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Editorial Results (free)

1. Juvenile Court Reforms Changing System Slowly, Leaders Say -

Two years into reforms of the local juvenile justice system, three leaders in those reforms say there has to be more contact with teenagers before and after they go through Juvenile Court.

And those leaders warn against a reliance on programs once a child is in custody as a total solution to juvenile crime.

2. AP Interview: Coke Exec on 'Adversarial' Ties With Critics -

NEW YORK (AP) — Coke says it wants to mend relations with critics of its sugary drinks.

Sandy Douglas, president of Coke North America, said in an interview with The Associated Press that Coke is hoping to change its "adversarial" relationship with public health advocates.

3. The Key to Success is Innovation -

“Life moves pretty fast. If you don’t stop and look around for a while, you could miss it.” – Ferris Bueller

If you’ve ever seen Ferris Bueller’s Day Off, you know that this quote sums up Ferris’ outlook on life. And he’s not wrong. Slowing down, taking a breath and taking a break will help stave off burnout – and it’s more enjoyable, too. But how does this apply to business? Balance is important, but it’s also essential to use “slowdown” time to take a bird’s eye view of your company so you don’t miss the next big thing.

4. Greenprint Summit Shows Region’s Possibilities -

Trails and bike lanes aren’t the only path to regional success, but they’re playing a growing role in partnerships among communities that sometimes find themselves competing for jobs.

To date, 19 of those communities have adopted a 25-year, green-centric plan that was introduced earlier this year and has been endorsed by more than 50 organizations.

5. Hoops & Dreams -

They were but a few words, yet they seemed to capture the mindset of the University of Memphis basketball program’s high-expectation fan base.

“Get back to like it was,” said former Tigers guard Jeremy Hunt.

6. Time for Tuition Equality in Tennessee -

Tennessee has a unique opportunity to help the state economy and support education. Passage of the “Tuition Equality” bill in the upcoming state legislative session will provide a critical chance to educate thousands of Tennessee youth and narrow the skills gap that exists for Tennessee employers.

7. Below the Waterline -

As of the end of October, the S&P 500 index had gained 2.59%. Unfortunately, for diversified investors, there is more to the story. The S&P 500 is a market capitalization weighted index, meaning the largest of the 500 companies have the largest influence over index performance.

8. FDA Clears First New Tobacco Products Under Federal Pathway -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Food and Drug Administration has cleared the first new tobacco products for the U.S. market, under a system authorized more than 5 years ago.

The agency on Tuesday cleared the sale of eight varieties of snus, or teabag-like pouches of loose tobacco, from Swedish Match. Snus are popular in Scandinavian countries and are a growing part of the U.S. smokeless tobacco market.

9. Crosstown Developer: Complicated Projects Can Be Transformative -

The Memphis-area commercial real estate market continues to trend upward, industry leaders say. All asset classes are trending toward pre-Recession levels, and Memphis is taking on more complicated projects like the Crosstown Concourse redevelopment.

10. Strategic Foresight For Key Projects -

Here are notes from the back end of Innovation conference 2015, in San Jose, California. These tips come from a workshop led by Tamara Carleton, Innovation Leadership Board LLC.

11. Caissa Public Strategy Works Behind The Scenes for Clients -

The word public, by its definition, seems to say out in the open.

For Caissa Public Strategy, that’s not how it works. In fact, the Memphis-based firm likes to work in the shadows, so to speak, where the agency helps its clients grow and protect reputations.

12. Client Compassion Drives Clay & Land’s Cook -

Kathryn Cook finds her profession rewarding. But building a successful career in an industry that doesn’t have many female producers hasn’t been easy, particularly for the single mother of a special-needs child.

13. Long-Awaited Artesian Opens on Riverside -

Despite being unfinished and empty for six years, the 16-story building at the corner of Riverside and Channel 3 drives has remained a landmark in the Downtown skyline.

And finally, the lights are coming on.

14. New Website for Memphis Workforce Alliance -

The Greater Memphis Alliance for a Competitive Workforce has launched a new website, gmacw.com.

The site will function as a resource for employers to connect with skilled workers and for workers to find training programs. It also will keep the public up to date with the GMAC Workforce’s impact.

15. Music Legacy -

When Barbara Newman took over as president and CEO of The Blues Foundation, it was her first job in the music industry.

16. Editorial: Connect Cooper-Young to Keep Midtown Momentum Going -

If you went to the Cooper-Young Festival a decade ago and compared it to what you saw this year, you would notice a difference.

And it would be more than just the size of the crowd.

You’d see different businesses, a different mix of restaurants and retail – and those would be just the immediately apparent changes.

17. Metro Nashville’s Local-Hire Rule Gets Battered On Many Fronts -

The ink wasn’t dry on standards for Metro Nashville’s local-hire charter amendment when new Mayor Megan Barry put the measure on hold – despite sizable support in the August election.

18. Groups Want More Memphians to Discover River’s Front Yard -

Once upon a time it was called the “promenade.” In 1828, two years after the city of Memphis was incorporated, the city’s founders and their successors put it in writing.

The statement – signed by the men who owned 5,000 acres where the Wolf and Mississippi rivers meet – read: “In relation to the piece of ground laid off and called the Promenade, said proprietors say that it was their original intention, is now and forever will be that the same should be public ground for use only as the word imports.”

19. For 1st Time, MIT's Free Online Classes Can Lead to Degree -

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (AP) — The Massachusetts Institute of Technology has offered free online courses for the last four years with one major downside: They didn't count toward a degree. That's about to change.

20. Haslam: Long-term Plan Needed for Road Project Backlog -

MURFREESBORO, Tenn. (AP) — Gov. Bill Haslam said Tuesday that a long-term revenue plan is needed to address Tennessee's growing list of unfunded road projects, and that one-time money won't fix the problem.

21. Raleigh’s Kennedy Park is ‘the Heart’ of Wolf River Greenway -

Charles Flink, the design consultant for the Wolf River Greenway, calls it “a season of construction” – seven segments of the 20-mile Wolf River Greenway in Shelby County are wrapping up their design work and set to begin a three-year construction phase.

22. Good Shepherd Health in Memphis Charts Different Pharmacy Path With New Model -

It quickly becomes apparent that Dr. Philip Baker, a pharmacist and founder of Good Shepherd Health in Memphis, runs a different kind of pharmacy operation out of his base in the Hickory Ridge Mall when he rattles off figures like this one.

23. Cossitt Library’s October Events Designed to Activate Riverfront -

Far from Tiger Lane, University of Memphis football fans will have a new place to tailgate Friday, Oct. 2, as the Tigers play the University of Southern Florida in Tampa.

It’s also the kickoff of a month of events to call attention to one of the best views of the Mississippi River on what was once known as the “promenade.”

24. ‘Set It and Forget It’ Investing -

Ray’s Take: Creating a retirement plan is a very personal thing because no one but you knows what you want for your future. But a plan is a must-have for everyone, and there are numerous ways to create a retirement plan as individual as you are.

25. Editorial: Memphis’ Direction and Your Choices for Mayor -

Fhe Oct. 8 Memphis mayor’s race is about where the city is and where it is going.

A C Wharton’s six-year mayoral tenure has been a mixed bag. There's been a genuine effort to change the nature of local government but also a wandering focus in which slogans are a kind of political fodder.

26. The Field -

The most competitive race for Memphis mayor in 24 years is in the hands of Memphis voters who will determine whether it will be as close as recent polls suggest it could be.

Early voting in advance of the Oct. 8 election day opened Friday, Sept. 18, with all 13 Memphis City Council seats on the ballot as well as the race for the City Court Clerk’s office.

27. Mathes Takes Helm at Community Legal Center -

Longtime attorney Anne Mathes has been named executive director of the nonprofit Community Legal Center, which has been providing civil legal services to lower-income Memphians for more than 20 years. In addition to civil cases and divorces, the CLC collaborates with other agencies to serve victims of domestic violence and elder abuse. They also take some immigration cases.

28. Roland Claims Shelby County Commission Chairmanship -

After Terry Roland took the chairman’s seat at the Monday, Sept. 14, Shelby County Commission meeting, Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell congratulated him and pledged to work with him.

29. Small-Business Tips: Research, Network and Have Cash -

Small business ideas – dreams, if you will – take time. To create, to develop, to implement and to sustain.

Until recently, Jennifer McCullough’s entrepreneurial dream was just starting to heat up. She had not yet become the successful seafood brand now known as Chef Jenn that spans 18 products in about 1,200 mostly Kroger and Wal-Mart stores.

30. Editorial: Small Business is Big in Importance, Impact -

No one considers the business they create to be a small business. Listen to the stories of their struggles, triumphs and ambition and you will quickly realize success is a big commitment – one that requires more than a bit of fair-weather persistence.

31. Family Force -

Pugh’s Flowers came first. Landscaping as Pugh’s Earthworks and then Lickety Split Couriers followed. And now the latest venture – Rosie’s Pest Control – has become its own entity.

32. ‘Bigger Than Ballet’ -

As a child growing up in Frayser with an unstable home life, Briana Brown latched on to dance classes at the New Ballet Ensemble & School as a source of stability.

Sitting at her University of Memphis dorm surrounded by psychology textbooks, she is ready to leap into the path built on 11 years of educational and professional development provided by her support system at New Ballet Ensemble.

33. Shelby County Schools Files Suit Over State Education Funding -

Shelby County Schools leaders announced Monday, Aug. 31, that the system has filed its own lawsuit against Tennessee state government over public education funding.

The school system filed its lawsuit Monday in Davidson County Chancery Court in Nashville.

34. ‘Chef Jenn’ To Serve Up Small-Biz Tips -

Her brand name, “Chef Jenn,” suggests she is running a restaurant. So does her background.

Jennifer McCullough not only graduated from the University of Texas with a bachelor’s degree and the University of Colorado Denver with a Master of Arts, but also from the Culinary School of the Rockies. And sure enough, the Memphis native worked three months in a fancy French restaurant in Denver – and she hated it.

35. Shelby County Budget Summit Call Begins With Different Priorities -

Shelby County government’s financial needs have changed in the nearly two months since the new fiscal year began.

And Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell called Monday, Aug. 24, for a “budget summit” with county commissioners and county trustee David Lenoir to explore the new budget realities.

36. Budget Report Sees Shrinking Deficits, But Only For Now -

WASHINGTON (AP) — An unforeseen flood of revenue is shrinking federal deficits to the lowest level of President Barack Obama's tenure, Congress' nonpartisan budget adviser said Tuesday. But in a report that will fuel both parties in their autumn clash over spending, the analysts also warned that perilously high shortfalls will roar back unless lawmakers act.

37. Luttrell Calls For County Budget Summit In Economic Growth Climate -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell called Monday, Aug. 24, for a “budget summit” with county commissioners and county Trustee David Lenoir to look at new budget realities.

38. Confederate Parks Renaming Court Ruling Charts Path of Controversy -

The Tennessee Court of Appeals concluded last week that the city of Memphis was involved in the placement of a concrete marker in what used to be Forrest Park that set off an ongoing chain of events.

39. Editorial: The Triumphant Return of Tigers Football -

Fifty years after the University of Memphis’ first season at the Liberty Bowl, and 52 years since the 1963 undefeated season, the annual return of Tigers football feels triumphant.

Maybe you don’t completely trust the tide from last year’s winning season – the first since 2007, the first conference championship since 1971 and the first bowl appearance since 2008. Your head tells you to assert your confidence in Tigers football. But in your heart, it feels like this may be at the expense of Tigers basketball.

40. Alabama Still Team to Beat, Tennessee On the Rise in 2015 Football Season -

Dak Prescott, the best returning quarterback in the Southeastern Conference, isn’t buying the national narrative that the league is “down” because the first College Football Playoff title game featured Ohio State beating Oregon.

41. Armstrong Finds Voice In Volatile Times -

Four years ago, when Toney Armstrong became the youngest Memphis Police director from the ranks since the position was created in the 1970s, critics were quick to point out that the one-time homicide detective had a lot to learn about the job’s public face.

42. Unlikely Path -

It all started on whim. Cassius Cash was on his way to band practice at the University of Arkansas when he decided to practice his interview skills instead.

“Someone informed me the (U.S.) Forest Service was doing recruitment, but I had no intention of going in there and landing the internship,” says Cash of that interview for a wildlife biologist internship. “I thought the interview was about as far as I was going to go to chase my dreams.”

43. Redbirds Manager Shildt Understands the Job -

The best part of being a Triple-A manager is obvious: You get to tell players they are going up to the major leagues.

First-year Redbirds skipper Mike Shildt has had the privilege of doing that many times this season. He says it’s never sweeter than telling a player, for the first time, that he’s going up to the St. Louis Cardinals.

44. Haunted History, A Story Retold -

WORRY ABOUT THE DOGS. Depending on who’s talking and when, history around Fort Pillow changes.

At the time of this story – one I shared first in a 2013 column – it was called the Cold Creek Correctional Facility, a minimum-security operation farming about 6,000 acres in Lauderdale County. Next it was called the Fort Pillow Prison and Farm, next door to something called the West Tennessee High Security Facility, now the West Tennessee State Penitentiary.

45. Departing Thoughts from Asia -

This entry will be my last submission penned while living in Asia, so rather than discuss the market’s recent wiggles, I thought I would share some top of mind takeaways as I prepare to depart Hong Kong.

46. Tax Revenue Reopens Budget Wounds -

The largest portion of $22 million in extra tax revenue collected by Shelby County Trustee David Lenoir will go to local public education, county commissioners said Monday, July 27.

47. Memphis Sole -

The football field measurements are perhaps inevitable in describing just how big Nike’s Northridge distribution center in Frayser is after its $301 million expansion.

The 2.8 million-square-foot facility – the equivalent of 49 football fields – is Nike Inc.’s largest distribution center in the world.

48. Social Security Disability Fund Projected to Run Dry in 2016 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The 11 million people who receive Social Security disability face steep benefit cuts next year — unless Congress acts, the government said Wednesday.

The trustees that oversee Social Security said the disability trust fund will run out of money in late 2016, right in the middle of a presidential campaign. That would trigger an automatic 19 percent cut in benefits.

49. Televised Memphis Mayoral Forum Set for September -

There could be a lot of candidates for Memphis Mayor in the Oct. 8 city elections. And much of the attention in the run up to active campaigning has focused on the field’s size.

But as campaigning begins the focus will shift to issues at play in the mayor’s race, from the city’s path to economic growth and the efficiency and fiscal health of city government to the perennial issues of crime and blight.

50. Boner, Fate and the Summer of Shame -

Phil Bredesen knew what he was trying to do. He just didn’t know if he could accomplish it.

“I had this sense that Nashville was ready for change,” says the former Metro mayor and Tennessee governor, reflecting on his early motivation for taking on the system that had run Nashville for decades.

51. Local Green News Piles Up, From Shelby Farms to CBU -

Chelsea Avenue Floodwall Becomes ‘Permission Wall’: The city’s renaissance of murals is taking a different form on the section of North Memphis floodwalls that are a border of sorts for the still developing Chelsea Greenline.

52. Insure Tennessee Path Still Facing Many Turns -

There’s a move in Nashville for a special session of the Tennessee General Assembly, but it would have nothing to do with the February special session on Gov. Bill Haslam’s Insure Tennessee proposal.

53. Shelby County Commission Explores Hiring Own Attorney -

Shelby County Commissioners will tie up the loose ends of their budget season Monday, July 6, and are exploring some longer-term changes in the body’s relationship to the Shelby County mayor, including a possible move to hire its own attorney.

54. Trade Schools Have to Find Grads Jobs, or Lose Financial Aid -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Exotic dancers hired as admissions counselors. Recruiters told to seek out "impatient" individuals who have "few people in their lives who care about them." Military personnel still recovering from brain damage told to sign on the dotted line.

55. Stephen & LeBron: Destined to Cross Paths? -

When NBA MVP Stephen (pronounced Steff’n) Curry was in high school, he attended a basketball camp sponsored by LeBron James. The first time LeBron saw Steph, though, was in March 2008. James’s Cleveland Cavaliers were playing the Detroit Pistons, a night game. That afternoon LeBron showed up at Ford Field, with 53,000 others.

56. Memphis Election Fundraising Deadline Prompts Flurry of Appeals -

For the last week, candidates in the October Memphis elections have had fundraising fever.

The campaign finance reports for the period that ended Tuesday, June 30, are due at the Shelby County Election Commission by July 10. That’s followed by the noon July 16 filing deadline for candidates in the races for Memphis Mayor, City Council and City Court Clerk.

57. New Forrest Front -

The political battle over an equestrian statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest and the park that houses it has opened a new front.

58. US Court Agrees Apple Violated Antitrust Law in E-Book Entry -

NEW YORK (AP) – Apple violated antitrust laws by colluding with publishers to raise electronic book prices when it entered a market in 2010 that had been dominated by Amazon.com, a divided federal appeals court panel said Tuesday.

59. Memphis Finance Gurus Retrace City’s Fiscal Path -

Mayors come and go at City Hall and what was a priority for one administration can change with the next. But one constant is finance.

It defines a city’s overall health, no matter who is in office, and thus its ability to borrow money to fund those priorities and then pay off that debt.

60. How Pope Francis’ Climate Encyclical Translates to Memphis -

On Thursday, June 18, the Vatican released Pope Francis’ much-anticipated encyclical, “Laudato si” (Praise Be to You: On the Care for Our Common Home). For some time now, Catholics, environmentalists and other Vatican watchers were aware that Francis was going to focus on the environment, especially the problem of global climate change.

61. Martin, Wilson Travel Parallel Paths to Success -

Pitmaster Pat Martin of Martin’s Bar-B-Que Joint and Chef Tandy Wilson of City House didn’t know one another in early 2007. Yet they’d soon have more than a few things in common.

62. Memphis Mayoral Election Heating Up As Strickland, Wharton Take Turns -

Here come the yard signs.

The first indication that candidates in the Oct. 8 Memphis elections are taking their appeals to the public will begin sprouting on lawns across the city in the next week.

63. US Consumers Ramp Up May Spending; Largest Gain Since 2009 -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. consumer spending surged in May with the biggest monthly increase in nearly six years – a sign of stronger economic growth ahead.

The Commerce Department said Thursday that consumer spending rose 0.9 percent last month, up from a revised 0.1 percent increase in April. May spending registered the biggest gain since August 2009, when the government's "Cash for Clunkers" program fueled auto-buying.

64. 'Underqualified' for a Job? You Can Still Apply -

If you’re like most people, there was a time in life when you were underqualified for a job. This is typically the case when you apply for your first job. It can also happen when you make a big career change midstream and have to start over.

65. Trade Bill Clears Senate Hurdle, At Brink of Final Passage -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate pushed bipartisan trade legislation to the brink of final approval Tuesday in a combined effort by President Barack Obama and Republican congressional leaders to rescue a measure that appeared all but dead less than two weeks ago.

66. Sales Volume Raises Risk of Closing Snafus -

The Greater Nashville Association of Realtors’ May sales data show sales continuing to rise.

There were 3,558 closings, up 15.6 percent from last May. In comparison, there were 1,783 closings in May 2009. So closings have almost doubled since the Recession. And, as everyone knows, inventory has dropped dramatically.

67. The Invisible Safety Net -

This week, the Internet is buzzing about the struggles of Gap Inc. and Lucky Magazine. Gap announced it will lay off 250 workers and close 175 stores. From the outside, Lucky appears to be going out of business or reducing operations considerably. At Lucky, there are rumors claiming many people were laid off without any severance. I received an email from a reader about just this issue, and what workers can do to prepare.

68. Talent-Supporting Structures -

A fallacy about organizational management prevents many firms from getting the best out of their best people: the notion that everyone who excels in their jobs will eventually become managers, directors, etc. True, some may have a talent for management, while others flourish in active roles that have nothing to do with managing.

69. Sit Near the Field, Stay Aware, Skip the Hot Dogs -

During the Great Home Run Chase of 1998, when Mark McGwire was a Paul Bunyan-esque figure armed with a wooden club, Rene Lachemann worked the third base coaching box for the St. Louis Cardinals.

Well, except when McGwire came to bat. Then Lachemann was nowhere near that coaching box. He was standing about 30 yards down the left field line to try and avoid Big Mac’s swing path.

70. Carlisle Corp. Gets Tentative OK on One Beale Plan -

Developers got a tentative green light to move forward with the ambitious One Beale project, convincing regulators that the twin skyscraper development would be a game-changer for the Memphis skyline.

71. Haslam Calls on Locals to Influence 'Changing Legislature' -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam on Tuesday issued an appeal to officials from Tennessee cities and towns to help influence what he described as a "changing" state Legislature less concerned with the interests of traditional institutions.

72. Connexion Point to Hire Nearly 400 in Memphis -

A technology-driven health care services company is opening a Memphis office that will employ nearly 400 people over the next few months.

Connexion Point, a Salt Lake City, Utah-based company that represents large insurance companies, will open a contact center at Nonconnah Corporate Center in Southwest Memphis.

73. Wolf River Greenway Planning Pushes Route Further North -

Now that you know the Greenline, here comes the Greenway.

After almost a year of behind-the-scenes planning, coordination and fundraising, the Wolf River Conservancy is about to go public with plans to add another 18 miles to the existing 2.6 miles of the Wolf River Greenway in Shelby County.

74. Germantown Leaders Exploring Elementary School Possibilities -

When Germantown Municipal School District leaders began talking openly last week about new school construction, they did so cautiously, keeping in mind similar recent discussions in Lakeland and Collierville.

75. Next Step: Returning Grizzlies Have to Be Better -

The possible return or exit of All-NBA First Team center Marc Gasol won’t be known for a while. So for our purposes today, let’s assume Gasol takes the mostly likely free agent path and signs a two-year deal with the Grizzlies that allows him to opt out after next season.

76. Harris Pushes For Insure Tennessee Comeback -

State Senate Democratic leader Lee Harris of Memphis will be on the campaign trail this summer.

Harris and other Democratic leaders in the majority Republican Tennessee legislature will campaign across the state this summer for the comeback of the Insure Tennessee proposal in the 2016 legislative session.

77. Tobacco Firms Get Partial Win Over Claims on Smoking Effects -

WASHINGTON (AP) – America's largest tobacco companies must inform consumers that cigarettes were designed to increase addiction, but not that they lied to the public about the dangers of smoking, a federal appeals court ruled on Friday.

78. Absolute Recovery Services Enjoys Solid Growth in Short Time -

Jason Burnett has worked his way through several different collections firms specializing in everything from retail to bank to medical debt.

79. UTHSC Research Assistant Wins Alzheimer’s Study Grant -

Sarah Neuner is interested in Alzheimer’s disease – including its causes and genes that influence a person’s likelihood of developing it – for both professional and personal reasons.

The University of Tennessee Health Science Center graduate research assistant saw the effects of the disease up close when her great-grandfather, who was still alive when she was younger, lived with it. Her grandparents wanted to keep him nearby rather than putting him in a home, and while he remained in familiar surroundings, Neuner recalls how confused and upset he would sometimes get because he didn’t always understand where he was or what he was going through.

80. Editorial: Grizzlies’ Impact Goes Beyond the Court -

You used to hear it about Tigers basketball.

These days, you hear it more about the Memphis Grizzlies. It goes something like this:

“Nothing brings Memphians together like the Grizzlies.” Or, “Memphians have their differences, but they come together for the Grizzlies.”

81. Reality Change -

“The ecosystem of the team is always live and is always shifting. You have to be able to adjust with whatever the situation might be at the time.”

– Marc Gasol

Roll those words from Marc Gasol over in your mind. Hold them up to the light so you can see them from every possible angle, so you can find hope, fear, inspiration, desperation and, last but not least, ambiguity and mystery.

82. Democrats Seek Return to Relevance in Tennessee Politics -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – For a party once accustomed to dominating state politics, the outlook for Tennessee Democrats is bleak.

Over the last decade, Democrats went from controlling all three branches of state government to giving up GOP supermajorities in both chambers of the Legislature, losing two governor's races by wide margins and watching as the state Supreme Court appointed the first Republican attorney general since Reconstruction.

83. Memphis City Council Appointment Reflects Political Urgency -

Attorney Alan Crone is the newest member of the Memphis City Council.

The former chairman of the Shelby County Republican Party – who said he’s traded politics for nonprofits over the last decade – was the choice of city council members Tuesday, May 19.

84. Noura Jackson Takes Plea Deal in Murder Retrial -

After serving nine years in prison, Noura Jackson entered an Alford plea Wednesday, May 20, to a charge of voluntary manslaughter in the death of her mother, Jennifer Jackson.

85. Noura Jackson Takes Plea Deal in Murder Retrial -

After serving nine years in prison, Noura Jackson entered an Alford plea Wednesday, May 20, to a charge of voluntary manslaughter in the death of her mother, Jennifer Jackson.

86. Will More Money, Reviews Improve on Common Core? -

Is it Kabuki theater or a transformative process?

That question comes to mind in the aftermath of the legislative session as the Tennessee General Assembly passed a bill "repealing and replacing" Common Core, a set of K-12 education standards, by adding another layer of review and pushing the governor’s process for completion to 2017, along with adding a $400,000 expense.

87. Your Fantasy Fundraiser -

Tired of hearing about fundraising challenges? Maybe it’s time to hire your fantasy fundraiser!

The work of your nonprofit is critically important. You’re helping young people choose the right path in life. You are challenging new forms of discrimination and civil rights violations. The teenagers enrolled in your math and science program are the engineers of tomorrow. Our seniors are protected from fraud and abuse thanks to your organization. And disaster relief is provided around the globe because of volunteers here in the United States.

88. Vanderbilt Poll: Majority Support Insure Tennessee -

An overwhelming majority of Tennesseans support Republican Gov. Bill Haslam’s failed proposal to extend health coverage to 280,000 low-income residents, according to a Vanderbilt University poll.

89. Conquering Fear of Heights on Mt. LeConte -

I was standing on the edge of a cliff during a hike to Mt. LeConte about two weeks ago.

Holding onto a thin metal handrail cable, I was walking a path maybe two feet wide on jagged rock with some water running through it, on the side of the mountain, about 4,000 feet above sea level.

90. Vanderbilt Poll: Majority Support Insure Tennessee -

An overwhelming majority of Tennesseans support Republican Gov. Bill Haslam’s failed proposal to extend health coverage to 280,000 low-income residents, according to a Vanderbilt University poll.

91. TCAT’s 27 Campuses Offer ‘A Different Life’ -

Ready for a new career? If you’re looking for a fresh start, Tennessee may be one of the best places in the world to find it.

Through May 15, residents who want to retrain in a new career field can apply for a full scholarship to the Tennessee College of Applied Technology, a unique and highly effective system of technical colleges with 27 main campuses around the state.

92. Cannabis Oil Bill Could Lead to More ‘Evil Weed’ Wins -

Logan and Stacie Mathes were on "pins and needles" as they waited for Gov. Bill Haslam to sign legislation into law allowing cannabis oil to be used to treat seizures and similar medical problems in Tennessee.

93. Blame Fed for Lame Q1 GDP? -

The U.S. economy grew 0.2 percent in the first quarter, well below analyst consensus. The fairly typical excuses followed the release, from weather to port strikes, to the first quarter growth curse that has stifled Q1 numbers since the financial crisis. The Fed even brushed off the weak numbers as a consequence of “transitory factors.”

94. Greenprint Guru -

When John Michels was a kid going to nature camps with his family and hiking with his brother and cousins, he was taking the first steps along his career path.

“We’d sort of learn how to survive in the woods and build shelters, learn about ecosystems,” Michels said of his days growing up in New Jersey, and then later trips to upstate New York by Lake George. “I started doing a lot of hiking in the Adirondack Mountains.

95. At Long Last -

It’s taken the city of Memphis 10 years to reel in Bass Pro Shops at The Pyramid, and business owners in the nearby Pinch District hope it will be a catalytic force they’ve been waiting for.

96. Day to Day -

For years, she was a “social drinker.” She could have two glasses of wine or the clichéd “a couple of beers,” and stop. No problem.

But a few years ago Yaya, who asked that her full name not be used, noticed a change.

97. City Council Again Rejects Belle Meade Development -

Four years after the Memphis City Council rejected a two-lot residential subdivision in the Belle Meade area of East Memphis, the developer returned to the council this week seeking approval of the same project.

98. Salinger Lawsuit Reflects Larger Issues of Literature -

When 22 of his short stories and other writings were published in 1974, J.D. Salinger broke a 20-year public silence and explained his feelings about his early works before he wrote “The Catcher in the Rye.”

99. Roundup: Defeat of Insure Tennessee Proposal Set Tone in 2015 Session -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The defeat of Gov. Bill Haslam's proposal to extend health coverage to 280,000 low-income Tennesseans set the tone for the 2015 session of the state Legislature.

100. City Council Again Rejects Belle Meade Development -

Four years after the Memphis City Council rejected a two-lot residential subdivision in the Belle Meade area of East Memphis, the developer returned to the council this week seeking approval of the same project.