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Editorial Results (free)

1. ABA President Silkenat Shares Notion Of ‘Civil Gideon’ -

The president of the American Bar Association sees at least a discussion on the way about a “civil Gideon” – a requirement that a citizen who cannot afford an attorney in a civil court proceeding should have one appointed by the court.

2. American Bar Association President Visits Memphis -

American Bar Association President James Silkenat is in Memphis Tuesday, April 15, for a speech at the Memphis Rotary Club and to visit Memphis Area Legal Services.

Silkenat is a partner in the New York law office of the national law firm of Sullivan & Worcester.

3. 2 Brokers Take Majority Stake in Colliers Memphis -

Two longtime members of Colliers International's Memphis office have taken a majority stake in the real estate company.

Andy Cates, executive vice president of brokerage, and Brad Kornegay, CEO of Colliers Management Services LLC, are now the majority shareholders in the two legal entities that make up the Memphis office.

4. Commission Budget Season Begins Quietly -

Shelby County Commissioners began their budget season quietly with a first look in committee sessions last week at a $1.2 billion consolidated county budget proposal by Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell.

5. Cates, Kornegay Take Majority Stake in Colliers’ Memphis Office -

Two longtime members of Colliers International's Memphis office have taken a majority stake in the real estate company.

Andy Cates, executive vice president of brokerage, and Brad Kornegay, CEO of Colliers Management Services LLC, are now the majority shareholders in the two legal entities that make up the Memphis office.

6. Medicare Database Reveals Top-Paid Doctors -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Medicare paid a tiny group of doctors $3 million or more apiece in 2012. One got nearly $21 million.

Those are among the findings of an Associated Press analysis of physician data released Wednesday by the Obama administration, part of a move to open the books on health care financing.

7. Race Judicata 5K To be Held Saturday -

The Race Judicata 5K fundraiser for Memphis Area Legal Services will be held Saturday, April 5, at 5 p.m. at Downtown’s Mississippi River Park.

The annual race is hosted by the Student Bar Association at the University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law.

8. Events -

National Civil Rights Museum will host a community day and grand reopening Saturday, April 5. The event includes a 9:30 a.m. Freedom Forward Parade from Cook Convention Center to the museum, 450 Mulberry St. Visit civilrightsmuseum.org.

9. Race Judicata 5K to be Held Saturday -

The Race Judicata 5K fundraiser for Memphis Area Legal Services will be held Saturday, April 5, at 5 p.m. at Downtown’s Mississippi River Park.

The annual race is hosted by the Student Bar Association at the University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law.

10. Events -

National Civil Rights Museum will host a candlelight vigil honoring the life of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Friday, April 4, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. in the museum courtyard, 450 Mulberry St. Cost is free. Visit civilrightsmuseum.org.

11. Council Unhappy With Budget Plans So Far -

The administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. got a rough reception at the Tuesday, April 1, Memphis City Council session as it set the stage for Wharton’s budget proposal to come in two weeks.

12. Clash of Contenders -

Shelby County Commissioner Steve Mulroy says his political plans last year didn’t include running for county mayor in 2014.

He was on U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen’s short list of recommendations for an open federal judgeship, a White House appointment he said he knew he might not get “the first time.”

13. Millions Could Get Extra Time for Health Sign-Ups -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Millions of Americans could get extra time to enroll for taxpayer-subsidized coverage this year under President Barack Obama's health care law. That would let the administration boost sign-ups and aid Democrats under attack over the program's troubles.

14. Backlog Backlash -

The first thing Veronica Coleman-Davis wanted to do was take a look at where thousands of untested rape kits had been stored over the last 30 years.

The former U.S. attorney is investigating how the backlog came to be. It’s an effort that, until her appointment in February by Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr., had been pointed at clearing the backlog with no answers from any of the players in the criminal justice system about how the backlog happened in the first place.

15. Events -

SHRM-Memphis will hold a legal seminar for human resources professionals Tuesday, March 18, from 8 a.m. to noon at the Fogelman Executive Center, 330 Innovation Drive. Attorneys from four firms will explore hot topics, trends and practical approaches to preventing and managing labor and employment law issues. Cost is $80 for members, $85 for nonmembers and $35 for students. Visit shrm-memphis.org.

16. Events -

The Daily News will hold a free breakfast seminar on monitoring, protecting and growing your business with The Daily News Online March 19, 9 a.m.-10 a.m. at the Germantown Conf. Center, 1900 S. Germantown Pkwy. Attendees receive a free five-day trial of Daily News Online services. RSVP at seminars.memphisdailynews.com.

17. Wells Joins Evans Petree as Associate -

Julie Wells has joined Evans Petree PC as an associate in the East Memphis office, focusing her practice in health care law and general business matters. She previously worked at Baptist Medical Group, where she played an integral role in physician practice acquisitions and contractual-related matters.

18. Wedding Services Bill Dead This Session -

NASHVILLE (AP) – A proposal to protect wedding-related businesses from lawsuits if they refuse to provide services to same-sex couples is dead for the session after being withdrawn from a Senate committee on Tuesday.

19. Ellis Joins State Systems As Sales Executive -

Alisa Ellis has joined State Systems Inc. as a low voltage sales executive. She brings 16 years of telecommunications experience to the company, which offers protection products and services, including fire protection equipment, training and cleaning services, as well as technology services such as network integration, cabling systems and wireless support.

20. City Council Reviews Raleigh Springs Mall Plan -

Memphis City Council members get their first public detailed look Tuesday, Feb. 4, of an “urban renewal” plan for the Raleigh Springs Mall.

The council meets at 3:30 p.m. at City Hall, 125 N. Main St. Follow the meeting @tdnpols, www.twitter.com/tdnpols.

21. Espitia Joins Michael Hatcher as Chief Financial Officer -

Ed Espitia has joined Michael Hatcher & Associates Inc. as chief financial officer. Espitia comes to the Memphis-based landscape services firm after serving since 2010 as finance manager for Schulz Xtruded Products, a Germany-based pipe maker with operations in North Mississippi.

22. Shankman-Cohn to Lead Interior Design Coalition -

Leslie Shankman-Cohn has been elected the 2014 president of the Tennessee Interior Design Coalition, a statewide coalition committed, through legislative and regulatory endeavors, to enhance and protect the right to practice interior design. Shankman-Cohn is a partner in Jill Hertz Interior Design, a division of Eclectic Interiors. She specializes in custom-designed furniture, space planning, furnishings and finishes specifications, universal design, Aging in Style and sustainable design issues.

23. Association for Women Attorneys to Host Annual Banquet -

In less than a month, the Association for Women Attorneys will host its annual bash that includes a silent auction, cocktail reception and an award presented to a prominent member of the legal community.

24. Dickerson to Carry Tradition of Service as Young Lawyers Division President -

Jake Dickerson, associate with Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz PC, is the incoming 2014 president for the Young Lawyers Division of the Memphis Bar Association.

The division arranges and hosts continuing legal education seminars, networking events, pro bono opportunities and fundraisers such as the annual golf tournament benefiting the Porter Goodwill Branch of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Memphis. MBA members 36 years or younger, or within their first three years of practice, are automatically members of the division.

25. Van Vliet Takes on Roles at UT Medical, The MED -

Dr. Michael M. Van Vliet has joined the department of plastic surgery at UT Medical Group, has been named assistant professor at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center and has been appointed director of burn critical care for the Firefighters Regional Burn Center at The Regional Medical Center at Memphis.

26. Veterans’ Aid -

Cordell Walker wanted to join the military in the 1960s as his older friends were enlisting or being drafted for the Vietnam War.

“I really wanted to join the military but could not because I was the only son in my family and I was too young,” said Walker, who for the last 26 years has been executive director of Alpha Omega Veterans Services Inc.

27. Tech Firms Vie to Protect Personal Data, Profits -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Even as Silicon Valley speaks out against the U.S. government's surveillance methods, technology companies are turning a handsome profit by mining personal data and peering into people's online habits.

28. US Consumer Spending Up 0.3 Percent in October -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. consumers increased their spending in October even though their wages and salaries barely increased, raising questions about how strong the economy will grow at the end of the year.

29. Silva Strikes Right Chord With Immigration Practice -

Tony Silva with Donati Law Firm LLP grew up in Nashville and with a background in music. He left the Music City for the University of Memphis as a classical performance major, with plans to become a performer and professor. He would go on to receive bachelor’s, master’s and doctorate degrees in music performance in classical piano before taking a turn towards law.

30. Leadership Selections Next for Suburban School Boards -

For five of the six municipal schools boards that began taking office this week, their only formal involvement in the talks that led to agreements on school buildings and ending the federal lawsuit that threatened to hold up their start dates was to approve the agreements already negotiated.

31. Amazon.com Sees Delivery Drones as Future -

NEW YORK (AP) – Amazon.com is working on a way to get packages to customers in 30 minutes or less – via self-guided drone.

Consider it the modern version of a pizza delivery boy, minus the boy.

32. Rainey Kizer’s Dexter Named Board Chair for Girls Inc. -

Latosha Dexter, an attorney with Rainey Kizer Reviere & Bell PLC, has been named board chair of Girls Inc. of Memphis, as well as the organization’s Mentor of the Year.

33. Suburban Leaders Turn to Schools Details -

Shelby County Schools board members have schools agreements with suburban leaders in Bartlett, Collierville and Millington on their agenda Tuesday, Nov. 26, a week after approving the same type of agreements with different dollar amounts with Arlington and Lakeland.

34. Pote Builds Bridges Through Seedco Community Work -

Seedco is a national nonprofit whose mission statement since 1987 has been “to advance economic opportunity for people, businesses and communities in need.”

This is done, says Lisa Pote, senior vice president for Seedco’s Mid-South regional office, by working with individuals and businesses, and within the communities themselves, “to be a contribution to the communities that we’re in.” Seedco has been working within Shelby County since 2004, and has 30 employees.

35. Council OKs Crosstown, Debates Schools Lawsuit -

Memphis City Council members approved the Crosstown planned development Tuesday, Nov. 19, marking the latest move through local government for the $180 million project with construction scheduled to begin late this year or early next year.

36. Governments Mining Google for More Personal Data -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Google is rebuffing governments more frequently as authorities in the U.S. and other countries get more aggressive about mining the Internet for information about people's online activities.

37. County Trustee Launches Workshop for Seniors -

Shelby County Trustee David Lenoir is introducing a new workshop series for seniors.

Titled “Home Sweet Home,” it focuses on things such as property taxes and the importance of properly transferring real estate to heirs.

38. Kelly Garners Accolade for Pro Bono Work -

To wrap up October as Pro Bono Month, Pamela Williams Kelly of the Law Offices of Pamela Kelly was presented with the Celebrate Pro Bono Award from the Memphis Bar Association Access to Justice Committee and the Memphis Area Legal Services Pro Bono Project.

39. Law School Draws Honors, High-Profile Speakers -

From a slew of high-profile guests who’ve come to speak over the past year, to a string of recent awards, to a U.S. Supreme Court justice’s visit next month, it could be argued the University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law is having a moment.

40. Few Options for Obama to Fix Cancellations Problem -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama says he'll do everything he can to help people coping with health insurance cancellations, but legally and practically his options appear limited.

41. Kinard Elected President of State Attorneys Association -

Christy Kinard, governmental affairs and professional standards director for the Memphis Area Association of Realtors, has been elected president of the Tennessee County Attorneys Association.

42. Events -

The West Tennessee Home Builders Association will hold the 2013 Fall Vesta Home Show Saturday, Nov. 9, to Dec. 1 at the St. James Place development in Germantown. General admission is $12. Visit vestahomeshow.com for hours and parking information.

43. Council Keeps Southbrook Mall Renovation Alive -

Memphis City Council members voted Tuesday, Nov. 5, to start over again in plans to find a legal use for city funds in renovating the Southbrook Mall in Whitehaven.

And the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. gave a qualified endorsement through what amounts to a new feasibility study on the mall due before the council in a month.

44. Kinard Elected President of Tennessee Attorneys Association -

Christy Kinard, governmental affairs and professional standards director for the Memphis Area Association of Realtors, has been elected president of the Tennessee County Attorneys Association.

45. Council to Talk Over Convention Center Study -

Memphis City Council members talk Tuesday, Nov. 5, about setting up a study committee with county leaders on expanding the Memphis Cook Convention Center. And the council will vote on $7.5 million in capital funding to kick off city plans to redevelop the Raleigh Springs Mall property.

46. 3 Memphians Among State Supreme Court Applicants -

Two Memphis judges and a Shelby County Commissioner are among the five applicants for a vacancy on the Tennessee Supreme Court.

Criminal Court Judge Chris Craft, Tennessee Court of Appeals Judge Holly M. Kirby and Shelby County Commissioner Steve Mulroy have submitted applications to the Governor’s Commission on Judicial Appointments, the newly formed body that will send a list of three finalists to Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam.

47. Children’s Services No Longer Removing Children Without Hearing -

NASHVILLE (AP) – The Tennessee Department of Children's Services says case workers can no longer remove children from homes without a hearing in court.

The Tennessean (http://tnne.ws/1f694tI) reports the agency told employees this month about the change, which comes on the heels of a pair of U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals opinions that said case workers have to abide by a constitutional amendment that guarantees people the right against searches and seizures without a warrant.

48. Trial Starts; Is Detroit Eligible for Bankruptcy? -

DETROIT (AP) — An attorney representing Detroit urged a judge Wednesday to allow the city to fix staggering financial problems through bankruptcy, arguing that without it nearly 65 cents of every tax dollar eventually would be gobbled up by debts and other obligations.

49. Catholic Charities Launches Program For Homeless Veterans -

This month Catholic Charities of West Tennessee launches a new program called St. Sebastian Veteran Services to provide critical assistance to homeless veterans and their families and to those facing imminent eviction or foreclosure.

50. Meyers Returns to Roots at Glankler Brown -

Robert Meyers has joined Glankler Brown PLLC as a member, and it isn’t his first time around this block. He worked for the firm as a newly licensed attorney right out of law school.

51. Wells Fargo's Profit Up 13 Percent; Revenue Slips -

Third-quarter profit for Wells Fargo & Co., the biggest U.S. mortgage lender, jumped 13 percent as a decline in revenue from mortgage lending was offset by reduced expenses and fewer soured loans.

52. City Pension Crisis Meets Sanitation Overhaul -

The city’s looming pension liability crisis and the proposed solution to it intersected Tuesday, Oct. 1, with a plan to overhaul city sanitation services and, in the process, provide a pension supplement to sanitation workers.

53. Council Delays Sanitation Changes -

Memphis City Council members put off a final vote Tuesday, Oct. 1, on raising the city’s monthly solid waste fee until December citing an upcoming fix to the city’s pension fund liability crisis.

54. Under Fire, 'Obamacare' Going Live – With Glitches -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Contentious from its conception, President Barack Obama's health care law has survived the Supreme Court, a battle for the White House and rounds of budget brinkmanship. Now comes the ultimate test: the verdict of the American people.

55. County Commission Sees Calmer Session -

Ruffled feelings on the Shelby County Commission earlier this month were smoothed for the most part Monday, Sept. 23, as James Harvey chaired the second meeting of his yearlong term as commission chairman.

56. Applying for Health Insurance? Homework Involved -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Getting covered through President Barack Obama's health care law might feel like a combination of doing your taxes and making a big purchase that requires research.

You'll need accurate income information for your household, plus some understanding of how health insurance works, so you can get the financial assistance you qualify for and pick a health plan that's right for your needs.

57. 'Obamacare' Contractors Project Confidence -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Major contractors hooking up the internal plumbing of President Barack Obama's health care law projected confidence Tuesday that they will be ready to go by an Oct. 1 deadline, even though the system is still being tested.

58. Incubator Launches to Assist Young Lawyers -

The University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law, in partnership with the Memphis Bar Association and the Service Corps of Retired Executives, has announced the launch of a new incubator program for young attorneys.

59. Masson’s Role Just One Chapter in Merger -

Six months after he took on the assignment of special master to the Shelby County schools merger, Rick Masson’s job is over for U.S. District Judge Samuel “Hardy” Mays.

“The transfer contemplated by the consent decree has been accomplished,” Mays wrote in his order Wednesday, Sept. 4. “The special master has performed his duties fairly and efficiently, and his duties have been completed.”

60. August 30-September 5, 2013: This week in Memphis history -

2008: The Levitt Shell in Overton Park opened its inaugural concert season with Amy LaVere and Justin Townes Earle following a $1.3 million renovation that improved the sound system and took out the shell’s benches in favor of an open green area.

61. UBS Creating Nashville Hub, Adding 1,000 Jobs -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Financial services firm UBS AG on Wednesday announced it will consolidate back office functions in Nashville, creating 1,000 jobs in the city over the next five years.

62. Pilot Settlement Plaintiff Denies Conflict -

The head of a group formed for the purpose of filing a lawsuit against a truck stop chain run by the family of Tennessee’s governor and the owner of the Cleveland Browns said Thursday it is not a shell corporation established to ensure the company reached a favorable settlement.

63. Car Company's Tunica Plans Haven't Come to Fruition -

TUNICA, Miss. (AP) – It seemed like a win for everyone involved when a startup car company, backed by political heavyweights, wooed investors with plans to build a massive auto plant in the Mississippi Delta, hire thousands of people and pump out a brand new line of fuel-efficient vehicles.

64. Legislature to Explore Annexation Votes -

The Tennessee legislature has put a moratorium on annexations, and even if the moratorium wasn’t in place, the Memphis City Council hasn’t been anxious to annex any territory beyond South Cordova for several years.

65. Salomon Helps Clients Navigate Estate Planning -

For Jason Salomon, an attorney with the trusts estate and personal planning service team of Wyatt, Tarrant & Combs LLP, the kinetic needs of his clients and the challenges turned into opportunities keep him involved and excited on a daily basis.

66. Rhodes Program Spotlights Community Service -

Rhodes College’s efforts to make community involvement an important part of student life was recently on display with its second annual REACH (Research, Engagement, and Community History) Symposium held in the Blount Auditorium of Buckman Hall.

67. FedEx Will Pay $21.5 Million to Settle Class Action -

FedEx Corp. agreed to pay $21.5 million to settle a 2011 class action that alleged the world’s largest cargo airline overcharged non-residential customers – including businesses and governments – higher residential shipping rates.

68. School Board Vacancy to be Filled in August -

Shelby County Commissioners plan to fill the vacancy on the countywide school board from the resignation of Reginald Porter at the Aug. 19 meeting.

69. School Board Vacancy to Be Filled in August -

Shelby County Commissioners plan to fill the vacancy on the countywide school board from the resignation of Reginald Porter at the Aug. 19 meeting.

70. Issues of County Budget Season Remain -

The Shelby County property tax rate of $4.38 is ready for the tax bills that are to go out starting later this month.

But with the county budget season now over, some of the major themes of the Shelby County Commission’s debate over taxes are likely to remain in play.

71. Commission Approves $4.38 Property Tax Rate -

Shelby County Commissioners approved a $4.38 county property tax rate Monday, July 22, ending a budget season that spilled into the first 22 days of the new fiscal year.

The key to the 7-5 vote on third and final reading of the ordinance was Commissioner Justin Ford changing his “no” vote earlier this month back to a “yes” vote and Commissioner Sidney Chism announcing he would no longer abstain from voting on the matter because of a day care center his family operates.

72. New Report: State Must Improve Response to Trafficking Victims -

NASHVILLE (AP) – A new state study shows Tennessee must improve its response to victims of human trafficking for recent changes in law to be effective.

The state legislature passed a series of statutes aimed at harsher punishment of people convicted of coercing adults and children into sexual servitude. Effective July 1, a dozen anti-trafficking statutes took effect. There are stronger penalties for traffickers and a longer period of time during which offenders can be charged.

73. Commission Tries Again to Set County Tax Rate -

Shelby County Commissioners try again Monday, July 22, to set a county property tax rate for the fiscal year that began July 1.

And they will start consideration of the issue with a proposed $4.38 tax rate backed by Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell on the second of three readings.

74. House GOP Presses Delay in Health Care Law -

WASHINGTON (AP) – House Republicans pressed ahead Wednesday on delaying key components of President Barack Obama's signature health care law, emboldened by the administration's concession that requiring companies to provide coverage for their workers next year may be too complicated.

75. Wal-Mart Faceoff With DC Fuels Minimum Wage Debate -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The bitter standoff between Wal-Mart and Washington, D.C. officials over the city's effort to impose a higher minimum wage on big-box retailers is fueling a wider debate about how far cities should go in trying to raise pay for low-wage workers – and whether larger companies should be required to pay more.

76. Trade Secrets: Important Assets -

Just as patents and trademarks are important assets for a company, so are trade secrets. But trade secrets seldom generate much attention, mostly because there isn’t a federal registration system that formalizes and protects them. Yet, a trade secret is a valuable part of the manufacturing process since it is part of a product’s signature and, as such, can distinguish a company’s product from its competitors, as would a trademark or patented feature.

77. Icahn to Seek Court Appraisal of $24.4 Billion Dell Deal -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Billionaire investor Carl Icahn will ask a judge to assess the fairness of a proposed $24.4 billion acquisition of struggling personal computer maker Dell in his latest attempt to wrangle a higher price from a group of buyers that includes company CEO Michael Dell.

78. Judicial Election Process Muddied -

The Judicial Nominating Commission had a busy last few days before it went into limbo last week.

The commission sent Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam two slates for each of the three appeals court vacancies to come a year and two months from now when three appellate court judges opt not to run for re-election and end their terms.

79. Events -

Memphis Area Legal Services, AutoZone Inc. and Bass, Berry & Sims PLC will hold the fifth annual pro bono legal clinic for Memphis-area seniors Tuesday, July 2, from 10 a.m. to noon at Orange Mound Senior Center, 2590 Park Ave. The free clinic offers seniors legal advice and helps in the preparation of wills, advanced care plans and more. Call Linda Warren Seely at 523-8822.

80. New Mississippi Laws Cover Wide Range of Issues -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Several new laws go into effect on Monday in Mississippi, including one to more clearly define that people have the right to openly carry guns in many public places.

81. Events -

The Cooper-Young Business Association will feature Standby for Mars as part of the Red Hot Summer concert series Wednesday, July 3, from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. in the gazebo at Cooper Street and Young Avenue. Cost is free. Visit cooperyoung.biz.

82. Events -

Downtown Memphis Commission, Victorian Village Inc. and the Association for the Preservation of Tennessee Antiquities will host a launch party for the James Lee House renovation Monday, July 1, from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. at the house, 690 Adams Ave. Visit downtownmemphiscommission.com.

83. Hancock Helps Employers Avoid Legal Landmines -

Jonathan Hancock, partner and shareholder in Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz PC’s labor and employment practice group, feels fortunate to have been instructed in employment law by current Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. while attending law school at the University of Mississippi in the mid-1990s.

84. Events -

The South Main Art Trolley Tour will be held Friday, June 28, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. in the South Main Historic Arts District. Email info@southmainmemphis.net.

85. Slower US Growth Might Lead Fed to Delay Tapering -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy may not be strong enough for the Federal Reserve to slow its bond purchases later this year.

That's the takeaway from economists after the government cut its estimate Wednesday of growth in the January-March quarter to a 1.8 percent annual rate, sharply below its previous estimate of a 2.4 percent rate. The main reason: Consumers spent less than previously thought.

86. US Economy Grows at 1.8 Percent Rate in First Quarter -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy grew at an annual rate of 1.8 percent in the first three months of the year, significantly slower than first thought. The steep revision occurred mostly because consumers spent less than previously estimated, a sign that higher taxes could be dampening growth.

87. House Investigators: Disability Judges are Too Lax -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Social Security is approving disability benefits at strikingly high rates for people whose claims were rejected by field offices or state agencies, according to House investigators. Compounding the situation, the agency often fails to do required follow-up reviews months or years later to make sure people are still disabled.

88. Five Years in the Life -

Delta Airlines and Northwest Airlines has just merged with more than 150 flights a day at Memphis International Airport shifting to the Delta brand. And Delta’s CEO, Richard Anderson, said Memphis would be an integral hub with more traffic.

89. Ebelhar Finds Rewards In Move From Classroom -

Jay Ebelhar was recently elected shareholder of Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz PC.

The Owensboro, Ky., native attended Bellarmine University in Louisville where he studied English and secondary education. He went on to teach high school English, public speaking and journalism. Though he enjoyed his time in front of the classroom, Ebelhar said, “I just didn’t love it, I couldn’t see myself doing it for the rest of my career.”

90. City Council Again Tackles Budget, Tax Rate -

Some Memphis City Council members say they are prepared for a long day Tuesday, June 18, at City Hall as they continue down the arduous path to a tax rate and budget for the coming fiscal year.

“Let’s just be ready to spend the night,” said council member Harold Collins last week. He commented as council-mediated discussions between the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. and municipal union leaders on possible cuts in employee benefits got nowhere quickly and ended after less than an hour.

91. Coverage May be Unaffordable for Low-Wage Workers -

WASHINGTON (AP) – It's called the Affordable Care Act, but President Barack Obama's health care law may turn out to be unaffordable for many low-wage workers, including employees at big chain restaurants, retail stores and hotels.

92. Google Asks to Publish More US Government Information -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Google is asking the Obama administration for permission to disclose more details about the U.S. government's demands for emails and other information that people transmit online.

93. Is Big Data Turning Government Into 'Big Brother'? -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – With every phone call they make and every Web excursion they take, people are leaving a digital trail of revealing data that can be tracked by profit-seeking companies and terrorist-hunting government officials.

94. Children's Services Would Charge $35,000 for Public Records -

The state agency that oversees the welfare of Tennessee children is again at financial odds with news organizations seeking more information.

The Tennessean reported the Department of Children’s Services said this week that it would charge $34,952 to produce public records of children who died or nearly died during the past 11 months after having some contact with DCS.

95. Commission Approves Budget and 1st Reading of Tax Rate -

Shelby County Commissioners approved an operating budget for Shelby County government Monday and approved on the first of three reading a $4.38 property tax rate to fund that budget.

The votes that signal the end of the county’s budget season came after a prolonged commission debate about the basic role of county government.

96. Lawsuit Seeks Restoration Of Confederate Park Names -

A group of nine Memphians called “Citizens To Save Our Parks” is taking the city of Memphis and the Memphis City Council to court over the council’s February decision to temporarily rename three Confederate-themed parks.

97. Lawsuit Seeks Restoration of Confederate Park Names -

A group of nine Memphians called “Citizens To Save Our Parks” is taking the city of Memphis and the Memphis City Council to court over the council’s February decision to temporarily rename three Confederate-themed parks.

98. City Council Mulls Ending Auto Inspections -

Memphis City Council member Lee Harris will propose Tuesday, May 21, exempting Memphis auto owners for two years from required auto emissions inspections.

99. Non-Financial Fraud’s Growing Threat -

Conventional fraud is all too familiar, including misappropriation of assets (better known as employee theft) and financial statement fraud (Enron, WorldCom and Stanford Financial Group).

However, a type of fraud climbing out from under-the-radar status is non-financial fraudulent statements – false or misleading information produced by an organization to the public or regulatory body.

100. Coupé Works to Protect City’s Most Vulnerable -

As supervising attorney over both the Judge’s Action Center and the Office of Advocate for Noncustodial Parents at Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court, Tom Coupé works to ensure that the most vulnerable members of society are being fairly and equally represented.