadly nursing home fires and a five-year lead-up to an August 2013 deadline to install sprinklers, 385 facilities in 39 states fail to meet requirements set by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the federal agency whose duties include regulating nursing homes. Together, those facilities are licensed to house more than 52,000 people, according to data from the agency known as CMS.

19. Room for Growth -

Sardor and Gulam Umarov are used to fighting battles with seemingly long odds.

Between 2005 and 2009, the brothers waged a high-profile human rights campaign against the authoritarian government in their native Uzbekistan for the release of their father, Sanjar Umarov, a Germantown businessman thrown into prison for opposing the regime.

20. Hopson Dispels Charter Takeover Talk -

The Innovation Zone schools in the Shelby County Schools system won’t be turned over to charter school organizations, superintendent Dorsey Hopson said Tuesday, Sept. 30.

“That’s absurd. I just want to be clear on that,” Hopson said of reports last month that the system is considering the move because of the expense of the extra efforts to turn around failing schools in the bottom 5 percent in Tennessee in terms of student achievement test scores.

21. New Seat, Same Drive -

Dawn Distler was a bus driver for 10 years, but these days she does her work from the passenger seat.

Knoxville’s new director of transit, on the job since June 1, rides the Knoxville Area Transit buses often, making the most of her commute, traveling to work-related events or taking her staff on a friendly fact-finding mission.

22. Ugwueke to Clarify Health Care Complexities -

Clarity. That’s what anyone attending a seminar on health care is seeking. What’s going on here and across the country? What’s the impact of the Affordable Care Act? What are the trends? What about the looming shortage of primary care physicians?

23. Pre-K’s Place -

It isn’t an application for federal pre-kindergarten funding the state filed earlier this month in Washington, the office of Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam emphasizes.

“It’s a note of intent to apply,” said Dave Smith, Haslam’s communications chief, last week.

24. County Commission Starts School Bond Process -

Shelby County Commissioners vote Monday, Sept. 22, on a resolution that is the first step in issuing $120 million in general obligation bonds over the next two years to finance “public works projects, including schools,” according to the resolution.

25. Road to Better Mass Transit -

Picking a new transit chief is critical for a city in transition.

Next year, Nashville residents will elect a new mayor and turn over its large Metro Council.

Davidson County also expects some 200,000 new residents over the next 20 years, and much of the success of future development will depend on the ease of navigating around Nashville – already the nation’s second-worst area for sprawl, according to Smart Growth America.

26. Education Secretary Praises Local Schools Leaders -

Sustainability is a term associated with environmental efforts, though innovation is a much more popular term across causes from economic development to education reform.

But when U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan came to Memphis this month as the last stop on a three-state bus tour of school districts, it was the word sustainability that came up more often than innovation.

27. Legacy Building -

2014 is shaping up to be a banner year for Legacy Wealth Management, an independent financial planning and portfolio management firm that’s moved into a prominent new space, continued staffing up over the last several months and is preparing to launch a seminar series.

28. Authors, Readers Converge for Book Festival -

Earlier this year, interest in the first Mid-South Book Festival, scheduled to take place later this month, began to reach what seemed like a fever pitch, according to Literacy Mid-South executive director Kevin Dean.

29. Legal Obligation -

The package arrived at the FedEx facility in Spokane, Wash., in early July, and as it moved along the parcel delivery system a conveyor belt malfunctioned and damaged the shipping box.

A FedEx employee inspecting the damaged package discovered what was believed to be illegal prescription pills in the container and the company contacted law enforcement, including the Spokane Police Department and the local Drug Enforcement Administration office.

30. Millington Leaders Emphasize Unique School System -

For much of the move to the demerger of public education in Shelby County, the Millington Municipal Schools district has been overshadowed by the five other suburban school systems.

All six formed starting in January and three weeks ago opened for classes, but Millington school system leaders, principals, teachers and civic leaders didn’t have their opening celebration until this past weekend, the day after the Millington Central High School Trojans beat the Germantown Red Devils in the first weekend of high school football.

31. Commission OKs Sewer Conversion in Cotton Creek -

Shelby County Commissioners approved Monday, Aug. 18, up to $3 million in county funding to convert a group of 100 homes in the Cotton Creek, Kirkland Estates and Fox Hollow Farms area near Collierville from individual pump sewer systems to a gravity-based sewer system, reversing a 2009 decision by a previous commission.

32. Class is In -

For Collierville Schools superintendent John Aitken, the demerger of public schools in Shelby County didn’t become “real” until teachers reported the week before the Aug. 4 first day of classes.

33. School Scores Provide Answers, Create More Questions -

The last phase of the state’s delayed rollout of achievement test scores came and went this week with a blur of percentages for hundreds of schools in Shelby County and explanations of success formulas for elementary and middle school students versus high school students.

34. Mumford Teacher Cheating Scandal Takes High Toll -

Federal prosecutors tallied the toll this week in the largest teacher exam cheating scandal ever pursued by authorities in the Western District of Tennessee.

The occasion was the announcement Tuesday, Aug. 19, by U.S Attorney Ed Stanton of diversion agreements with four more teachers in the two-decade long scandal and a June guilty plea and sentencing of former Hillcrest High School and Byhalia High School basketball coach James O. Sales of Memphis.

35. US Won't Reveal Records on Health Website Security -

WASHINGTON (AP) – After promising not to withhold government information over "speculative or abstract fears," the Obama administration has concluded it will not publicly disclose federal records that could shed light on the security of the government's health care website because doing so could "potentially" allow hackers to break in.

36. Commission OKs Sewer Conversion in Cotton Creek -

Shelby County Commissioners approved Monday, Aug. 18, up to $3 million in county funding to convert a group of 100 homes in the Cotton Creek, Kirkland Estates and Fox Hollow Farms area near Collierville from individual pump sewer systems to a gravity-based sewer system, reversing a 2009 decision by a previous commission.

37. Williams Joins Memphis Obstetrics as OB/GYN -

Dr. Jason Williams has joined the staff of Memphis Obstetrics & Gynecological Association PC, where he will focus on women’s health care issues, including prevention, diagnosis and management of many general medical conditions. As an OB/GYN, he specializes in general obstetrical care, infertility, pelvic disorders, and prevention and detection of diseases such as breast and cervical cancer.

38. Commission Ends Term with Residency Guidelines and School Board Pay Raises -

At the last meeting of their current four-year term of office, Shelby County Commissioners approved Monday, Aug. 18, a specific set of guidelines for future commissions to weigh residency challenges of elected county officials.

39. Brogdon Joins Race for Germantown Mayor -

With about a week left to the filing deadline for candidates, Germantown has a race for mayor.

George Brogdon, the recently retired director of community services for the city of Germantown, filed his petition Monday, Aug. 11, in the Nov. 4 election to succeed Sharon Goldsworthy as mayor of Germantown.

40. Commission to Have Different Look After Election -

The first post-election appointment for the winners of the 13 Shelby County Commission races on the Thursday, Aug. 7, election ballot is a Friday luncheon with commission Chairman James Harvey.

41. Ag Tourism Touted as Way to Boost Rural Economies -

CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. (AP) – With its sweet fruit-flavored liqueurs, a working farm and eccentric cast of characters – including a dancing lemon – Bloomery Plantation Distillery has attracted tourists from every U.S. state and countries as far away as Laos and Iceland.

42. US Job Growth Eases but Tops 200,000 for a Sixth Month -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A sixth straight month of solid 200,000-plus job growth in July reinforced growing evidence that the U.S. economy is accelerating after five years of sluggish expansion.

43. School’s In -

When public schools open Monday, Aug. 4, for the academic year across Shelby County, the merger of public education into one school system will give way to the demerger into seven separate public systems.

44. County Schools Show Gains in Reading, Science -

The Tennessee Comprehensive Assessment Program – or TCAP – test data for Shelby County Schools students in grades 3-8 shows 41.7 percent were proficient or advanced in math, with 41 percent proficient or advanced in reading and 52 percent proficient or advanced in science.

45. Bartlett Ninth Grade Academy Prepares for Debut -

A group of 213 children in Bartlett who are coming out of middle school and into a new academic year and system got an introduction last week to the Bartlett school that is a bridge between their middle schools and Bartlett High.

46. Registration Could Reflect Suburban Relocation -

When Shelby County’s six new suburban school districts register students on Tuesday, July 29, some of those systems’ superintendents will watch for changes from the numbers of students who pre-registered in the new school systems less than a year ago.

47. Suburban Schools Mark A Week to Debut -

Suburban school leaders drop by the Shelby County Schools data center Monday, July 28, to get their first formal look at achievement test scores for their students during the only year of the Shelby County Schools merger.

48. School Year Brings New Lessons for Teachers -

When the school year begins on Aug. 4 for Shelby County Schools and the six suburban public school systems, the learning process will begin not only for students but for teachers.

As the larger system-wide changes of the demerger have played out, teachers across the county have been preparing for the world inside classrooms that always offers change at the beginning of a new school year.

49. Local Projects Win State Grant Money -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam handed out five oversized grant checks Wednesday, July 23, on the University of Memphis campus for a total of $1.4 million in grants funding for various pedestrian, park and recreation projects across Shelby County.

50. County Commission Continues Prekindergarten Debate -

Shelby County Commissioners pick up Monday, July 21, where they left off earlier in the month about a way to fund prekindergarten programs.

The commission faces dueling resolutions, with one setting up further study on an expansion, and the other dedicating $3 million in surplus funds from the just-ended fiscal year and the first $3 million of any surplus from the current fiscal year to Shelby County Schools and the suburban school systems.

51. Johnson Returns to Different Schools Reality -

When Carol Johnson left as superintendent of Memphis City Schools at about this time in 2007, the system was struggling with Bush-era No Child Left Behind standards and making progress at some schools.

52. States Told to Find Way to Clear Medicaid Backlog -

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) – A half-dozen states with backlogs for Medicaid enrollees were facing a federal deadline Monday to create plans for getting those low-income residents enrolled in health coverage.

53. SCORE Launches Teacher Fellowship Program -

The State Collaborative on Reforming Education is launching a program that will provide Tennessee teachers an opportunity to have a greater impact on key state-level education policy issues.

The advocacy and research institution will select about 20 classroom teachers to serve a one-year term under the Tennessee Educator Fellowship.

54. Memphis’ Water Remains Envy of Other Cities -

Brian Waldron is cautious even as he talks about the city’s advantages in its water supply and the abundance of that supply.

“We are in good shape and our future looks positive,” said the director of the University of Memphis Ground Water Institute.

55. SCORE Launches Teacher Fellowship Program -

The State Collaborative on Reforming Education is launching a program that will provide Tennessee teachers an opportunity to have a greater impact on key state-level education policy issues.

The advocacy and research institution will select about 20 classroom teachers to serve a one-year term under the Tennessee Educator Fellowship.

56. Archer-Malmo Hits Record-High Headcount -

In terms of its headcount, Memphis-based marketing communications agency archer-malmo is at a high-water mark.

The agency’s growth – in everything from its creative talent to its physical footprint and client roster – hasn’t slowed down this year. In the second quarter alone, for example, archer-malmo added seven new hires, bringing its employee roster to a record high of 160.

57. Beale Street Eastern Border Marks Changes -

For much of the renovated Beale Street Entertainment District’s 30-year history, George Miller was a figure in exile just on the other side of the district’s formal eastern border of Fourth Street.

58. Highway Crisis Looms as Soon as August, US Warns -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Gridlock in Washington will lead to gridlock across the country if lawmakers can't quickly agree on how to pay for highway and transit programs, President Barack Obama and his top officials warned Tuesday.

59. Drones Could Help Mississippi Farm Industry -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – The applications for drones have softened, shifting from machines of war to whirlybirds that can capture incredible aerial photos of any event under the sun.

The newest possibility mixes that magic with cost-savings that could prove revolutionary for Mississippi's agricultural industry.

60. Hopson Contract Extension Represents Reform Mandate -

Public school superintendents in Tennessee are not elected in a popular vote anymore. They are appointed by school boards – the only hiring decision school boards make.

So when the Shelby County Schools board voted 6-0 Monday, June 23, to extend the three-year contract of superintendent Dorsey Hopson through June 2018, it was a mandate by the board for the student achievement gains Hopson and the board have set as goals.

61. Hopson's Contract Extended Through June 2018 -

Dorsey Hopson’s contract as Shelby County Schools superintendent runs through June of 2018 after the school board approved Monday, June 23, a two-year extension of the original three year employment contract with him.

62. Crime Data Show iPhone 'Kill Switch' Cuts Thefts -

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) – New crime data show Apple's addition of a "kill switch" to its iPhones last September has sharply reduced robberies and thefts, authorities said Thursday.

The report by state attorneys general, prosecutors, police and other officials from a year-old initiative called "Secure Our Smartphones" said Google and Microsoft will incorporate a kill switch into the next version of their operating systems on smartphones. The three systems – Android, iOS, and Windows Phone – are used in 97 percent of smartphones in the U.S.

63. County Budget Season Not Over Yet -

The Shelby County Commission defeated two competing versions of the county property tax rate for the new fiscal year on the second of three readings Monday, June 16.

But they both advance to third and final readings when the commission meets in July.

64. Pay Raises Go Mainly to Those in Select Industries -

NEW YORK (AP) – If you hope to get a raise that finally feels like one, it helps to work in the right industry.

Historically, at this stage in the economy's recovery, pay would be rising in most sectors. But five years after the Great Recession officially ended, raises remain sharply uneven across industries and, as a whole, have barely kept up with prices. Overall pay has been rising about 2 percent a year, roughly equal to inflation.

65. Departing PDS Head Says Education Needs ‘Disruption’ -

The departing headmaster of Presbyterian Day School says American education needs more of a revolution than evolution.

Lee Burns is leaving the East Memphis private school to become head of school at the McCallie School in Chattanooga, Tenn., after 14 years in Memphis. He was the keynote speaker Wednesday, June 11, for the second day of the Martin Institute for Teaching Excellence’s two-day summer conference on the PDS campus.

66. Luttrell Opens Campaign With Warning -

The way Mark Luttrell sees it, his campaign for mayor in 2014 is different than his campaign four years ago because then he was challenging an incumbent and now he is the incumbent.

67. State Systems Prides Itself on Protecting Customers -

In 1986, the father-and-son team of Robert and Bob McBride bought a fledgling small business called State Systems.

68. Game Changer -

One educator’s reform is another educator’s wrong move.

Dorsey Hopson doesn’t use the word “reform” as often as he uses the term “game changer.”

But the superintendent of Shelby County Schools has himself become a game changer as the school board that signed him to a three-year contract last September weighs a further extension of his three-year contract that for now runs through September 2016.

69. Commission Prepares Final Budget Moves -

When Shelby County Commissioners make the last adjustments to the county budget in committee sessions Wednesday, May 28, they will likely increase the 2.5 percent pay raise county Mayor Mark Luttrell proposed for county employees to 3 percent.

70. Hopson Contract Extension Faces Tight Timeline -

The Shelby County Schools board will discuss Tuesday, May 27, an extension of Dorsey Hopson’s three-year contract to be superintendent of the school system.

And a vote could come at the board’s June 17 work session, if not sooner. Under state law, the body has up to 45 days before the August school board elections to extend the contract or leave the matter for consideration by the next school board.

71. Germantown Schools Joins Shared Services Pact -

When the Germantown Municipal Schools board voted May 5 to not participate in three shared services agreements with the other five suburban school systems, it “strained” the school system’s relationship with the other five, Germantown Schools superintendent Jason Manuel told the board Wednesday, May 14.

72. Schools Merger ‘Closeout’ Underway -

The first and only year of a single public school system in Shelby County comes to an end May 23 with the last day of school.

And the legal details of the demerger are quickly taking shape.

Leaders of Shelby County’s seven public school systems met Tuesday, May 13, to discuss the closeout procedures starting June 2 that will begin the actual demerger of public education in Shelby County.

73. Martavius Jones Weighs Primary Vote Challenge -

As Memphis Democrats gathered for various campaign efforts last weekend, County Commission candidate Martavius Jones received a lot of condolences on his loss in the Democratic primary for commission District 10, and rival candidate Reginald Milton got a lot of congratulations.

74. Jones, Reaves Look to Commission Terms -

For David Reaves and Eddie Jones, the 2014 election year is over.

75. Commission Votes on Schools Funding -

Shelby County Commissioners vote Monday, May 12, on $47.3 million in immediate capital funding for Shelby County Schools in a decision that pits a majority on the commission against County Mayor Mark Luttrell.

76. Politics Continues After County Primaries -

A lot of the candidates from the Shelby County primary ballot were in the same room the day after the Tuesday, May 6, election.

The occasion was County Commission committee sessions.

It was mostly winners.

77. Suburban Schools Seek Share of $50 Million -

The leaders of Shelby County’s seven school systems are expected to make their cases before the Shelby County Commission Wednesday, May 7, for $50 million in capital funds the county set aside for the current fiscal year.

78. Germantown School Board Approves Budget Without Shared Services -

The Germantown Municipal Schools board approved Monday, May 5, a tentative $47.1 million budget for the coming fiscal year and school year that includes the school system opting out of shared services with other municipal school districts for in-house nutrition services, purchasing services and employee benefits services.

79. White House Calls for More Privacy Laws -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The White House is asking Congress to pass new privacy laws that would add more safeguards for Americans' data and provide more protections for emails sought in the course of a law enforcement investigation.

80. Aitken Talks Next Steps for Collierville Schools -

Budgets for the six municipal school systems and Shelby County Schools are starting to come together.

Shelby County Schools board members could vote in a special meeting Tuesday, April 22, on their budget proposal to the Shelby County Commission.

81. Bill Makes Changes to State Textbook Commission -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Legislation that makes changes to the process for selecting books for public schools is headed to Republican Gov. Bill Haslam's desk.

Lawmakers in both chambers on Thursday agreed to minor changes made by a conference committee.

82. McCullough: Trucking Critical to Local Economy -

Jim McCullough could have ended up in a cubicle working in the accounting industry after he graduated from the Mississippi State University School of Business.

83. Wharton Outlines $596 Million Budget Plan -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. warned Tuesday, April 15, that “half measures” in converting city employees to a defined contributions benefits plan would not restore the city’s financial health and resolve an unfunded pension liability of hundreds of millions of dollars.

84. In Tennessee, School Voucher Bill Fails for Session -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam's proposal to create a program that gives parents the option to move a child from a failing public school to a private school has once again failed to pass.

85. State Textbook Commission Bill Advancing in House -

NASHVILLE (AP) – A proposal that makes changes to the process for selecting books for public schools is headed for a full House vote.

The measure was approved on a voice vote in the House Finance Committee on Tuesday. The Senate approved the companion bill 29-3 last month.

86. Wharton Takes Budget to City Council -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. takes a budget proposal to the Memphis City Council Tuesday, April 15, that is supposed to be a departure for an administration that, since 2010, has come to the council with options instead of a total budget plan.

87. Savers Beware: Fees May be Shrinking Your 401(k) -

WASHINGTON (AP) – It's the silent enemy in our retirement accounts: High fees.

And now a new study finds that the typical 401(k) fees – adding up to a modest-sounding 1 percent a year – would erase $70,000 from an average worker's account over a four-decade career compared with lower-cost options. To compensate for the higher fees, someone would have to work an extra three years before retiring.

88. Commission Budget Season Begins Quietly -

Shelby County Commissioners began their budget season quietly with a first look in committee sessions last week at a $1.2 billion consolidated county budget proposal by Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell.

89. Enovate Medical Expanding in Murfreesboro -

NASHVILLE (AP) – State officials say medical device company Enovate Medical plans to expand its operations at its U.S. headquarters in Murfreesboro, adding 410 jobs in the next five years.

90. Luttrell Wants Suburban Schools Consideration in Funding Split -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell has a pretty good idea what is on the $52.6 million capital spending “ask” list Shelby County Schools is sending his way.

91. School Board to Vote on $52.6 Million Capital Funding -

Shelby County Schools board members take up a $52.6 million capital funding request Tuesday, March 25, that superintendent Dorsey Hopson would take to the Shelby County Commission for funding.

And the board votes as well Tuesday on setting attendance zones for the school year that begins in August – the first school year of the demerger into six suburban school systems as well as a Shelby County Schools system that becomes the city of Memphis and the unincorporated areas of Shelby County.

92. Federal Court Ruling Ends Consolidation Quest -

The last unresolved issue of the 2010 attempt to consolidate city of Memphis and Shelby County governments ended quietly last week in Memphis federal court.

The 2010 federal court lawsuit over the failed consolidation attempt – the most serious attempt in 39 years – ended with an order Wednesday, March 19, from U.S. District Judge Thomas Anderson granting a motion for summary judgment by defendants in the case.

93. Bill Makes Changes to State Textbook Commission -

NASHVILLE (AP) – A proposal that makes changes to the process for selecting books for state schools has been approved by the Senate.

The measure sponsored by Republican Sen. Mike Bell of Riceville was approved 29-2 on Monday evening.

94. Schools Demerger Reflects Cooperation, Competition -

For now, Shelby County’s seven public school systems are cooperating and competing with one another often at the same time on the way to the demerger of public education in August.

The same dual existence is playing itself out between the Shelby County Schools board and parents of children who have attended schools about to be in the suburban school systems but who live outside the six cities and towns.

95. Tennessee House Votes to Delay Common Core Standards -

NASHVILLE (AP) – A proposal to delay further implementation of the state's Common Core standards was approved in the House on Thursday, even though Republican Gov. Bill Haslam has called them key to Tennessee students' improvement.

96. Ruling Sets School Board Membership at Nine -

No local elected body in Shelby County has changed as many times in as short a period of time as the Shelby County Schools board.

The federal court order Tuesday, March 11, by U.S. District Judge Samuel “Hardy” Mays approving the restructure of the school board to a nine-member body effective Sept. 1 will mark the third change in the school board in three years when it takes effect following August school board elections.

97. Mays Approves 9-Member County Schools Board -

With two rulings in as many days, U.S. District Judge Samuel “Hardy” Mays this week cleared his schedule of any pending matters in the reformation of public education in Shelby County.

Mays approved the restructuring of the Shelby County Schools board Tuesday, March 11, to a nine-member body with districts that include the city of Memphis and unincorporated Shelby County but not the six suburban towns and cities.

98. Court Dismissal Leaves Matter of School Board Restructuring -

UPDATE: U.S. District Judge Samuel "Hardy" Mays approved Tuesday, March 11, the Shelby County Commission's plan to restructure the Shelby County Schools board to a nine-member board with the August 2014 elections.

99. Mays Accepts Suburban Schools Settlements, Dismisses Related Court Claims -

The Memphis Federal Court judge overseeing the three-year old court case over the reformation of public schools in Shelby County has dismissed the last major claim of the case, all remaining claims still pending.

100. Mays Accepts Suburban Schools Settlement, Dismisses Related Court Claims -

The Memphis Federal Court judge overseeing the three-year old court case over the reformation of public schools in Shelby County has dismissed the last major claim of the case, all remaining claims still pending.