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Editorial Results (free)

1. McDonald's Won't Pursue Real Estate Investment Trust -

OAK BROOK, Ill. (AP) — McDonald's says it will not pursue spinning off its real estate assets.

The world's largest hamburger chain, which is in the midst of a turnaround plan, had been considering forming a real estate investment trust partly because of the potential tax advantages it could provide.

2. New Mayor in Town -

Jim Strickland has some big decisions to make.

At the top of the list: make sure the toilets are flushing, the lights are coming on at night and the stoplights are flashing red, yellow and green.

3. Airbnb Provides Options to Memphis Homeowners, Guests -

It all began for Marilyn White over phone conversations with a close friend back home in Buffalo, N.Y.

4. Memphis Mayoral Contenders Talk Public Transit -

The four major contenders for Memphis mayor all favor keeping the Mid-South Coliseum in some form and a Memphis Zoo parking garage.

But the positions were limited to yes-or-no answers during the Memphis Rotary Club debate Tuesday, Sept. 22, among Mayor A C Wharton and challengers Harold Collins, Jim Strickland and Mike Williams.

5. Duncan-Williams Launches Asset-Management Business -

A new standalone financial firm has launched out of Duncan-Williams Inc. that has its own name and website and will soon move into its own Poplar Avenue office space.

6. Tax Revenue Reopens Budget Wounds -

The largest portion of $22 million in extra tax revenue collected by Shelby County Trustee David Lenoir will go to local public education, county commissioners said Monday, July 27.

7. Vols, Titans Fight to Fill Empty Stadium Seats -

When it comes to giving the consumer what it wants, few sports programs can match University of Tennessee football.

Neyland Stadium, which 40 years ago could accommodate only 70,000 fans, has swelled to a capacity of 102,455, fifth largest in college football. It has a $4 million, 4,580-square-foot Jumbotron, W-Fi connections for fans and enough flashing lights around the stadium’s interior to shame the Las Vegas Strip.

8. One Beale Nabs 20-Year Tax Freeze -

The developers behind One Beale have earned key pieces of the public-private partnership they say is necessary to pursue the twin tower project overlooking the Mississippi River.

Memphis-based Carlisle Corp. on Tuesday, July 14, received a 20-year payment-in-lieu-of-taxes incentive and a $10 million contribution toward a public parking garage from the Center City Revenue Finance Corp.

9. Haslam Needs to Back Up Call for More Local Control -

If Gov. Bill Haslam is trying to build political capital, he’s making the right move by trying to light a fire under local officials.

He might also want to turn up the flame on his own game.

10. House Votes to Kill Health Care Law's Medical Device Tax -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The House defied a White House veto threat and voted Thursday to abolish a tax on medical device makers as a group of Democrats uncharacteristically joined Republicans in moving to kill part of President Barack Obama's health care law.

11. Feds Charge Joe Armstrong With Fraud, Tax Evasion -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Democratic state Rep. Joe Armstrong of Knoxville has been indicted on federal fraud and tax evasion charges connected to an increase in the state's cigarette tax in 2007.

12. Backsplash -

In the beginning, there was Splash – the first legal casino in Tunica County following the Mississippi Legislature’s passage of the 1990 law legalizing “dockside” casinos in the state.

13. Christian Brothers Students Help Secure Tax Refunds -

As an outgrowth of a new Christian Brothers University course on poverty in America, a group of IRS-certified students brought some major relief to a few hundred Memphis-area families this tax season.

14. Estate Planning and Your Collectibles -

Ray's take: We’ve all heard those stories about someone inheriting Great Aunt Matilda’s Avon bottle collection and having no idea what to do with it. But the collection meant something to Aunt Matilda. She could have planned differently for her collection and it might have found a home with someone (or somewhere) who loved it.

15. Equality Project Still Tough Sell in Some Areas -

A decade into its existence, the Tennessee Equality Project is facing a year that will likely contain its biggest milestones.

A U.S. Supreme Court decision in June may strike down marriage bans in the state, but also trigger new legislation regarding same-sex marriage that will lead to additional court battles.

16. Less for the Tank, More for the Bank -

The U.S. Energy Information Administration predicts the typical American household will save nearly $750 on gasoline in 2015, but no one should expect the good fortune to last forever.

Yes, gas prices did fall below $2 – and have begun falling again in recent days after rising about 35 cents in February and early March – but now it’s spring, a time when gas prices typically rise.

17. AP Survey: Why the Outlook for Global Economy Has Brightened -

WASHINGTON (AP) – From the United States to Asia to Europe, a global economy that many had feared was faltering appears poised for a resurgence on the strength of cheap oil and falling interest rates.

18. Brewery Developers Buy Site for New Apartment Building -

11 Butler Ave.
Memphis, TN 38103
Sale Amount: $1.25 million

Sale Date: Feb. 23, 2015
Buyer: 495 Tennessee LLC
Seller: BCH Investments LLC
Details: The team behind the development of the historic Tennessee Brewery has acquired a key piece of property adjacent to the long-vacant structure as plans for the new Tennessee Brewery: The Revival series of events there move forward.

19. Luttrell Scolds State Legislators -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell says the political forces that defeated the Insure Tennessee proposal of Gov. Bill Haslam this month in Nashville weren’t in a fight with Washington and President Barack Obama

20. ‘Government’s Too Big and People are Sick of It’ -

Knox County Mayor Tim Burchett is an enigma of the modern civil servant, a career politician who doesn’t seem to take himself too seriously. He thinks he’s paid too much (his salary is state mandated) and brings it up often in interviews with the media.

21. Net Neutrality and What It Could Mean to You -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A top U.S. regulator just announced he wants more power to oversee Internet service, much in the same way that the government already regulates phone service and other public utilities. The goal is to prevent Internet service providers like AT&T, Verizon, Comcast, Sprint and T-Mobile from blocking or slowing down Web traffic, or striking deals with companies that provide content like Amazon, Google or Netflix to move their data faster than others.

22. Wal-Mart Launches Cash Pickup Option for Tax Refunds -

NEW YORK (AP) – Wal-Mart is launching a service allowing customers to pick up their tax refunds in cash at all stores nationwide.

It's the discounter's latest move to offer more financial services, which is seen as a path to bringing more shoppers to its stores.

23. IRS Cuts Taxpayer Services as Filing Returns Gets Harder -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The IRS is cutting taxpayer services to historically low levels just as President Barack Obama's health law will make filing a federal tax return more complicated for millions of families.

24. Departing Postmaster General Slams Banking Duties Proposal -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Retiring Postmaster General Patrick R. Donahoe scoffed Tuesday at suggestions that the Postal Service could ease some of its chronic financial woes by branching out and offering basic banking services to its customers.

25. Rental Showdown -

Tiffany H., 43, has found the perfect way to make money. It’s close to home, easy-to-manage and gives her the flexibility she needs as a busy mom shuttling two children back and forth to two different schools each day.

26. City Council Approves Pension Changes -

Memphis City Council members put to rest Tuesday, Dec. 16, at least the City Hall portion of the debate about city employee benefits and the liability of those benefits by approving changes to the city’s pension plan.

27. Justices to Hear Challenge to Health Law Subsidies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court agreed Friday to hear a new challenge to President Barack Obama's health care law.

The justices said they will decide whether the law authorizes subsidies that help millions of low- and middle-income people afford their health insurance premiums.

28. Battle Rages On Between Regional Foes -

In October, Old Dominion Freight Line Inc. opened the door, or 267 doors to be more precise, on its new $30 million service center in Memphis.

29. Health Law Waivers: Too Complicated to Claim? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Millions of Americans may qualify for waivers from the most unpopular part of President Barack Obama's health care overhaul. But getting that exemption could be an ordeal.

30. New Seat, Same Drive -

Dawn Distler was a bus driver for 10 years, but these days she does her work from the passenger seat.

Knoxville’s new director of transit, on the job since June 1, rides the Knoxville Area Transit buses often, making the most of her commute, traveling to work-related events or taking her staff on a friendly fact-finding mission.

31. HipD: Donelson Finds Its Cool Side -

The tag “Hip Donelson” evoked plenty of snickers, eye rolls and snarky comments when it first appeared. After all, the local joke goes, Donelson’s known for hip replacements – not hipsters.

32. Limits on Overseas Mergers Prompt Renewed Debate -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Obama administration's decision to curb the ability of U.S. corporations to skirt taxes by merging with foreign companies kicked off an immediate election-season debate over when and how to tackle the nation's complex corporate tax code.

33. Road to Better Mass Transit -

Picking a new transit chief is critical for a city in transition.

Next year, Nashville residents will elect a new mayor and turn over its large Metro Council.

Davidson County also expects some 200,000 new residents over the next 20 years, and much of the success of future development will depend on the ease of navigating around Nashville – already the nation’s second-worst area for sprawl, according to Smart Growth America.

34. Democrats Choose State Senate Nominee -

When Shelby County Democratic Party leaders gather Monday, Sept. 8, to pick their party’s nominee in the November special general election for state Senate District 30, it will also be an indication of how deep the wounds run from the party’s disastrous August election outing.

35. Changing Landscape -

A “high-end” grocery store chain not currently serving the Memphis market has leased the shuttered former Kroger store at 9050 U.S. 64 in Lakeland and should open in the spring, according to a Lakeland official.

36. US Postal Service Loses $2 Billion This Spring -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. Postal Service lost $2 billion this spring despite increasing its volume and charging consumers more money to send mail, officials said Monday.

The loss for the spring quarter, which ended June 30, was significantly higher than the $740 million loss for the same three-month period last year. The agency blamed increases in compensation and benefit costs for the red ink and said it would be unable to make a congressionally mandated payment of $5.7 billion this September for health benefits for future retirees. The loss came despite a 2 percent increase in operating revenue compared to last spring.

37. Cannon Wright Blount Names Wages as Partner -

It might be easy to think of Mike Wages’ line of work as involving stone-faced number-crunchers whose main task involves making sure figures line up correctly, as they focus mostly on gathering and presenting data.

38. Walgreen Turns Down Inversion to Cut Tax Bill -

Walgreen plans to keep its roots firmly planted in the United States, saying it will no longer pursue an overseas reorganization that would have trimmed its U.S. taxes but drew political scorn.

The nation's largest drugstore chain – which bills itself as "America's premier pharmacy" – said Wednesday that it will buy the remaining stake in Swiss health and beauty retailer Alliance Boots that it does not already own.

39. From Despair to Belief -

A July weekday afternoon, about 2:45. It’s the perfect time for just about anyone to be nodding off in class.

But in the basement of Midtown Church of Christ, where HopeWorks Inc. is housed, class is in session and a dozen men and their teacher are having a lively discussion.

40. Council Moves to Bridge Gaps in Health Coverage Changes -

The ad hoc committee that gathered municipal union leaders, city retirees and Memphis City Council members at the same table to talk about city health insurance meets Thursday, July 17, for the first time since the council approved health insurance plan changes that have drawn vocal protests from city employees and retirees.

41. Wharton Courts Alternatives in Benefits Dispute -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. says any alternatives are welcome to the coming health insurance changes for city employees and retirees.

But delaying the roll out of those changes in January is not an option. And neither is reopening the city budget or the city property tax rate.

42. Budget Reality Informs Response to Sick-Outs -

For about a year, Memphis Fire Department Director Alvin Benson has been taking ladder trucks out of service to deal with firefighters on vacation and on sick leave at much lower levels than those that surfaced Wednesday.

43. Highway Crisis Looms as Soon as August, US Warns -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Gridlock in Washington will lead to gridlock across the country if lawmakers can't quickly agree on how to pay for highway and transit programs, President Barack Obama and his top officials warned Tuesday.

44. Timing Key Element of County Tax Rate Debate -

More funding from Shelby County government for prekindergarten classrooms is a matter of timing, say those on both sides of the property tax rate question on which the $2.8 million in additional funding hinges.

45. FAA, Developers Clash Over Tall Buildings -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The government wants to dramatically reduce the allowable height of buildings near hundreds of airports – a proposal that is drawing fire from real estate developers and members of Congress who say it will reduce property values.

46. Battle Lines -

The city’s operating and capital budgets are just about set for the new fiscal year next month. Hard decisions made about health insurance for city employees and retirees Tuesday, June 17, are unlikely to be revisited by the Memphis City Council.

47. IRS to Waive Penalties for Some Overseas Accounts -

The Internal Revenue Service is offering to waive steep penalties for Americans living abroad who haven't been paying their U.S. taxes.

But there is a catch: You have to be able to show that you didn't evade U.S. taxes on purpose.

48. Wal-Mart Faces Big Hurdles -

The world's largest retailer faces new challenges at a time when low prices and one-stop shopping can be a few clicks away on a tablet computer or mobile phone.

Wal-Mart Stores Inc. built its reputation on everyday low prices and convenient supercenters that allow customers to do all their shopping in one place.

49. Now Application 'Inconsistencies' Vex Health Law -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A huge new paperwork headache for the government could also be jeopardizing coverage for some of the millions of people who just got health insurance under President Barack Obama's law.

50. Bailey Continues Call for Shelby Farms Development -

Walter Bailey is the only serving Shelby County Commissioner who was part of the 1970s debate on the commission about what to do with the farmland that was the old Shelby County Penal Farm.

51. Council Hesitates Over Fire Recruit Class Funding and Charter Restrictions -

Memphis City Council members discussed a new recruit class Tuesday, May 20, for the Memphis Fire Department that is not in Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s budget proposal.

But council members voted down a plan to come up with the $1.7 million for the class of 100 fire recruits from a $3 million cut in the line item for fire department sick leave, proposed by council member Kemp Conrad.

52. IRS Paid at Least $13 Billion in Improper Tax Credits -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Internal Revenue Service paid more than $13 billion in tax credits last year to people who may not have qualified, a government investigator said Tuesday.

The Earned Income Tax Credits were supposed to go to low-income working families.

53. Wal-Mart Jumps Into the Money Transfer Biz, Loudly -

NEW YORK (AP) – Wal-Mart is delving deeper into financial services at its stores and shaking up the money transfer business.

The world's largest retailer introduced a new money transfer service Thursday that it says will cut fees for its low-income customers by up to 50 percent compared with similar services elsewhere. The Walmart-2-Walmart service is being rolled out in partnership with Ria Money Transfer, a subsidiary of Euronet Worldwide Inc.

54. Council Questions Five-Year Wharton Plan -

It’s usually a quick bottom line for any local government budget proposal – does it mean a property tax hike?

The $596 million operating budget submitted to the Memphis City Council Tuesday, April 15, by Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. does not include a property tax hike.

55. IRS Says Tennesseans Owed $12.8 Million for 2010 -

The Internal Revenue Service says more than 16,000 Tennesseans who didn’t file their tax returns in 2010 are due refunds totaling more than $12.8 million.

The IRS says those who are owed refunds have a deadline of April 15 to file their 2010 tax return in order to collect the money.

56. Health Care Law Has Uneven Impact on Companies -

Sarah Curtis-Fawley will have to offer insurance to her workers at Pacific Pie Co. because of the health care overhaul, and the estimated $100,000 cost means she may have to raise prices or postpone opening a third restaurant.

57. IRS Says Tennesseans Owed $12.8 Million for 2010 -

The Internal Revenue Service says more than 16,000 Tennesseans who didn’t file their tax returns in 2010 are due refunds totaling more than $12.8 million.

The IRS says those who are owed refunds have a deadline of April 15 to file their 2010 tax return in order to collect the money.

58. CDC Leaders Have Challenges in Communities -

Community development corporations are designed to help create more housing in areas where investors and banks might not normally invest without incentives.

But the CDCs, as they are known, are increasingly in the business of adding business development to the housing in a combination of community building.

59. 10 Things to Know About Haslam's $32.6 Billion Budget -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Here's 10 items you should know about Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam's $32.6 billion spending proposal for the budget year beginning in July:

DRIVE TO 55: The governor is proposing to waive tuition to two-year colleges in the state as part of his "Drive to 55" campaign to increase higher education graduation rates from the current 32 percent to 55 percent by 2025. The program would be paid for through an endowment created with lottery reserve money. He has also earmarked $15 million in new spending toward the effort.

60. Detractors Call Ballpark Deal Part of Larger ‘Quagmire’ -

Memphis City Council member Wanda Halbert calls it a “serious quagmire.”

And City Hall probably isn’t out of it with last week’s council approval of the AutoZone Park deal.

“Over the last two years, the mayor has come to the council … and said we are financially strapped,” Halbert said on the WKNO-TV program “Behind The Headlines.” “We’ve got to reduce service, raise taxes. The people are saying how are we consistently finding money to do some of these other projects. But we can’t pave streets like we need to.”

61. Council Approves Ballpark Deal -

Memphis City Council members approved the city’s $19.5 million purchase of AutoZone Park Tuesday, Jan. 7, and another $4.5 million in improvements to the baseball park.

The deal includes the St. Louis Cardinals buying the Memphis Redbirds franchise and entering into a 17-year lease with the city of Memphis at $300,000 a year.

62. Debt and Liability -

There is rarely a good answer to the question “How much?” in politics.

With issues including the unfunded pension liability, overall debt, and revenue estimates and their validity, City Hall’s overall money problem begins but hardly ends with the question. It won’t be that simple.

63. Congress OKs New IRS Chief, Ends Turbulent Year -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A cross Congress ended its business for the year Friday as the Senate approved a new boss for the troubled Internal Revenue Service but remained slowed and bitterly riven over majority Democrats' weakening of Republicans' power to filibuster.

64. Bipartisan Budget Agreement Nears Final Passage -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Senate lined up Wednesday to give final congressional approval to legislation scaling back across-the-board cuts on programs ranging from the Pentagon to the national park system, adding a late dusting of bipartisanship to a year more likely to be remembered for a partial government shutdown and near-perpetual gridlock.

65. City Council Questions Pension Plan -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. plans to ask the Memphis City Council sometime in February or March to close the city’s defined benefits pension plan to new hires and those city employees with less than 10 years of service.

66. Council Opens Unfunded Liability Plan Talks With Questions -

Memphis City Council members again rejected Tuesday, Dec. 17, an increase in the city’s monthly solid waste fee and affirmed a 2.1 percent hike in the Memphis Light Gas and Water Division water rate hike.

67. Ending Tax Breaks Eyed as Way to Ease Budget Cuts -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Democrats' new mantra in budget talks is to close tax loopholes for certain businesses, investors and professionals as a way to raise more revenue to help ease autopilot spending cuts that soon are to become more painful.

68. Negotiators Report Little Progress in Budget Talks -

WASHINGTON (AP) – House and Senate budget negotiators say they're not close to an agreement but plan to keep at it.

"We're trying to find common ground but we're not there yet," said House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan, R-Wis. He said Republicans and Democrats have spent lots of time in the recent past airing their differences but it's now time to find a way to strike an accord. "The hard part is figuring out where we agree," Ryan said.

69. Report: IRS Refunded $4 Billion to Identity Thieves -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Internal Revenue Service issued $4 billion in fraudulent tax refunds last year to people using stolen identities, with some of the money going to addresses in Bulgaria, Lithuania and Ireland, according to a Treasury report released Thursday.

70. ‘Pro-Business’ -

The explosive population growth and business-friendly environment in DeSoto County have combined to transform its formerly sleepy suburbs into thriving retail and industrial development centers.

Today, Goodman Road looks more and more like a busy commercial strip in Memphis, and DeSoto County has become the favored location for large industrial developers.

71. ‘Pro-Business Environment’ -

The explosive population growth and business-friendly environment in DeSoto County have combined to transform its formerly sleepy suburbs into thriving retail and industrial development centers.

Today, Goodman Road looks more and more like a busy commercial strip in Memphis, and DeSoto County has become the favored location for large industrial developers.

72. Both Sides Agree: No Major Budget Deal Foreseen -

WASHINGTON (AP) — On this, GOP budget guru Rep. Paul Ryan and top Senate Democrat Harry Reid can agree: There won't be a "grand bargain" on the budget.

73. Shelby County Schools To Apply For Head Start Funding -

Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson said Monday, Oct. 14, the school system will apply for $23 million in federal Head Start funding that now goes to Shelby County government.

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell said Monday, Oct. 14, Porter-Leath children’s service will also make a bid for the Head Start contract county government now operates.

74. Flinn, Whalum Differ on Sales Tax Hike Ballot Question -

To Memphis City Council member Shea Flinn, the only uncertainty about the proposed citywide half-cent sales tax hike on the Nov. 21 ballot is the outcome of the vote.

To former Shelby County Schools board member Rev. Kenneth Whalum, nothing in the ballot question comes close to assuring the money will cover prekindergarten expansion costs the tax is supposed to guarantee.

75. Council Gives Conditional OK to Southbrook Funding -

Memphis City Council members approved Tuesday, Oct. 1, $1.5 million in capital funding for renovations to Southbrook Mall in Whitehaven that are contingent on a legal opinion from the city attorney’s office on whether the use of the bond money amounts to a private use that is prohibited by the federal tax code.

76. City Council Gives Conditional Approval to Southbrook Mall Funding -

Memphis City Council members approved Tuesday, Oct. 1, $1.5 million in capital funding for renovations to Southbrook Mall in Whitehaven that are contingent on a legal opinion from the city attorney’s office on whether the use of the bond money amounts to a private use that is prohibited by the federal tax code.

77. Council Delays Sanitation Changes -

Memphis City Council members put off a final vote Tuesday, Oct. 1, on raising the city’s monthly solid waste fee until December citing an upcoming fix to the city’s pension fund liability crisis.

78. Airlines Promise a Return to Civility, For a Fee -

NEW YORK (AP) – Airlines are introducing a new bevy of fees, but this time passengers might actually like them.

Unlike the first generation of charges which dinged fliers for once-free services like checking a bag, these new fees promise a taste of the good life, or at least a more civil flight.

79. Arkansas Prepares to Launch Insurance Market -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – After two elections and two legislative sessions that were centered on the federal health care overhaul, Arkansas is preparing to implement a key part of the 2010 health law with the launch of its online insurance marketplace.

80. In Government Shutdown, Obamacare Just Rolls On -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Republicans pulling on the budget thread can't neatly unravel President Barack Obama's health care law.

A partial government shutdown next week would leave the major parts of the law in place and rolling along, according to former Democratic and Republican budget officials, as well as the Obama administration itself. Health care markets for the uninsured would open as scheduled on Tuesday.

81. Career Shift Lands Fish in Financial Planning -

To hear the way she speaks of Memphis, and to know the many ways in which she works to better her community, one would never guess that Kathy Fish was not born and raised right here.

82. Schools Move Focus to Early Childhood -

The date still isn’t firm for the Nov. 21 ballot. But the campaign for a half-cent hike in the city’s sales tax rate to fund an expansion of pre-kindergarten in the city of Memphis is underway.

So are the complications that have been a close companion of the idea since it was first proposed a year ago and approved by the Memphis City Council.

83. Mo’ Money Taxes Barred From Operating -

MEMPHIS (AP) – A federal judge has issued a permanent injunction prohibiting the owners and a former manager of a tax preparation service from running such a business and from preparing tax returns for other people.

84. IRS Collections From Enforcement Actions Drop -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A Treasury investigator says tax collections from reluctant taxpayers dropped for the second straight year in 2012.

The Treasury inspector general for tax administration says budget cuts at the Internal Revenue Service are resulting in lower revenues for the federal government. The IG released a report Tuesday that says tax collections from enforcement actions dropped by 9 percent in the 2012 budget year, to a little more than $50 billion.

85. Some Employers See Perks of Hiring Older Workers -

Older people searching for jobs have long fought back stereotypes that they lack the speed, technology skills and dynamism of younger applicants. But as a wave of baby boomers seeks to stay on the job later in life, some employers are finding older workers are precisely what they need.

86. Applying for Health Insurance? Homework Involved -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Getting covered through President Barack Obama's health care law might feel like a combination of doing your taxes and making a big purchase that requires research.

You'll need accurate income information for your household, plus some understanding of how health insurance works, so you can get the financial assistance you qualify for and pick a health plan that's right for your needs.

87. Postal Service Had $740 Million Third-Quarter Loss -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Postal Service has trimmed its losses to $740 million over the last three months by consolidating processing facilities, cutting hours for workers and post offices and reducing workers' compensation costs, the agency said Friday.

88. Salomon Helps Clients Navigate Estate Planning -

For Jason Salomon, an attorney with the trusts estate and personal planning service team of Wyatt, Tarrant & Combs LLP, the kinetic needs of his clients and the challenges turned into opportunities keep him involved and excited on a daily basis.

89. Commissioner Harvey Home to Stay -

As the Shelby County Commission began debating whether or not property tax rates caused homeowners and small-business owners to move out of the county, one commissioner was preparing to move to Dallas.

90. Senate Moves Forward on Transportation Spending -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A $108 billion measure that would boost funding for infrastructure projects and housing subsidies for the poor is moving ahead in the Senate.

The measure cleared a procedural hurdle by a bipartisan 73-26 vote Tuesday, and that sets up days of debate with the goal of passing the measure next week.

91. Council Delays Referendums and OKs Alarm Fee Hike -

Memphis City Council members delayed Tuesday, July 16, several items that would have called for special referendum elections in this off-election year for Memphis voters.

The council delayed final votes to set referendums on civil service changes as well as on a proposed half-percent sales tax hike.

92. Council Delays Referendums, Approves Hike in Alarm Fees -

Memphis City Council members delayed Tuesday, July 16, several items that would have called for special referendum elections in this off-election year for Memphis voters.

The council delayed final votes to set referendums on civil service changes as well as on a proposed half-percent sales tax hike.

93. Council Ponders Use of Reserve To Keep Fire Station Open -

Memphis City Council member considered briefly Tuesday, July 16, using $1.1 million from the $48 million city reserve fund to keep a North Memphis fire station open.

But they dropped the idea after Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. agreed to keep Fire Station #6, on Danny Thomas Boulevard north of Chelsea Avenue open at least until Labor Day.

94. Memphis Tax Rate Sparks Revenue Debate -

The city should have some extra money when the end of the next fiscal year comes on June 30, according to Memphis City Council member Harold Collins.

95. Commission Begins Work on New Tax Rate -

Shelby County Commissioners have several important questions to consider Wednesday, July 17, in committee sessions, all of them having to do with that most volatile of political questions – taxes.

More than two weeks into the new fiscal year, Shelby County government has no new property tax rate. The commission last week on third and final reading voted down the $4.38 tax rate proposed by Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell.

96. Council Eyes September Special Election -

Memphis City Council members continue a shift away from budget season Tuesday, July 16, with an agenda that includes allocating some money from the last fiscal year and other money for the new fiscal year.

97. GOP-Led House Seeks to Punish IRS With Budget Cuts -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The GOP-controlled House unveiled slashing cuts to the budget of the Internal Revenue Service on Tuesday, punishing the beleaguered agency after it targeted tea party groups and other nonprofits seeking tax-exempt status.

98. Health Insurers Fear Young People Will Opt Out -

MIAMI (AP) – Dan Lopez rarely gets sick and hasn't been to a doctor in 10 years, so buying health insurance feels like a waste of money.

99. Property Tax Hike Highlights New City Budget -

Memphis City Council members raised the city property tax rate Tuesday, June 26, by 4 cents above the recertified tax rate and put the rest of a turbulent budget season to rest.

The approval of the $3.40 property tax rate and city operating and capital budgets came in a council session that ended at 12:30 a.m. Wednesday morning.

100. Second Round Council Budget Plans Emerge -

Memphis City Council chairman Edmund Ford Jr. and council members Harold Collins and Lee Harris will have plans for the full council to consider when the body meets Tuesday, June 25, in special session.