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Editorial Results (free)

1. Home for the Holidays -

Jasmine Morris, a 27-year-old Memphis native, had been renting while trying to raise her daughter, but she always longed to follow her dream of owning a home.

That long-awaited dream is finally becoming a reality.

2. Events -

Memphis Reads, the citywide community reading program, will host Dinaw Mengestu, author of Memphis Reads selection “The Beautiful Things That Heaven Bears” Tuesday, Nov. 4, for a reading at 5:30 p.m. at the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library, 3030 Poplar Ave. Mengestu will also speak at 8 p.m. at the University Theater on the Christian Brothers University campus, 650 East Parkway S. Both events are free. Visit cbu.edu.

3. Events -

Memphis Reads, the citywide community reading program, will host Dinaw Mengestu, author of Memphis Reads selection “The Beautiful Things That Heaven Bears” Tuesday, Nov. 4, for a reading at 5:30 p.m. at the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library, 3030 Poplar Ave. Mengestu will also speak at 8 p.m. at the University Theater on the Christian Brothers University campus, 650 East Parkway S. Both events are free. Visit cbu.edu.

4. Events -

Memphis Light, Gas and Water board will meet Thursday, Aug. 7, at 1:30 p.m. in the MLGW administration building 220 S. Main St. Visit mlgw.com.

5. Events -

Kiwanis Club of Memphis will meet Wednesday, Aug. 6, from noon to 1 p.m. at The University Club of Memphis, 1346 Central Ave. Michelle Fowlkes of the Memphis Crime Commission will speak. Cost is $18 for nonmembers.

6. SunTrust Joins Effort to Upgrade Bank Branches -

ATLANTA (AP) – The largest bank based in Georgia has joined a national push to upgrade branches, spurred by customers who prefer online banking to waiting in a teller line.

Two SunTrust locations – one already open inside a food court at the bank's Atlanta headquarters and another scheduled to open this summer in the Georgetown neighborhood in Washington, D.C. – will test customers' response to new technology. Bank officials said they will use that feedback to help determine where and when to roll out the updates at other branches.

7. Wal-Mart CEO: Speed Up Pace of Change -

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. (AP) – Wal-Mart's CEO Doug McMillon said the world's largest retailer's task is to more quickly bring e-commerce together with physical stores to better serve shoppers.

8. Literacy Mid-South to Launch Book Festival -

Literacy Mid-South is preparing to turn the page on 2013 and begin a new year and new chapter in the group’s story.

It has been a transformative year for the group, which tweaked its programming in recent months and relocated into a new home in early December at Playhouse on the Square. And big things already are on the horizon for 2014 – including the group’s first-ever book festival, according to Literacy Mid-South executive director Kevin Dean.

9. Health Support Effort Launches in Tennessee -

UnitedHealthcare has launched an effort in Tennessee to provide one-on-one health support to TennCare-eligible individuals who have unmanaged or complex health conditions.

The Neighborhood Connections program is creating health assistance centers in communities across the state and hiring workers from those local communities. Coordinators will help participants set health and self-management goals, and create health, emotional and social support plans. The coordinators will also follow up in person to help participants address challenges.

10. Pote Builds Bridges Through Seedco Community Work -

Seedco is a national nonprofit whose mission statement since 1987 has been “to advance economic opportunity for people, businesses and communities in need.”

This is done, says Lisa Pote, senior vice president for Seedco’s Mid-South regional office, by working with individuals and businesses, and within the communities themselves, “to be a contribution to the communities that we’re in.” Seedco has been working within Shelby County since 2004, and has 30 employees.

11. Health Support Effort Launches in Tennessee -

UnitedHealthcare has launched an effort in Tennessee to provide one-on-one health support to TennCare-eligible individuals who have unmanaged or complex health conditions.

The Neighborhood Connections program is creating health assistance centers in communities across the state and hiring workers from those local communities. Coordinators will help participants set health and self-management goals, and create health, emotional and social support plans. The coordinators will also follow up in person to help participants address challenges.

12. Short-Term Leases Next for South Memphis -

The temporary storefronts are down at Mississippi Boulevard and Walker Avenue in South Memphis from this weekend’s MEMfix event.

But some of the other changes remain with plans for more to come.

13. Affordable Care Act -

On Oct. 1, a new shopping website will launch in Tennessee.

Much like Amazon.com, it will offer a place where consumers can compare products from different sellers and buy the one that best suits their needs.

14. Complaint Alleges Bank of America Discrimination -

Bank of America allegedly discriminated against minority neighborhoods and property owners in Memphis in the way it handled bank-owned properties, according to an amended complaint filed with the federal government.

15. Complaint: Bank of America Discriminated in Memphis -

Bank of America allegedly discriminated against minority neighborhoods and property owners in Memphis in the way it handled bank-owned properties, according to an amended complaint filed with the federal government.

16. United Housing Places 3,000th Homeowner -

Lisa Brice was living in a Memphis-area townhouse with her two teenage daughters when the water was turned off in the community back in January.

17. Events -

BlackGirlsCODE will host a mobile-app development workshop for girls ages 13 to 17 Saturday, Aug. 24, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library, 3030 Poplar Ave. The event will also feature tech chats with women mobile developers. Cost is $35. Visit blackgirlscode.com.

18. Neighborhood Vitality -

The history at the Four-Way Restaurant is as rich and soulful as the food.

The walls of the South Memphis institution are decorated with photographs of politicians, athletes, entertainers, business leaders and civil rights icons – including the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. – who made the famous restaurant at Mississippi Boulevard and Walker Avenue a “home away from home.”

19. Events -

Neighborhood Assistance Corp. of America will host its American Dream Event Friday, Aug. 23, through Monday, Aug. 26, from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. at Memphis Cook Convention Center, 255 N. Main St. Counselors and bank representatives will assist with home loans and loan modifications. Cost is free. Visit naca.com.

20. Car Company's Tunica Plans Haven't Come to Fruition -

TUNICA, Miss. (AP) – It seemed like a win for everyone involved when a startup car company, backed by political heavyweights, wooed investors with plans to build a massive auto plant in the Mississippi Delta, hire thousands of people and pump out a brand new line of fuel-efficient vehicles.

21. Events -

Memphis Light, Gas & Water Division will hold a board meeting Thursday, June 6, at 1:30 p.m. in the MLGW board room, 220 S. Main St. Visit mlgw.com.

22. Clinic Expands Christ Community’s Services -

Last year, Christ Community Health Services delivered 652 Memphis babies. Even with that patient volume, the faith-based medical organization had to turn away about 180 patients daily because the organization’s facilities are stretched beyond capacity.

23. Wells Fargo Funds Start Homebuyer Program -

A major effort to help people buy and keep homes in Memphis and Shelby County has launched, thanks to funding received by Memphis and Shelby County from Wells Fargo.

The Memphis-Shelby County Helping Homebuyers program is providing down payment assistance of up to $15,000 to qualifying borrowers who buy and live in a home in the city or county. The funds also can be used for renovation.

24. Renewed Focus -

Reginald Milton calls it the “dirty little secret” of nonprofits whose mission is to provide social services.

25. Planning Continues for Broad, Binghampton -

As after-school traffic made its way north and south on Tillman Street last week, a crossing guard whistled children across one of the narrow streets by Lester Community Center.

The traffic was mostly cars, but the occasional bicycle from the nearby western terminus of the Shelby Farms Greenline whizzed by as well.

26. Agape Means Love -

Last week we spotlighted SRVS, which is an organization that is now celebrating 50 years of enhancing the lives of people with disabilities and bringing peace of mind to their families. This week let us turn our attention to a Christian-based organization that is providing children and families with healthy homes in the regional area through community restoration, homeless services, mentoring, foster care, adoption, maternity services and counseling: Agape Child & Family Services.

27. United Housing Reaches 2,500th Homeowner -

United Housing Inc., a nonprofit housing agency, recently assisted its 2,500th homeowner when Joyce Taylor closed on her first home in the Scenic Hills area of Raleigh.

28. Federal Funds to Aid Efforts in Binghampton, Frayser -

Two Memphis neighborhood revitalization efforts will split $225,000 in federal funds awarded Monday, Aug. 6, to the Greater Memphis Partnership – a coalition of local agencies.

The grants are through the Building Neighborhood Capacity Program, a White House initiative directed at distressed neighborhoods. The Greater Memphis Partnership will match the federal funding for a total of $450,000 that goes for technical assistance on revitalization plans in Binghampton and Frayser.

29. Economic Dev. Conference Slated for Saturday -

The Home for the Holidays Summer Conference 2012 is slated for Saturday, July 14, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the Union Avenue Campus of Southwest Tennessee Community College in the Verties Sails Gymnasium (Building E).

30. Homes Part of North Memphis Revitalization -

Usually Self + Tucker Architects do the design work and planning for someone else who is the developer.

But in an open lot on the north side of Chelsea Avenue at Leath Street, seven single- family homes to come in the next year will be the architecture firm’s first steps into developing.

31. Plough Foundation Awards $1.7M to Talent Dividend -

The Plough Foundation has awarded a $1.7 million grant to the Memphis Talent Dividend College Attainment Initiative, whose purpose is to build a stronger city by increasing the number of college graduates in the Memphis metropolitan area by 1 percent over the next five years.

32. Cos., Churches Deliver Christmas Cheer to Perea -

Perched on a stool and wearing a blue-and-gray Memphis Tigers Santa hat, one-man-band Jeff Hulett led a group of preschoolers in singing “Feliz Navidad” Wednesday, Dec. 14, at Perea Preschool, located inside Klondike Elementary School in North Memphis.

33. Several New Businesses on Tap for South Main -

The Center City Development Corp. at its Wednesday, Nov. 16, meeting will be voting on applications for development incentives totaling almost $27,000 for six Downtown projects that include new restaurants, retail stores and office locations. The meeting starts at 9 a.m. in the Downtown Memphis Commission at 114 N. Main St.

34. Obama Offers Mortgage Relief on Western Trip -

LAS VEGAS (AP) — The Obama administration offered mortgage relief on Monday to hundreds of thousands of Americans in the latest attempt to ease the economic and political fallout of a housing crisis that has bedeviled President Barack Obama as he seeks a second term.

35. Loeb Unveils Ambitious Plan For Renewed Overton Square -

Loeb Properties Inc. hopes to capitalize on Midtown’s recent successes with a $31 million revitalization plan for Overton Square.

36. Loeb Properties Reveals Theater Arts District for Overton Square -

Loeb Properties Inc. is hoping to capitalize on Midtown’s recent successes with a $31 million revitalization plan for Overton Square.

37. Murry-Drobot Joins Family Safety Center -

Olliette Murry-Drobot has joined the Family Safety Center of Memphis and Shelby County as executive director.

Hometown: West Memphis

Work Experience: Fourteen years in not-for-profit management, neighborhood revitalization, organizational development and social services delivery. Recently, I served as the executive director for the Southeast Memphis Community Development Corp. and as a lead consultant on community outreach efforts for The Center for Criminology and Research at the University of Memphis.

38. New Song -

The music and worship arts college formerly known as Visible School officially changed its name to Visible Music College as it prepares to move into its new home at 200 Madison Ave. Downtown later this year.

39. United Housing Helps Prospective Homeowners Realize Goals -

Three years and 50 houses.

That was the mandate handed to Tim Bolding in 1994 when United Way of the Mid-South hired him to operate United Housing, a new community development corporation devoted to helping homebuyers.

40. Broad Ambitions -

Its title may sound like a Woody Allen movie, but an innovative, two-day street festival in a resurging Midtown neighborhood may draw in new businesses via bike traffic.

“A New Face for an Old Broad,” to be held from 3 p.m. to 10 p.m. Friday and from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday, will temporarily exhibit Broad Avenue as a connector between the terminus of the Shelby Farms Greenline and Overton Park.

41. Memphis Habitat Hosts World Habitat Day Events -

Habitat for Humanity of Greater Memphis will host two events Monday in honor of World Habitat Day.

At noon, Memphis Habitat will dedicate the first three homes in the new planned development in Trinity Park in the Oakhaven community. During the program, representatives from Memphis Habitat, full-house sponsors Delta Airlines Inc., FedEx Corp. and The ServiceMaster Co. will address the crowd, as well as John Gemmill, field office director for the U.S Department of Housing and Urban Development.

42. Realizing Dreams -

William Adair’s quad-cab, four-wheel-drive pickup truck is splattered with mud. The office where he parks it out back, a converted country home at the corner of Tenn. 196 and U.S. 72, is littered with maps.

43. Springdale Fights Back -

In the mile of Springdale Street between Chelsea and Jackson avenues there are five churches. That’s not counting the churches on side streets.

On Eldridge Avenue, one of those side streets, between two tiny churches is a pair of identical small houses – both boarded up.

The one closest to the corner has faded blue spray paint stenciled across the plywood.

In inner-city Memphis, the stenciling is as familiar as gang graffiti. It’s the mark of the Memphis Police Department’s Blue CRUSH campaign.

Five years into the crackdown guided by a devotion to crime statistics, crime is down in Memphis.

But the statistical drop in crime has come with lingering questions and concerns in Springdale and other neighborhoods with Blue CRUSH houses.

“Once we board them up, we really have to depend on the community to let us know if drug dealers have broken back into them,” Shelby County District Attorney General Bill Gibbons said. “If we don’t know about it, sometimes drug dealers can get right back in there.”

In the neighborhoods, homeowners lament that street level dealers are easily replaced and soon released from jail to resume their place in the neighborhoods – now with a criminal record that makes a move away from drug dealing even more unlikely.

Last year, a team from Memphis that included a police officer, a state prosecutor, a federal prosecutor, a University of Memphis researcher, the head of the Memphis Leadership Foundation and the pastor of one of those five churches along Springdale went to several cities to get training in a new anti-drug strategy.

“We were really interested in changing people’s lives, not locking them up,” Springdale Baptist Pastor Derrick Hughes told The Memphis News. Hughes wasn’t sure at first if he would be part of the Drug Market Intervention (DMI) program.

“It sounded as if possibly it was just another program that was going to possibly just put criminals in jail without rehabilitation,” he said. “And I wanted to make sure that if we were going to be a part of something that it was going to look at rehabilitating the person, changing lives, changing them from a holistic point of view as well as a spiritual point of view.”

Gibbons said some of his prosecutors and some police brass also had their doubts as they looked for an area to test out DMI Memphis style.

“It was based primarily on looking at crime patterns and in particular drug activity in that area,” he told The Memphis News. There was plenty of open drug dealing in the Springdale area.

Drug Market Intervention is picking several street level drug dealers in a community, confronting them with the evidence against them and telling them they have one more chance to get out of the business. The police are involved in making a decision not to prosecute a few as they target dozens of others in an area.

Others on the team are community leaders from the neighborhood. And some are with proven programs to provide job training and other help in getting a legitimate job.

High Point, N.C., was the first stop for the Memphis group because it is the birthplace of DMI. It seems an unlikely example for Memphis with a population of fewer than 100,000. But in 2003, High Point had several open air drug markets. The city’s new police chief, James Fealy, attacked them using what became the DMI strategy.

David Kennedy, director of the Center for Crime Control and Prevention at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, replicated DMI in other cities with money from the federal Bureau of Justice Assistance. The BJA funded the training of the Memphis team and came here.

Kennedy’s philosophy is specific to open air drug markets. It doesn’t pretend to eliminate all drug dealing.

“Open air drug markets are found primarily in our cities and in African-American neighborhoods,” Kennedy wrote in a 2008 article for the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) Journal. “Although we are loathe to admit it, this issue is soaked in race.”

Kennedy said police complained to him that the families of the drug dealers and others in the surrounding communities knew they were selling drugs, did nothing to stop it and profited from it.

But Kennedy said those living in the communities countered that police were only interested in locking up as many people as they could as part of a conspiracy to destroy the community.

Kennedy said each side had a point and each side was wrong.

“The crime is real and overwhelmingly the arrests are legitimate. But we are destroying the village in order to save it,” he wrote. “And none of this gets rid of the crime. The drug markets and violence continue to exist.”

Kennedy didn’t try to tackle the long-standing racial issues and their lengthy back story. The conversations that formed the basis for the DMI strategy were about drug markets.

It was hard for some on the Memphis team to believe that hardened drug dealers would respond when the threat of arrest, prison time, drive-by shootings and gang turf tripwires hadn’t discouraged them from the life.

Nevertheless, when they returned to Memphis, the planning began for several months of undercover drug buys in the Springdale area by the police Organized Crime Unit. For months, the officers bought repeatedly from dozens of street dealers in a two-mile radius of Springdale. And they recorded the drug buys on video – not just one buy but multiple buys.

Prosecutors reviewed the cases against more than 60 men and women and prosecuted 51 of them. Five were indicted on federal drug charges. Six others – five men and a woman – were the first candidates for the Memphis DMI program.

“It was taking a look at individuals who obviously were involved in drug trafficking, but a little more on the periphery – not an extensive drug record,” Gibbons said.

A few days after New Year’s Day, police descended on the Springdale area serving the arrest warrants and putting up a fresh crop of plywood with blue stenciling on the drug houses in the area. The neighborhood grapevine buzzed anew about the heavy police presence.

It was still buzzing when on the coldest day of the year – Jan. 8 – the Memphis group knocked on six doors in the Springdale area. The temperature never got near freezing and was in single digits part of the day.

No one inside the six houses knew they were coming. No one approaching the doorsteps knew what the reaction inside would be.

It was the first indication the six people involved and inside those homes had that they had sold drugs to undercover Memphis police officers and had been recorded on video making multiple drug sales to the officers.

The father of one of the six was among those who had been arrested.

When the DMI team knocked on his door, his grandmother answered.

“He did not want his grandmother to know why we were standing at the door,” Peggie Russell, the DMI coordinator and a University of Memphis researcher and community resource specialist, said. “He said, ‘It’s OK grandmother.’”

Howard Eddings, president of the Memphis Leadership Foundation, said the young man didn’t deny he was a drug dealer.

“He wanted to basically shut the door,” Eddings told The Memphis News. “She might not have known exactly what he was doing. She was an older lady. He didn’t like the fact that we were knocking on her door.”

He and the other five got a letter asking them to come to Springdale Baptist Church a few days later. If they came, the letter from Police Director Larry Godwin said they would not be prosecuted this time.

For Hughes the pledge was crucial. He wanted to be able to say, “I give you my word, you will not be arrested,” with certainty and conviction.

Five of the six showed up at Hughes’ church where the congregation and other community leaders were waiting in the sanctuary. On the walls were posters of the 51 defendants who weren’t getting the chance they were about to get. The posters included the possible prison sentences those defendants faced.

The five “guests” sat in a reserved front row with a friend or family member.

Their faces blurred in a video of the event, they listened as Assistant District Attorney Amy Weirich told them, “We’ve had it,” and called their names individually. “The Memphis Police Department is tired of picking up dead bodies in the street.”

Russell remembers some denying they had done anything wrong. Then police showed the video.

They watched video of themselves selling drugs numerous times to undercover police officers.

The woman’s denials stopped.

“She got caught during the first time. I don’t necessarily know that we believed it was the first time,” Eddings remembered. “But she was so embarrassed as a mom who had small kids who was put in the spotlight. … All of her junk is coming to the forefront.”

Russell said some of the others were telling those who came with them that they had no idea why they were summoned to the church.

“You’re sitting there and you’re telling your family member, ‘No, I didn’t do it,’” Russell said. “Then the tape started rolling … and you see yourself. It’s reality. You can’t hide it. I think that was a turning point for most of them.”

Hughes told the group of five that the church cared about them and was willing to help.

Some of his congregants spoke up too.

“Our congregants said, ‘Listen, we’re tired of watching you sell drugs. We’re tired of being afraid of coming in and out of our communities. We want our community back,’” Hughes recalled. “During the call in, some of our residents had an opportunity to look in their faces and say, ‘We are tired of the way you’ve been running down our communities. This used to be a wonderful community where people had pride, where people had hope. … Now a lot of us are afraid.’”

After the tough talk and the confrontation came a commitment to work with the five DMI candidates. Eddings emphasized there are no guarantees.

“We were careful not to promise them that we were going to get them jobs or that even if we could get them a job that it was going to pay them something comparable to what they were making on the street,” he said. ”We said the opposite. We can’t do that at all. But one thing we do know for sure. If you stop doing what you’re doing, you don’t go to jail.”

Russell, who gets much of the credit for pushing to give DMI a try and has become the program’s de facto coordinator, described the response as “something totally new.”

“It’s not about those five,” she said. “They are supposed to stay out of trouble for two years to make the necessary transition in their lives. But it’s really about the Hollywood Springdale community, changing the response of the community to open air drug sales.”

Eddings was surprised by the response.

“Most of these guys’ mamas know what they’re doing. But to know now that other mamas and other grandparents and other church leaders and the community have their eye on you, it has a different motivation,” he said. “Some of these guys are hardened. They’ve been doing it for a while and they’ve been out there on the streets. So, not much embarrasses them. But I could tell by looking at them and even some of the denials.”

The Memphis Leadership Foundation already works with convicted felons trying to make the difficult transition after prison. There are even fewer guarantees for those with a substantial prison record.

Marcus, who didn’t want his last name used, vented about how hard it’s been to find a legitimate job since he did prison time in 2006 for felony drug dealing.

“It’s not like people want to sell drugs,” he began. “On a lot of applications they are saying they don’t discriminate. They’re lying. … They’re ready to end the session right then. They might tear up the application in your face.”

If drug dealers like him bring blight to areas like Springdale and violence and a hard life for law-abiding citizens, Marcus said society has responded with its own brand of hardness.

“They ain’t reaching out anymore,” he said. “They expect for the world to be better because we’re building more jails. We’re putting more cops out. If somebody killed me today – the person who killed me, they want to put him in jail. But why put him in jail when y’all treating this man he killed like he’s a nobody anyway.”

Eddings said with criminal records or without, street level drug dealers have problems as they get older because they have no legitimate work history. He started to say there aren’t transferable skills before thinking about it.

“Actually, some of the skills do transfer. They’ve just got to get access,” he said. “It’s really a reshaping, a little bit more recognition that they need to deal with in terms of how they see themselves and how they can use those skills that they utilize on the streets to do something positive and pursue a legitimate way of life.”

The young man Eddings is working with seems not to have hit the wall that Marcus is at yet.

“He is simply trying to figure out how to put one foot in front of the other. They go from having some source of income to having no source of income,” Eddings told The Memphis News. “We’re convincing him now that getting his GED ought to be a decision that he ought to make. He’s been a little slow in that.”

Hughes said he would get the occasional dope boy showing up at his church before DMI.

“Very rarely. I did hear one or two stragglers you come across who say, ‘Yes, I do want to change.’ Often times, it’s usually because of a pending trial or they are in trouble,” he said. “Since that time, we’ve had a lot of people coming, wanting to change their lives.”

Gibbons is reviewing some neighborhoods where DMI might go next but he’s not saying where because of the undercover police work involved. He wants to see it replicated based on lessons learned in Memphis and he hopes to get a federal grant to hire a full-time coordinator.

The sixth man given a chance in the DMI program didn’t come to the church and was prosecuted. He pleaded guilty to five counts of selling drugs and was sentenced to four years in prison and fined $10,000. But the sentence was suspended and he was put on a diversion program.

Weirich recalled Criminal Court Judge John Fowlkes asking the man why he didn’t respond. He told Fowlkes, “It sounded too good to be true.”

...

44. Different Mayor, Same Story in Budget Talks -

Memphis has had three mayors since the last budget season at City Hall, and the latest appears to have picked up where the other left off.

Several City Council members are questioning the budget priorities of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr., just as they questioned those of former

45. Watchdog: Obama Foreclosure Plan Leaves Many Out -

WASHINGTON (AP) - A watchdog panel overseeing the financial bailouts says the Obama administration's flagship mortgage aid program lags well behind the foreclosure crisis and leaves too many families out.

46. Trezevant Place to Offer More Room at Senior Home -

The hottest bistro on Highland Street isn’t on the strip of clubs near the University of Memphis or in Poplar Plaza.

In late March, a major renovation of the Trezevant Manor campus at 177 N. Highland St. that took nearly six years reached completion.

47. Memphis College of Art Files Permit for South Main Building Renovation -

477 S. Main St.
Memphis, TN 38103
Permit Amount: $2.2 Million

Project Cost: $3 million
Permit Date: Applied April 2010
Completion: Fall 2010 (Phase I)
Owner: Memphis College of Art
Tenant: Memphis College of Art
Contractor: Montgomery Martin Contractors LLC
Architect: Askew Nixon Ferguson Architects

48. Mid-South Food Bank Seeks Donations -

Officials at the Mid-South Food Bank are hoping people will use some of the money from their income tax rebates to make a contribution.

49. Cold-Weather States Lose Heating Aid to South -

PORTLAND, Maine (AP) - The recent cold snap in the Deep South has sucked federal emergency home heating dollars away from traditional cold-weather states, causing heating aid to dry up faster than usual in many northern states.

50. Stimulus Helps Nearly, Newly Homeless -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) - The mother of five was at wits' end. Her husband had lost his job, their lease-to-purchase house was foreclosed on and she had only one completed sale all year as a real estate agent.

51. 1.3 Million to Lose Jobless Benefits by Year's End -

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (AP) - Jobless since January, Donald Money has already moved in with his elderly parents, stopped going to the movies and started using less of his prescription medication so it will last longer.

52. Obama Administration To Expand Housing Plan -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Obama administration expanded its $50 billion mortgage aid program on Thursday, announcing new measures that would help homeowners avoid foreclosure if they don’t qualify for other assistance.

53. Store Murder Makes Small Businesses, Community Wary -

People who live and work in the community around LeMoyne-Owen College wonder if the person who killed Abdallah Assaedi last month is still in their midst.

The 42-year-old store clerk at Sam’s Food Market died after being shot during a Nov. 21 robbery. Business owners are taking extra precautions.

54. FDIC Plan Tests Limits of Leniency -

ANTIOCH, Calif. – When the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. seized control of IndyMac Bancorp – the nation's 10th-largest mortgage lender by loan volume – the agency vowed to ease terms for many of its troubled borrowers. In doing so, the FDIC wanted to show the mortgage industry how it could slash home foreclosures by making decisions both sensible and humane.

55. Home Sales Slip in Southern Cities in July -

Sales of existing homes in the South tumbled 18 percent in July from a year ago, while the median price fell 3.5 percent to $179,300, the National Association of Realtors said Monday.

Compared to the rest of the country, sales in the South were weaker, although prices held up better. Nationwide, July sales fell 13 percent from a year ago, while the median price slid 7.1 percent to $212,000.

56. Despite Decline, 100 Percent Financing Can Be Found -

While most banks and mortgage companies have pretty much eliminated 100 percent financing for home loans, the product still exists. It just doesn't flourish like it once did.

Long gone are the days of no-documentation, no-money-down, stated-income loans that ultimately sent the housing industry reeling in 2007. In response to the subsequent subprime fallout and skyrocketing foreclosure rate, companies tightened their guidelines and removed many of the loan products that created those problems in the first place.

57. Events -

The University of Memphis will host Ken Reardon of Cornell University today from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. in Room 123 of the Fogelman Executive Center, 330 Innovation Drive. Reardon will present "Urban Design and Placemaking: The Emerging Role of Higher Education and Other Institutions in Neighborhood Revitalization." The event is free and open to the public.

58. Hickory Hill Residents Complain of Slow Storm Response -

There was no looting last week in Hickory Hill, the section of Southeast Memphis hit harder than any other place in the city by a swarm of tornadoes that devastated a five-state region. So said Memphis Police Director Larry Godwin at a weekend meeting with about 60 area residents. "There was none," he stressed.

59. Riviana Foods Invests in Memphis -

Known primarily for exporting barbecue and blues music, Memphis soon will become one of the country's largest manufacturing and distribution centers for rice.

And once again, the city has its location to thank.

60. Breaking Point -

Over the last few months, the finishing touches have been put on a settlement agreement covering a series of companion lawsuits that Memphis Area Legal Services recently brought against defendants including appraisers, brokers, closing agents and others.

61. California Company Buys Pendleton Place Apartments -

1780 Pendleton St.
Memphis, TN 38114
Sale Amount: $2.7 million

Sale Date: Dec. 14, 2007

Buyer: Pendleton Investors LLC

62. As Foreclosures Surge, Mortgage Lenders Pressured to Offer Borrowers Relief -

LOS ANGELES (AP) - Countrywide Financial Corp., the nation's largest mortgage lender, said Tuesday it will begin calling borrowers to offer refinancing or modifications on $16 billion in loans with interest rates set to adjust by the end of 2008.

63. DeSoto Commercial: A Study in Success -

The progress made in DeSoto County the past few years is apparent in its swelling residential population and its booming commercial development, which have helped create one of Mississippi's - and the Mid-South's - fastest-growing communities.

64. Infusion by Bank of America Buys Time, Stability for Countrywide -

LOS ANGELES (AP) - The infusion of $2 billion from Bank of America Corp. should help shore up sagging Countrywide Financial Corp. as it tries to outlast the credit crunch squeezing Wall Street and the mortgage industry, analysts said Thursday.

65. Prostitution Plagues Memphis Neighborhoods, Businesses -

You can't buy much with $20 nowadays. It won't even buy a full tank of gas.

But in the sex-for-sale industry, buyers have quite a few options, most of which are not suitable to be printed in the newspaper.

66. Elvis Managers PlanOverhaul for Graceland -      The thousands of Elvis Presley fans descending on Memphis for the 30th anniversary of his death Aug. 16 won't see much sign of it, but plans are moving along for big-time changes at Graceland.
    

67. Elvis Managers Plan Big-Time Overhaul for Graceland - MEMPHIS (AP) - The thousands of Elvis Presley fans descending on Memphis for the 30th anniversary of his death Aug. 16 won't see much sign of it, but plans are moving along for big-time changes at Graceland.

68. Deferring Taxes Important In Real Estate, Investors Say -

Twenty years ago, Tom Elledge Jr. began investing in real estate on the side.

He bought a three-bedroom, two-bathroom house in the Berclair neighborhood and began renting it. He later sold that home and bought another, and then another.

69. COMEC to Raise Money and Awareness With Sunday Treasure Hunt -

Searching for a missing child is no laughing matter. It's easy to imagine that for people involved in a search - family, volunteer workers and law enforcement officials - passing moments can seem like hours.

70. Operation Safe Community Exec Looks to Reduce Memphis Crime -

Linda Miller was an East Memphis housewife in the late 1970s when she unexpectedly began a career in criminal justice. She was handpicked in 1979 by then-Gov. Lamar Alexander to serve as a citizen appointee on the Tennessee Board of Probation and Parole.

71. Forces Gather To Revitalize Blighted Frayser Community -

Denesa Segrest calls the 38127 ZIP code in Frayser the "good secret that people don't know about" - at least not yet.

"They don't know about the good quality of housing, they don't know about the good schools. ... There's a lot that's going on that they just don't know," she said.

72. Eighth Jubilee School to Get New Building in '08 -

3575 Emerald St.
Memphis, TN 38115
Permit Cost: $2 million

Project Cost: $3.2 million (phase one)

73. Sowing and Reaping -

Whipping up the perfect business plan is a little like baking a multi-layer cake.

Layers one and two are the innovation and the entrepreneurial pluck, both of which are topped off by a healthy dose of good fortune. Actually baking the cake - or, getting the business up and running - requires the panache of a dinner party host who must diplomatically accommodate sworn enemies.

74. In Pursuit of L.I.F.E. -

Editor's Note: The following stories comprise the second part of a special series on the state of children in Memphis and Shelby County. To read yesterday's pieces, visit www.memphisdailynews.com.

75. Events -

The Memphis chapter of the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) meets today at 11:45 a.m. at the Holiday Inn-University of Memphis, 3700 Central Ave. Dr. Steven J. Bares, president and executive director of the Memphis Bioworks Foundation, is the guest speaker. Cost is free for members; $25 for non-members; and $15 for students. Contact Jamie Coggins at jamieprsa@bellsouth.net or visit www.prsamemphis.org for reservations.

76. Archived Article -

TDN: How would you characterize the current climate for existing small businesses and startups in the Mid-South?

RS: Small business startups will always be with us. Unfortunately, on the national level, only 22 percent are successful after five years. Another national survey done by the American Business Journal ranked Memphis dead last out of 50 major metropolitan cities in its friendliness toward small business. When the economy gets tight and there are a lot of layoffs with the large employers, the independent business startups greatly increase. Most of these are micro-businesses in the service industry and stay off the radar for taxes, reporting - and they lack growth potential. However, there are a number of these startups that will be legitimate businesses, and the owners plan to run them as businesses instead of sideline income. These are the ones the Small Business Chamber is especially interested in helping. We can help provide business structure, motivation and direction.

77. Full Steam Ahead: -

When the little guy in the back of a collegiate crew boat yells, "Stroke!" all the hearty rowers dip their oars and pull in unison. The result is a powerful thrust forward by the sleek and speedy craft that wouldn't be possible without cooperation on board.

78. RACE Battle Heads for City Council Vote -

Until now, both sides in the debate over a proposed radioactive waste incinerator on Presidents Island have been mostly concerned with environmental issues.

The potential health risks of burning waste from hospitals, universities, nuclear power plants and other government facilities were the tie that first bound together several groups, including the Sierra Club, the Riverview Community Collaborative and Memphistruth.org, which is comprised of an assortment of civic and business leaders.

79. Events -

Seedco presents "Benefits for Businesses," a free event for Memphis business owners and their employees, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. today in Court Square. Attendees will learn about assistance available to businesses in Memphis and Shelby County. Light refreshments will be served. Call 528-1205 or visit www.earnbenefits.org for details.

80. City Makes Push for New Affordable Housing -

Steve Lockwood is helping residents of Frayser put a down payment on a very big dream: affordable home ownership.

As executive director of the Frayser Community Development Corp. - which was formed in 2000 to become a revitalization engine for the post-WWII suburb - Lockwood currently oversees several projects, such as the disbursement of federal grant money and the planning of new housing developments.

81. Archived Article: Law Talk - Law Talk Delisa F

Eddings Earns Honor for Pro Bono Work

LANE GARDNER CAMP

The Daily News

Delisa F. Eddings received the W.J. Michael Cody Pro Bono Attorney of the Year Award for her exceptional assistance to a client of Memphis Area Lega...

82. Archived Article: Daily Digest - Carlyle Place Lots

Carlyle Place Lots

Financed for $2.7 Million

David Miller LLC has financed 18 lots in the Carlyle Place Subdivision in Cordova for $2.7 million, according to The Daily News Public Records Database, www.memphisdailynews.co...

83. Archived Article: Lead - By Andy Meek

City Effort Targets Neighborhood Blight

Binghamton, Frayser, other areas seek new beginning

ANDY MEEK

The Daily News

Hamidullah Adam desperately wants to see new life breathed into his Binghamton neighborhood. A newly cer...

84. Archived Article: Real Recap - 6101 Hickory Ridge Trail

Virginia Company Finances Waterstone Landing

6101 Hickory Ridge Trail

Memphis, TN 38115

Cost: $12.2 million

Borrower: Hickory Gardens Associates LLC

Lender: Wachovia Bank NA

Trustee: Michael Champlin

...

85. Archived Article: Real Focus - Real

Added Incentives Push Builders to Stay in City

LANCE ALLAN

The Daily News

As home builders continue to meet success in surrounding areas such as DeSoto and Fayette counties, Memphis and Shelby County leaders find themselves wanting ...

86. Archived Article: Comm Focus - Community

New School Helps Revitalize Neighborhood

LANCE ALLAN

The Daily News

April 4, 1968, was a dark day in Memphis history. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., in town to support striking sanitation workers, was assassinated on that day. But...

87. Archived Article: Comm Focus - Agencies' coffers dwindle, but needs grow

Agencies coffers dwindle, but needs grow

By STACEY WIEDOWER

The Daily News

Memphians are well known for their volunteer spirit. Typically, area nonprofits find that when they need one helper to t...

88. Archived Article: Bridges (lead) - Bridges to bolster pedestrian safety on U of M campus

Bridges to bolster pedestrian safety on U of M campus

By MARY DANDO

The Daily News

Pedestrians who risk life and limb by dodging oncoming cars on Central Avenue to reach the Universit...

89. Archived Article: Real Focus - By STACEY WIEDOWER

Housing initiatives help residents weather economic storm

By STACEY WIEDOWER

The Daily News

In these days of job loss and economic hardship, making enough money to buy groceries, put gas in the car and still cover the ...

90. Archived Article: Co-yo (lead) - By JENNIFER MURLEY Pie factory faces fate in crumbling market By JENNIFER MURLEY The Daily News A dilapidated warehouse long included in the eclectic fabric of a historic Midtown neighborhood is now for sale and facing an uncertain fate, after year-...

91. Archived Article: Comm Focus - By JENNIFER MURLEY Center helping crime victims hosts annual event By JENNIFER MURLEY On Aug. 26, 1994, a phone call from a neighborhood Ikes Store employee forever changed Yvonne Bectons life. The clerk told Becton her 32-year-old daughter had been...

92. Archived Article: Comm Focus - By Jennifer Murley CDCs reap benefits of HUD incentives By JENNIFER MURLEY The Daily News A recent announcement by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development designating specific areas of the city as part of the Memphis Renewal Community c...

93. Archived Article: Comm Focus - Random acts of kindness

Random acts of kindness spreading over Memphis

By MARY DANDO

The Daily News

French philosopher Jean Jacques Rousseau once wrote What wisdom can you find that is greater than kindness?

During Random Acts of Kind...

94. Archived Article: Brownfields (lead) - Kim Olson,

Amendment quickens brownfield reuse

By SUE PEASE

The Daily News

Last week, Gov. Don Sundquist visited a vacant 15-acre site on Florida Street in Memphis, pronouncing it the first property to be identified as a brownfield reuse...

95. Archived Article: Mcdp (lead) - By JENNIFER MURLEY

Development, growth

focus of MCDP forum

By JENNIFER MURLEY
The Daily News
The Memphis Community Development Partnership along with the Community Development Council is hosting a work force development forum to...

96. Archived Article: Real Focus - By JENNIFER MURLEY CDC builds residential development through community involvement By JENNIFER MURLEY The Daily News Two city blocks sandwiched between the site of the $20 million Stax Museum of American Soul Music and the $75 million, 40-acre rede...

97. Archived Article: Real Focus - The department of Housing and Urban Development announced last week during National Homeownership Week the creation of a new d HUD proposes third facet to down payment assistance plan By JENNIFER MURLEY The Daily News The department of Housing and U...

98. Archived Article: Real Focus - By: JENNIFER MURLEY Seedco involvement grows in Memphis community By JENNIFER MURLEY The Daily News Memphis will receive about $1.8 million over the next three to five years from a national non-profit assistance corporation dedicated to strengthenin...

99. Archived Article: Seedco (lead) - By: JENNIFER MURLEY Community developers get seed money By JENNIFER MURLEY The Daily News Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton announced Tuesday the creation of a $1.1 million affordable housing fund resulting from a collaboration between the public and pr...

100. Archived Article: Law Focus - Garbage pick-up, schools, roads, police get top priority in mayors budget Garbage, streets, schools, police get nod in 02 budget By MARY DANDO The Daily News Mayor Willie Herenton outlined his 2002 budget to members of the Memphis City Council Tuesd...