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Editorial Results (free)

1. Suburban Precincts Lead in Early Vote Turnout -

Seven of the top 10 precincts for early voter turnout through this past weekend and the first of two weeks of early voting in Shelby County are in the suburbs.

Through Monday, July 28, a total of 43,725 citizens had voted early in Shelby County, which is 8.1 percent of the voters in Shelby County. The highest turnout by day so far since early voting opened July 18 was 7,038 on July 22.

2. Events -

B.I.G. for Memphis, a business interest group that connects Memphis Police colonels and business leaders, will meet Wednesday, July 30, from 9:45 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at Phelps Security, 4932 Park Ave. Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell will present the State of the County. Visit phelpssecurity.com.

3. School Year Brings New Lessons for Teachers -

When the school year begins on Aug. 4 for Shelby County Schools and the six suburban public school systems, the learning process will begin not only for students but for teachers.

As the larger system-wide changes of the demerger have played out, teachers across the county have been preparing for the world inside classrooms that always offers change at the beginning of a new school year.

4. Signs, Space Occupy Final Weeks of Elections -

In the closing weeks of the summer campaign to the Aug. 7 election day, the political struggle has come to the place all hard-fought campaigns ultimately come at this point – signs and space.

5. Democratic Sample Ballot Omits Some Names -

Not every candidate who claimed the Democratic nomination in the May county primaries is on the Shelby County Democratic Party’s endorsement ballot that hits the streets this week.

With early voting underway in advance of the Aug. 7 election day, the sample ballot does not include Juvenile Court clerk candidate Henri Brooks, Circuit Court clerk nominee Rhonda Banks, Probate Court clerk candidate William Chism and County Clerk nominee Charlotte Draper.

6. Supreme Court Justices Make Campaign Push -

Among the candidates going door to door in Memphis this summer looking for votes was a Tennessee Supreme Court justice.

Sharon Lee, one of three justices seeking re-election in the yes-no retention races on the August ballot, campaigned Saturday, July 19, in Hickory Hill.

7. Dueling Rulings: Courts Split on Health Law Clash -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama's health care law is snarled in another big legal battle, with two federal appeals courts issuing contradictory rulings on a key financing issue within hours of each other Tuesday.

8. Tennessee Gets High Marks in Child Welfare Report -

NASHVILLE (AP) – The latest national ranking of the well-being of children shows Tennessee is among five states that made the biggest improvement in the last year.

The Kids Count Data Book, an annual report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation, grades states on education, health care and poverty.

9. Beale Street Landing Looks Beyond Early Curiosity -

The Riverfront Development Corp. is filling in a calendar of events at the newly opened Beale Street Landing that stretches into the fall and demonstrates the role of programming in holding the larger public’s interest beyond those coming to the landing now out of curiosity.

10. Mississippi Jobless Rate Rises to Worst in Nation -

Mississippi registered the worst jobless rate in the nation in June, as unemployment rose in the state while improving elsewhere. The jobless rate rose to 7.9 percent in June as the number of jobless Mississippians rose back above 100,000.

11. Health Department Seeking Input on State Health Plan -

The Tennessee Department of Health is seeking public input on the State Health Plan.

The plan is required by state law and acts as the health department’s guide for protecting, promoting and improving the health of people in Tennessee.

12. County Commission Continues Prekindergarten Debate -

Shelby County Commissioners pick up Monday, July 21, where they left off earlier in the month about a way to fund prekindergarten programs.

The commission faces dueling resolutions, with one setting up further study on an expansion, and the other dedicating $3 million in surplus funds from the just-ended fiscal year and the first $3 million of any surplus from the current fiscal year to Shelby County Schools and the suburban school systems.

13. Wharton Ready to Shift Talk on Benefits Debate -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. is trying to turn the page on the emotional City Hall debate over cuts in health insurance benefits to city employees and retirees and also close the book on the city budget for the two-week old fiscal year.

14. No Crying in Vanderbilt Football, Not Anymore -

HOOVER, Ala. – Before James Franklin, Vanderbilt never had been to consecutive bowl games. He took them to three in three years.

15. SEC Media Days Notebook: July 16 -

HOOVER, Ala. – Although the first games involving Southeastern Conference football teams are not until Aug. 28, the league’s full-on blitz in promoting the new SEC Network has been going on for a while now.

16. Uber, Lyft Operating Despite Cease-and-Desist Notices -

Uber and Lyft continued to shuttle customers back and forth early this week, undaunted by the city’s decision last week to send the companies cease-and-desist letters.

A representative from Uber said the company had not received any notice from the city by Tuesday, July 15, and indicated the company has no intention of putting the brakes on the app-based service.

17. Juvenile Court Reform Moves to Child Welfare Cases -

For the last two years, much of the attention in Juvenile Court reforms has been on delinquent children who come to the court for their actions.

But this fall, the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges will begin an examination of its child welfare program – the reason that most children come to the court.

18. Uphill Climb -

Shelby County’s homebuilding industry is off to a slow start in 2014, with builders filing 16.6 percent fewer permits in the second quarter than in the same three-month period a year ago.

Builders filed 245 permits in Shelby County in the second quarter, compared with 294 permits in the second quarter of 2013, according to real estate information company Chandler Reports, www.chandlerreports.com. Builders filed 191 permits in the first quarter.

19. Welcoming Home Baby Boomers -

Part two of a two-part series. Talented leadership is always in high demand. The question is: Where do you look for leaders, who are you overlooking and how do you effectively sustain their involvement?

20. Wharton Courts Alternatives in Benefits Dispute -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. says any alternatives are welcome to the coming health insurance changes for city employees and retirees.

But delaying the roll out of those changes in January is not an option. And neither is reopening the city budget or the city property tax rate.

21. Changing Landscape -

It’s been confusing from a distance.

The formal groundbreaking for Shelby Farms Park’s $70 million “Heart of the Park” improvements, including an expansion of Patriot Lake, came the same week last month the Memphis City Council voted to delay for one year the city’s portion of funding for the Shelby Farms Parkway.

22. Riverfront Cornerstone -

Beale Street Landing seems an unlikely choice as a cornerstone, considering its troubled path to completion.

At this point, it’s almost a motto – not on time and over budget, and by a lot on both counts.

23. Archer-Malmo Hits Record-High Headcount -

In terms of its headcount, Memphis-based marketing communications agency archer-malmo is at a high-water mark.

The agency’s growth – in everything from its creative talent to its physical footprint and client roster – hasn’t slowed down this year. In the second quarter alone, for example, archer-malmo added seven new hires, bringing its employee roster to a record high of 160.

24. Checkered Progress on Disabled Care Despite Ruling -

Brent Kaderli has a wheelchair-accessible van waiting in the driveway, a hospital bed in a spare bedroom and an electric lift that's left unused. If the 30-year-old quadriplegic had his way, he'd be living here, in his father's house, with help from aides. Instead, he is in an institution, hoping each day for a place that feels more like a home.

25. Tunica Roadhouse Launches Free Concert Series -

Tunica Roadhouse Casino & Hotel has announced it is hosting a free concert series starting July 5.

The first show will feature the band Fuel, with a free fireworks show immediately after the concert. Additional concerts will take place Aug. 2 and Sept. 6, with the bands being announced the first week of July.

26. Editorial: Park Should Be Place to Unify Community -

There is something about an economic impact study of a 4,500-acre park that at first glance seems out of place.

But given the recent travels of Shelby Farms Park through our local political machinery, further proof of the park’s worth is still needed.

27. 'Get a Warrant' to Search Cellphones, Justices Say -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In an emphatic defense of privacy in the digital age, a unanimous Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that police generally may not search the cellphones of people they arrest without first getting search warrants.

28. Civil Rights Museum Sit-In Exhibit Goes Digital -

Raumesh Akbari remembers her first encounter with the sit-in exhibit at the National Civil Rights Museum.

As a sixth-grader, she had heard and read about the lunch counter sit-ins of the early 1960s. But like many visitors to the museum, she was too young to have encountered them herself.

29. Heart of Arlington -

When Sandy Brewer and her family moved more than eight years ago from Cordova to a turn-of-the-century home just two blocks from Arlington’s Depot Square, she said it felt like taking a step back in time.

30. Hopson Contract Extension Represents Reform Mandate -

Public school superintendents in Tennessee are not elected in a popular vote anymore. They are appointed by school boards – the only hiring decision school boards make.

So when the Shelby County Schools board voted 6-0 Monday, June 23, to extend the three-year contract of superintendent Dorsey Hopson through June 2018, it was a mandate by the board for the student achievement gains Hopson and the board have set as goals.

31. Ni Hao, Y'all: US Hinterlands Woo Chinese Firms -

PINE HILL, Ala. (AP) – Burdened with Alabama's highest unemployment rate, long abandoned by textile mills and furniture plants, Wilcox County desperately needs jobs.

They're coming, and from a most unlikely place: Henan Province, China, 7,600 miles away.

32. Accountability and Trust: Keys to Partnership -

Part two of a three-part series. Are you considering a private/public partnership to advance the work of your nonprofit? Learn from those who have already waded into the waters.

Cathy Davis, executive director of Bayview Hunters Point Multipurpose Senior Services, Inc. (BHPMSS) in California is a leader with experience.

33. New Health Chief Moves to Put Stamp on Overhaul -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Aiming to avoid more insurance chaos this fall, the nation's new health care chief announced Friday she's revamping the management of President Barack Obama's health overhaul.

34. Heart of Park Advances as Shelby Farms Parkway Stalls -

Within the space of a few days this month, the Shelby Farms Park Conservancy formally broke ground on the park’s $70 million Heart of the Park project and then its leaders watched as the Memphis City Council delayed the Shelby Farms Parkway project for a year.

35. Identity Theft and Social Media -

Ray’s take: You just logged into your online banking and your account is empty. You go to apply for a loan and are told you don’t qualify due to overextended credit. You file your tax return only to discover it has already been filed and your refund check issued and cashed. These are some of the very real things that have happened due to identity theft.

36. County Budget Season Not Over Yet -

The Shelby County Commission defeated two competing versions of the county property tax rate for the new fiscal year on the second of three readings Monday, June 16.

But they both advance to third and final readings when the commission meets in July.

37. Creating a Nonprofit Private-Public Partnership -

Part one of a three-part series. Private-public partnerships are promoted as a collaborative way to bring people and resources together across sectors.

A recent example is the development of senior housing in San Francisco, California’s Bayview Hunters Point community. We are proud to be affiliated with this project and have witnessed the many twists and turns it has taken over the years. We asked Cathy Davis, executive director of the Bayview Hunters Point Multipurpose Senior Services Inc. (BHPMSS), to share specifics of her partnership so you imagine what a partnership could look like for your organization or institution. Her story is specific to her community; your story will be specific to Memphis.

38. Cash Reflects on ‘Long Way Home’ -

As Graceland marks the anniversary of the death of Elvis Presley in August, another important artist from Sun Records will be remembered in Dyess, Ark.

The opening of Johnny Cash’s childhood home in Dyess as a museum is Aug. 16.

39. Wilkins Targets Cohen as ‘Career Politician’ -

Ricky Wilkins told a packed campaign headquarters in Poplar Plaza on a busy campaign weekend that U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen is waging a dirty campaign while complaining that Wilkins is doing the same.

40. Conduit Global Opens Call Center -

Civic and business leaders celebrated Conduit Global’s new call center with a ribbon-cutting ceremony Wednesday, June 11.

The $8 million call center and back-office support operation at 7000 Goodlett Farms Parkway will eventually employ 1,000 people, making it one of the largest local job creation projects in recent history.

41. Conduit Global Opens Call Center -

Civic and business leaders celebrated Conduit Global’s new call center with a ribbon-cutting ceremony Wednesday, June 11.

The $8 million call center and back-office support operation at 7000 Goodlett Farms Parkway will eventually employ 1,000 people, making it one of the largest local job creation projects in recent history.

42. Departing PDS Head Says Education Needs ‘Disruption’ -

The departing headmaster of Presbyterian Day School says American education needs more of a revolution than evolution.

Lee Burns is leaving the East Memphis private school to become head of school at the McCallie School in Chattanooga, Tenn., after 14 years in Memphis. He was the keynote speaker Wednesday, June 11, for the second day of the Martin Institute for Teaching Excellence’s two-day summer conference on the PDS campus.

43. Conduit Global Opens Call Center -

Civic and business leaders celebrated Conduit Global’s new call center Wednesday, June 11, with a ribbon-cutting ceremony.

The $8 million Conduit Global call center and back-office support operation at 7000 Goodlett Farms Parkway will eventually employ 1,000 people, making it one of the largest local job creation projects in recent history.

44. Tennessee Democrats Hire Abortion Amendment Staffer -

NASHVILLE (AP) – The Tennessee Democratic Party has hired a new staffer to work against a proposed constitutional amendment to give lawmakers more power to regulate abortion in the state.

45. Council Hears Tentative Plans for Office Building -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s administration would move the Memphis Police Department, information technology services and six city agencies renting offices on Union Avenue Extended into the Donnelley J. Hill office building if the city goes through with a plan to swap the office building with state government in exchange for parking spaces in the Peabody Place garage.

46. City Council Hears Tentative Plans for Office Building -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s administration would move the Memphis Police Department, information technology services and six city agencies renting offices on Union Avenue Extended into the Donnelley J. Hill office building if the city goes through with a plan to swap the office building with state government in exchange for parking spaces in the Peabody Place garage.

47. Plough Grant Requires All Rape Kits Be Tested -

Before they agreed to put up $750,000 toward funding the disposition of the city’s untested rape kit backlog, leaders of the Plough Foundation wanted assurances that the city would process every rape kit.

48. Commission to Vote on Budget, Tax Rate -

Shelby County Commissioners take final votes Monday, June 2, on a $1.1 billion operating budget and a $75 million capital budget for Shelby County government, and the first of three votes on a new property tax rate for the fiscal year that begins July 1.

49. Judge: East Tennessee City Can Change Name to Rocky Top -

NASHVILLE (AP) – A federal judge has given a former coal mining town in East Tennessee the go-ahead to change its name to Rocky Top – a move that developers have said is needed to entice them to build a massive tourist complex in the town of 1,800 people.

50. School Board Unveils Digital Devices -

Shelby County Schools board members got a look this week at the new digital devices students in 16 schools will get when the new academic year begins in August.

The first Lenovo Yoga and Yoga 11e convertible laptops to arrive were unwrapped before the board vote Tuesday, May 27, for the $5.4 million contract with Unistar-Sparco Computers Inc. to lease 13,000 devices for three years.

51. Administration Announces US Manufacturing Regions -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Obama administration on Wednesday named 12 regions of the country that will receive special attention under a new federal program designed to help make them more attractive to manufacturing companies looking for a place to set up operations, provide a boost to the U.S. manufacturing industry and create jobs.

52. Commission Prepares Final Budget Moves -

When Shelby County Commissioners make the last adjustments to the county budget in committee sessions Wednesday, May 28, they will likely increase the 2.5 percent pay raise county Mayor Mark Luttrell proposed for county employees to 3 percent.

53. Haslam Vetoes Reduction of Penalties for Pollution -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Republican Gov. Bill Haslam on Thursday vetoed a bill over what he called an unintended consequence of reducing the criminal penalties for pollution in Tennessee.

The bill sponsored by Sen. Stacey Campfield of Knoxville and fellow Republican Rep. Andy Holt of Dresden was aimed at penalizing retail vandalism by "flash mobs." It had passed the Senate 29-0 and the House 63-31.

54. Medical Makeover -

After suffering from years of benign neglect, a new, more invigorated Memphis Medical Center is finally beginning to take shape.

A drive or walk around the area these days shows the hallmarks of a changing landscape – bulldozers, backhoes, cranes and construction crews working feverishly to forge the new urban environment.

55. May County Primary Results Certified -

The closest race in the May Shelby County primary elections turned into a tale of the tape Wednesday, May 21, as the Shelby County Election Commission certified the results of that and all of the other races on the ballot.

56. Airport Artists -

Several years ago Richard White, vice president of properties and business development at the Memphis-Shelby County Airport Authority, noticed what he thought was a troubling trend.

57. Study: Political TV Ads on Health Law Total $445 Million -

CHICAGO (AP) – A new analysis finds the nation's health care overhaul deserves a place in advertising history as the focus of extraordinarily high spending on negative political TV ads that have gone largely unanswered by the law's supporters.

58. Economic Experts Offer Analysis, Forecast -

A report from Fitch Ratings May 14 declared that going forward the U.S. economy will have to grow without the help it has enjoyed in recent years from things such as low interest rates and government spending.

59. Board to Review Historic Properties -

The State Review Board will meet later this month to review Tennessee’s proposed nominations to the National Register of Historic Places, including the Picardy Place Historic District in Shelby County.

60. Editorial: Wellness Programs Can Play Key Role in City -

Corporate wellness plans have come a long way in the last 20 years.

So has the idea of fitness and exercise in a city whose population is part of a region consistently near the top of national rankings for some significant health problems.

61. Board to Review Nominations for Historic Register -

The State Review Board will meet later this month to review Tennessee's proposed nominations to the National Register of Historic Places, including the Picardy Place Historic District in Shelby County.

62. Prescott Earned Place in Sports Hall of Fame -

On Easter Sunday, April 17, 1960, a 13-year-old Allie Prescott and his father were sitting down the third-base line at Russwood Park watching an exhibition game between the Cleveland Indians and the Chicago White Sox.

63. Events -

Memphis in May World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest will be held Thursday, May 15, through Saturday, May 17, in Tom Lee Park on Riverside Drive. Hundreds of teams compete for more than $110,000 in prizes. Visit memphisinmay.org.

64. Events -

Memphis Botanic Garden will host Farmers Market at the Garden Wednesday, May 14, from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m., and every Wednesday through Oct. 29 at the garden, 750 Cherry Road. Visit memphisbotanicgarden.com.

65. RNC Changes Debate Rules for 2016 -

MEMPHIS (AP) – Lunging for control of the GOP ahead of high-stakes elections, the Republican National Committee on Friday took steps to end free-for-all presidential debates and vowed to punish potential contenders who participate in rogue forums.

66. Tennessee 12th-Graders Below Average in Math, Reading -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Tennessee Education Commissioner Kevin Huffman said Wednesday that a report showing the state's high school seniors' below-average performance in math and reading is partially due to them not being exposed to recent education changes that have more rigorous standards.

67. Brown’s Complex Contempt Case Moves Forward -

Former Criminal Court Judge Joe Brown’s actions in Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court in March will live on in court past the May county primaries and into the campaign season as Brown prepares to challenge incumbent District Attorney General Amy Weirich in the August general election.

68. Editorial: Gathering at the River Still Part of Our Lives -

Where the Mississippi River runs and recedes, it usually leaves more than was there before.

In the case of the Arkansas side of the river at Memphis, the muddy waters come and go, offering a riverside experience that mixes nature, history and that indefinable experience of just being at the river’s edge to watch its journey to the sea.

69. The Heartbreak Hotel -

HEARTBREAK HOTEL. ON THE EDGE OF THINGS. “They’re calling this area The Edge, and it’s about to explode,” Ben said.

We were looking up at The Heartbreak Hotel, a stack of bricks where traveling salesmen a century ago would rest their sample cases for the night, rising three tired stories above the all-but-forgotten intersection of Monroe and Marshall – pretty much like Elvis sang – down at the end of Lonely Street.

70. Miles to Lead Germantown Community Theatre -

Michael D. Miles took over as executive director of Germantown Community Theatre Monday, April 28, about two weeks before the theater closes its 2013-2014 season with “A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum” May 16 to June 1.

71. Grizz Players React to Sterling’s Comments -

Five years ago, for part of one NBA season, Zach Randolph was a Los Angeles Clipper and on the payroll of owner Donald Sterling.

72. Building It for the Long Haul -

Minus the cornfield backdrop, the owners of big-box gyms know that if they build it, the line from “Field of Dreams” will hold up and people will come. They most definitely will come.

Unfortunately, the average gym-goer is something of a dream-chaser, too, imagining she will be losing weight like it is merely an extra layer of unwanted clothing or believing he will undergo a Herculean-style transformation in 30 days.

73. Hands Up, You’re in Tennessee -

ARMED AND DANGEROUS. I got an email last week from a White Station classmate.

“Aren’t you the guy who once wore a western style .22 pistol in a holster into the drug store at Poplar and Perkins? Man, were you ever ahead of your time.”

74. Election Commission May Move Initial Early Voting Site -

Shelby County Election Commissioners certified the ballot Wednesday, April 16, for the Aug. 7 state and federal primary elections and the nonpartisan judicial and Shelby County Schools board elections on what politicos call the “big ballot.”

75. Fantasy Games and Online Gambling -

Despite the federal prohibition of “online gambling,” fantasy sports are cropping up everywhere – especially last month during March Madness and now as baseball season gets underway.

76. Aghabeg Joins Gateway Group as Controller -

Angela Aghabeg has joined temporary staffing and executive search firm Gateway Group Personnel as controller. In her new role, Aghabeg is responsible for the maintenance and accuracy of the general ledger and compliance with governmental reporting requirements and tax filings. She also is accountable for compiling historical and current data and financial records and preparing monthly financial statements for analysis and projections.

77. Sponsor Says He Would Raise Money for Open Carry -

NASHVILLE (AP) – The House sponsor of a bill seeking to do away with permit requirements to openly carry is offering to raise the estimated $100,000 cost from private sources.

Republican Rep. Micah Van Huss said in a letter to his House colleagues on Monday that he was disappointed with what he called a "bogus" cost estimate attached to the bill that he sees as an attempt to kill the measure.

78. The Business Case for Investing in Green Space -

Editor’s Note: This column will appear Tuesdays through April in honor of Sustainability Month for Memphis and Shelby County.

During 2013 the Greater Memphis Chamber formed the Chairman’s Circle, a group of over 100 Memphis business leaders organized to push for action on key issues to accelerate the regional economy. Early in the life of the organization we created “moon missions,” which are coordinated efforts to truly transform our community.

79. Tenn. House OKs Anti-Meth Bill -

Supporters of a watered-down version of Gov. Bill Haslam’s anti-methamphetamine legislation approved by the House on Wednesday believe it will help in the fight against the drug’s production across the state, even though it’s not as tough as they would like.

80. Schools Leaders Outline Budget Goals -

The Shelby County Commission and Shelby County Schools leaders eased into what is likely to be the most difficult discussion of county government’s budget season – funding the county’s school district in the first academic year of the demerger.

81. Tennessee House OKs Watered-Down Anti-Meth Bill -

Supporters of a watered-down version of Gov. Bill Haslam's anti-methamphetamine legislation approved by the House on Wednesday believe it will help in the fight against the drug's production across the state, even though it's not as tough as they would like.

82. Fourth Annual MED Night Raises Hospital Awareness -

“Celebrate good times, come on!” The song by Kool & the Gang – this year’s MED Night: A Soul Celebration headliner – pretty much encapsulates not only the night, but the overall feeling about Regional One Health’s vision and new direction.

83. Tennessee Legislative Session Nearing End -

Legislative leaders are hoping to adopt Tennessee's annual spending plan as early as this week, clearing the way to the conclusion of the legislative session.

But that assumes that the Republican-controlled House and Senate can find quick agreement over budget cuts proposed by Gov. Bill Haslam to close a funding gap created by flagging tax revenues.

84. Lebanon’s Pody Works for Amendment Passage -

Helping people with insurance requires the ability to plan for multiple scenarios.

That’s something Rep. Mark Pody, a Republican from Lebanon, Tenn., has taken with him to the Tennessee General Assembly, and he says it helps even when everyone is in agreement on a bill’s final outcome.

85. 2014 Campaigns Hit the Streets -

With the April filing deadline behind them and early voting for the county primaries a week and a half ahead, those running for elected office in Shelby County this year kept a full weekend schedule.

86. Museum Milestone -

When the National Civil Rights Museum formally reopens Saturday, April 5, it will be with the “breaking” of a ceremonial chain at the new entrance to the building that was once the Lorraine Motel, where Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in 1968.

87. High Court Loosens Reins on Big Campaign Donors -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court's conservative majority voted Wednesday to free wealthy donors to give to as many political candidates and campaigns as they want, further loosening the reins on giving by big contributors as the 2014 campaign moves into high gear.

88. Report: Tennessee Offered Contingent Incentives to VW -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Tennessee's incentive offer to Volkswagen was made contingent on the labor situation at the German automaker's plant in Chattanooga developing to the "satisfaction" of Republican Gov. Bill Haslam's administration, according to documents obtained by WTVF-TV in Nashville.

89. Campfield Sticks to Goals of Smaller Government -

For a decade, state Sen. Stacey Campfield has been unafraid of making headlines.

First as a state representative, and then in the Senate, he’s spoken his mind and put forth legislation that meets his stated goals of shrinking government.

90. Judge Upholds Country of Origin Label for Meat -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Shoppers who want to buy American beef for dinner instead of meat from Canada or Mexico will still be able to find the country of origin on the label.

A federal appeals court ruling Friday allows the government to go forward with rules that require labels on packaged steaks, ribs and other cuts of meat to say where the animals were born, raised and slaughtered. The meat industry attempted to block the rules, which went into effect last year, saying they are costly and provide no health benefits to the consumer.

91. Brown’s Contempt Hearing Reflects Political Skirmish -

Joe Brown’s bid to unseat District Attorney General Amy Weirich in the 2014 elections probably wasn’t supposed to begin this way – in a courtroom dispute with Juvenile Court that has nothing to do with Weirich.

92. Editorial: Government Must Address Coverage Gap -

Our national discussion of the Affordable Care Act continues to say so much about more than the issue of affordable health care.

It continues to be the most profound statement about what passes for political discourse and the decision-making process our elected officials have created for issues that are of crucial importance to citizens.

93. Caught in the Middle -

Even before the Affordable Care Act came along, Deborah Casey was living between a logistical rock and an economic hard place. Casey, a 61-year-old widow, draws a monthly Social Security check based on her husband’s earnings. She works part-time for Shelby County (no benefits), and to continue receiving the same amount in that Social Security check, she has to keep tabs on how much she makes. This is exactly how someone who wants to provide for herself winds up on a “fixed income.”

94. Tigers Season Sits Somewhere Between Respectable, Not-Quite-Great -

So, how best to categorize the 2013-2014 season for the Memphis Tigers basketball team?

Great? Not even coach Josh Pastner has settled on that word.

Respectable? It was much more than that. You may be tired of hearing Pastner say it, but it is true the Tigers stayed in the national rankings until the final Associated Press poll right before the NCAA Tournament.

95. Senate Sponsor Says Compromise Near on Common Core -

NASHVILLE (AP) – The Senate sponsor of a contentious proposal to delay further implementation of Tennessee's Common Core education standards for two years said Tuesday that a compromise is close on the legislation.

96. Brown Contempt Jailing Maps Political Challenge -

The arrest of the Democratic nominee for Shelby County district attorney general Monday, March 24, is the best indication yet of the tumult within the local Democratic Party as it attempts to win countywide offices four years after losing every race to Republicans.

97. The Daily News Claims Four Awards -

The Daily News and The Memphis News earned first place honors over the weekend for editorials in the annual Tennessee Associated Press Managing Editors awards.

The editorials were judged the best among Division 3 newspapers across the state of Tennessee, newspapers with a circulation of up to 15,000.

98. Federal Court Ruling Ends Consolidation Quest -

The last unresolved issue of the 2010 attempt to consolidate city of Memphis and Shelby County governments ended quietly last week in Memphis federal court.

The 2010 federal court lawsuit over the failed consolidation attempt – the most serious attempt in 39 years – ended with an order Wednesday, March 19, from U.S. District Judge Thomas Anderson granting a motion for summary judgment by defendants in the case.

99. Fisher Finds Reward Sharing Local Economic Story -

When Conduit Global announced during a January event at FedExForum it would create 1,000 new jobs in Memphis over the next three to five years, Gwyn Fisher was finally able to exhale and show some emotion.

100. Backlog Backlash -

The first thing Veronica Coleman-Davis wanted to do was take a look at where thousands of untested rape kits had been stored over the last 30 years.

The former U.S. attorney is investigating how the backlog came to be. It’s an effort that, until her appointment in February by Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr., had been pointed at clearing the backlog with no answers from any of the players in the criminal justice system about how the backlog happened in the first place.