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Editorial Results (free)

1. Plosser, a Leading Fed 'Hawk,' to Retire in March -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Charles Plosser, a leading inflation "hawk" at the Federal Reserve, announced Monday that he plans to retire March 1.

Plosser, who has been president of the Fed's Philadelphia regional bank since August 2006, has been a leader of the officials known as hawks for their concerns that a continuation of low-interest rate policies could ignite inflation.

2. Education Secretary Praises Local Schools Leaders -

Sustainability is a term associated with environmental efforts, though innovation is a much more popular term across causes from economic development to education reform.

But when U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan came to Memphis this month as the last stop on a three-state bus tour of school districts, it was the word sustainability that came up more often than innovation.

3. Council Could Close Door on Alternative Health Plans -

Memphis City Council members could put to rest alternatives to the health care insurance benefits cuts they approved in June when they meet Tuesday, Sept. 16.

The question is whether they would do that with some kind of vote or indication through discussion or whether they will simply let the June decision stand and take no further votes.

4. Education Secretary Calls for System-Wide Reforms -

U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan saw much that he liked in Memphis Wednesday, Sept. 10, at the end of his three-day “back to school” bus tour of schools in three states.

The last stop was Cornerstone Prep Elementary School in Binghampton.

5. Duncan Bus Tour Ends With Binghampton Kudos -

U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan wrapped up a three-day “back to school” bus tour of schools in several states Wednesday, Sept. 10, at Cornerstone Prep Elementary School in Binghampton.

6. Regional Airlines Not Sharing in Majors' Success -

DALLAS (AP) – For passengers traveling between smaller cities and large hub airports, the ticket may say Delta, American or United, but they're likely flying on a regional airline whose planes are painted in the major carrier's colors.

7. Push for Broader Minority Business Participation Grows -

A larger share of business for minority- and women-owned local businesses should begin with an inventory that matches existing businesses with existing opportunities.

And three leaders of the recently revived effort to build that share of business say from there the local Memphis economy overall can grow.

8. Gov. Haslam's Medicaid Talk Draws GOP Criticism -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam's suggestion this week that he may soon submit a proposal for Medicaid expansion in Tennessee received some blowback from a fellow Republican leader in the Legislature on Friday.

9. Google's Pivotal IPO Launched a Decade of Big Bets -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Google's IPO, a decade ago this week, launched the company on a trajectory that continues to reshape its business and much of the world in its orbit.

And CEO Larry Page is determined to push even further.

10. Congress Races to Finish VA, Highway Bills -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress ran full-tilt into election-year gridlock over immigration Thursday and headed toward a five-week summer break with no agreement in sight on legislation to cope with the influx of young immigrants flocking illegally to the United States.

11. Probe Exposes Flaws Behind HealthCare.gov Rollout -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Management failures by the Obama administration set the stage for the computer woes that paralyzed the president's new health care program last fall, nonpartisan investigators said in testimony released Wednesday.

12. GOP Pushes House Toward Approving Obama Lawsuit -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans pushed a divided House Wednesday toward a campaign-season lawsuit against President Barack Obama, accusing him of deliberately exceeding the bounds of his constitutional authority. Obama and other Democrats derided the effort as a stunt aimed at tossing political red meat to conservative voters.

13. Yellen Rejects Move to Set Up Formula for Fed -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said Wednesday it would be a serious mistake for Congress to require the nation's central bank to adopt a formal policy rule to guide its decisions on setting interest rates.

14. Volkswagen to Build New SUV in Tennessee, Add 2,000 Jobs -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Volkswagen plans to build a new seven-passenger SUV at its factory in Chattanooga, Tennessee, adding about 2,000 factory jobs as it tries to reverse U.S. sales that have fallen for the past two years.

15. Cushman & Wakefield Adds Yates to Capital Markets Team -

Alex Yates has joined the Cushman & Wakefield/Commercial Advisors Capital Markets team as vice president, assisting and executing investment sales, debt/equity placement and development advisory projects. Yates’ efforts will be heavily concentrated in multifamily and retail, but he will focus on other product types as well.

16. Report: Health Law Sign-Ups Dogged by Data Flaws -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Many of the 8 million Americans signed up under the new health care law now have to clear up questions about their personal information that could affect their coverage.

17. Baker’s Career Mirrored State’s Political Story -

As the week begins, political leaders of both parties and across several generations will gather in East Tennessee for the funeral of former U.S. Sen. Howard Baker.

18. New Health Chief Moves to Put Stamp on Overhaul -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Aiming to avoid more insurance chaos this fall, the nation's new health care chief announced Friday she's revamping the management of President Barack Obama's health overhaul.

19. This week in Memphis history: June 20-26 -

2013: FedEx Corp. executives watched as a 727 landed at Memphis International Airport, completing the last flight by a 727 for the company ending the use of the jets by the pioneering Memphis company after 35 years.

20. Wilkins Targets Cohen as ‘Career Politician’ -

Ricky Wilkins told a packed campaign headquarters in Poplar Plaza on a busy campaign weekend that U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen is waging a dirty campaign while complaining that Wilkins is doing the same.

21. This week in Memphis history: June 13-19 -

1993: The model of a statue of blues legend B.B. King was unveiled at B.B. King’s Blues Club on Beale Street. The plan was to install the 18-foot statue in a park on Beale Street similar to the setting for the statue of Elvis Presley. Ultimately, the statue wound up in the visitors center on Riverside Drive, where it remains to this day along with the refurbished Elvis Presley statue that was originally on Beale Street as well. The old Elvis statue was replace by a new statue.

22. Congress, FBI Moving on Veterans Affairs Health Care -

WASHINGTON (AP) – As Congress moves to help thousands of military veterans enduring long wait times for VA medical care, the FBI said it has opened a criminal investigation into the Department of Veterans Affairs.

23. Obama Moves to Extend Student Loan Payment Relief -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Aiming to alleviate the burden of student loan debt, President Barack Obama expanded a program Monday that lets borrowers pay no more than 10 percent of their income every month, and threw his support behind more sweeping Senate legislation targeting the issue.

24. Game Changer -

One educator’s reform is another educator’s wrong move.

Dorsey Hopson doesn’t use the word “reform” as often as he uses the term “game changer.”

But the superintendent of Shelby County Schools has himself become a game changer as the school board that signed him to a three-year contract last September weighs a further extension of his three-year contract that for now runs through September 2016.

25. Obama: Power Plant Rule Will Shrink Power Prices -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In a sweeping initiative to curb pollutants blamed for global warming, the Obama administration unveiled a plan Monday aimed at cutting carbon dioxide emissions from power plants by nearly a third by 2030. But it delays the deadline for some states to begin complying until long after President Barack Obama leaves office.

26. Plough Grant Requires All Rape Kits Be Tested -

Before they agreed to put up $750,000 toward funding the disposition of the city’s untested rape kit backlog, leaders of the Plough Foundation wanted assurances that the city would process every rape kit.

27. Norris Defends Rape Kit Backlog Approach -

State Senate Republican leader Mark Norris of Collierville says the Tennessee Legislature wants to know the size of the statewide problem of untested rape kits, an explanation of why it happened and a credible plan for eliminating it before coming up with funding to deal with the problem.

28. Parkinson, White Compare Notes Across Aisle -

Two state representatives from Memphis say the 19-member Shelby County delegation in the Tennessee General Assembly isn’t as united as it should be.

“I have to be brutally honest. I have yet to see us come together and move as a block for Shelby County,” Democratic state Rep. Antonio Parkinson said on the WKNO-TV program “Behind the Headlines.” “There appears to be an alignment with some members of our delegation that align with other parts of Tennessee before they align with Shelby County. I’m optimistic that will shift.”

29. GOP Blocks Democrats' Minimum Wage Try in Senate -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Senate Republicans derailed a Democratic drive Wednesday to raise the federal minimum wage, blocking a cornerstone of President Barack Obama's economic plans and ensuring the issue will be a major feature of this fall's congressional elections.

30. Democrats Bemoan Lack of Medicaid Expansion -

NASHVILLE (AP) – House Democratic leaders said Tuesday that Republican Gov. Bill Haslam's decision not to expand Medicaid in Tennessee eclipses his signature plan to cover tuition at two-year colleges.

31. Late Sign-Ups Improve Outlook for Obama Health Law -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A surge of eleventh-hour enrollments has improved the outlook for President Barack Obama's health care law, with more people signing up overall and a much-needed spark of interest among young adults.

32. Wharton Takes Budget to City Council -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. takes a budget proposal to the Memphis City Council Tuesday, April 15, that is supposed to be a departure for an administration that, since 2010, has come to the council with options instead of a total budget plan.

33. Editorial: First Tennessee Bank’s Business Model Endures -

As First Tennessee Bank marks its 150th anniversary, we are reminded of the changes over that span in technology and what our financial institutions have come to offer in the way of services.

34. New Perspective -

When the U.S. Postal Service closed its branch office at 826 Mississippi Blvd. near E.H. Crump Boulevard in 2012, workers carted off an oil painting that hung there for several decades with little thought about the man portrayed in the painting.

35. Obama Signs Actions Taking Aim at Gender Pay Gap -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In a concerted election-year push to draw attention to women's wages, President Barack Obama signed directives Tuesday that would make it easier for workers of federal contractors to get information about workplace compensation. He seasoned his move with a sharp rebuke of Republicans whom he accused of "gumming up the works" on workplace fairness.

36. Senate Nears Passage of Jobless-Benefits Bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Capping a three-month struggle, the Senate closed in Monday on passage of election-year legislation to restore jobless benefits for the long-term unemployed that expired late last year.

37. High Court Loosens Reins on Big Campaign Donors -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court's conservative majority voted Wednesday to free wealthy donors to give to as many political candidates and campaigns as they want, further loosening the reins on giving by big contributors as the 2014 campaign moves into high gear.

38. Filing Frenzy -

Until Tuesday, no one was running for the District 7 seat on the Shelby County Schools board. No one had pulled a qualifying petition from the Shelby County Election Commission until just two days before the filing deadline for candidates on the August election ballot.

39. Jury Selection Begins in Apple-Samsung Case -

SAN JOSE, Calif. (AP) – Jury selection began Monday in the latest legal battle between the fiercest rivals in the world of smartphones, with Apple and Samsung accusing each other, once again, of ripping off designs and features.

40. Haslam’s Medicaid Expansion Talks Continue -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam has walked a fine line since announcing a year ago that the state would not accept federal funding for an expansion of TennCare, Tennessee’s version of Medicaid, at least for now.

41. Millions Could Get Extra Time for Health Sign-Ups -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Millions of Americans could get extra time to enroll for taxpayer-subsidized coverage this year under President Barack Obama's health care law. That would let the administration boost sign-ups and aid Democrats under attack over the program's troubles.

42. McDonald's Hit by Lawsuits Over Worker Pay -

NEW YORK (AP) – McDonald's workers in three states filed lawsuits against the fast-food chain this week, saying the company engages in a variety of illegal practices to avoid paying them what they're owed.

43. Senate Passes Medicaid Legislative Approval Bill -

NASHVILLE (AP) – A proposal that requires Gov. Bill Haslam to secure legislative approval for any potential deal to expand Medicaid in Tennessee has passed the Senate even though the Republican governor has already said he would consult with lawmakers.

44. Norris Finds Legislative Leadership Has its Price -

Many people who like problem solving usually tackle a tough crossword, or maybe Sudoku.

Collierville’s Mark Norris opted for politics.

45. Haslam Asks Feds for Medicaid Counterproposal -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Republican Gov. Bill Haslam said Monday he has asked U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius to make a counterproposal to Tennessee's efforts to carve out a special deal for Medicaid expansion.

46. Governors Erupt in Partisan Dispute at White House -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The nation's governors emerged from a meeting with President Barack Obama on Monday claiming harmony, only to immediately break into an on-camera partisan feud in front of the West Wing.

47. Watson Sets Record Straight About Labor Union Views -

Tennessee Sen. Bo Watson, a Republican from Hixon, has been showing up in the national media lately, thanks to his public statements against unionization effort at the Volkswagen plant in Chattanooga.

48. White House: Stimulus Bill Was Good for Economy -

RANCHO MIRAGE, Calif. (AP) — The costly $787 billion spending bill that President Barack Obama signed into law soon after taking office boosted the economy and helped avoid another Great Depression, the White House said in a status report on Monday's fifth anniversary of the law's enactment.

49. Senate Clears Debt Limit Measure for Obama -

WASHINGTON (AP) – After a dramatic Senate tally in which top GOP leaders cast the crucial votes, must-pass legislation to allow the government to borrow money to pay its bills cleared Congress Wednesday for President Barack Obama's signature.

50. Mae Be, Mae Be Not -

MAE BE ONTO SOMETHING. State Sen. Mae Beavers – really, that’s her name – has offered legislation that makes it against the law in Tennessee to obey the law in the United States – really, I couldn’t possibly make that up.

51. Heritage Trail Financing Plans Change -

The city of Memphis is making changes in its plans to finance two housing developments that are part of the broader Heritage Trail plan for redevelopment of the area south of FedExForum and into South Memphis.

52. Farm Bill Deal Would Cut Food Stamps by 1 Percent -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Farm-state lawmakers are lobbying colleagues member by member, vote by vote as they push for House passage of a massive, five year farm bill that would make cuts to food stamps and continue generous subsidies for farmers.

53. Poll: Uninsured Rate Drops as Health Law Rolls Out -

WASHINGTON (AP) – It may just be the start of a new trend. The uninsured rate dropped modestly this month as expanded coverage rolled out under President Barack Obama's health care law, a major survey released Thursday has found.

54. Barbic: Diversity Not a Requirement of Charter Schools -

NASHVILLE (AP) – The head of an initiative to turn around Tennessee's lowest performing schools is being criticized for stating that charter schools shouldn't be responsible for diversity.

55. January 17-23: This week in Memphis history -

1998: A Klan group rallied on the steps of the Shelby County Courthouse to protest the federal holiday honoring civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The protest ended with police using pepper spray and nightsticks to disperse the crowd of counter demonstrators and onlookers after several counter demonstrators breached a police barrier.

56. January 17-23: This week in Memphis history -

1998: A Klan group rallied on the steps of the Shelby County Courthouse to protest the federal holiday honoring civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The protest ended with police using pepper spray and nightsticks to disperse the crowd of counter demonstrators and onlookers after several counter demonstrators breached a police barrier.

57. Both Sides Pledge New Effort on Jobless Bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Republicans and Democrats both pledged Wednesday to renew efforts at resurrecting jobless benefits for the long-term unemployed, but immediate prospects for compromise appeared dim one day after a Senate deadlock.

58. Unemployment Bill Remains Stalled in Senate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Republicans and Democrats squabbled in public while negotiating in private on Monday on stalled legislation to resurrect unemployment benefits for the long-term jobless.

59. Senate Ready to OK Yellen to Lead Federal Reserve -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Senate is ready to approve Janet Yellen's nomination to become the first woman to lead the Federal Reserve in its century-long history.

Yellen is a long-time advocate of fighting unemployment and a backer of the central bank's recent efforts to spur the economy with low interest rates and massive bond purchases. She was expected to win easy approval in Monday's vote.

60. Consolidation Voting Case Still Complex in 3rd Year -

Three years after all the votes were counted in dual votes on an attempt to consolidate city and county governments, the federal lawsuit over the dual-vote requirement in state law continues.

And a look at the depositions and other written statements in the case file from the experts for each side shows the issues in the federal court case remain complex.

61. Debt and Liability -

There is rarely a good answer to the question “How much?” in politics.

With issues including the unfunded pension liability, overall debt, and revenue estimates and their validity, City Hall’s overall money problem begins but hardly ends with the question. It won’t be that simple.

62. Congress OKs New IRS Chief, Ends Turbulent Year -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A cross Congress ended its business for the year Friday as the Senate approved a new boss for the troubled Internal Revenue Service but remained slowed and bitterly riven over majority Democrats' weakening of Republicans' power to filibuster.

63. Elkington’s Farewell -

It’s been more than three years since city leaders declared the next chapter of the Beale Street entertainment district was about to begin.

But it wasn’t until Monday, Dec. 16, that Beale Street developer John Elkington marked his coming farewell to the street at the end of this year.

64. Health Care Signups Pick Up but May Not Close Gap -

WASHINGTON (AP) – With time running short, the nation's health care rolls still aren't filling up fast enough.

New signup numbers Wednesday showed progress for President Barack Obama's health care law, but not enough to guarantee that Americans who want and need coverage by Jan. 1 will be able to get it. Crunch time is now, as people face a Dec. 23 deadline to sign up if they are to have coverage by New Year's.

65. Haslam: Talks Continue on TennCare Expansion -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam says his letter this week to Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius on the terms of a possible Medicaid expansion in Tennessee means ongoing talks between his administration and Sebelius’ office will continue.

66. Bipartisan Negotiators Seek Modest Budget Pact -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Republican and Democratic negotiators reached out for a budget agreement Tuesday to reduce automatic spending cuts aimed at programs ranging from parks to the Pentagon, risking a backlash from liberals and conservatives that highlighted the difficulty of compromise within divided government.

67. Crosstown Effort Shines as Development Example -

Construction documents for the $180 million revitalization of the Crosstown building were scheduled to be finished Friday, Dec. 6, with the project moving toward closing and construction in the next months.

68. Fast-Food Protests Return Amid Push for Wage Hikes -

NEW YORK (AP) – Fast-food workers and labor organizers are marching, waving signs and chanting in cities across the country Thursday amid a push for higher wages.

Organizers say employees planned to forgo work in 100 cities, with rallies set for another 100 cities. But it's not clear what the actual turnout has been or how many of the participants are workers. By afternoon, disruptions seemed minimal or temporary at the targeted restaurants.

69. Soulful Synergy -

What happened at the corner of McLemore Avenue and College Street in the 1960s is nothing short of extraordinary.

At the crossroads of segregated neighborhoods in South Memphis, two white business partners would open the doors wide to whites and blacks alike, who congregated to write and record songs that would set off a soul explosion heard around the world.

70. Mississippi to Start Making Voter ID Cards in Early 2014 -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Mississippi's top elections official says the state should start issuing free voter identification cards in early 2014, months before the first election in which people will be required to show photo IDs at the polls.

71. Few Support Delaying Changes in Flood Insurance -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Efforts to delay implementation of changes in the federal flood insurance program have run into roadblocks on both sides of Capitol Hill.

The leaders of the House Financial Services Committee say they are standing behind last year's bipartisan legislation to put the flood insurance program on sounder financial footing even as the implementation of the law has sparked a chorus of complaints from constituents fearing spikes in premiums and plummeting home values.

72. Banks Tweak Checking, Online Options -

As the two banks with the biggest customer deposit shares in Memphis, First Tennessee Bank and Regions Bank must stay closely in touch with their clients’ checking and online banking needs.

73. Yellen Stands by Fed's Low Rate Policies -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Janet Yellen made clear Thursday that she's prepared to stand by the Federal Reserve's extraordinary efforts to pump up the economy when she's chairman, if that's what it needs.

74. Congress Governs Self Under 'Obamacare' -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Think you're confused by "Obamacare"? It's roiling Capitol Hill behind the scenes, too.

Members of Congress are governing themselves under President Barack Obama's signature law, which means they have great leeway in how to apply it to their own staffs.

75. Food Stamps, Milk Prices on Table in Farm Talks -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The fight over renewing the nation's farm bill has centered on cuts to the $80 billion-a-year food stamp program. But there could be unintended consequences if no agreement is reached: higher milk prices.

76. Both Sides Agree: No Major Budget Deal Foreseen -

WASHINGTON (AP) — On this, GOP budget guru Rep. Paul Ryan and top Senate Democrat Harry Reid can agree: There won't be a "grand bargain" on the budget.

77. Fisher Joins Boy Scouts Chickasaw Council as CEO -

Richard L. Fisher has joined the Chickasaw Council of the Boy Scouts of America as chief executive officer. In his new role, Fisher will extend character development and leadership skills to youth who live in the Chickasaw Council territory, which includes the Mississippi Delta, Memphis, and Shelby and Crittenden counties.

78. Cohen Pushes Medicaid Expansion in Wake of Shutdown -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen, D-Memphis, got a lift back to his district from Sen. Roger Wicker, R-Miss., at the end of a long week in Washington in which Congress ended the government shutdown just as it was hours from intersecting with the debt ceiling.

79. Community Oasis -

A visitor walking the winding, sun-dappled paths of Memphis Botanic Garden past stands of maple trees and beds of hydrangeas might never guess that there was a time when a black cloud hung low over the East Memphis attraction.

80. Shutdown Over, Obama Surveys Damage and Blames GOP -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The government unlocked its doors Thursday after 16 days, with President Barack Obama saluting the resolution of Congress' bitter standoff but lambasting Republicans for the partial shutdown that he said had damaged the U.S. economy and America's credibility around the world.

81. A Deal: Voting to Avoid Default, Open Government -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Up against one last deadline, Congress raced to pass legislation Wednesday avoiding a threatened national default and ending a 16-day partial government shutdown along the strict terms set by President Barack Obama when the twin crises began.

82. New House GOP Plan as Debt-Limit Deadline Nears -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Time growing desperately short, House Republicans pushed for passage of legislation late Tuesday to prevent a threatened Treasury default, end a 15-day partial government shutdown and extricate divided government from its latest brush with a full political meltdown.

83. As Shutdown Drags On, Time to Call in Mediator? -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Maybe it's time to call in a mediator – if there's one not on furlough.

President Barack Obama and congressional Republicans are in stalemate over a partial government shutdown now in its second week. And a looming crisis over the federal debt limit is rapidly approaching, with economists saying that could have a devastating effect on the U.S. economy.

84. Poll: No Heroes in Shutdown, GOP Gets Most Blame -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama and lawmakers must rise above their incessant bickering and do more to end the partial government shutdown, according to a poll Wednesday that places the brunt of the blame on Republicans but finds no one standing tall in Washington.

85. Obama Nominates Yellen to Succeed Bernanke at Fed -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In a history-making selection, President Barack Obama nominated Janet Yellen to be chairman of the Federal Reserve, a critical post as the nation continues its fitful economic recovery. If confirmed she would be the first woman to lead the powerful central bank.

86. Obama Says Talks OK – After Default Threat Averted -

WASHINGTON (AP) – After weeks of gridlock, House Republicans floated broad hints Tuesday they might be willing to pass short-term legislation re-opening the government and averting a default in exchange for immediate talks with the Obama administration on reducing deficits and changing the three-year-old health care law.

87. Increasing Teacher Pay Next Goal for Haslam -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam signaled last week that the next front in an increasingly vocal debate about education reform in the state will be over increasing teacher pay.

During a press conference Thursday, Oct. 3, in Nashville, Haslam set a goal of becoming “the fastest improving state in the U.S. when it comes to teacher pay.”

88. Shutdown in Third Day With Debt Trouble Looming -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Efforts to resolve the government shutdown were at a standstill Thursday as President Barack Obama and House Speaker John Boehner traded barbs, the Treasury warned of a dire risk to the economy ahead and work in the Capitol was briefly halted because of gunshots outside.

89. City Explores Crucial Crosstown Funding -

City officials are exploring multiple options for financing $15 million in infrastructure improvements at the Sears Crosstown site, key funding that could make or break the ambitious $175 million project.

90. Stop Being So Stupid, Voters Tweet to Congress -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The roiling debate over the U.S. government shutdown is extending to Twitter, Facebook and Instagram as fed-up Americans turn to social media to register their disgust with federal lawmakers for shutting down the government.

91. Norris Elected Chairman of National Council -

Tennessee Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris has been elected chairman of the national Council of State Governments based in Lexington, Ky.

92. Boehner: House Won't Pass 'Clean' Spending Bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) – House Republicans will not simply pass a temporary spending bill from the Democratic Senate after it is shorn clean of a tea party plan to "defund Obamacare," House Speaker John Boehner said on Thursday.

93. Norris Elected Chairman of National Council -

Tennessee Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris has been elected chairman of the national Council of State Governments based in Lexington, Ky.

94. GOP House: Keep Government Open, Hit 'Obamacare' -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Charting a collision course with the White House, the Republican-controlled House approved legislation Friday to wipe out the three-year-old health care law that President Barack Obama has vowed to preserve – and simultaneously prevent a partial government shutdown that neither party claims to want.

95. Job Training Spurs Unilever Growth -

The Unilever USA plant in Covington should be the largest ice cream manufacturing plant in the world by 2016, following an $108.7 million expansion announced last week in Covington.

But when the global company began making ice cream in Covington in 2011 at what used to be a SlimFast plant, it was not a promising beginning.

96. This week in Memphis history: September 20-26 -

1993: Elvis Presley Enterprises joined the ownership group for the proposed Memphis NFL franchise that city leaders were seeking. William B. Dunavant Jr., the leader of the effort, announced Graceland’s role in the ownership group during a reception at Graceland. Others in the ownership group included Fred Smith, Mike Starnes, J.R. “Pitt” Hyde and Paul Tudor Jones.

97. Covington Unilever Expansion To Add 428 New Jobs -

Executives of Unilever USA announced Thursday, Sept. 19, their Covington plant will expand to add 428 new jobs at what is already the largest employer in Tipton County.

The $108.7 million expansion will add the jobs over a four year period bringing the plant that makes ice cream products to 1,000 employees.

98. Dodge Default, Defund Obamacare, GOP Leaders Say -

WASHINGTON (AP) – House Republicans vowed Wednesday to pass legislation that would prevent a partial government shutdown and avoid a historic national default while simultaneously canceling out Obamacare, inaugurating a new round of political brinkmanship as critical deadlines approach.

99. Obama Economic Adviser Leaving, Successor Picked -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama will replace Gene Sperling, his chief economic adviser and West Wing workaholic, with Jeffrey Zients, a top aide who has filled in as acting budget director and who led a White House effort to streamline government.

100. More Than 350 Economists Back Yellen for Fed Chair -

WASHINGTON (AP) – More than 350 economists have a signed a letter to President Barack Obama calling on him to nominate Federal Reserve Vice Chair Janet Yellen to be the Fed's next chairman. The letter is designed to draw attention back to Yellen amid signs that Obama is leaning toward nominating his former economic adviser Larry Summers.