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Editorial Results (free)

1. Redistricting Controversy Shares Political Stage With Council Restructure -

At one point Tuesday, July 21, during the Memphis City Council’s discussion of the complexities and controversies of drawing new district lines, council attorney Allan Wade’s review of events reached the year 1967.

2. Beale Authority Prepares to Negotiate Lease With Memphis Leaders -

The Beale Street Tourism Development Authority is at what Downtown Memphis Commission president Paul Morris describes as an “awkward interim stage.”

3. Want to Get Into Knoxville-Area Showbiz? Here’s How -

“Chasing the fun” keeps Jaime Hemsley, founder and owner of Gage Models and Talent Agency, in high gear to find her clients opportunities in the entertainment business.

“There’s lots of different ways to get involved in the industry,” she says, adding that her clients work both locally and nationally. Her agency recently booked a client with a TV reality dating show. Gage is headquartered in Knoxville but has clients throughout the southeast and works with agencies in New York and Los Angeles.

4. ‘Honda Girl’ Ashley Blair Finds Career Outside Car Ads -

Ten-year-old actress Ashley Blair takes her job seriously. She’s like many other actors in the region working to improve her craft and looking for the next project. The Knoxville area has a thriving community of actors, writers, directors, and producers, all trying to showcase their best work, both locally and nationally.

5. Acting Up -

The Knoxville area has a rich legacy of actors who have found success in show business: Patricia Neal, David Keith, Cylk Cozart, David Dwyer, John Cullum, Bruce McKinnon, Polly Bergen, Dale Dickey, Brad Renfro, Johnny Knoxville, perhaps the most famous of all, Dolly Parton, singer/songwriter turned actress.

6. Cardwell a Link to Metro’s Past, Present -

Metro Trustee Charlie Cardwell definitely is a member of the “good old boys” network that ran Nashville for decades.

7. Former Mayor Purcell Traces Nashville Transformation to 1978 Election -

Former Mayor Bill Purcell lived through the transition from the good old boys who ran Nashville to the “new Nashville,” in which a displaced Yankee became mayor in 1991 and began the type of forward-thinking, executive-style leadership that has propelled Nashville to skyline-shattering status on the national stage.

8. Beale Group Plans for Lease Agreement Instead of District Ownership -

The Beale Street Tourism Development Authority is dropping the idea for now of a fee simple ownership of the entertainment district.

Members of the authority board, which met Thursday, July 9, will instead pursue the leasehold agreement with the city of Memphis, as contemplated in the city ordinance that created the authority as the new long-term planning group for the district.

9. Shelby County Mortgage Market Rises 14 Percent -

On a normal day, Independent Bank vice president of mortgage Sam Goff will get maybe one or two calls from buyers asking about rates and looking to buy a home.

10. A Baseball Guy -

Bottom of the first inning at AutoZone Park, and Redbirds first baseman Dan Johnson is in the batter’s box. Oklahoma City’s pitcher winds and delivers and Johnson, a left-handed hitter, swings and makes contact. Loud contact.

11. Piano-Playing Senator's Latest Tune: New Education Policy -

WASHINGTON (AP) – How does a musician-senator fill the time during yet another partisan Senate stalemate?

In Sen. Lamar Alexander's case, he sits down at a borrowed piano in his Capitol Hill office and, with a grin, bangs out "The Memphis Blues."

12. This week in Memphis history: July 3-9 -

2014: Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong says 308 police officers have called in sick during the Fourth of July holiday week in what he acknowledges is probably a “work action” by cops upset over cuts to health benefits.
The sick-out causes the department to use contingency plans, which include sending officers in units such as the Organized Crime Unit back to uniform patrol and using Shelby County Sheriff’s deputies in the Beale Street Entertainment District.

13. Building Ballet -

Ask Ballet Memphis CEO and founding artistic director Dorothy Gunther Pugh about her dance company's newly announced move to Midtown, and the conversation doesn't immediately turn to obvious things like the when and the why.

14. Obama Signs Trade, Worker Assistance Bills Into Law -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In a rare bipartisan scene at the White House, President Barack Obama on Monday signed into law two hard-fought bills giving him greater authority to negotiate international trade deals and providing aid to workers whose jobs are displaced by such pacts.

15. Justices Rule Against EPA Power Plant Mercury Limits -

The Supreme Court ruled Monday against the Obama administration’s attempt to limit power plant emissions of mercury and other hazardous air pollutants, but it may only be a temporary setback for regulators.

16. Nashville’s Long, Hot, Delicious Summer -

Summertime brings us wedges of juicy watermelon and drippy ice cream cones. It yields pies piled with blackberries and peaches so fresh they can fill a room with their aroma.

It offers jewel-toned tomatoes for slicing and piling onto BLTs.

17. Murphy, the Realist -

“Whatever can go wrong will go wrong.” That’s a common wording for the epigram that we call “Murphy’s Law.” Granted, others have said it somewhat differently.

In her 1953 book, “The Making of a Scientist,” Ann Roe (1904-1991) attributed “If anything can go wrong, it will” to an unnamed physicist whom she’d interviewed. In his 1952 book, “The Butcher – The Ascent of Yerupaja,” John Sack cited a saying among mountaineers: “Anything that can possibly go wrong, does.”

18. Seeds of Nutrition in South Memphis -

Second in a series of profiles on the Community Foundation of Greater Memphis’ GiVE 365 grantees.

The community garden/urban farming concept literally took root years ago. Knowledge Quest founder and director Marlon Foster remembers well the 25-by-25-foot plot at the Fowler Homes housing project back in 1999. It was a humble beginning planted with a few seeds and a lot of faith and hope.

19. Baptist Health Care, Church Health Center Launch Residency Program -

Baptist Memorial Health Care and the Church Health Center have teamed up to launch a new family medicine residency that involves recruiting a group of residents in waves, with the first batch starting work next summer.

20. Need Reason to Pay By Phone? Apple, Google Add New Features -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – The tech industry has been saying for years that smartphones would make traditional wallets obsolete. But most people still use cash or plastic when they shop in stores.

21. Building Green in a Red-Hot Market -

Counting cranes has become a Nashville pastime, and the perks of all that development are clear – a robust economy, vibrant real estate market and more jobs.

Naturally, there is concern among some residents that all of the construction and increased population could harm the area’s environment, water and air quality and green space.

22. Garibaldi's Temptations Club Celebrates its 1980s Run -

Mike Garibaldi is known for his Memphis restaurant chain, Garibaldi's Pizza.

At the original Garibaldi’s, near the University of Memphis, is a picture on the wall of a smiling waitress in her 50s.

23. Chism Political Picnic Offers Pre-Campaign Snapshot -

Memphis mayoral contender Jim Strickland saw a face he didn’t recognize Saturday, June 13, in the southwest Memphis crowd at former County Commissioner Sidney Chism’s annual political picnic.

24. New Memphis Institute's Annual Summer Experience Connecting Young Professionals -

Hundreds of interns working at Memphis companies this summer are getting a taste of what the Bluff City has to offer them, should they choose to put down roots here.

The New Memphis Institute’s annual Summer Experience slate of events is intended to connect young professionals working in the city with their peers; to establish movers and shakers; and to give them an up-close look at Memphis. The goal: capture their attention at a formative stage in their life, when they’re poised to make plans about whatever city they’ll ultimately call home.

25. Old-Time Country, Stones Intertwined -

Joey, the CowPolka King, well remembers the times he would play acoustic bass, piano or his specialty – the accordion – and try to catch up after Cowboy Jack Clement launched into one of his favorite songs….

26. Playing Big Outdoor Stadiums Costly, Risky -

Tickets still are available from most online brokers for The Stones‘ ZIP Code Tour stop in Nashville.

And while the band should reasonably fill the LP Field, it is not without risk that they’re playing stadiums this time around, according to Gary Bongiovanni, editor of Pollstar, a trade publication that covers the international concert business.

27. Stones’ Nashville Connections Go Way Back -

While Brad Paisley lives what he calls “a bucket list item” by singing while playing his guitar in typically showy fashion as the opening act for The Rolling Stones, the most important guitarist in rock ‘n’ roll history and a man idolized by Keith Richards and Ronnie Wood will be sitting in his house on Blueberry Hill in the hills of northern Davidson County.

28. Stones Rock Music City -

Pleased to meet you, hope you guessed our name. Well, hell, Mick, if it’s puzzling you, it’s Nashville. Music City USA.

We’re the national media’s flavor of the day – the “It city,” which has gone from being a secondary concert market – remember The Beatles played Memphis, not Nashville – to one of the country’s prime touring destinations.

29. Panel Alters Wharton’s Plan for Memphis Fairgrounds -

The Mid-South Coliseum becomes a pavilion with a grove next to a multi-purpose sports center. A 10-acre water park fronts on Central Avenue where a high school gym now stands.

A second north-south Tiger Lane intersects with the current east-west version.

30. Panel Alters Wharton’s Plan for Memphis Fairgrounds -

The Mid-South Coliseum becomes a pavilion with a grove next to a multi-purpose sports center. A 10-acre water park fronts on Central Avenue where a high school gym now stands.

A second north-south Tiger Lane intersects with the current east-west version.

31. Frayser Community Fair Scheduled for Saturday -

NeighborWorks America’s national NeighborWorks Week puts redevelopment, empowerment and civic pride at center stage with a variety of events, including a Frayser community fair this Saturday.

“We wanted to have a fair that connected neighbors and neighborhoods to resources,” said Amy Schaftlein, director of development at United Housing Inc.

32. Wal-Mart Keeps It All in the Family, Chair Passed to Penner -

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. (AP) – Wal-Mart is passing the chairmanship of the world's largest retailer from the eldest son of late founder Sam Walton to a third generation.

The company said that board Chairman Rob Walton will step down and be succeeded by Vice Chairman Greg Penner, who is his son-in-law.

33. Opry Has Become Big Part of CMA Fest -

The relationship between the Grand Ole Opry – the 90-year-old radio program and down home variety show – and CMA Music Fest is a pretty simple formula.

“A win for CMA Music Fest is a win for the Opry,” says Pete Fisher, vice president and general manager of the nation’s longest continuously running radio program.

34. Downtown Business Owners Love CMA Fest -

It’s the business she’s chosen, and being a multi-bar owner gives Brenda Sanderson a unique perspective on what used to be called Fan Fair, a blue-collar celebration that has gradually been transformed into Nashville’s main culture festival and all-inclusive calling card.

35. Bonnaroo, CMA Fest Overlap Presents Problems -

With CMA Music Fest and Bonnaroo on the same four-day weekend, it will be tough for a fan to catch Rubblebucket down in the field in Manchester and, say, Florida Georgia Line at LP Field.

Well, that might be a reach, but there are likely fans that would want both Billy Joel and Alan Jackson, for instance.

36. CMA Fest a Blast for Artists, Merchants -

The Glimmer Twins wannabe in the white cowboy hat and the 21-year-old blonde who has worked her tail off to climb from the audience to one of the main stages at CMA Music Festival display different but genuine levels of excitement about Music City’s biggest week.

37. Mother's Day Road Trip -

In the afternoon of Thursday before Mother’s Day, I drive southeast. I stop at a certain spot in White Hall, Ark., and pick up a mess of fried chicken. Then I drive on to Lake Village, Ark., where I am greeted by twin great-nieces Sloan and Amelia, age 6. They live on the banks of Lake Chicot with mom Caroline and dad Chuck.

38. Events -

Germantown Charity Horse Show will be held Tuesday through Saturday, June 2-6, at 7745 Poplar Pike. The all-breed event will feature more than 800 horses in competition, plus vendors, Jack Russell Terrier races (June 6, 10 a.m. to noon) and more. Visit gchs.org.

39. Talent Takes the Wheel -

As the economy continues to improve, employers are beginning to think of what they can do to attract and retain the best talent. In fact, I was just asked for tips on this very topic by a local employer.

40. Farewell to the King -

There is a real temptation to sum up the passing of B.B. King by writing that his death marks the end of an era in entertainment.

But that would marginalize, if not belittle, both his talent, his gift and his enormous influence. The world that brought B.B. King to Memphis in the 1940s can’t be found on the road King called home.

41. Ramsey: No Medicaid Expansion Until 2017 -

The Tennessee legislative session ended in late April, giving itself a little more than two and a-half months to handle the state’s business. That’s plenty of time, according to Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey.

42. Media Heads Rule Ranks of Best-Paid CEOs -

NEW YORK (AP) – They're not Hollywood stars, they're not TV personalities and they don't play in a rock band, but their pay packages are in the same league.

Six of the 10 highest-paid CEOs last year worked in the media industry, according to a study carried out by executive compensation data firm Equilar and The Associated Press.

43. Do Not Fear What You Should be Afraid Of -

There are factors conspiring in the market’s industrial kitchen right now that might lead to a fit of indigestion for investors. This week we will look at the three main ingredients and discuss how to medicate.

44. Future Methodist CEO Michael Ugwueke Fueled by Health Care Passion -

Growing up in war-torn Nigeria helped Michael Ugwueke decide early on that health care would be his eventual profession.

Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare’s president and chief operating officer – recently tapped by the Methodist board to succeed Gary Shorb as CEO when Shorb decides to retire – recalls carnage, disease and “people dying left and right” during his childhood. It was more than enough, he says, to inspire him to find a job where he could make a difference in people’s lives and, even if in a small way, counteract some of the negative forces he grew up with.

45. Commission Budget Consensus Includes Tax Rollback -

There is still some “cognitive dissonance” left in the county’s budget season, county commissioner Heidi Shafer said near the end of the marathon Wednesday, May 20, budget committee session she oversaw.

46. Memphis Financial Startup Secures Seed Funding -

Consumers are increasingly turning to technology and the convenience of smartphones to pay for goods and services or perform banking-related tasks.

That explains everything from the launch of Apple’s new ApplePay service to the formation of Memphis startup SynapsePay, a self-described early-stage financial network that has just completed a seed funding round.

47. Kristin Chenoweth Set to Perform at The Orpheum -

Emmy and Tony Award-winning actress and singer Kristin Chenoweth is performing a one-night show at The Orpheum Theatre later this year.

Her show is Sept. 19 at 8 p.m., the theatee announced Monday. Tickets go on sale May 29 at 10 a.m.

48. Raising the Barre -

Memphis has always been known for its rich musical history, but another performing art is whirling across the city: dance.

Several collectives and companies are dedicated to making dance accessible to underserved communities and changing the perception that ballet is a dusty and stifled endeavor.

49. Conquering Fear of Heights on Mt. LeConte -

I was standing on the edge of a cliff during a hike to Mt. LeConte about two weeks ago.

Holding onto a thin metal handrail cable, I was walking a path maybe two feet wide on jagged rock with some water running through it, on the side of the mountain, about 4,000 feet above sea level.

50. East Tennessee’s Endangered 8 -

The East Tennessee Preservation Alliance’s list of endangered heritage sites for the region:

1. The Stonecipher-Kelly House in Morgan County was built around 1814 by the first permanent white settlers in that area, as part of a Revolutionary War land-grant.

51. Investors Pumping Hundreds of Millions Into Tennessee Startups -

The assignment sounded simple enough: Find out whether more money is coming into Nashville for startups.

If so, where is it coming from and what does it means to entrepreneurs, investors and the rest of us?

52. Events -

WYNIT Distribution will host a distribution center and warehouse job fair Saturday, May 16, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at WYNIT, 4655 E. Shelby Drive. For more information, visit wynit.com or call 800-GO-WYNIT.

53. Last Stand: Only a Game 6 Victory Can Keep Grizzlies’ Season Alive -

With Tony Allen on the bench because of a strained hamstring and thus not available to wander through the junior dance team’s routine or to harass Golden State guard Klay Thompson, the crowd at Oracle Arena for Game 5 needed another target.

54. Do Not Fear Europe’s Recovery -

Interest rates determine the cost of capital for corporations, directly influence the capitalized value of corporate earnings and establish relative value positions within the currency markets. Simply stated, meaningful shifts in interest rates create meaningful shifts in the investment marketplace.

55. County Budget Season Reflects Priorities, Angst -

It’s that time of year in Downtown’s Civic Center Plaza.

In late April, May and into June, the budget committee sessions of the Memphis City Council and Shelby County Commission become the stage for the priorities – political and financial – of both bodies.

56. Council OKs Graceland Tourism Surcharge -

Memphis City Council members approved on third and final reading a 5 percent Graceland tourism surcharge on all items bought on the 120-acre Graceland campus.

The revenue stream will go toward financing the three-phase Graceland expansion project including the construction of a $90 million, 450-room hotel north of the mansion.

57. Council Approves Graceland Campus Tourism Surcharge -

Memphis City Council members approved on third and final reading a 5 percent Graceland tourism surcharge on all items bought on the 120-acre Graceland campus.

The revenue stream will go toward financing the three-phase Graceland expansion project including the construction of a $90 million, 450-room hotel north of the mansion.

58. Cannabis Oil Bill Could Lead to More ‘Evil Weed’ Wins -

Logan and Stacie Mathes were on "pins and needles" as they waited for Gov. Bill Haslam to sign legislation into law allowing cannabis oil to be used to treat seizures and similar medical problems in Tennessee.

59. Council Questions Administration's Intent on Southbrook Mall -

Memphis City Council members questioned Tuesday, May 5, whether the Wharton administration’s plan for a town center at the Southbrook Mall site in Whitehaven was set up to fail.

The reaction came as citizens on the board of the nonprofit organization that owns the mall complained that the terms of $2.1 million in bond money they got for HVAC and roof repairs changed.

60. 'Symphony in Rose Garden' May 17 in Collierville -

The Collierville Arts Council is once again staging the annual fundraiser, “Symphony in the Rose Garden,” Sunday, May 17.

The annual event will be held on the three-acre estate home of Bob and Mary Jean Smith. The historic home is located at 156 West Poplar Ave., just off the historic town square, and features a garden filled with more than 1,000 roses.

61. Germantown Parkway Parcels Sell for $3.4 Million -

789 and 725 N. Germantown Parkway
Memphis, TN 38018
Sale Amount: $3.4 million

62. Tesla CEO Plugs Into New Market With Home Battery System -

FOSTER CITY, Calif. (AP) – Never lacking daring ideas, billionaire entrepreneur Elon Musk is determined to jolt the electricity market.

The CEO of electric car maker Tesla Motors hopes to park hundreds of millions of large, solar panel-connected batteries in homes and businesses so the world can disconnect from power plants – and he can profit. On Thursday night, before an adoring crowd and a party-like atmosphere, Musk unveiled how he intends to do it.

63. Lantern Square Apartments Sell for $1.9 Million -

The Lantern Square Apartments community in Raleigh has sold for $1.9 million to a California investor.

Raleigh Management LLC purchased the Class D property from Lantern Square Apartments LLC, an affiliate of New Orleans-based Fountainbleau Management Services LLC, in an April 29 warranty deed.

64. Real Estate Industry Emerges From Frigid Winter With High Hopes -

Overall home sales in Shelby County were essentially flat in the first quarter while homebuilding activity increased, despite arctic temperatures in February and March that could have put the residential real estate sector in the deep freeze.

65. Avondale Partners Expands Into Memphis -

Avondale Partners, a Nashville-based boutique investment banking and wealth management firm, has opened a new office in Germantown with John Santi heading up the location as managing director.

The new office brings to the Mid-South investment banking and equity research focused on the health care, transportation, logistics and business services sectors as well as a fiduciary investment practice for individuals and institutions.

66. Economic Microscope -

Back in 2012, Century Wealth Management president and founder Jay Healy was telling the firm’s clients that the U.S. stock market was behaving like a coiled spring.

67. With or Without Conley, Grizz Face Pass-Fail Exam in Golden State -

We will get to the looming challenge that is the Golden State Warriors in just a moment.

But first, something needs to be said.

No matter what it is in your favor, including a 3-0 series lead, you don’t just push a button for automatic passage to the next round of the NBA Playoffs. The Portland Trail Blazers reminded us of this truth when they rallied in Game 4 to bring the series back to Memphis.

68. Pyramid Promises -

It took about 25 years for an elevator ride to reach the top of The Pyramid.

That’s how long several generations of political leaders – three county mayors and three Memphis mayors as well as a changing group of city council members over seven elections – have been seeking a Pyramid with a ride to the apex.

69. Mayoral Contenders Define Campaign Differences -

The first campaign forum in the city election season for the still-forming field of mayoral contenders showed a theme that looks set in stone at this early stage: very different views of Memphis’ present and how that influences its future.

70. Methodist Unveils Renovated Outpatient Diagnostic Center -

Part of the motivation behind the extensive renovation of the Outpatient Diagnostic and Mammography Center at Methodist North Hospital, which has been in the planning stage for some two years, is an understanding of how patients might feel intimidated by some of the tests performed there.

71. What I Tell My Team -

Ask the hard questions. As a thriving consultancy, our primary vocation is providing insight that adds value to our clients. To meet this objective we have to play enlightened court jester, asking the unaskable questions those inside the company cannot ask.
We also have to set the stage, carefully constructing an atmosphere of trust where we can mine issues deeply, uncover hidden orthodoxies, serve as a mirror, and always point out reachable possibilities for growth. We also have a duty to name the obstacles. Sometimes there are “family-style” secrets inside companies and denial as thick as prison walls. Be respectful on this quest. People, especially tough people, are really tender.

72. Wharton on State ‘Blueprint’ Funding, Mud Island Plan -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. wants to bring state funding to the table when he takes his “Blueprint for Prosperity” to the Memphis City Council and others.

Wharton was to meet with Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam Friday, April 24, in Nashville to secure the state’s commitment to the effort, he said after taping the WKNO-TV program "Behind The Headlines" earlier that day.

73. Wharton on 'Blueprint for Prosperity' Funding, Cates' Mud Island Plan -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. wants to bring state funding to the table when he takes his “Blueprint for Prosperity” to the Memphis City Council.

Wharton was to meet with Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam Friday, April 24, in Nashville to secure the state’s commitment to the effort, he said after a taping earlier Friday morning on the WKNO TV program Behind The Headlines.

74. Nature is a Stage in San Juan Islands -

An island getaway can have water sports, delectable seafood, amazing drinks, lots of sunshine, sand and the beautiful scent of saltwater in the air.

But not all island getaways are created the same. The San Juan Islands in Washington State has plenty of the above, but you’re not taking a ferry to Friday Harbor to soak in the sun. To be clear, the islands do get sunshine – 247 days with it annually – and roughly half the rainfall of nearby Seattle. But relaxing in the sun probably isn’t the No. 1 item on a to-do list for a visitor to the San Juan Islands.

75. Huey’s Hosting Celebration for 45th Anniversary -

Huey’s Restaurants is throwing a block party later this month to celebrate its 45th anniversary, a bash for which the public will need to bring lawn chairs and big appetites.

The Memphis-based restaurant company, which is inviting the community to its block party April 26 starting at 2 p.m., plans to line Madison Avenue from Rembert to Barksdale with beer, food tents, a kid’s area and a live-music stage the middle of the street.

76. Dogwoods & Elvis -

Dogwood Arts Festival President Janet Testerman’s family lore with Knoxville’s spring celebration goes back to the days of Elvis when he was a showstopper at the event. Her mother, also named Janet, had the once-in-a-lifetime chance to meet the King.

77. Start Co. Uses Startup Insights to Fuel Community Benefits -

A few weeks ago, representatives of Start Co., the Memphis-based venture development organization that guides startups through a few fast-paced business accelerators, spent a day at the library.

78. Sustainability Means Opportunity for Shelby County -

Editor’s Note: This column will appear weekly throughout April in honor of Memphis and Shelby County’s Sustainability Month.

Shelby County is investing in energy efficiency upgrades, waste reduction and green workforce training through the Green Prisons Initiative at the Shelby County Corrections. With a state grant to conduct energy efficiency upgrades, sustainability and reentry programs intersect. Not only will the facility receive upgrades, but the installation will be used as reentry training for the inmates as they will be trained to install the systems. With my background in law enforcement, at Shelby County Corrections, Federal Prisons, and as Shelby County Sheriff, I have a keen interest in reducing recidivism and reentry programs are known to be effective.

79. Big Leap From Hollywood Hustle to Nolensville ‘Barn’ -

The step-grandmother of Clark Gable’s granddaughter leans back in her chair inside the Mennonite furniture store and holds up a foot.

“Look. I’m wearing orange socks. I must be eccentric,” says Linda Roberts as a gray, misty day chases me from Nolensville Road into the worn building tucked against Mill Creek.

80. Collins Plots Different Course for Memphis Mayoral Bid -

Backers of Memphis mayoral contender Harold Collins are referring to his campaign as a crusade in which incumbent Mayor A C Wharton Jr. and Collins’ City Council colleague Jim Strickland may have claimed most of the contributions and support of business leaders.

81. Live Nation Beale Alliance Touted As Concert Comeback -

On the sidewalk in front of the New Daisy Theater on Beale Street are two brass music notes, side by side. One honors the late Mid-South Concerts promoter Bob Kelley and the other honors Mike Glenn, the New Daisy’s long-time operator.

82. Obama Signs Order Creating New Cyber Sanctions Program -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama on Wednesday authorized a new U.S. government approach to deterring cyberattacks: financial sanctions against malicious overseas hackers and companies that knowingly benefit from the fruits of cyberespionage.

83. 'The Wizard of Oz' Coming to Collierville’s Harrell Theatre -

From April 17-27, The Harrell Theatre in Collierville will be home to a stage production of “The Wizard of Oz.”

Join Scarecrow, Cowardly Lion and Tin Man as they travel to the Land of Oz and meet the munchkins, witches and the Wizard himself.

84. Central Station Project Relies on Local Institutions -

At $55 million, the proposed redevelopment plan for Central Station that debuted last week isn’t quite the “vertical village” that Crosstown Concourse is. The price tag, all except $3 million of which is private financing, is about a quarter of the $200 million cost of Crosstown.

85. Two New Elvis Exhibits Now Open at Graceland -

Two new exhibits featuring more than 125 Elvis Presley-related items have opened at Graceland in Memphis.

Elvis Presley Enterprises says the exhibits opened Thursday, March 19, at Graceland, the tourist attraction centered on the former home of Presley, who died on Aug. 16, 1977, at age 42.

86. Events -

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Memphis District will offer free tours of the largest diesel towboat on the Mississippi River, the Motor Vessel Mississippi, Thursday, March 19, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Beale Street Landing, 251 Riverside Drive. For more information, visit www.mvd.usace.army.mil.

87. Manning Lecture Moving -

In the summer of 1966 I met Archie Manning in his hometown of Drew, Miss. In a game of touch football, I caught a pass or two from the future All-Pro quarterback. A few months later he spent a Friday night at my house in Greenville, after a dance to which he took a Greenville girl he was dating.

88. Events -

Society of Female Transportation Professionals Mid-South will host the second annual Blue Pump Gala Wednesday, March 18, at 5:15 p.m. at the Holiday Inn University of Memphis, 3700 Central Ave. Tickets are $50. Visit memphis.edu/setwc for details.

89. Mploy Promises More Than Summer Jobs -

Approximately 800 teenagers and young adults already had applied for 1,000 summer jobs in a new city program by the time Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. announced it last week.

But Wharton said the Mploy Youth Summer Experience is about more than a two-month paycheck.

90. Initiative Launched to Increase Colonoscopy Screenings in Memphis -

A new initiative is underway to curb colon cancer deaths in Memphis by increasing colonoscopy screenings, an effort timed to coincide with March’s status as National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month.

91. Misappropriation -

On the golf course, a 20-foot putt rolls on a green, slows down, collides with the right half of the hole, spins 360 degrees along the rim, and winds up hanging on the front edge of its destination. “Call nine-one-one!” a player says. “You were robbed!”

92. MATA Head Draws Heat on Trolley Delays -

The president and CEO of the Memphis Area Transit Authority told a group of South Main residents and business owners this week the trolley system is “starting all over from scratch” and won’t be operational any time soon.

93. Harvest Creative Celebrates 10 Years of Plowing Creative Ground -

As they were finishing up brand work for the new Porcellino’s restaurant in East Memphis, plus completing two Whole Foods store décor packages and preparing to dive into a branding project for Wendy’s, the team at Harvest Creative recently took some time to soak up the moment.

94. Qsource Merging With Indianapolis Firm -

Qsource, a Memphis-based nonprofit regional health care consultancy, is planning to merge with Indianapolis-based Network Strategies & Innovations Inc.

95. The Wine That Saved a Knoxville Landmark -

Linn Slocum started making wine from kits because she enjoyed it, later surprising herself by parlaying her hobby into a winery business that has enlivened downtown Knoxville, led to the renovation of a historic site and showcased East Tennessee’s farm-to-table food movement.

96. Financial Debate Looms at City Hall -

With Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. to present his budget proposal to the City Council in May, some on the council started to set the table this week for an election year challenge of Wharton’s methods for righting the city’s financial condition.

97. Local Health Care Firm to Merge With Indianapolis Firm -

Qsource, a Memphis-based nonprofit regional health care consultancy, is planning to merge with Indianapolis-based Network Strategies & Innovations Inc.

98. Events -

Leadership Memphis will host its 2015 Leadership Awards Luncheon Wednesday, March 4, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Hilton Memphis, 939 Ridge Lake Blvd. Awardees Pat Halloran, Brian Stephens and Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare will be honored for empowering the community and making a positive impact in the Mid-South. Tickets are $50. Visit leadershipmemphis.org.

99. Lady Vols Seem to Be Slipping Off National Stage -

KNOXVILLE – There is a bronze statue of legendary Tennessee women’s basketball coach Pat Summitt standing proudly across the street from Thompson-Boling Arena.

Summitt’s arms are crossed and she has a smile on her face. Thousands of Lady Vols fans have walked past the Summitt statue since it was unveiled Nov. 22, 2013.

100. Methodist Foundation Awarded $25,000 Grant -

Methodist Healthcare Foundation has been chosen as one of 23 grant recipients for the Avon-Pfizer Metastatic Breast Cancer Grants Program, “Identify-Amplify-Unify.”

Methodist’s $25,000 grant will be used by the West Cancer Center to develop and implement a program for women with metastatic breast cancer.