» Subscribe Today!
More of what you want to know.
The Daily News
X

Forgot your password?
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search
Search results for 'Kids' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:12
Shelby Public Records:176
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:26
Middle Tennessee:140
East Tennessee:84
Other:0

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

The Daily News subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. Stonewall Jackson's Little Slice of Heaven in Brentwood -

“Everybody has to meet his Waterloo,” sings honky-tonk hero Stonewall Jackson in his breakthrough No. 1 hit back in 1959.

Of course, that line, the entire song really, means everybody must meet his or her fate someday.

2. Education Historian Denounces Common Core -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – One of the nation's leading opponents of the education reform movement said Thursday that a public review process the governor has created for Tennessee's Common Core standards can be effective if teachers' ideas are taken seriously.

3. The ‘Meh’ Generation -

ALL THIS IS GETTING OLD. Mitch McConnell is 117. Across the aisle, Harry Reid is 132, same age as Nancy Pelosi over in the House, and John Boehner is 98.

The last time any of them had an original idea, they had to call it in on a rotary phone. The way they get somewhere, or fail to, is as antiquated as our infrastructure, as much in danger of collapse as our bridges.

4. New Lawmakers Trace Likely Abortion Legislation -

The two newest state legislators from Shelby County say they hope to find ways to work across party lines and even with the Shelby County Commission and the Memphis City Council.

“We may not be in the majority, but there is a lot we can do,” said incoming state Sen. Sara Kyle, who will be one of five Democrats in the 33-member Senate when next year’s legislative session in Nashville begins.

5. Secours' Video Histories: The Gift That Keeps Giving -

Five days before her mother died, Molly Secours did what seemed natural. She took out her video camera and began asking questions.

Those moments were the last ones caught on film, and for Secours, capturing her mother’s story not only gave her a lasting document of her life, but the mini-film she created from the footage helped her process her grief.

6. ’Tis the Shopping Season -

Buoyed by rising home prices and stock portfolios, Middle Tennesseans are ready to spend big again on the holidays and will be shopping earlier than ever.

In fact, they already have.

Forget Black Friday or even Thanksgiving Day as the traditional start of the holiday shopping season.

7. With Dobbs at QB, Vols Look Set for Bowl Season -

As the jubilation settled this week, the University of Tennessee’s football team and its fans still savored last Saturday’s 45-42 overtime victory at South Carolina.

This week’s open date is so much sweeter for UT (4-5, 1-4 SEC) because of the stunning comeback victory.

8. Rural Tennessee Museum a Success in First Year -

UNION CITY, Tenn. (AP) – When Discovery Park of America opened on a cornfield in rural Tennessee, its founders expected the museum described as a "mini-Smithsonian" to draw about 150,000 visitors in its first year.

9. Frayser Battleground for Achievement Schools -

After two years of being confronted with bad student achievement data, teachers at schools on the Achievement School District’s list for a takeover are confronting the ASD and charter organizations with data from the first two years of the state-run district.

10. Atonement for a Halloween Past -

‘Twas many and many a year ago when I acquired a genuine witch’s hat. That Halloween I covered my face with clown-white and donned an old choir robe. I was trying to be the funniest witch imaginable.

11. Achievement Schools Opposition Finds Frustration -

Charter school operators who are being considered for the next round of schools entering the state-run Achievement School District are facing the most organized opposition effort in the three-year history of the district in Memphis.

12. I Choose Memphis: Edward C-W Harper IV -

“I Choose Memphis” spotlights Memphians who are passionate about calling this community home. New Memphis Institute provides the profiles.

Name: Edward C-W Harper IV

13. Porter-Leath Extends Reach of Books From Birth -

Each month, the Shelby County Books from Birth program distributes more than 39,000 books via the mail to homes with children age 5 and younger. It’s an impressive effort.

But since the program started here in 2005, there has always been a major challenge: How to get books to kids whose addresses are always changing?

14. Events -

RiverArtsFest 2014 will be held Friday, Oct. 24, through Sunday, Oct. 26, in the South Main Historic Arts District. The festival will feature a juried artist market, 50 musical acts, food courts, interactive art stations and more. Admission is free on Friday and $5 on Saturday and Sunday. Visit riverartsmemphis.org for hours and more information.

15. On Stage -

With a box of old ticket stubs, some photographs he took at the concerts he went to and newspaper ads for concerts he came across on microfilm searches for other things, Ron Hall set out to document as many of the major rock and roll and rock concerts in Memphis he could over a fertile 30-year period.

16. Las Vegas Without Gambling -

Who in his right mind spends four days in Las Vegas, without kids to slow down things, and doesn’t sit at a table game even once to play a hand?

Who visits Sin City and doesn’t buy in at a morning poker game? And who travels to Las Vegas with a group of friends, almost all of whom played at least one table game, and doesn’t sit with them?

17. Expanding Opportunities -

The popular image of a library may be one of a dowdy old institution that loans out books and demands hushed voices from its patrons. But because of where the library system in Memphis is headed, though, that notion is – no pun intended – overdue for a rethink.

18. Recruiter’s Career Twist -

Ask Janet Miller about her remarkable career at the Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce and she’ll likely attribute it to good timing or pass credit onto others.

19. Tigers Look to Johnson to be Floor Maestro -

Most of them, the ones that become their college basketball team’s leading scorer or the guy that runs the show from the point, were always obvious talents.

You know the type, best player on the court at age 6 when all the other kids are carrying the basketball like a football or dribbling the ball off their knees.

20. Schools Leaders Move Toward Cooperation -

As the Achievement School District weighs a short list of a dozen low-performing Memphis schools for the state-run school district in the next school year, Shelby County Schools officials are involved in the selection process far more than they have been in past years.

21. Bringing Innovation to Innovation -

Notes from a keynote by John Kao, BEI 2014, Las Vegas

2.6 billion Google queries were on "innovation" last month, Kao posits. The issue, there is no shared definition, or mental map, of innovation. We are creating a tower of Babel effect.

22. Garrison Charts New Course for MATA -

The new president of the Memphis Area Transit Authority wants more collaboration with groups that have ideas about where the city’s bus system can gain passengers while keeping those riders who depend on the bus system.

23. Tourette Help -

In sports talk radio, questions are a good thing. They don’t have to bring solutions, after all, just open the gates to discussion and debate.

Craig Carton, who is co-host of WFAN’s morning show, “Boomer & Carton,” in New York, is comfortable with that format in that setting.

24. Events -

The Broad Avenue Arts District will host the Broad Avenue Night Market 2.0 Saturday, Oct. 11, from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. at the Water Tower Pavilion. The marketplace will feature artists, food, live music and activities for kids. Cost is free. Visit broadavearts.com.

25. Maryville City Schools Wants Another Win -

Maryville City Schools doesn’t rest on its laurels.

After being named a finalist three out of four years for the State Collaborative on Reforming Education [SCORE] Prize and winning recognition as the top Tennessee district for student learning in 2011, it could claim another victory this year.

26. Goodpasture Celebrates 50th Anniversary -

Aijalon Carter, 15, still remembers her first day as a timid 3-year-old at Goodpasture Christian School. Crying and scared, she was greeted by Miss Jill, her new preschool teacher and immediately felt better.

27. Events -

The 42nd annual Pink Palace Crafts Fair will be held Friday, Oct. 10, through Sunday, Oct. 12, at Audubon Park, 745 S. Perkins Road. The event will include handmade fine art and crafts, live entertainment, artist demonstrations and more. Hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. Adult tickets are $9. Visit memphismuseums.org.

28. Events -

The Memphis Railroad & Trolley Museum will celebrate the 100th anniversary of the grand opening of Memphis Central Station on Saturday, Oct. 4, with an 11 a.m. ceremony and free events from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Attendees can tour the Amtrak Exhibit Train, a Norfolk Southern Railroad exhibit car and a Canadian National freight locomotive cab. Visit mrtm.org.

29. Is This the Year the Vols Stomp the Chomp? -

KNOXVILLE – Much has happened since Tennessee placekicker James Wilhoit booted a 50-yarder with seven seconds remaining and the No. 13-ranked Vols beat No. 11 Florida 30-28 at Neyland Stadium.

30. Events -

The Circuit Playhouse will present “The Fantasticks” Friday, Oct. 3, to Oct. 26, at the theater, 51 S. Cooper St. Buy tickets at playhouseonthesquare.com.

31. Focus On Your Strengths -

A few weeks ago, I had the honor of sitting on a career panel about making the right career moves. In a packed room, we covered everything from preparing for a job interview to how office politics can influence promotions at work.

32. App Teaches Kindergartners Basic Computer Coding -

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (AP) – This computer programming app is so easy to use that even a kindergartener can do it.

Researchers in Massachusetts have created a basic computer coding app that they say is the first designed specifically for children as young as 5. Kids who haven't yet learned to read can use the app to craft their own interactive stories and games.

33. HipD: Donelson Finds Its Cool Side -

The tag “Hip Donelson” evoked plenty of snickers, eye rolls and snarky comments when it first appeared. After all, the local joke goes, Donelson’s known for hip replacements – not hipsters.

34. Middle-Class Squeeze: From Day Care to Health Care -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Three years ago, Jason Prosser was stunned to discover the cost of child care for his newborn son – so much so that he and his wife postponed having a second child.

35. Commitment to Fitness Looks to Reverse Childhood Obesity -

If American children and teenagers are fat, then those in the Mid-South are fatter. And you don’t have to rely on some “Fattest Cities in America” list aimed at generating clicks and views to reach this conclusion.

36. Woodland Expansion Reflects Broader Changes -

From the outside, the most noticeable change to the campus of Woodland Presbyterian School is the new building for the seventh- and eighth-graders at the pre-K through 8 independent private school in East Memphis.

37. Ban Sought on Children Working on Tobacco Farms -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Thirty-five House Democrats are urging the Obama administration to prohibit children from working on tobacco farms, citing concerns about ill health effects.

The lawmakers, led by Reps. David Cicilline, D-R.I., and Matt Cartwright, D-Pa., made their plea in a letter to Labor Secretary Thomas Perez. A copy of the letter was obtained by The Associated Press on Tuesday.

38. Events -

Volunteer Mid-South will hold a volunteer expo Tuesday, Sept. 23, from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. at Oak Court Mall, 4465 Poplar Ave. Dozens of Mid-South nonprofits will on hand to discuss programs and volunteer opportunities. Visit volunteermidsouth.org.

39. Events -

Volunteer Mid-South will hold a volunteer expo Tuesday, Sept. 23, from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. at Oak Court Mall, 4465 Poplar Ave. Dozens of Mid-South nonprofits will on hand to discuss programs and volunteer opportunities. Visit volunteermidsouth.org.

40. Prep Coaches, Players Sold on Jones the Recruiter -

Nothing surprises Murfreesboro Blackman High School football coach Philip Shadowens when it comes to college recruiting.

Shadowens has seen it all – including the flurry of activity created by Blackman senior quarterback and safety Jauan Jennings, rated the No. 18 athlete in the nation by Rivals.com.

41. Jones’ Wide Net Gathers Old Friends, Top Prospects -

Butch Jones was sitting in the office of Knoxville’s South-Doyle High School athletic director and football coach Clark Duncan during a visit to see recruit Jocquez Bruce last winter.

42. Education Secretary Praises Local Schools Leaders -

Sustainability is a term associated with environmental efforts, though innovation is a much more popular term across causes from economic development to education reform.

But when U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan came to Memphis this month as the last stop on a three-state bus tour of school districts, it was the word sustainability that came up more often than innovation.

43. Teacher Surplus Count Drops to Only Four -

Every school year the first estimates come in high in the count of how many school teachers will be surplused – declared excess because of the number of students that are counted at the start of the school year and then reassigned based on the final student head count.

44. 100 Percent Sure -

IF A PROGRAM IS 100 PERCENT SUCCESSFUL, GET WITH THE PROGRAM. I wrote something three years ago when President Obama visited Booker T. Washington High School. In light of recent events, I’d like to visit those words again.

45. Tigers Hope to ‘Grind’ Win Against MTSU -

It’s a big game. Big enough that the University of Memphis got the Grizzlies’ Tony Allen – “The Grindfather” – to do a short video urging fans to come out for the football game this Saturday, Sept. 20, against the Middle Tennessee Blue Raiders.

46. Community Advocates Seek Crime Solutions -

In mid-August, Memphis Police brass realized they had a crime problem in different parts of the city.

“We realized we had a spike in crime,” is how Deputy Police Chief Clete Knight put it Wednesday, Sept. 17, to a neighborhood group in East Memphis.

47. Seeking Long-Term Outcomes -

Long-term outcomes, such as improved high school graduation rates and reduced dropout rates, are the ultimate objectives of the Memphis Athletic Ministries’ still-young Academic Diligence program.

48. Events -

Sales and Marketing Society of the Mid-South will meet Wednesday, Sept. 17, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at The Racquet Club, 5111 Sanderlin Ave. Phil Trenary, president and CEO of the Greater Memphis Chamber, will present “Selling Memphis: locally, nationally and internationally.” Cost for nonmembers is $35 at the door. Visit sms-midsouth.org.

49. Events -

Remington College Memphis campus will hold the 3 Lives blood drive, a national effort to recruit minority blood donors, Tuesday, Sept. 16, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Remington, 2710 Nonconnah Blvd. Visit 3lives.com.

50. Events -

The fourth annual Downtown Museum Day will be held Saturday, Sept. 13, with free or half-price admission at 15 local museums and attractions. For more information on participating attractions, visit facebook.com/downtownmuseumday.

51. Legal Issues Await Mob Attack Investigation -

Memphis police could make more arrests in the Poplar Plaza mob attack, but investigators believe they have the teenagers who started the riot on the parking lot of the Kroger supermarket Saturday, Sept. 6, that injured three people.

52. Events -

ANF Architects will host an opening night reception for the Memphis Camera Club’s “Places We Worship” Friday, Sept. 12, from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at ANF, 1500 Union Ave. Visit anfa.com.

53. At the Counter -

THE COLLEGE INN, FULL CIRCLE. The future was in my hands. My parents had set me free and I sat there all by myself for the very first time, my own stool at the counter, my own menu in front of me and a cool new show on the TV above. It was 1957. I was eight. The show was Perry Mason. And I was in control.

54. Mob Effect -

For much of the week after the Saturday, Sept. 6, mob attack at the Poplar Plaza shopping center, Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong has resolutely kept his focus on the incident.

But the larger issues of violence in Memphis and specifically youth violence – and the criminal justice system response to both – have never been far away.

55. Heart Foundation’s Novick Prepares for Ukraine Work -

Dr. William Novick isn’t real big on taking orders – especially from his doctors. Four weeks ago, he had his second hip replacement surgery since the first of the year.

56. Shelby County Mortgage Market Down 19 Percent in August -

BankTennessee president and CEO Jim Rout sees new home sales and resales “fairly steady” at the moment.

But, in a common refrain among many local bankers looking at their recent numbers, the activity is not at the level that might be expected, considering still-historic low interest rates.

57. City Leaders Face Mixed Reaction to Poplar Plaza Attack -

Memphis police had arrested and charged 11 juveniles by the end of the day Monday, Sept. 8, in the mob attack Saturday at the Poplar Plaza shopping center.

Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong said several parents had followed the advice he and Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. gave Sunday and turned in their children after learning they may have been involved in the attack that injured two other teenagers working at the Kroger supermarket at Poplar Plaza.

58. The Best Education Comes When Traveling -

Proponents of formal classroom education, the following message might not be for you.

In my opinion, the best education comes on the road, even if it means taking the kids out of school for a few days.

59. City's Response to Poplar Plaza Attack Charts New Path -

The next front in City Hall’s discussion of youth violence won’t be another crime summit.

The last one happened just days before and within a mile of the Poplar Plaza shopping center where a mob of teenagers attacked, beat and injured three people Saturday, Sept 6.

60. Wharton Urges Parental Responsiblity for Poplar Plaza Attack -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. says the parents of the teenagers who attacked, beat and injured three people on the parking lot of the Poplar Plaza Kroger supermarket in East Memphis should bring their children in to authorities immediately.

61. Focus on Teens ‘At Risk of Being Homeless’ -

Not only is Crossroads Campus a successful non-profit operation that’s building a bridge to help homeless animals and potentially homeless young people, it’s also a thriving retail business operation driven by the savvy of executive director Lisa Stetar and her staff.

62. US Savings Bond – A Golden Oldie -

Ray’s take: U.S. savings bonds are debt instruments issued and fully backed by the federal government and were once touted as a great way to be patriotic. Their attraction historically has been safety (yes), deferred taxes (yes) and convenience (maybe). Traditionally, they were a staple gift for graduates, newlyweds and newborns.

63. Embracing Cremation -

As business decisions go, this was a tricky one.

Jeff and Steve Murphy, owners of Music City Mortuary, opened their Nashville business in 2001, catering primarily to the needs of other funeral directors, providing transportation, embalming and preparation services, shipping – everything a mortuary business provides.

64. Mortarville to Memphis -

On the walls of his office at Hickory Ridge Middle School, principal Cedric Smith has a poster of an Iraqi flag. It’s from the time his Army reserve unit was called up in 2009 and stationed on a base that soldiers nicknamed “Mortarville” for how often it was hit by enemy shells.

65. Discover Labor Day Getaways Close to Home -

Labor Day, the traditional end to summer. Public swimming pools are closing and college football is getting underway.

It’s also time for one last getaway before fall settles in, especially if you have school-age children.

66. Vanderbilt Students Find Happiness in Music City -

As the Class of 2018 begins to poke around the Vanderbilt University campus, the newest Commodores will be met with the highest of expectations.

“This class is projected to have the highest academic quality in our history as measured by high school class rank and SAT scores,’’ says Doug Christiansen, vice provost for enrollment and dean of admissions.

67. Class is In -

For Collierville Schools superintendent John Aitken, the demerger of public schools in Shelby County didn’t become “real” until teachers reported the week before the Aug. 4 first day of classes.

68. Humes Rises From Bottom 5 Percent of Tennessee Schools -

Humes Preparatory Academy is no longer in the bottom 5 percent of schools in the state in terms of student achievement, as measured by state education officials.

That according to school-by-school test data from the Tennessee Comprehensive Assessment Program (TCAP) and Tennessee Value Added Assessment System (TVAAS) data, released by state education officials Tuesday, Aug. 19, in Nashville.

69. Tenn. Attorney General: Parents Can't Give Kids New Last Names -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Tennessee's attorney general says married parents can't invent new last names for their children.

Attorney General Bob Cooper writes in a legal opinion that state law limits the options to the last name of either the father or the mother, or both.

70. I Choose Memphis: Andrés Flores -

“I Choose Memphis” spotlights Memphians who are passionate about calling this community home. New Memphis Institute provides the profiles.

Name: Andrés Flores

71. Former Tigers Head Man Finds Simpler Life at MTSU -

In nine years as the head coach, Tommy West provided the University of Memphis with much of its football lore: five bowls – there have only been seven – and 49 wins (third-most all time).

72. Hit Factory -

The massive trees and the shade they make are the only thing left on the northwest corner of Danny Thomas Boulevard and Chelsea Avenue from the days when American Studios turned out 120 hit records from 1965 to 1972.

73. Over 50 – Should You ‘Catch Up’? -

Ray’s Take: If you’re age 50 or older, you can make extra “catch-up” contributions to certain types of tax-favored retirement accounts.

Is this something you should take advantage of? On the surface, it seems like a positive for your retirement account. But take a long honest look at why you are going to make those catch-up contributions and check your plan to make sure you qualify. There is a lot of information out there regarding these types of contributions, and you need to separate the good from the not so good.

74. Nonprofits to Pitch Ideas for GiVE 365 Grants -

Three minutes to make their best pitch. That’s what the finalists will have Monday night, Aug. 18, when they compete for Community Foundation of Greater Memphis GiVE 365 grants.

“It’s by far the most important event we have,” said Ashley Harper, director of grants and initiatives at the foundation. “And it’s high energy because we’re strict about those three minutes.”

75. Early Diagnosis -

Of the approximately 7 million people in the United States that have scoliosis (curvature of the spine), most of them are teenagers and children.

Years ago, scoliosis screenings in the public schools were the norm. Today, less than 50 percent of the states require the screenings. This despite the fact that the Adam’s Forward Bend test – the initial screening for scoliosis – can be done in less than 30 seconds.

76. Start of School Features Historic Change -

A child ready for his first day of school Monday, Aug. 4, in the new Bartlett City Schools system mistakenly got on a bus bound for Shelby County Schools that ran close to the route he was supposed to take.

77. Ag Tourism Touted as Way to Boost Rural Economies -

CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. (AP) – With its sweet fruit-flavored liqueurs, a working farm and eccentric cast of characters – including a dancing lemon – Bloomery Plantation Distillery has attracted tourists from every U.S. state and countries as far away as Laos and Iceland.

78. Incoming Civil Rights Museum President Seeks Connection -

The incoming president of the National Civil Rights Museum remembers a quick and hurried visit to the museum shortly after the debut of an extensive renovation earlier this year.

“It lends itself to giving people a physical, spiritual experience in coming here. It is a moving institution,” said Terri Lee Freeman, who comes to the museum from being president of the Community Foundation for the National Capital Region in Washington, D.C. “I come from a town where there are a lot of museums. I’ve never had the experience of being physically moved by a museum like I had when I came here the first time.”

79. Senate Reprieve for Highly Contested Border Bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A bill to deal with the immigration surge on the U.S.-Mexico border won a temporary reprieve in the Senate Wednesday as lawmakers maneuvered to offer some response to the crisis before adjourning for the summer.

80. Events -

Overton Square will hold a Thursdays Squared concert Thursday, July 31, from 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. in the Tower Courtyard at Trimble Place and Florence Street. The series continues through Aug. 28. Visit thursdayssquared.com for a schedule.

81. Events -

Church Health Center Wellness and Bring It Food Hub will hold a Bring It, Cook It, Take It cooking class Thursday, July 31, at 5:30 p.m. at 1115 Union Ave. The class will include cooking demonstrations using fresh produce, plus tastings and recipes. Cost is $5 and includes a bag of produce. Visit churchhealthcenter.org.

82. Bartlett Ninth Grade Academy Prepares for Debut -

A group of 213 children in Bartlett who are coming out of middle school and into a new academic year and system got an introduction last week to the Bartlett school that is a bridge between their middle schools and Bartlett High.

83. Registration Could Reflect Suburban Relocation -

When Shelby County’s six new suburban school districts register students on Tuesday, July 29, some of those systems’ superintendents will watch for changes from the numbers of students who pre-registered in the new school systems less than a year ago.

84. Suburban Schools Mark A Week to Debut -

Suburban school leaders drop by the Shelby County Schools data center Monday, July 28, to get their first formal look at achievement test scores for their students during the only year of the Shelby County Schools merger.

85. Fast Food Workers Prepare to Escalate Wage Demands -

CHICAGO (AP) – Fast food workers say they're prepared to escalate their campaign for higher wages and union representation, starting with a national convention in suburban Chicago where more than 1,000 workers will discuss the future of the effort that has spread to dozens of cities in less than two years.

86. School Year Brings New Lessons for Teachers -

When the school year begins on Aug. 4 for Shelby County Schools and the six suburban public school systems, the learning process will begin not only for students but for teachers.

As the larger system-wide changes of the demerger have played out, teachers across the county have been preparing for the world inside classrooms that always offers change at the beginning of a new school year.

87. Tennessee Gets High Marks in Child Welfare Report -

NASHVILLE (AP) – The latest national ranking of the well-being of children shows Tennessee is among five states that made the biggest improvement in the last year.

The Kids Count Data Book, an annual report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation, grades states on education, health care and poverty.

88. Teach for America Leverages Start Co. Resources -

Education reform has been alive and well here in Memphis over the last few years. There have been many great initiatives established to secure dollars and establish programming to move our youth forward. As always, I am thinking of scale, sustainability and innovation to stay relevant.

89. Rising Up -

Adrienne Johnson remembers being stalked. It was actually a good thing. “I grew up in a single-parent home,” said Johnson, 35, today a financial analyst at International Paper and one of IP’s mentors in the RISE Foundation Goal Card program. “I was the first in my family to go to college. It was unrealistic (to attend college), not something I envisioned at all.”

90. Juvenile Court Reform Moves to Child Welfare Cases -

For the last two years, much of the attention in Juvenile Court reforms has been on delinquent children who come to the court for their actions.

But this fall, the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges will begin an examination of its child welfare program – the reason that most children come to the court.

91. SRVS Merges with Special Kids & Families -

SRVS, Tennessee’s largest provider of services for people with disabilities, is merging with Special Kids & Families, creating the only local nonprofit to provide supports for individuals with disabilities from birth throughout life.

92. SRVS Merges With Special Kids & Families -

SRVS, Tennessee’s largest provider of services for people with disabilities, is merging with Special Kids & Families, creating the only local nonprofit to provide supports for individuals with disabilities from birth throughout life.

93. We’re All Invited -

MEMPHIS, SERVED IN THE SHELL. Following up last week’s column, this from a reader:

“We have no civic pride, half the population is intent on killing as many as they can and the other part lives behind walls or gates. There was a time in the fifties when you could leave your front door unlocked and keys in the car.”

94. Survey Finds Math, Science Grads Earn Top Dollar -

WASHINGTON (AP) – What you study – math and science are a plus – seems to matter more than whether your alma mater is public or private when it comes to finding a high-paying job after college, according to a report released Tuesday by the Education Department.

95. Amazon Vows to Fight FTC on Kids In-App Purchases -

LOS ANGELES (AP) – Amazon says that it is prepared to go to court against the Federal Trade Commission to defend itself against charges that it has not done enough to prevent children from making unauthorized in-app purchases.

96. Health Choice Selects Abisch to Lead Population Health Services -

Ellen Abisch has joined Health Choice LLC as senior director of population health services. In the newly created position, Abisch will be responsible for designing, implementing and managing population health and wellness programs for the Health Choice network.
Prior to joining the physician hospital organization, she served as manager of benefits and wellness for ServiceMaster.

97. University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Le Bonheur Form Pediatric Obesity Center -

Doctors like to go where they are needed.

Dr. Joan C. Han is coming to Memphis to be the founding director of the new UT-Le Bonheur Pediatric Obesity Center and to direct the new Le Bonheur Healthy Lifestyle Clinic.

98. Still Rock ‘n’ Roll -

When Jeff Nolan, the Hard Rock Café’s music and memorabilia historian, got to Memphis Sunday, June 29, to prepare for the next day’s preview tours of the new Hard Rock location at Beale and Second streets, he grabbed a bite to eat at nearby Rum Boogie Café.

99. Timing Key Element of County Tax Rate Debate -

More funding from Shelby County government for prekindergarten classrooms is a matter of timing, say those on both sides of the property tax rate question on which the $2.8 million in additional funding hinges.

100. Connected Home -

When he founded Memphis-based Phoenix Unequaled Home Entertainment 20 years ago, Scott Fuelling couldn’t have predicted the degree to which consumers eventually would embrace the concept of the connected home.