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Editorial Results (free)

1. Discover Labor Day Getaways Close to Home -

Labor Day, the traditional end to summer. Public swimming pools are closing and college football is getting underway.

It’s also time for one last getaway before fall settles in, especially if you have school-age children.

2. Vanderbilt Students Find Happiness in Music City -

As the Class of 2018 begins to poke around the Vanderbilt University campus, the newest Commodores will be met with the highest of expectations.

“This class is projected to have the highest academic quality in our history as measured by high school class rank and SAT scores,’’ says Doug Christiansen, vice provost for enrollment and dean of admissions.

3. Class is In -

For Collierville Schools superintendent John Aitken, the demerger of public schools in Shelby County didn’t become “real” until teachers reported the week before the Aug. 4 first day of classes.

4. Humes Rises From Bottom 5 Percent of Tennessee Schools -

Humes Preparatory Academy is no longer in the bottom 5 percent of schools in the state in terms of student achievement, as measured by state education officials.

That according to school-by-school test data from the Tennessee Comprehensive Assessment Program (TCAP) and Tennessee Value Added Assessment System (TVAAS) data, released by state education officials Tuesday, Aug. 19, in Nashville.

5. Tenn. Attorney General: Parents Can't Give Kids New Last Names -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Tennessee's attorney general says married parents can't invent new last names for their children.

Attorney General Bob Cooper writes in a legal opinion that state law limits the options to the last name of either the father or the mother, or both.

6. I Choose Memphis: Andrés Flores -

“I Choose Memphis” spotlights Memphians who are passionate about calling this community home. New Memphis Institute provides the profiles.

Name: Andrés Flores

7. Former Tigers Head Man Finds Simpler Life at MTSU -

In nine years as the head coach, Tommy West provided the University of Memphis with much of its football lore: five bowls – there have only been seven – and 49 wins (third-most all time).

8. Hit Factory -

The massive trees and the shade they make are the only thing left on the northwest corner of Danny Thomas Boulevard and Chelsea Avenue from the days when American Studios turned out 120 hit records from 1965 to 1972.

9. Over 50 – Should You ‘Catch Up’? -

Ray’s Take: If you’re age 50 or older, you can make extra “catch-up” contributions to certain types of tax-favored retirement accounts.

Is this something you should take advantage of? On the surface, it seems like a positive for your retirement account. But take a long honest look at why you are going to make those catch-up contributions and check your plan to make sure you qualify. There is a lot of information out there regarding these types of contributions, and you need to separate the good from the not so good.

10. Nonprofits to Pitch Ideas for GiVE 365 Grants -

Three minutes to make their best pitch. That’s what the finalists will have Monday night, Aug. 18, when they compete for Community Foundation of Greater Memphis GiVE 365 grants.

“It’s by far the most important event we have,” said Ashley Harper, director of grants and initiatives at the foundation. “And it’s high energy because we’re strict about those three minutes.”

11. Early Diagnosis -

Of the approximately 7 million people in the United States that have scoliosis (curvature of the spine), most of them are teenagers and children.

Years ago, scoliosis screenings in the public schools were the norm. Today, less than 50 percent of the states require the screenings. This despite the fact that the Adam’s Forward Bend test – the initial screening for scoliosis – can be done in less than 30 seconds.

12. Start of School Features Historic Change -

A child ready for his first day of school Monday, Aug. 4, in the new Bartlett City Schools system mistakenly got on a bus bound for Shelby County Schools that ran close to the route he was supposed to take.

13. Ag Tourism Touted as Way to Boost Rural Economies -

CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. (AP) – With its sweet fruit-flavored liqueurs, a working farm and eccentric cast of characters – including a dancing lemon – Bloomery Plantation Distillery has attracted tourists from every U.S. state and countries as far away as Laos and Iceland.

14. Incoming Civil Rights Museum President Seeks Connection -

The incoming president of the National Civil Rights Museum remembers a quick and hurried visit to the museum shortly after the debut of an extensive renovation earlier this year.

“It lends itself to giving people a physical, spiritual experience in coming here. It is a moving institution,” said Terri Lee Freeman, who comes to the museum from being president of the Community Foundation for the National Capital Region in Washington, D.C. “I come from a town where there are a lot of museums. I’ve never had the experience of being physically moved by a museum like I had when I came here the first time.”

15. Senate Reprieve for Highly Contested Border Bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A bill to deal with the immigration surge on the U.S.-Mexico border won a temporary reprieve in the Senate Wednesday as lawmakers maneuvered to offer some response to the crisis before adjourning for the summer.

16. Events -

Overton Square will hold a Thursdays Squared concert Thursday, July 31, from 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. in the Tower Courtyard at Trimble Place and Florence Street. The series continues through Aug. 28. Visit thursdayssquared.com for a schedule.

17. Events -

Church Health Center Wellness and Bring It Food Hub will hold a Bring It, Cook It, Take It cooking class Thursday, July 31, at 5:30 p.m. at 1115 Union Ave. The class will include cooking demonstrations using fresh produce, plus tastings and recipes. Cost is $5 and includes a bag of produce. Visit churchhealthcenter.org.

18. Bartlett Ninth Grade Academy Prepares for Debut -

A group of 213 children in Bartlett who are coming out of middle school and into a new academic year and system got an introduction last week to the Bartlett school that is a bridge between their middle schools and Bartlett High.

19. Registration Could Reflect Suburban Relocation -

When Shelby County’s six new suburban school districts register students on Tuesday, July 29, some of those systems’ superintendents will watch for changes from the numbers of students who pre-registered in the new school systems less than a year ago.

20. Suburban Schools Mark A Week to Debut -

Suburban school leaders drop by the Shelby County Schools data center Monday, July 28, to get their first formal look at achievement test scores for their students during the only year of the Shelby County Schools merger.

21. Fast Food Workers Prepare to Escalate Wage Demands -

CHICAGO (AP) – Fast food workers say they're prepared to escalate their campaign for higher wages and union representation, starting with a national convention in suburban Chicago where more than 1,000 workers will discuss the future of the effort that has spread to dozens of cities in less than two years.

22. School Year Brings New Lessons for Teachers -

When the school year begins on Aug. 4 for Shelby County Schools and the six suburban public school systems, the learning process will begin not only for students but for teachers.

As the larger system-wide changes of the demerger have played out, teachers across the county have been preparing for the world inside classrooms that always offers change at the beginning of a new school year.

23. Tennessee Gets High Marks in Child Welfare Report -

NASHVILLE (AP) – The latest national ranking of the well-being of children shows Tennessee is among five states that made the biggest improvement in the last year.

The Kids Count Data Book, an annual report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation, grades states on education, health care and poverty.

24. Teach for America Leverages Start Co. Resources -

Education reform has been alive and well here in Memphis over the last few years. There have been many great initiatives established to secure dollars and establish programming to move our youth forward. As always, I am thinking of scale, sustainability and innovation to stay relevant.

25. Rising Up -

Adrienne Johnson remembers being stalked. It was actually a good thing. “I grew up in a single-parent home,” said Johnson, 35, today a financial analyst at International Paper and one of IP’s mentors in the RISE Foundation Goal Card program. “I was the first in my family to go to college. It was unrealistic (to attend college), not something I envisioned at all.”

26. Juvenile Court Reform Moves to Child Welfare Cases -

For the last two years, much of the attention in Juvenile Court reforms has been on delinquent children who come to the court for their actions.

But this fall, the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges will begin an examination of its child welfare program – the reason that most children come to the court.

27. SRVS Merges with Special Kids & Families -

SRVS, Tennessee’s largest provider of services for people with disabilities, is merging with Special Kids & Families, creating the only local nonprofit to provide supports for individuals with disabilities from birth throughout life.

28. SRVS Merges With Special Kids & Families -

SRVS, Tennessee’s largest provider of services for people with disabilities, is merging with Special Kids & Families, creating the only local nonprofit to provide supports for individuals with disabilities from birth throughout life.

29. We’re All Invited -

MEMPHIS, SERVED IN THE SHELL. Following up last week’s column, this from a reader:

“We have no civic pride, half the population is intent on killing as many as they can and the other part lives behind walls or gates. There was a time in the fifties when you could leave your front door unlocked and keys in the car.”

30. Survey Finds Math, Science Grads Earn Top Dollar -

WASHINGTON (AP) – What you study – math and science are a plus – seems to matter more than whether your alma mater is public or private when it comes to finding a high-paying job after college, according to a report released Tuesday by the Education Department.

31. Amazon Vows to Fight FTC on Kids In-App Purchases -

LOS ANGELES (AP) – Amazon says that it is prepared to go to court against the Federal Trade Commission to defend itself against charges that it has not done enough to prevent children from making unauthorized in-app purchases.

32. Health Choice Selects Abisch to Lead Population Health Services -

Ellen Abisch has joined Health Choice LLC as senior director of population health services. In the newly created position, Abisch will be responsible for designing, implementing and managing population health and wellness programs for the Health Choice network.
Prior to joining the physician hospital organization, she served as manager of benefits and wellness for ServiceMaster.

33. University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Le Bonheur Form Pediatric Obesity Center -

Doctors like to go where they are needed.

Dr. Joan C. Han is coming to Memphis to be the founding director of the new UT-Le Bonheur Pediatric Obesity Center and to direct the new Le Bonheur Healthy Lifestyle Clinic.

34. Still Rock ‘n’ Roll -

When Jeff Nolan, the Hard Rock Café’s music and memorabilia historian, got to Memphis Sunday, June 29, to prepare for the next day’s preview tours of the new Hard Rock location at Beale and Second streets, he grabbed a bite to eat at nearby Rum Boogie Café.

35. Timing Key Element of County Tax Rate Debate -

More funding from Shelby County government for prekindergarten classrooms is a matter of timing, say those on both sides of the property tax rate question on which the $2.8 million in additional funding hinges.

36. Connected Home -

When he founded Memphis-based Phoenix Unequaled Home Entertainment 20 years ago, Scott Fuelling couldn’t have predicted the degree to which consumers eventually would embrace the concept of the connected home.

37. Redbirds Back Home For Weekend Series -

The Memphis Redbirds open up a four-game weekend series Thursday, June 26, at AutoZone Park against the Round Rock Express, the Triple-A affiliate of the Texas Rangers.

The homestand includes the St. Louis Cardinals’ 2013 National League Championship Series replica ring giveaway on Friday night for the first 3,000 fans. Gates open at 5 p.m. Friday, and first pitch is at 7:05 p.m. Also on Friday, Cardinals pitcher and former Redbird Joe Kelly is scheduled to make a rehab start as he works his way back from a hamstring injury.

38. Hagan Classic Honors Local Baseball Pioneer -

Recently, Andy Cook ran into a couple of his old Memphis Tigers teammates at the Levitt Shell in Overton Park.

39. Redbirds Back Home for Weekend Series -

The Memphis Redbirds open up a four-game weekend series Thursday, June 26, at AutoZone Park against the Round Rock Express, the Triple-A affiliate of the Texas Rangers.

The homestand includes the St. Louis Cardinals’ 2013 National League Championship Series replica ring giveaway on Friday night for the first 3,000 fans. Gates open at 5 p.m. Friday, and first pitch is at 7:05 p.m. Also on Friday, Cardinals pitcher and former Redbird Joe Kelly is scheduled to make a rehab start as he works his way back from a hamstring injury.

40. Tunica Reels as Competition, Recession Hit Casinos -

TUNICA RESORTS, Miss. (AP) – It was 3:30 p.m. on a Monday in May at Harrah's Tunica Hotel & Casino in northwestern Mississippi.

Gamblers were few in number, and dealers stood ready at idle card tables.

41. Lehman-Roberts’ Longevity Paved by Family Ownership -

Lehman-Roberts Co. is a highway paving contractor that president Patrick Nelson regards with the kind of pride that might at first seem out of place for work that involves asphalt and roadwork.

42. US Slower to Embrace Fanaticism of World’s Game -

Andy Marcinko has been to every World Cup since 1986, and he will be in Brazil for a good two weeks of the 2014 World Cup.

But the Rhodes College men’s soccer coach didn’t have to go beyond his own soccer camps to start putting on his game face.

43. Eye Care Deserts -

By the time students are on board SAVE’s mobile vision unit the secret is out.

They’ve failed a school eye screening and parents and teachers are catching on that they may be having trouble reading notes on the board, pages in a book, and grasping all that they should in class.

44. Ben Crane Wins St. Jude Classic for 5th PGA Title -

MEMPHIS (AP) – With four PGA Tour titles on his resume, Ben Crane knew what it would take to win again.

45. Events -

Moon River Music Festival, hosted by Drew Holcomb & The Neighbors, will be held Saturday, June 7, from 11 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. at the Levitt Shell, 1930 Poplar Ave. The event will include more than a dozen performers, food trucks, activities and more. General admission is $25. Visit moonriverfestival.com.

46. Game Changer -

One educator’s reform is another educator’s wrong move.

Dorsey Hopson doesn’t use the word “reform” as often as he uses the term “game changer.”

But the superintendent of Shelby County Schools has himself become a game changer as the school board that signed him to a three-year contract last September weighs a further extension of his three-year contract that for now runs through September 2016.

47. Study: At-Home Dads Down Slightly Since Recession -

NEW YORK (AP) – The number of U.S. fathers home with their kids full-time is down, from a peak 2.2 million in 2010, the official end of the recession, to about 2 million in 2012, according to a report released Thursday by the Pew Research Center.

48. Events -

Theatre Memphis will present “The Music Man” Friday, June 6, through June 29 at the theater, 630 Perkins Road Extended. Buy tickets at theatrememphis.org.

49. Skip the Website? Some Small Businesses Still Do -

NEW YORK (AP) – It's cheap. It's easy to do. And it can take less than 20 minutes to set up. Yet more than half of all small businesses still don't have a website.

"It's just ridiculous," says Jim Blasingame, a small business author and radio show host. "Every small business needs a website. Period. Nonnegotiable."

50. Curb Appeal’s Greg Black Has Roots in Landscaping -

Greg Black sits down on some outdoor furniture on the patio of a client in South Bluffs. He is wearing a short-sleeve, green, polo-style shirt that bears his business’s name – Curb Appeal – and blue jeans and boots.

51. Senatobia Furniture Factory to Close -

A furniture factory that was once had more than 1,000 employees in Senatobia is closing.

Chromcraft Revington laid off as many as 200 employees earlier this month, leaving the furniture maker and distributor with about 30 employees to wind down its operations.

52. Cannon Works for Golf Tournament's Success -

The putter and a few white golf balls sit next to a wall in Phil Cannon’s office at TPC Southwind. It seems logical, the long-time director of the FedEx St. Jude Classic having golf equipment within easy reach.

53. Discussing Family Finances with the Kids -

Ray’s take: The March 2013 T. Rowe Price Annual Parents, Kids and Money Survey indicates that 73 percent of parents discuss money with their kids. This is good news! It’s an important part of a kid’s education to understand money and finances. Kids may not have to worry about mortgage payments just yet, but learning about money while they’re young can set them up to become financially responsible adults.

54. Senatobia Furniture Factory to Close -

A furniture factory that was once had more than 1,000 employees in Senatobia is closing.

Chromcraft Revington laid off as many as 200 employees earlier this month, leaving the furniture maker and distributor with about 30 employees to wind down its operations.

55. I Choose Memphis: Jon Alfuth -

“I Choose Memphis” spotlights Memphians who are passionate about calling this community home. New Memphis Institute provides the profiles.

Name: Jon Alfuth

Job title and company: Teacher, The Soulsville Charter School

56. FBI Head: Cyber Crime Posing 'Enormous Challenge' -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Law enforcement faces an "enormous challenge" in preventing state-sponsored cyber crimes, FBI Director James Comey said Wednesday, days after the Justice Department charged five Chinese military officials with hacking into American companies to steal trade secrets.

57. Your Life in Five Years -

Ray’s take: A typical job interview question is “Where do you see yourself in five years?” So should you be asking yourself this question in general? Is a five-year plan a must to your fiscal future?

58. Airport Artists -

Several years ago Richard White, vice president of properties and business development at the Memphis-Shelby County Airport Authority, noticed what he thought was a troubling trend.

59. Tennessee 12th-Graders Below Average in Math, Reading -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Tennessee Education Commissioner Kevin Huffman said Wednesday that a report showing the state's high school seniors' below-average performance in math and reading is partially due to them not being exposed to recent education changes that have more rigorous standards.

60. Commission Rejects Luttrell’s Schools Request -

Shelby County Commissioners rejected Wednesday, May 7, a plan by Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell to give Shelby County Schools $13.9 million in capital funding for the current fiscal year instead of a much larger amount the school system requested.

61. Tackling the ‘Taboo’ -

Bill Courtney is adamant – which, if you know him, is a redundancy – that he has not written a political book.

62. Moon River Music Festival Set for Levitt Shell -

When Nashville-based singer-songwriter Drew Holcomb comes back to his hometown of Memphis in June, it will be to launch a music festival at the Levitt Shell.

It’s something he says he’s wanted to do for a while now. The event is the one-day Moon River Music Festival on June 7 at the Shell, presented by Southern Sun AM. Holcomb, whose workman-like touring schedule over the years has included high-profile slots as the opener for The Avett Brothers, Ryan Adams and others, has handpicked acts for the festival, which also serves as a kind of thank-you to Memphis.

63. What Does Wal-Mart Not Sell? -

NEW YORK (AP) – The news that Wal-Mart is getting into the car insurance business begs the question: is there anything that the world's largest retailer doesn't hawk?

Surprisingly, the answer is plenty.

64. Paying for the College Dream -

Ray’s Take: Education is one of the greatest gifts you can give, and the value is clearly calculable. It’s also something that deserves a serious conversation.

Per Sallie Mae’s article “How Americans Save for College 2014,” roughly 50 percent of families are saving for college. Of those not saving, 22 percent expect their children to obtain financial aid or scholarships to pay for college and 16 percent believe it is their children’s responsibility to pay. So should parents pay for college, or should the kids “have some skin in the game” and pay for part or all of it?

65. Imagination Library Celebrates 20 Million Books to Kids -

The Books From Birth program, originated in Tennessee, marked its 10th anniversary Monday, April 28, in Memphis with its 20 millionth book going to a 3-year-old girl.

Tamera Tynes received an oversized, hardback copy of “The Little Engine That Could,” which was almost as big as she was, from Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam and first lady Crissy Haslam.

66. FDA Proposes First Regulations for E-Cigarettes -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The federal government wants to ban sales of electronic cigarettes to minors and require approval for new products and health warning labels.

While the proposal being issued Thursday by the Food and Drug Administration won't immediately mean changes for the popular devices, the move is aimed at eventually taming the fast-growing e-cigarette industry.

67. Hopson Pushes Realignment, New Goals in Budget -

After hearing from more than a dozen citizens Tuesday, April 22, including some who quoted Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in their arguments against specific Shelby County Schools budget cuts, superintendent Dorsey Hopson had his own quote from the civil rights leader.

68. First Lady Announces One-Stop Job Site for Veterans -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Aiming to streamline employment resources for people leaving the military, the government is creating an integrated website that can help job-seekers create resumes, connect with employers and become part of a database of veterans and their spouses for companies to mine for skills and talents.

69. Ugwueke Named Methodist Le Bonheur President -

Michael O. Ugwueke has been named president and chief operating officer of Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare, as well as president and CEO of Methodist Healthcare Memphis Hospitals. In his new role, Ugwueke will be responsible for strategic management of the operations of six hospitals within the Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare system, as well as other key corporate functions.

70. Mo’s Bows Founder to Appear on ‘Shark Tank’ -

Memphis entrepreneur and Mo’s Bows founder Moziah Bridges will appear on the hit ABC show “Shark Tank” this Friday, April 25, and it’s a pretty good bet he’ll be dressed to the nines as he displays his typical pluck and sense of style to a panel of investors that includes Mark Cuban.

71. Oldham Catches Criticism for County’s Rape Kit Backlog -

Shelby County Sheriff Bill Oldham took fire at a weekend political forum over his department’s backlog of 300 untested rape kits, which Oldham revealed during budget hearings before the Shelby County Commission earlier in the week.

72. Wearing it Proudly -

Businesses in Memphis increasingly seem to be getting the essence of their brands down to a T.

Said another way, if it involves something enough Memphians care about – the Memphis Grizzlies, civic efforts like the Tennessee Brewery Untapped project or even just slices of Memphis nostalgia, to name a few examples – the T-shirt printing will likely soon commence, if it hasn’t already.

73. Blue Streak Making Difference for Memphis Kids -

To say that the job I was given when I was superintendent of Catholic School for the Memphis Diocese was daunting would be an understatement. One of the assignments I had was to resurrect Catholic education in the inner city of Memphis.

74. Crews Center Finds Place in Startup Landscape -

At the Crews Center for Entrepreneurship at the University of Memphis, a feeder system for the rest of the city’s technology, innovation and entrepreneurial ecosystem is slowly coming together.

A new director has been in place for a few months. Programming is taking shape, and interest is beginning to build as the Crews Center hosts everything from speakers to supporting one-off creative endeavors like the group Memphis Makers and Creators, which recently got funding from the center to build a giant, functional Nintendo controller.

75. High-Tech Workshop -

Give a crew of tech-savvy creatives a digital sandbox in which to stretch their imagination, and they’re liable to build something fun and inventive that requires so much inspiration it feeds back into their real job.

76. In Tennessee, School Voucher Bill Fails for Session -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam's proposal to create a program that gives parents the option to move a child from a failing public school to a private school has once again failed to pass.

77. Upward Mobility -

In hindsight, the story started exactly as it should have.

Recruited by a headhunter to move from South Carolina to Memphis, Chuck Haddad packed up the family – wife Darlene and sons Garen and Jered – and came for a job that he would lose, forcing him to make a life-changing decision.

78. Collierville Explores New School Options -

The Collierville Schools system is about to start the process of finding a site for a new high school and determining how much it would cost.

The Collierville school board voted unanimously Tuesday, April 8, to have the school system’s staff begin developing a request for the qualifications of an architect and planners to come up with plans for the school and select a site.

79. House Democrats Unveil Budget Plan With Tax Hikes -

WASHINGTON (AP) – House Democrats unveiled their response to Paul Ryan's GOP budget on Monday, and it relies on a $1.5 trillion in higher taxes over the coming 10 years and the economic benefits of immigration reform to make the numbers work.

80. Children’s Commission Wants Pre-K Expansion -

The Tennessee Commission on Children and Youth is recommending the state expand its pre-K and home visitation programs to help youth be more successful in school and life.

The commission is basing its recommendations on a policy report released Tuesday by the Annie E. Casey Foundation's Kids Count project.

81. For-Profit Charter Schools Bill Fails in House -

NASHVILLE (AP) – A proposal to allow charter schools in Tennessee to be operated by for-profit groups failed in its final committee vote Thursday before reaching the House floor for debate.

82. Taveras Aims to Prove Himself at Top -

Before every Memphis Redbirds season, there is picture day. On Monday, March 31, the Redbirds held an open workout at AutoZone Park, but first, players lined up like school kids in the first-base dugout to don a Redbirds jersey and cap and get their pictures taken.

83. Children’s Commission Wants Pre-K Expansion -

The Tennessee Commission on Children and Youth is recommending the state expand its pre-K and home visitation programs to help youth be more successful in school and life.

The commission is basing its recommendations on a policy report released Tuesday by the Annie E. Casey Foundation's Kids Count project.

84. School Board Approves $52.6 Million Capital Ask -

Shelby County Schools board members have approved 25 sets of attendance zone changes for the first school year of the demerger and sent a $52.6 million capital “ask” for the current fiscal year to the Shelby County Commission for consideration.

85. Sugarmon Opens Campaign for Juvenile Court Judge -

City Court Judge Tarik Sugarmon told supporters Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court is “administratively top-heavy” and too expensive to operate as it currently is.

“We are going to make a change to a 50-year continuum of Juvenile Court,” Sugarmon told supporters at the Shelby County Election Commission last week as he filed his qualifying petition to run in the August election for Juvenile Court judge. “We’re going to reverse this trend. We are going to change this court.”

86. Positive Pastner Makes More Sense After Wins -

Take a hike.

Yes, you, Negative Nelly Tigers fan. You have unrealistic expectations for the University of Memphis basketball team and its coach, Josh Pastner, who suggested – amid criticism – that this small minority of overly critical Tiger fans no longer was needed inside the tent.

87. Hopson Says Common Core Waiver is Option -

Shelby County Schools could seek a waiver from the state to continue using Common Core state education standards if the Tennessee Legislature suspends the use of the standards.

“As our world changes … this is really where we need to be,” Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson told school board members Tuesday, March 18. “If this is where the country is going – 45 of the states are going – and ultimately all states are going there, I think it really sets our kids back if we say, ‘Well, not you kids. We’re going to wait for a couple of years.’”

88. ‘It’s Natural’ -

He goes to bed at 10 p.m. and gets up at 6 a.m.

“We’re designed for early to bed and early to rise,” Dr. Bill Sears said.

89. Schools Demerger Reflects Cooperation, Competition -

For now, Shelby County’s seven public school systems are cooperating and competing with one another often at the same time on the way to the demerger of public education in August.

The same dual existence is playing itself out between the Shelby County Schools board and parents of children who have attended schools about to be in the suburban school systems but who live outside the six cities and towns.

90. Right on Cue -

The Orpheum Theatre Memphis frequently plays host to musicals, but an arrival next week will bring something the theater doesn’t get to put on its stage often – a Broadway play.

“War Horse,” a play that inspired a Steven Spielberg movie of the same name, will premiere at The Orpheum March 25. It’s the story about a character named Albert and his horse Joey, the latter of which has been tapped to fight for the English during World War I.

91. Talking Sex -

ALL OF OUR COLLEGE PRESIDENTS SHOULD GET SEXY. The Tennessee General Assembly has long been afraid of sex.

When I was a UT student in the late sixties, the Tennessee legislature proposed a law making it illegal for anyone under the age of 18 to view nude art. On the humanities complex plaza, stood and still stands a huge statue of Europa and the Bull – both starkers and anatomically and quite dramatically correct. The morning after the news of the proposed law broke, Europa was wearing a huge bra and the bull a jock strap, fashioned from sheets – lots of them – and placed on the statue by enterprising students in the night.

92. Rardin Takes Trial Advocacy Training to Liberia -

Assistant Shelby County District Attorney General Kevin Rardin is leaving for Liberia next month for a week of trial advocacy training in the African nation.

For Rardin it is his latest venture in parts of the world with different criminal justice systems or systems that are just forming.

93. Book Blitz -

Literacy Mid-South is spending part of this month literally surrounded by books.

The nonprofit, which is promoting the national Read Across America initiative in March, is in the process of collecting some 3,000 books (valued at $48,000) to give away. And in the meantime, those books will need to be somehow stored in the organization’s 1,300-square-foot office.

94. Grinder Looks to Bring Energy to Associated Builders Role -

Justin Grinder knew at an early age that he wanted to be involved in the construction industry.

95. Tigers Seniors Hope to Script Memorable Last Chapter -

The five Memphis seniors talked about their college basketball careers and they sounded older, wiser. And although nobody used this word, maybe a little scared about what might, or might not, come next.

96. Hopson Talks New School Construction -

Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson said he will seek funding before the new fiscal year that begins July 1 for a new Westhaven Elementary School and possibly two other new schools in southeast and northwest Shelby County.

97. Do You Feel Lucky? -

Ray’s Take: When thinking about your future, do you believe that you will be taken “feet first in a pine box” out of the home you worked so hard for during your younger years? Or do you sometimes get that uncomfortable feeling that you need to “knock on wood” as you look around at friends or acquaintances who have experienced a sudden change in health forcing a change in venue?

98. Collierville Schools Prepares for Parent ‘Angst’ -

UPDATE: In a special meeting Friday, March 7, the Germantown Municipal Schools board voted 3-0 to rescind its tuition requirement for open enrollment of students living outside Germantown.

--

99. Obama Admin Drives Ahead With New Cleaner Gas Rule -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Obama administration is driving ahead with a dramatic reduction in sulfur in gasoline and tailpipe emissions, declaring that cleaner air will save thousands of lives per year at little cost to consumers.

100. Exlines’ Best Pizza Marks 40 Years -

It was about 40 years ago that Walt and Violet Exline were looking for a home in Raleigh and stopped with their Realtor to eat lunch at a pizza parlor at the corner of Austin Peay Highway and Stage Road.