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Editorial Results (free)

1. Music & Heritage Festival Brings Region’s Culture to Life -

Spend any amount of time with Judy Peiser at the Center for Southern Folklore and it’s easy to see she loves talking to people.

It’s not just making small talk; she enjoys getting to know everyone who comes through the center’s cafe at 119 S. Main St. And she never misses an opportunity to talk up the Memphis Music & Heritage Festival, which will be Saturday, Sept. 5, and Sunday, Sept. 6, along Main Street in front of the center.

2. Hotel Developer Moves On Scimitar Building Conversion -

179 Madison Ave.
Memphis, TN 38103

Permit Cost: $5.2 million

Permit Date: Applied August 2015

3. City of Memphis, EPIcenter Get $50,000 for Startup Efforts -

When Walter Perry, director of the U.S. Small Business Administration’s Tennessee district office, joins other SBA staff in presenting Memphis officials Wednesday, Sept. 2, with a $50,000 Start Small Model prize, the ceremony will be more than a perfunctory civic affair.

4. Car Wash Facilities Sell for $29 Million -

Car Wash USA Express Holdings LLC, a Mississippi limited liability company, has sold its portfolio of car wash facilities located across Memphis and Shelby County.

5. Rocking for Love -

When Lahna Deering and Jason Freeman join the other musicians performing at the Rock for Love music festival next week, the gig will be a bit more meaningful for them than the shows they normally play.

6. Only ‘Fall Guy’ Needed Here Is Cris Carter -

Remember the quaint old days of American sport, when the symbol a player had made it was the number of luxury cars in his garage or unnecessary bathrooms in his mansion?

So passé. Now you’ve only made it if you have a “crew.” And if you have a crew, you must have a “fall guy.”

7. Homegrown Talent -

The New Daisy Theatre will play host in a few weeks to a local music festival featuring a handful of Memphis bands that also serves as a showcase of sorts for a new record label in town.

The Hometown Throwdown 2 is set to rock the Daisy Sept. 12, a follow-up to the inaugural version of the festival in 2013. It’s a “homegrown Memphis rock festival,” said Gary Segars, a festival organizer as well as the singer with Prosevere, one of the bands on the bill.

8. Car Wash Facilities Sell for $29 Million -

Car Wash USA Express Holdings LLC, a Mississippi limited liability company, has sold its portfolio of car wash facilities located across Memphis and Shelby County.

9. Lighting Girls’ Lives -

The Pink Eagles are like a Girl Scouts troop created just for Memphis. For the past seven years, the nonprofit has helped area girls ages 5 to 19 build self-confidence, leadership skills and financial literacy. The weekly meetings and seasonal events are free for the participants thanks to the leadership of founder Loretta McNary.

10. New Logistics Accelerator Gets Under Way -

A new logistics-focused business accelerator has launched in Memphis.

Five teams are participating in the 14-week 2015 EPIcenter Logistics Innovation Accelerator, which is sponsored by FedEx and got under way Monday, Aug. 17.

11. Affordable Homes in an Unaffordable Market -

The gold rush of residential development throughout Middle Tennessee conceals what some in the region say is a growing crisis in affordable housing.

New homes and condos come on to the market every day, and even more are under construction or still in the planning stage, but those homes are often on the higher end of the price scale.

12. New Logistics Accelerator Gets Under Way -

A new logistics-focused business accelerator has launched in Memphis.

Five teams are participating in the 14-week 2015 EPIcenter Logistics Innovation Accelerator, which is sponsored by FedEx and got under way Monday, Aug. 17.

13. Final Forrest Statue Vote Moves Controversy to Planning Stage -

Memphis City Council members closed out a series of votes Tuesday, Aug. 18, on moving the statue and disinterring the remains of Nathan Bedford Forrest from Health Sciences Park near Downtown Memphis.

14. Council Gives Final Approval To Forrest Statue Removal -

Memphis City Council members gave final approval Tuesday, Aug. 18, to an ordinance setting the stage for removal of the Nathan Bedford Forrest statue in Health Sciences Park

15. Musical Space -

It took a while – four years, in fact – for the Memphis Music Hall of Fame to finally get a space of its own. But it’s preparing to celebrate that physical space at 126 Beale St., adjacent to the Hard Rock Café, with a grand opening ceremony Friday, Aug. 21.

16. Hooker Fights for Right to Die on His Terms -

John Jay Hooker, a household name in Middle Tennessee if nowhere else, is suffering from stage 4 metastatic cancer with weeks, not months to live.

17. Orpheum Art Installation Unveiled Later This Month -

Later this month, the Orpheum Theatre will unveil its newest art installation – “Orpheus Ascending” – by world-renowned sculptor Richard MacDonald.

18. Rock for Love Adds Bands, Announces Expansion -

Rock for Love is expanding a bit, with just three weeks to go until the ninth annual concert-fundraiser for the Church Health Center kicks off.

Among the latest news, the University of Memphis Music Industry Division will curate and manage a stage at the Friday, Sept. 4, Crosstown Block Party. Lauren Moscato, Drew Erwin, Kyndle McMahan and Jeffery Jordan also will perform that night at Midtown Crossing Grill, at 394 N. Watkins St., starting at 6 p.m.

19. Thank You, Thank You Very Much -

A THANK YOU NOTE FROM A COPYWRITER TO ELVIS. Elvis was once asked what kind of music he played. “I play all kinds,” was his response.

That pretty much sums up Memphis, and Elvis was pretty much the sum up of its parts. Part gospel and part blues, part country and part soul. And all original. Part dirt poor and part flashy rich, part Mama’s boy and part nasty and naughty. And all surprising. Part glitz and glitter and part sad and tragic. And all too real. Part Mississippi and part Tennessee. And all world shaking.

20. Rock for Love Adds Bands, Announces Times, Expansion -

Rock for Love is expanding a bit, with just three weeks to go until the ninth annual concert-fundraiser for the Church Health Center kicks off.

Among the latest news, the University of Memphis Music Industry Division will curate and manage a stage at the Friday, Sept. 4, Crosstown Block Party. Lauren Moscato, Drew Erwin, Kyndle McMahan and Jeffery Jordan also will perform that night at Midtown Crossing Grill, at 394 N. Watkins St., starting at 6 p.m.

21. Treated Like 'The King' -

Dr. Mark Castellaw’s clinic in Germantown not only treats its patients’ medical needs – it’s also home to a memorabilia-packed shrine in honor of the King of Rock ‘n’ Roll.

22. Google Forms a New Holding Company, 'Alphabet' -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Google is creating a new company to oversee its highly lucrative Internet business and a growing flock of other ventures, including some — like building self-driving cars and researching ways to prolong human life — that are known more for their ambition than for turning an immediate profit.

23. College Football Notebook: Nick Saban Needs a Quarterback -

Another season at Alabama and another battle for quarterback.

Last year’s runner-up, Florida State transfer Jacob Coker, returns for a second shot at the job after losing out to Blake Sims in 2014. Redshirt freshman David Cornwell showed enough last spring to become a contender, and the race may be wide enough open to go beyond these two if neither can assert himself as the leader of the offense.

24. Party in Style at Schermerhorn, Hall of Fame, Other Top Nashville Venues -

When showing off Nashville to business associates, family and friends, doing so at a swanky location with some Music City cache is sure to hammer home exactly why everyone wants to be here right now.

25. Party in Style at Schermerhorn, Hall of Fame, Other Top Nashville Venues -

When showing off Nashville to business associates, family and friends, doing so at a swanky location with some Music City cache is sure to hammer home exactly why everyone wants to be here right now.

26. Best Hotel Rooms in Nashville – With or Without Helicopter -

Tod Roadarmel, director of sales and marketing for the nearly 2-year-old Omni Hotel downtown, is awestruck by the vitality of Nashville’s hospitality industry. In town since 1988, he remembers when pre-Bridgestone Arena Broadway was not a place you’d want to be late at night.

27. Orpheum Art Installation Unveiled Later This Month -

Later this month, the Orpheum Theatre will unveil its newest art installation – “Orpheus Ascending” – by world-renowned sculptor Richard MacDonald.

28. Memphis Divorce Attorneys Prepare for Same-Sex Separations -

Memphis attorneys Miles Mason Sr. and Larry Rice have written the book on divorces.

Each is the author of authoritative guides to divorce law.

29. GTx Reports Second-Quarter Loss -

Memphis-based biopharmaceutical company GTx Inc. reported a net loss of $48 million in the second quarter, wider than its $10.9 million net loss in second quarter 2014.

30. For Small Businesses, Agility is King -

Editor’s note: This is the first column in a two-part series on being nimble and proactive with technology in the small business world.

Small business owners can learn a thing or two from the Scout motto, “Be prepared.” Preparedness allows an organization to be nimble, which sets the stage for turning challenges into opportunities. Being able to quickly pivot from Plan A to Plan B and even Plan C is essential for keeping up with the inevitable hiccups that will arise, particularly when it comes to technology.

31. 'En Fuego' -

When Southaven Mayor Darren Musselwhite took office in June 2013, one of the first tasks that landed on his desk was a long-planned regional outlet mall.

The outlet mall, planned for a roughly 33-acre site at Church Road and Interstate 55 in the DeSoto County city, had been on the drawing board for some time, but the recession and its aftermath caused developers and Mississippi officials to put it on hold.

32. Warehouse At Perimeter Point Sells for $775,000 -

A Perimeter Point industrial building has been sold for $775,000.

Missouri-based Martabra Real Estate LLC acquired the flex warehouse building at 5055 Covington Way, just off Covington Pike south of Elmore Road, from CP Perimeter Point LLC, an affiliate of California-based Coastal Partners LLC.

33. Family, Art Bleed Into History At House of Mtenzi Museum -

Part performing arts space and part family scrapbook come-to-life, the House of Mtenzi Museum is made to “tell the story of forgotten legends,” according to owner Stanley Campbell.

34. New Daisy Renovation Signals New Era for Historic Building -

With a national partner found in Live Nation Entertainment, the New Daisy Theater is getting all dolled up to host nearly 200 musical acts annually.

The job doesn't just call for a new coat of paint to cover the decades of graffiti: the historic theater at 330 Beale is getting a complete overhaul.

35. Redistricting Controversy Shares Political Stage With Council Restructure -

At one point Tuesday, July 21, during the Memphis City Council’s discussion of the complexities and controversies of drawing new district lines, council attorney Allan Wade’s review of events reached the year 1967.

36. Beale Authority Prepares to Negotiate Lease With Memphis Leaders -

The Beale Street Tourism Development Authority is at what Downtown Memphis Commission president Paul Morris describes as an “awkward interim stage.”

37. Want to Get Into Knoxville-Area Showbiz? Here’s How -

“Chasing the fun” keeps Jaime Hemsley, founder and owner of Gage Models and Talent Agency, in high gear to find her clients opportunities in the entertainment business.

“There’s lots of different ways to get involved in the industry,” she says, adding that her clients work both locally and nationally. Her agency recently booked a client with a TV reality dating show. Gage is headquartered in Knoxville but has clients throughout the southeast and works with agencies in New York and Los Angeles.

38. ‘Honda Girl’ Ashley Blair Finds Career Outside Car Ads -

Ten-year-old actress Ashley Blair takes her job seriously. She’s like many other actors in the region working to improve her craft and looking for the next project. The Knoxville area has a thriving community of actors, writers, directors, and producers, all trying to showcase their best work, both locally and nationally.

39. Acting Up -

The Knoxville area has a rich legacy of actors who have found success in show business: Patricia Neal, David Keith, Cylk Cozart, David Dwyer, John Cullum, Bruce McKinnon, Polly Bergen, Dale Dickey, Brad Renfro, Johnny Knoxville, perhaps the most famous of all, Dolly Parton, singer/songwriter turned actress.

40. Cardwell a Link to Metro’s Past, Present -

Metro Trustee Charlie Cardwell definitely is a member of the “good old boys” network that ran Nashville for decades.

41. Former Mayor Purcell Traces Nashville Transformation to 1978 Election -

Former Mayor Bill Purcell lived through the transition from the good old boys who ran Nashville to the “new Nashville,” in which a displaced Yankee became mayor in 1991 and began the type of forward-thinking, executive-style leadership that has propelled Nashville to skyline-shattering status on the national stage.

42. Beale Group Plans for Lease Agreement Instead of District Ownership -

The Beale Street Tourism Development Authority is dropping the idea for now of a fee simple ownership of the entertainment district.

Members of the authority board, which met Thursday, July 9, will instead pursue the leasehold agreement with the city of Memphis, as contemplated in the city ordinance that created the authority as the new long-term planning group for the district.

43. Shelby County Mortgage Market Rises 14 Percent -

On a normal day, Independent Bank vice president of mortgage Sam Goff will get maybe one or two calls from buyers asking about rates and looking to buy a home.

44. A Baseball Guy -

Bottom of the first inning at AutoZone Park, and Redbirds first baseman Dan Johnson is in the batter’s box. Oklahoma City’s pitcher winds and delivers and Johnson, a left-handed hitter, swings and makes contact. Loud contact.

45. Piano-Playing Senator's Latest Tune: New Education Policy -

WASHINGTON (AP) – How does a musician-senator fill the time during yet another partisan Senate stalemate?

In Sen. Lamar Alexander's case, he sits down at a borrowed piano in his Capitol Hill office and, with a grin, bangs out "The Memphis Blues."

46. This week in Memphis history: July 3-9 -

2014: Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong says 308 police officers have called in sick during the Fourth of July holiday week in what he acknowledges is probably a “work action” by cops upset over cuts to health benefits.
The sick-out causes the department to use contingency plans, which include sending officers in units such as the Organized Crime Unit back to uniform patrol and using Shelby County Sheriff’s deputies in the Beale Street Entertainment District.

47. Building Ballet -

Ask Ballet Memphis CEO and founding artistic director Dorothy Gunther Pugh about her dance company's newly announced move to Midtown, and the conversation doesn't immediately turn to obvious things like the when and the why.

48. Obama Signs Trade, Worker Assistance Bills Into Law -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In a rare bipartisan scene at the White House, President Barack Obama on Monday signed into law two hard-fought bills giving him greater authority to negotiate international trade deals and providing aid to workers whose jobs are displaced by such pacts.

49. Justices Rule Against EPA Power Plant Mercury Limits -

The Supreme Court ruled Monday against the Obama administration’s attempt to limit power plant emissions of mercury and other hazardous air pollutants, but it may only be a temporary setback for regulators.

50. Nashville’s Long, Hot, Delicious Summer -

Summertime brings us wedges of juicy watermelon and drippy ice cream cones. It yields pies piled with blackberries and peaches so fresh they can fill a room with their aroma.

It offers jewel-toned tomatoes for slicing and piling onto BLTs.

51. Murphy, the Realist -

“Whatever can go wrong will go wrong.” That’s a common wording for the epigram that we call “Murphy’s Law.” Granted, others have said it somewhat differently.

In her 1953 book, “The Making of a Scientist,” Ann Roe (1904-1991) attributed “If anything can go wrong, it will” to an unnamed physicist whom she’d interviewed. In his 1952 book, “The Butcher – The Ascent of Yerupaja,” John Sack cited a saying among mountaineers: “Anything that can possibly go wrong, does.”

52. Seeds of Nutrition in South Memphis -

Second in a series of profiles on the Community Foundation of Greater Memphis’ GiVE 365 grantees.

The community garden/urban farming concept literally took root years ago. Knowledge Quest founder and director Marlon Foster remembers well the 25-by-25-foot plot at the Fowler Homes housing project back in 1999. It was a humble beginning planted with a few seeds and a lot of faith and hope.

53. Baptist Health Care, Church Health Center Launch Residency Program -

Baptist Memorial Health Care and the Church Health Center have teamed up to launch a new family medicine residency that involves recruiting a group of residents in waves, with the first batch starting work next summer.

54. Need Reason to Pay By Phone? Apple, Google Add New Features -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – The tech industry has been saying for years that smartphones would make traditional wallets obsolete. But most people still use cash or plastic when they shop in stores.

55. Building Green in a Red-Hot Market -

Counting cranes has become a Nashville pastime, and the perks of all that development are clear – a robust economy, vibrant real estate market and more jobs.

Naturally, there is concern among some residents that all of the construction and increased population could harm the area’s environment, water and air quality and green space.

56. Garibaldi's Temptations Club Celebrates its 1980s Run -

Mike Garibaldi is known for his Memphis restaurant chain, Garibaldi's Pizza.

At the original Garibaldi’s, near the University of Memphis, is a picture on the wall of a smiling waitress in her 50s.

57. Chism Political Picnic Offers Pre-Campaign Snapshot -

Memphis mayoral contender Jim Strickland saw a face he didn’t recognize Saturday, June 13, in the southwest Memphis crowd at former County Commissioner Sidney Chism’s annual political picnic.

58. New Memphis Institute's Annual Summer Experience Connecting Young Professionals -

Hundreds of interns working at Memphis companies this summer are getting a taste of what the Bluff City has to offer them, should they choose to put down roots here.

The New Memphis Institute’s annual Summer Experience slate of events is intended to connect young professionals working in the city with their peers; to establish movers and shakers; and to give them an up-close look at Memphis. The goal: capture their attention at a formative stage in their life, when they’re poised to make plans about whatever city they’ll ultimately call home.

59. Old-Time Country, Stones Intertwined -

Joey, the CowPolka King, well remembers the times he would play acoustic bass, piano or his specialty – the accordion – and try to catch up after Cowboy Jack Clement launched into one of his favorite songs….

60. Playing Big Outdoor Stadiums Costly, Risky -

Tickets still are available from most online brokers for The Stones‘ ZIP Code Tour stop in Nashville.

And while the band should reasonably fill the LP Field, it is not without risk that they’re playing stadiums this time around, according to Gary Bongiovanni, editor of Pollstar, a trade publication that covers the international concert business.

61. Stones’ Nashville Connections Go Way Back -

While Brad Paisley lives what he calls “a bucket list item” by singing while playing his guitar in typically showy fashion as the opening act for The Rolling Stones, the most important guitarist in rock ‘n’ roll history and a man idolized by Keith Richards and Ronnie Wood will be sitting in his house on Blueberry Hill in the hills of northern Davidson County.

62. Stones Rock Music City -

Pleased to meet you, hope you guessed our name. Well, hell, Mick, if it’s puzzling you, it’s Nashville. Music City USA.

We’re the national media’s flavor of the day – the “It city,” which has gone from being a secondary concert market – remember The Beatles played Memphis, not Nashville – to one of the country’s prime touring destinations.

63. Panel Alters Wharton’s Plan for Memphis Fairgrounds -

The Mid-South Coliseum becomes a pavilion with a grove next to a multi-purpose sports center. A 10-acre water park fronts on Central Avenue where a high school gym now stands.

A second north-south Tiger Lane intersects with the current east-west version.

64. Panel Alters Wharton’s Plan for Memphis Fairgrounds -

The Mid-South Coliseum becomes a pavilion with a grove next to a multi-purpose sports center. A 10-acre water park fronts on Central Avenue where a high school gym now stands.

A second north-south Tiger Lane intersects with the current east-west version.

65. Frayser Community Fair Scheduled for Saturday -

NeighborWorks America’s national NeighborWorks Week puts redevelopment, empowerment and civic pride at center stage with a variety of events, including a Frayser community fair this Saturday.

“We wanted to have a fair that connected neighbors and neighborhoods to resources,” said Amy Schaftlein, director of development at United Housing Inc.

66. Wal-Mart Keeps It All in the Family, Chair Passed to Penner -

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. (AP) – Wal-Mart is passing the chairmanship of the world's largest retailer from the eldest son of late founder Sam Walton to a third generation.

The company said that board Chairman Rob Walton will step down and be succeeded by Vice Chairman Greg Penner, who is his son-in-law.

67. Opry Has Become Big Part of CMA Fest -

The relationship between the Grand Ole Opry – the 90-year-old radio program and down home variety show – and CMA Music Fest is a pretty simple formula.

“A win for CMA Music Fest is a win for the Opry,” says Pete Fisher, vice president and general manager of the nation’s longest continuously running radio program.

68. Downtown Business Owners Love CMA Fest -

It’s the business she’s chosen, and being a multi-bar owner gives Brenda Sanderson a unique perspective on what used to be called Fan Fair, a blue-collar celebration that has gradually been transformed into Nashville’s main culture festival and all-inclusive calling card.

69. Bonnaroo, CMA Fest Overlap Presents Problems -

With CMA Music Fest and Bonnaroo on the same four-day weekend, it will be tough for a fan to catch Rubblebucket down in the field in Manchester and, say, Florida Georgia Line at LP Field.

Well, that might be a reach, but there are likely fans that would want both Billy Joel and Alan Jackson, for instance.

70. CMA Fest a Blast for Artists, Merchants -

The Glimmer Twins wannabe in the white cowboy hat and the 21-year-old blonde who has worked her tail off to climb from the audience to one of the main stages at CMA Music Festival display different but genuine levels of excitement about Music City’s biggest week.

71. Mother's Day Road Trip -

In the afternoon of Thursday before Mother’s Day, I drive southeast. I stop at a certain spot in White Hall, Ark., and pick up a mess of fried chicken. Then I drive on to Lake Village, Ark., where I am greeted by twin great-nieces Sloan and Amelia, age 6. They live on the banks of Lake Chicot with mom Caroline and dad Chuck.

72. Events -

Germantown Charity Horse Show will be held Tuesday through Saturday, June 2-6, at 7745 Poplar Pike. The all-breed event will feature more than 800 horses in competition, plus vendors, Jack Russell Terrier races (June 6, 10 a.m. to noon) and more. Visit gchs.org.

73. Talent Takes the Wheel -

As the economy continues to improve, employers are beginning to think of what they can do to attract and retain the best talent. In fact, I was just asked for tips on this very topic by a local employer.

74. Farewell to the King -

There is a real temptation to sum up the passing of B.B. King by writing that his death marks the end of an era in entertainment.

But that would marginalize, if not belittle, both his talent, his gift and his enormous influence. The world that brought B.B. King to Memphis in the 1940s can’t be found on the road King called home.

75. Ramsey: No Medicaid Expansion Until 2017 -

The Tennessee legislative session ended in late April, giving itself a little more than two and a-half months to handle the state’s business. That’s plenty of time, according to Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey.

76. Media Heads Rule Ranks of Best-Paid CEOs -

NEW YORK (AP) – They're not Hollywood stars, they're not TV personalities and they don't play in a rock band, but their pay packages are in the same league.

Six of the 10 highest-paid CEOs last year worked in the media industry, according to a study carried out by executive compensation data firm Equilar and The Associated Press.

77. Do Not Fear What You Should be Afraid Of -

There are factors conspiring in the market’s industrial kitchen right now that might lead to a fit of indigestion for investors. This week we will look at the three main ingredients and discuss how to medicate.

78. Future Methodist CEO Michael Ugwueke Fueled by Health Care Passion -

Growing up in war-torn Nigeria helped Michael Ugwueke decide early on that health care would be his eventual profession.

Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare’s president and chief operating officer – recently tapped by the Methodist board to succeed Gary Shorb as CEO when Shorb decides to retire – recalls carnage, disease and “people dying left and right” during his childhood. It was more than enough, he says, to inspire him to find a job where he could make a difference in people’s lives and, even if in a small way, counteract some of the negative forces he grew up with.

79. Commission Budget Consensus Includes Tax Rollback -

There is still some “cognitive dissonance” left in the county’s budget season, county commissioner Heidi Shafer said near the end of the marathon Wednesday, May 20, budget committee session she oversaw.

80. Memphis Financial Startup Secures Seed Funding -

Consumers are increasingly turning to technology and the convenience of smartphones to pay for goods and services or perform banking-related tasks.

That explains everything from the launch of Apple’s new ApplePay service to the formation of Memphis startup SynapsePay, a self-described early-stage financial network that has just completed a seed funding round.

81. Kristin Chenoweth Set to Perform at The Orpheum -

Emmy and Tony Award-winning actress and singer Kristin Chenoweth is performing a one-night show at The Orpheum Theatre later this year.

Her show is Sept. 19 at 8 p.m., the theatee announced Monday. Tickets go on sale May 29 at 10 a.m.

82. Raising the Barre -

Memphis has always been known for its rich musical history, but another performing art is whirling across the city: dance.

Several collectives and companies are dedicated to making dance accessible to underserved communities and changing the perception that ballet is a dusty and stifled endeavor.

83. Conquering Fear of Heights on Mt. LeConte -

I was standing on the edge of a cliff during a hike to Mt. LeConte about two weeks ago.

Holding onto a thin metal handrail cable, I was walking a path maybe two feet wide on jagged rock with some water running through it, on the side of the mountain, about 4,000 feet above sea level.

84. East Tennessee’s Endangered 8 -

The East Tennessee Preservation Alliance’s list of endangered heritage sites for the region:

1. The Stonecipher-Kelly House in Morgan County was built around 1814 by the first permanent white settlers in that area, as part of a Revolutionary War land-grant.

85. Investors Pumping Hundreds of Millions Into Tennessee Startups -

The assignment sounded simple enough: Find out whether more money is coming into Nashville for startups.

If so, where is it coming from and what does it means to entrepreneurs, investors and the rest of us?

86. Events -

WYNIT Distribution will host a distribution center and warehouse job fair Saturday, May 16, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at WYNIT, 4655 E. Shelby Drive. For more information, visit wynit.com or call 800-GO-WYNIT.

87. Last Stand: Only a Game 6 Victory Can Keep Grizzlies’ Season Alive -

With Tony Allen on the bench because of a strained hamstring and thus not available to wander through the junior dance team’s routine or to harass Golden State guard Klay Thompson, the crowd at Oracle Arena for Game 5 needed another target.

88. Do Not Fear Europe’s Recovery -

Interest rates determine the cost of capital for corporations, directly influence the capitalized value of corporate earnings and establish relative value positions within the currency markets. Simply stated, meaningful shifts in interest rates create meaningful shifts in the investment marketplace.

89. County Budget Season Reflects Priorities, Angst -

It’s that time of year in Downtown’s Civic Center Plaza.

In late April, May and into June, the budget committee sessions of the Memphis City Council and Shelby County Commission become the stage for the priorities – political and financial – of both bodies.

90. Council OKs Graceland Tourism Surcharge -

Memphis City Council members approved on third and final reading a 5 percent Graceland tourism surcharge on all items bought on the 120-acre Graceland campus.

The revenue stream will go toward financing the three-phase Graceland expansion project including the construction of a $90 million, 450-room hotel north of the mansion.

91. Council Approves Graceland Campus Tourism Surcharge -

Memphis City Council members approved on third and final reading a 5 percent Graceland tourism surcharge on all items bought on the 120-acre Graceland campus.

The revenue stream will go toward financing the three-phase Graceland expansion project including the construction of a $90 million, 450-room hotel north of the mansion.

92. Cannabis Oil Bill Could Lead to More ‘Evil Weed’ Wins -

Logan and Stacie Mathes were on "pins and needles" as they waited for Gov. Bill Haslam to sign legislation into law allowing cannabis oil to be used to treat seizures and similar medical problems in Tennessee.

93. Council Questions Administration's Intent on Southbrook Mall -

Memphis City Council members questioned Tuesday, May 5, whether the Wharton administration’s plan for a town center at the Southbrook Mall site in Whitehaven was set up to fail.

The reaction came as citizens on the board of the nonprofit organization that owns the mall complained that the terms of $2.1 million in bond money they got for HVAC and roof repairs changed.

94. 'Symphony in Rose Garden' May 17 in Collierville -

The Collierville Arts Council is once again staging the annual fundraiser, “Symphony in the Rose Garden,” Sunday, May 17.

The annual event will be held on the three-acre estate home of Bob and Mary Jean Smith. The historic home is located at 156 West Poplar Ave., just off the historic town square, and features a garden filled with more than 1,000 roses.

95. Germantown Parkway Parcels Sell for $3.4 Million -

789 and 725 N. Germantown Parkway
Memphis, TN 38018
Sale Amount: $3.4 million

96. Tesla CEO Plugs Into New Market With Home Battery System -

FOSTER CITY, Calif. (AP) – Never lacking daring ideas, billionaire entrepreneur Elon Musk is determined to jolt the electricity market.

The CEO of electric car maker Tesla Motors hopes to park hundreds of millions of large, solar panel-connected batteries in homes and businesses so the world can disconnect from power plants – and he can profit. On Thursday night, before an adoring crowd and a party-like atmosphere, Musk unveiled how he intends to do it.

97. Lantern Square Apartments Sell for $1.9 Million -

The Lantern Square Apartments community in Raleigh has sold for $1.9 million to a California investor.

Raleigh Management LLC purchased the Class D property from Lantern Square Apartments LLC, an affiliate of New Orleans-based Fountainbleau Management Services LLC, in an April 29 warranty deed.

98. Real Estate Industry Emerges From Frigid Winter With High Hopes -

Overall home sales in Shelby County were essentially flat in the first quarter while homebuilding activity increased, despite arctic temperatures in February and March that could have put the residential real estate sector in the deep freeze.

99. Avondale Partners Expands Into Memphis -

Avondale Partners, a Nashville-based boutique investment banking and wealth management firm, has opened a new office in Germantown with John Santi heading up the location as managing director.

The new office brings to the Mid-South investment banking and equity research focused on the health care, transportation, logistics and business services sectors as well as a fiduciary investment practice for individuals and institutions.

100. Economic Microscope -

Back in 2012, Century Wealth Management president and founder Jay Healy was telling the firm’s clients that the U.S. stock market was behaving like a coiled spring.