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Editorial Results (free)

1. $2.4 Million Spent on TV Ads For Ballot Measures -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Supporters and opponents of a proposed amendment to the Tennessee Constitution to give lawmakers more power to regulate abortion are flooding the television airwaves to try to influence voters ahead next month's election.

2. Grizzlies Find Respect Hard to Come By -

Perhaps it was a just coincidence. On the day that the results of the annual NBA General Managers’ survey were announced, ESPN was in Memphis for its only scheduled visit of the season.

Or perhaps this was no coincidence at all.

3. US to Track Everyone Coming From Ebola Nations -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Stepping up their vigilance against Ebola, federal authorities said Wednesday that everyone traveling into the U.S. from Ebola-stricken nations will be monitored for symptoms for 21 days. That includes returning American aid workers, federal health employees and journalists, as well as West African travelers.

4. Winless SMU on Tap for 3-3 Tigers -

They aren’t No. 18 East Carolina and they aren’t winless SMU. Halfway through the 2014 season, the Tigers are in the middle. The University of Memphis is 3-3 overall, 1-1 in the American Athletic Conference and in a large pack of teams whose seasons could yet reach lofty heights … or tumble down to the lowly place everyone knows too well.

5. Spirited Revival -

One of the oldest and most prominent names in Memphis business is in the midst of transforming a Downtown warehouse, reviving a premium liquor brand that disappeared with Prohibition and restoring its prominent role in the community.

6. Mississippi Hospitals, Clinic Receiving Updates on Ebola -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — State health officials say Mississippi hospitals will be capable of handling any Ebola cases that may arise.

State Epidemiologist Dr. Thomas Dobbs said some hospitals are updating procedures based on information provided by the state Department of Health and the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

7. Carr Appointed to Chancery Court Vacancy -

Attorney Oscar C. Carr III is the newest Shelby County Chancery Court judge. Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam announced Thursday, Oct. 16, his appointment of Carr to the vacancy on the court created when Chancellor Kenny Armstrong was appointed to the Tennessee Court of Appeals earlier this year.

8. How Bad is Knoxville Crime? -

From murders to burglaries, most of Knoxville’s crime can be attributed to illegal drugs, police say.

But even as crime figures have remained static for years, where you live likely determines how you feel about crime and safety.

9. Ben Little's: Service Station Service in Self-Serve World -

The gentle soul who used to get his hair cut by an Everly Father a couple of doors down – and who pumped 100 percent pure gas to keep country immortal Ernest Tubb movin’ on – has enjoyed the last four-plus decades next to what used to be called Hailey’s Shopping Center.

10. UT Who? Vols-Ole Miss Game a Mirror Image of ’69 -

KNOXVILLE – Bud Ford usually had no problem wearing the orange blazer in his early days as assistant sports information director at the University of Tennessee.

Not on this day, though. It was Nov. 15, 1969.

11. Carr Appointed to Chancery Court Vacancy -

Attorney Oscar C. Carr III is the newest Shelby County Chancery Court judge.

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam announced Thursday, Oct. 16, his appointment of Carr to the vacancy on the court created when Chancellor Kenny Armstrong was appointed to the Tennessee Court of Appeals earlier this year.

12. Events -

Memphis Zoo will host Zoo Boo Friday, Oct. 17, through Sunday, Oct. 19, and Oct. 24-26 from 5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. at the zoo, 2000 Prentiss Place. Activities include trick-or-treat stations, not-so-haunted tour of Primate Canyon, straw maze, haunted hayride and more. Tickets are $12 for members and $15 for nonmembers. Visit memphiszoo.org.

13. Schools Leaders Move Toward Cooperation -

As the Achievement School District weighs a short list of a dozen low-performing Memphis schools for the state-run school district in the next school year, Shelby County Schools officials are involved in the selection process far more than they have been in past years.

14. State Rolls Out New Election App -

Just in time for early voting, the Tennessee Secretary of State’s office is out with a Smartphone app that can answer common questions from voters in every election about where they can vote early, the polling place for their election day precinct and directions to it and some of the districts they live in.

15. Kingsport Schools Pursues ‘Comprehensive Approach’ -

Kingsport City Schools goes about improving learning by coming at students and staff from every direction.

“We don’t have the luxury of having random acts of greatness,” Superintendent Lyle Ailshie says.

16. Maryville City Schools Wants Another Win -

Maryville City Schools doesn’t rest on its laurels.

After being named a finalist three out of four years for the State Collaborative on Reforming Education [SCORE] Prize and winning recognition as the top Tennessee district for student learning in 2011, it could claim another victory this year.

17. Harpeth Hall: ‘Tenacious’ Curriculum, Dedication to Tradition -

Harpeth Hall’s new head of school is a fierce proponent of single-sex education who says that an all-girls school can nurture a female mind, especially one interested in going into a STEM fields – science, technology, engineering and math.

18. Tigers Expect Bigger Crowd, Shorter Lines -

Everyone among the 46,000-plus fans attending the University of Memphis football team’s 36-17 over Middle Tennessee three weeks ago at Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium, seemed to have a good time.

Well, once they got inside the stadium.

19. On Faulkner and the Use of Punctuation -

Regarding the recent Faulkner column, Tracy writes that she got “a solid feel for the place and the time of year. Thank you for not honoring your subject by writing paragraph-long sentences with intricate layers of subordination.”

20. Haslam Touts State Constitutional Amendments -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam intends to vote for all four of the proposed amendments to the state Constitution on the Nov. 4 ballot, he said during a stop in Memphis Monday, Oct. 6.

Haslam was in Memphis to campaign specifically for the amendment that would require approval from the Tennessee Legislature of appellate court judges nominated by the governor. Amendment 2 would also leave in place judicial retention elections.

21. Haslam Favors Abortion Amendment -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam said Monday, Oct. 6, he intends to vote for all four of the proposed amendments to the state Constitution on the Nov. 4 ballot.

Haslam commented during a stop in Memphis to campaign for the amendment that would require approval from the Tennessee Legislature of appellate court judges nominated by the governor. It would leave in place judicial retention elections.

22. Wealthy Giving Less to Charity; Utah Tops States -

NEW YORK (AP) – Even as the income gap widens, the wealthiest Americans are giving a smaller share of their income to charity, while poor and middle-income people are donating a larger share, according to an extensive analysis of IRS data conducted by the Chronicle of Philanthropy.

23. Tennessee Voters to Decide on Abortion Amendment -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee voters will have a chance this November to decide whether they want to give the state Legislature more power to regulate abortions.

In 2000, the Tennessee Supreme Court struck down laws requiring a two-day waiting period and mandatory physician-only counseling and preventing second-trimester abortions from taking place anywhere but in a hospital.

24. Despite Rules, Nursing Homes Still Lack Sprinklers -

Tens of thousands of the country's most vulnerable people are living in nursing homes without adequate sprinklers or that are missing them altogether, according to government data.

Despite a history of deadly nursing home fires and a five-year lead-up to an August 2013 deadline to install sprinklers, 385 facilities in 39 states fail to meet requirements set by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the federal agency whose duties include regulating nursing homes. Together, those facilities are licensed to house more than 52,000 people, according to data from the agency known as CMS.

25. Downtown Knoxville Tourism Finally Finds its Stride -

When Kim Trent moved to Knoxville in 1990, she could stand along Gay Street on a Sunday and be the only soul in sight. Today, she’s a face in the crowd.

26. Yoga, Pilates Provide Workout Options -

Whether it’s a desire to slim down in advance of holiday binging or a New Year’s resolution reboot, many people look at the fall as a good time to kick-start their exercise efforts.

For some, this just means dusting off that gym membership or home treadmill, getting back to spin class, lifting weights or whatever their preferred activity might be.

27. Judicial Retention Travels Complex Path -

The 2014 election year is proving to be a long one for those interested in the judicial races on the ballot.

Voters in Shelby County decided the local judicial races and participated in the August statewide retention races for appellate court positions, including three on the Tennessee Supreme Court.

28. Room for Growth -

Sardor and Gulam Umarov are used to fighting battles with seemingly long odds.

Between 2005 and 2009, the brothers waged a high-profile human rights campaign against the authoritarian government in their native Uzbekistan for the release of their father, Sanjar Umarov, a Germantown businessman thrown into prison for opposing the regime.

29. Williams-Sonoma Growth Highlights DeSoto Push -

In 1999, Williams-Sonoma Inc. opened its first DeSoto County distribution center on Polk Lane in Olive Branch.

30. Whitehaven Flood Response Complicated -

When the Memphis area got seven inches of rain on Sept. 11, a group of Whitehaven homeowners at the state line watched once the rain stopped as their neighbors on the other side of the border got a prompter response in terms of a federal disaster declaration.

31. State Supreme Court Reverses Bartlett Murder Conviction -

The man convicted and sentenced to death for the brutal 2003 double murder of a husband and wife in Bartlett will get a new trial, the Tennessee Supreme Court ruled last week.

The court decision Thursday, Sept. 25, in the case of Henry Lee Jones is the latest reversal of a conviction in Shelby County Criminal Court by the highest court in the state.

32. Vols Hope to Snap 20-Game Road Slump vs. Ranked Opponents -

KNOXVILLE – It doesn’t get much easier for the University of Tennessee’s football team.

The Sept. 20 open date has come and gone. UT’s coaches and players had ample time to digest and dissect details of the 34-10 loss to No. 4-ranked Oklahoma on Sept. 13 and a week to prepare for a challenge just as formidable.

33. HipD: Donelson Finds Its Cool Side -

The tag “Hip Donelson” evoked plenty of snickers, eye rolls and snarky comments when it first appeared. After all, the local joke goes, Donelson’s known for hip replacements – not hipsters.

34. Roxul Opening 17 Years in Making -

U.S Sen. Roger Wicker of Mississippi searched the 1997 Congressional Record this week before he arrived in Marshall County for the formal opening of the Roxul Inc. plant.

35. Middle-Class Squeeze: From Day Care to Health Care -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Three years ago, Jason Prosser was stunned to discover the cost of child care for his newborn son – so much so that he and his wife postponed having a second child.

36. Woodland Expansion Reflects Broader Changes -

From the outside, the most noticeable change to the campus of Woodland Presbyterian School is the new building for the seventh- and eighth-graders at the pre-K through 8 independent private school in East Memphis.

37. Pre-K’s Place -

It isn’t an application for federal pre-kindergarten funding the state filed earlier this month in Washington, the office of Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam emphasizes.

“It’s a note of intent to apply,” said Dave Smith, Haslam’s communications chief, last week.

38. Technology Key to Knoxville’s Improving Economy -

Multiple industry sectors have always been a strength for the Knoxville job market, and that deep bench is helping the area once again as state and national economies improve.

From high-tech spinoffs out of both the University of Tennessee and Oak Ridge National Laboratories to a strong manufacturing climate, the area is benefiting as both companies and investors ramp up their expansion and hiring efforts, says Rhonda Rice, who serves as executive vice president of the Knoxville Chamber

39. Road to Better Mass Transit -

Picking a new transit chief is critical for a city in transition.

Next year, Nashville residents will elect a new mayor and turn over its large Metro Council.

Davidson County also expects some 200,000 new residents over the next 20 years, and much of the success of future development will depend on the ease of navigating around Nashville – already the nation’s second-worst area for sprawl, according to Smart Growth America.

40. Education Secretary Praises Local Schools Leaders -

Sustainability is a term associated with environmental efforts, though innovation is a much more popular term across causes from economic development to education reform.

But when U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan came to Memphis this month as the last stop on a three-state bus tour of school districts, it was the word sustainability that came up more often than innovation.

41. Editorial: Growing Rape Kit Backlog Raises More Concern -

The backlog gets bigger. And with the recent news that 196 rape kits dating back to 1976 have been found by Memphis Police, questions never fully answered about the rape kit backlog that surfaced about a year ago become more urgent.

42. Tennessee Recidivism Among Key Topics During Hearings -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The chairman of a legislative panel examining criminal justice reform in Tennessee says he will share information from hearings this week with a special task force the governor has appointed.

43. Justices to Announce New Attorney General on Monday -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee Supreme Court justices plan to announce their choice for the next state attorney general on Monday.

According to a news release issued Thursday, the announcement will take place at 11 a.m. in the courtroom at the Supreme Court Building in Nashville.

44. Unintended Consequences: ER Visits Increase -

Hospital officials have been pushing for the state to expand Medicaid health care coverage for thousands of Tennessee’s poorest citizens, despite two significant and related concerns:

Expansion will lead to increased visits to the most expensive place in America for routine health care, the emergency room.

45. Coverage Gap Leaves Rural Tennessee Hospitals on Life Support -

Four rural hospitals have closed and dozens are at risk of shuttering: That’s the fallout, some say, from Gov. Bill Haslam’s decision not to join the Affordable Care Act in 2013 and tap into millions in promised federal funds for Tennessee’s financially-strapped health care institutions.

46. Education Secretary Calls for System-Wide Reforms -

U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan saw much that he liked in Memphis Wednesday, Sept. 10, at the end of his three-day “back to school” bus tour of schools in three states.

The last stop was Cornerstone Prep Elementary School in Binghampton.

47. Authors, Readers Converge for Book Festival -

Earlier this year, interest in the first Mid-South Book Festival, scheduled to take place later this month, began to reach what seemed like a fever pitch, according to Literacy Mid-South executive director Kevin Dean.

48. Duncan Bus Tour Ends With Binghampton Kudos -

U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan wrapped up a three-day “back to school” bus tour of schools in several states Wednesday, Sept. 10, at Cornerstone Prep Elementary School in Binghampton.

49. ‘Love Mob’ Responds to Poplar Plaza Attack -

The amount of traffic that comes through the intersection of Highland Street and Poplar Avenue has made it a favorite of causes through the years – from war protestors and advocates to those on both sides of the death penalty, and, more recently, city employees upset over benefit changes.

50. Governor Gets Report on Tennessee Juvenile Jails -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A security audit will be performed on all three of the state's youth development centers after a recent breakout and violence at the facility in Middle Tennessee, according to a preliminary report sent to the governor.

51. Democrats Choose State Senate Nominee -

When Shelby County Democratic Party leaders gather Monday, Sept. 8, to pick their party’s nominee in the November special general election for state Senate District 30, it will also be an indication of how deep the wounds run from the party’s disastrous August election outing.

52. Safe House -

She talks about the bad old days easily now. That’s what years of steady sobriety will do. For the last three-plus years, Amy Phillips, 54, has worked as a program coordinator at Grace House of Memphis, a recovery program for women with alcohol and/or drug problems and, in many cases, co-occurring mental health disorders.

53. Focus on Teens ‘At Risk of Being Homeless’ -

Not only is Crossroads Campus a successful non-profit operation that’s building a bridge to help homeless animals and potentially homeless young people, it’s also a thriving retail business operation driven by the savvy of executive director Lisa Stetar and her staff.

54. Redbirds Prepare for Playoffs Appearance -

First-year Memphis Redbirds general manager Craig Unger grew up a St. Louis Cardinals fan and he spent the last five years working in the team’s front office. He even wears a huge World Series ring from the team’s 2011 championship.

55. Redbirds’ Easley, Scruggs Enjoy Stellar Season -

Oscar Taveras, Randal Grichuk and Stephen Piscotty. Those were the St. Louis Cardinals’ hot outfield prospects stashed in Memphis at season’s start.

Taveras and Grichuk have shuttled between the Cardinals and Redbirds and both are with the big club as the Redbirds’ regular season winds down. Piscotty has stayed with the Redbirds, but throughout the year Cardinals general John Mozeliak openly has talked about having playing time in St. Louis for Piscotty in the near future.

56. Vols Among NCAA’s Youngest Headed Into Sunday Opener -

KNOXVILLE – For better or worse, University of Tennessee football coach Butch Jones won’t need to wait long to see the talent level of his highly touted freshman class.

Jones will find out Sunday night at 7 when the Vols play host to Utah State at Neyland Stadium. The Aggies will be an underdog – probably by a touchdown or so – and a trendy pick for some as an upset special.

57. A More Earth-Friendly Burial Option Now Available -

When Dara Ashworth’s father died this spring after battling metastatic melanoma, she and her two sisters struggled with the best way to honor his life, his memory and his body.

Their father, Leonard Daniel Hamby, 64, a lab technician with the Tennessee Department of Health, didn’t have a specific plan, but the family knew enough about his wishes and knew that he didn’t want a traditional burial.

58. Embracing Cremation -

As business decisions go, this was a tricky one.

Jeff and Steve Murphy, owners of Music City Mortuary, opened their Nashville business in 2001, catering primarily to the needs of other funeral directors, providing transportation, embalming and preparation services, shipping – everything a mortuary business provides.

59. People Power -

Meg Crosby and her fellow principals at the HR-focused consulting firm PeopleCap chose that name for their organization because of the way they think about the modern workplace – particularly, the ever-changing nature of the employees who populate it.

60. Kirby, Wiseman Campaign for Judicial Selection -

Attorney Lang Wiseman says there will be no return to the days when Tennessee legislators had no direct role in who the governor appointed to be appellate court judges if an amendment to the Tennessee Constitution is defeated in November.

61. Longtime Tennessee Civil Rights Lawyer Dies at 86 -

NASHVILLE (AP) – George Barrett, a longtime Tennessee civil rights lawyer known for handling a case that ultimately desegregated the state's public colleges and universities, has died. He was 86.

62. Cohen: Ferguson Police Could Have ‘Shot to Wound’ -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen said police in Ferguson, Mo., could have shot to wound instead of shot to kill Michael Brown in the fatal incident there this month that has prompted national and international reaction to a number of race-related issues beyond the shooting.

63. Appeals Panel Weighing Occupy Nashville Suit -

CINCINNATI (AP) – A special three-judge panel focused on issues of camping, protests, free speech and executive power on Monday during arguments in an appeal of a lawsuit brought by Occupy Nashville protesters arrested on War Memorial Plaza in October 2011.

64. Jackson Ruling Draws Line on Comments to Juries -

Prosecutors and defense attorneys sometimes get right up to the line that separates proper from improper when it comes to their closing statements to a jury during a trial.

The closing statements offer both sides some room in terms of their descriptions or overviews of the case with judges commonly reiterating that what attorneys on either side say there and in opening statements are to be considered evidence.

65. Mason: Vanderbilt Success More Than Defeating UT -

Coach Derek Mason is determined to put his own mark of toughness on the Vanderbilt University football program as it continues its climb into the ranks of conference heavyweights.

66. Vols: Looks Like 6-6 Season -

Pull out your 2014 schedules, UT fans.

Fall camp is done, and it’s time to get in game-week mode with the season opener against Utah State fast approaching.

So go to the little box next to each of UT’s opponents on the 2014 schedule and pick the winner.

67. Kaaa-BOOM! -

This Labor Day weekend, hundreds of Knoxvillians will be working harder than ever so hundreds of thousands can kick back and relax.

Knoxville is hosting a huge street festival and one of the biggest fireworks shows in the country on Saturday, followed by the first UT game of the season on Sunday.

68. Belmont Welcomes Largest-Ever Freshman Class -

If you graduated from Belmont 20 years ago, you might not recognize the campus today.

Near ceaseless on-campus construction and a huge spike in enrollment has changed the once-sleepy little school into a major player in Nashville and in national collegiate circles.

69. E-Books Cut Costs for Tennessee State Students -

Tennessee State University students face higher costs, tacked on by state government, but that downer could be offset by “e-books” that can save students $735 each semester.

TSU is set to offer the electronic books to freshmen and sophomores for general education courses in an effort to lower the cost of traditional books, according to the university.

70. SEC’s New Quarterbacks Ready to Prove Themselves -

They are the SEC quarterbacks left behind. The quarterbacking gods, with names like Manziel, McCarron, Mettenberger and Murray – what is it about M’s? – have ascended to a higher place: playing on Sundays in the NFL.

71. Another Round -

Some time in October, lovers of local craft beers could enjoy a cold brew in a new tasting room at Memphis Made Brewing Co.’s facility in the Cooper-Young district.

72. Southwest’s Essex to Retire In 2015 -

The leader who guided the merger of the city’s two community colleges announced Tuesday, Aug. 19, that he will retire in June.

Nathan Essex became president of Shelby State Community College and State Technical Institute at Memphis in 2000 as the two institutions were merging to become Southwest Tennessee Community College.

73. Commission Ends Term with Residency Guidelines and School Board Pay Raises -

At the last meeting of their current four-year term of office, Shelby County Commissioners approved Monday, Aug. 18, a specific set of guidelines for future commissions to weigh residency challenges of elected county officials.

74. Council Reviews Pension Investment Changes -

For the first time in months, Memphis City Council members have no committee discussions scheduled Tuesday, Aug. 19, on city health insurance benefits or proposed pension plan changes.

But the council will vote on the first in a series of pension plan changes to come.

75. 5 Tennessee Sites Added to National Register -

Five Tennessee sites, including one in Memphis, have been added to the National Register of Historic Places.

The registry is part of a nationwide program that coordinates and supports efforts to identify, evaluate and protect historic resources. The Tennessee Historical Commission administers the program in Tennessee.

76. Commission Reopens Anti-Discrimination Debate -

Six of the 13 Shelby County Commissioners attend their last meeting Monday, Aug. 18.

The finale of the four-year term of office will feature renewed discussion about a proposed anti-discrimination ordinance and attempts to make the residency requirement for county commissioners more specific.

77. Reshaping a City, One Lot at a Time -

John G. Brittle Jr. doesn’t have an office. He has a war room. The space, crowded with maps, charts, books, piles of paper and marked-up spreadsheets, is ground zero for InfillNashville, the 10-person team of site selection specialists that Brittle leads at Village Real Estate Services.

78. Bigger, Better, Louder -

“When it comes to college football, the South has no equal, because the Southeastern Conference has no equal. Find me a conference with a better commissioner, better players, better head coaches, better staffs, better game-day atmospheres, better-looking coeds – better anything.”

79. Local Leaders Work to Keep Cummins in Memphis -

Memphis and Shelby County are preparing to fight a border battle with Mississippi to keep hundreds of jobs inside the city.

The state of Mississippi is aggressively courting diesel engine manufacturer Cummins Inc. to move most of its Memphis operations south of the state line to DeSoto County, according to sources familiar with the effort.

80. Sentencing Changes Sought for Business Crimes -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The federal panel that sets sentencing policy eased penalties this year for potentially tens of thousands of drug dealers. Now, defense lawyers and prisoner advocates are pushing for similar treatment for an arguably less-sympathetic category of defendants: swindlers, embezzlers, insider traders and other white-collar criminals.

81. Pinch District Could Lose Historic Designation -

The Pinch District, one of the city’s oldest commercial districts, could lose its designation on the National Register of Historic Places, a move that would jeopardize existing buildings but possibly make some new development easier.

82. Editorial: Economic Woes Pose Questions for Memphis -

It may be gone. But the recession sure took its time in departing after taking a heavy toll on economic development in Memphis. And some of us aren’t sure it has totally left the premises, especially in a city that is watching as other parts of the state are rebounding and recovering at a much quicker pace than Memphis.

83. Problem Property -

The city of Memphis and the Downtown Memphis Commission suffered a stinging setback this week in their quest to rid a key section of Main Street of a deteriorating eyesore, one that has survived multiple attempts to be sold and defied repeated orders to clean up.

84. Johnson to Lead Pink Palace Fundraising Efforts -

Cathi Johnson has joined the Pink Palace Family of Museums as director of development. In her new role, she’ll design, implement and manage the museum system’s fundraising efforts, including individual and corporate gifts and sponsorships, grant writing, capital funds and planned giving.

85. Utility to Pay Tennessee Coal Ash Victims $27.8 Million -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The nation's largest public utility has agreed to pay $27.8 million to settle claims from Tennessee property owners who suffered damages from a huge spill of toxin-laden coal ash sludge.

86. School’s In -

When public schools open Monday, Aug. 4, for the academic year across Shelby County, the merger of public education into one school system will give way to the demerger into seven separate public systems.

87. August 1-7: This week in Memphis history -

2013: Owners of the Nineteenth Century Club began preliminary demolition work on the Union Avenue mansion, which would later be stopped by court order.

1978: Shaun Cassidy at the Mid-South Coliseum.

88. End in Sight -

One more weekend of early voting and then it’s the four-day sprint to election day for candidates, their campaigns and the voters who didn’t vote during the early voting period.

Because of the length of the ballot – the longest of any election cycle in Shelby County political history – state election officials are encouraging voters who have made their decisions to vote early.

89. Suburban Precincts Lead in Early Vote Turnout -

Seven of the top 10 precincts for early voter turnout through this past weekend and the first of two weeks of early voting in Shelby County are in the suburbs.

Through Monday, July 28, a total of 43,725 citizens had voted early in Shelby County, which is 8.1 percent of the voters in Shelby County. The highest turnout by day so far since early voting opened July 18 was 7,038 on July 22.

90. Events -

B.I.G. for Memphis, a business interest group that connects Memphis Police colonels and business leaders, will meet Wednesday, July 30, from 9:45 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at Phelps Security, 4932 Park Ave. Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell will present the State of the County. Visit phelpssecurity.com.

91. School Year Brings New Lessons for Teachers -

When the school year begins on Aug. 4 for Shelby County Schools and the six suburban public school systems, the learning process will begin not only for students but for teachers.

As the larger system-wide changes of the demerger have played out, teachers across the county have been preparing for the world inside classrooms that always offers change at the beginning of a new school year.

92. Signs, Space Occupy Final Weeks of Elections -

In the closing weeks of the summer campaign to the Aug. 7 election day, the political struggle has come to the place all hard-fought campaigns ultimately come at this point – signs and space.

93. Democratic Sample Ballot Omits Some Names -

Not every candidate who claimed the Democratic nomination in the May county primaries is on the Shelby County Democratic Party’s endorsement ballot that hits the streets this week.

With early voting underway in advance of the Aug. 7 election day, the sample ballot does not include Juvenile Court clerk candidate Henri Brooks, Circuit Court clerk nominee Rhonda Banks, Probate Court clerk candidate William Chism and County Clerk nominee Charlotte Draper.

94. Supreme Court Justices Make Campaign Push -

Among the candidates going door to door in Memphis this summer looking for votes was a Tennessee Supreme Court justice.

Sharon Lee, one of three justices seeking re-election in the yes-no retention races on the August ballot, campaigned Saturday, July 19, in Hickory Hill.

95. Dueling Rulings: Courts Split on Health Law Clash -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama's health care law is snarled in another big legal battle, with two federal appeals courts issuing contradictory rulings on a key financing issue within hours of each other Tuesday.

96. Tennessee Gets High Marks in Child Welfare Report -

NASHVILLE (AP) – The latest national ranking of the well-being of children shows Tennessee is among five states that made the biggest improvement in the last year.

The Kids Count Data Book, an annual report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation, grades states on education, health care and poverty.

97. Beale Street Landing Looks Beyond Early Curiosity -

The Riverfront Development Corp. is filling in a calendar of events at the newly opened Beale Street Landing that stretches into the fall and demonstrates the role of programming in holding the larger public’s interest beyond those coming to the landing now out of curiosity.

98. Mississippi Jobless Rate Rises to Worst in Nation -

Mississippi registered the worst jobless rate in the nation in June, as unemployment rose in the state while improving elsewhere. The jobless rate rose to 7.9 percent in June as the number of jobless Mississippians rose back above 100,000.

99. Health Department Seeking Input on State Health Plan -

The Tennessee Department of Health is seeking public input on the State Health Plan.

The plan is required by state law and acts as the health department’s guide for protecting, promoting and improving the health of people in Tennessee.

100. County Commission Continues Prekindergarten Debate -

Shelby County Commissioners pick up Monday, July 21, where they left off earlier in the month about a way to fund prekindergarten programs.

The commission faces dueling resolutions, with one setting up further study on an expansion, and the other dedicating $3 million in surplus funds from the just-ended fiscal year and the first $3 million of any surplus from the current fiscal year to Shelby County Schools and the suburban school systems.