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Editorial Results (free)

1. With No Real Rival, Tennessee Republicans Attack Their Own -

Republicans are sitting in Tennessee’s political catbird seat, but that doesn’t keep them from flying off in different directions.

Elected political leaders of the same stripe found themselves at odds this year over the Bible as a state book, Common Core education standards and Insure Tennessee, Republican Gov. Bill Haslam’s plan to catch 280,000 people in a medical coverage gap.

2. Charles Hughes to Head Rhodes’ Memphis Center -

Dr. Charles L. Hughes has been named director of Rhodes College’s Memphis Center, an academic hub focused on the human experience of the Memphis and Mid-South region. He will be teaching classes on Memphis history and culture, coordinating student projects and developing programs, and also will be continuing his own research on the area.

3. Auburn Picked to Win SEC Championship -

HOOVER, Ala. – Only once in the previous six years did the media correctly pick the Southeastern Conference champion in the annual voting that is part of SEC Media Days. That was last year, when media accurately projected Alabama as conference champion.

4. Vols, Titans Fight to Fill Empty Stadium Seats -

When it comes to giving the consumer what it wants, few sports programs can match University of Tennessee football.

Neyland Stadium, which 40 years ago could accommodate only 70,000 fans, has swelled to a capacity of 102,455, fifth largest in college football. It has a $4 million, 4,580-square-foot Jumbotron, W-Fi connections for fans and enough flashing lights around the stadium’s interior to shame the Las Vegas Strip.

5. SRVS, AutoZone Honored For Disability Job Efforts -

Memphis-based disability services provider SRVS and auto parts retailer AutoZone have garnered recognition from the Association of People Supporting Employment First for their contributions supporting integrated community employment for people with disabilities.

6. Auburn Picked to Win SEC Championship -

HOOVER, Ala. – Only once in the previous six years did the media correctly pick the Southeastern Conference champion in the annual voting that is part of SEC Media Days. That was last year, when media accurately projected Alabama as conference champion.

7. Steve Spurrier Pokes Fun at Tennessee, Arkansas -

HOOVER, ALA. – South Carolina coach Steve Spurrier wasted no time taking his first jabs at other SEC schools. As he made his opening remarks at SEC Media Days Tuesday, July 14, at The Wynfrey Hotel, he spoke of the joy he and his team felt by rallying at season’s end to get to a bowl game, then win the Independence Bowl against Miami and finish 7-6.

8. SRVS, AutoZone Honored for Disability Employment Efforts -

Memphis-based disability services provider SRVS and auto parts retailer AutoZone have garnered recognition from the Association of People Supporting Employment First for their contributions supporting integrated community employment for people with disabilities.

9. ‘Honda Girl’ Ashley Blair Finds Career Outside Car Ads -

Ten-year-old actress Ashley Blair takes her job seriously. She’s like many other actors in the region working to improve her craft and looking for the next project. The Knoxville area has a thriving community of actors, writers, directors, and producers, all trying to showcase their best work, both locally and nationally.

10. Acting Up -

The Knoxville area has a rich legacy of actors who have found success in show business: Patricia Neal, David Keith, Cylk Cozart, David Dwyer, John Cullum, Bruce McKinnon, Polly Bergen, Dale Dickey, Brad Renfro, Johnny Knoxville, perhaps the most famous of all, Dolly Parton, singer/songwriter turned actress.

11. Boner, Peel and a Reporter’s Call Spark a City’s Embarrassment -

Nashville’s mayor broke into a broad smile and funny walk, pointing across the main dining room at the old TGI Friday’s on Elliston Place to a young reporter seated at a long table with eight colleagues and friends.

12. Boner, Fate and the Summer of Shame -

Phil Bredesen knew what he was trying to do. He just didn’t know if he could accomplish it.

“I had this sense that Nashville was ready for change,” says the former Metro mayor and Tennessee governor, reflecting on his early motivation for taking on the system that had run Nashville for decades.

13. Local Green News Piles Up, From Shelby Farms to CBU -

Chelsea Avenue Floodwall Becomes ‘Permission Wall’: The city’s renaissance of murals is taking a different form on the section of North Memphis floodwalls that are a border of sorts for the still developing Chelsea Greenline.

14. Forrest Vote Signals Change in General’s Legacy -

When the city of Memphis voted to rename Forrest Park and two other Confederate-themed parks in Downtown Memphis two years ago, City Council member Bill Boyd criticized the move and extolled Nathan Bedford Forrest’s virtues.

15. Insure Tennessee Path Still Facing Many Turns -

There’s a move in Nashville for a special session of the Tennessee General Assembly, but it would have nothing to do with the February special session on Gov. Bill Haslam’s Insure Tennessee proposal.

16. Ikea Seeks $16 Million Permit For First Memphis Store -

Future Ikea Store
On 42 Acres In Cordova
Permit Cost: $16 million

Application Date: July 2015
Owner/Tenant: Ikea
Details: Ikea is moving forward with its massive retail store in Cordova.

17. Memphis City Council to Vote on Forrest Statue Removal -

[Update: Adds specifics of City Council's proposal on Nathan Bedford Forrest. The council will vote on the Forrest statue removal today.] With the city budget season done, Memphis City Council members turn their attention Tuesday, July 7, to development in the Pinch district, the statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest and redrawing council district lines.

18. All-Male Nanny Service Eyeing Middle Tennessee -

Mary Poppins he’s not. No flying umbrellas, no Oscar-winning musical numbers.

But as a caregiver, Jon Ericksen would rank himself right up there with any nanny in the business.

“Two nieces grew up in the house with me, I have worked with kids a lot in all my jobs, so I knew this was something that I would be very interested in,” says Ericksen, one of the men working for MyManny, a Tennessee-based, all-male nanny agency.

19. Trade Schools Have to Find Grads Jobs, or Lose Financial Aid -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Exotic dancers hired as admissions counselors. Recruiters told to seek out "impatient" individuals who have "few people in their lives who care about them." Military personnel still recovering from brain damage told to sign on the dotted line.

20. New Forrest Front -

The political battle over an equestrian statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest and the park that houses it has opened a new front.

21. Mark Mosteller Joins Evolve Bank & Trust -

Mark E. Mosteller Sr. recently joined Evolve Bank & Trust as executive vice president, accounting and finance.
The new role includes a variety of responsibilities, including management of the accounting and finance department team, accounting internal controls, internal and external financial reporting, budgeting and forecasting, taxes and treasury management. Mosteller also works with senior and executive management and the board on accounting, finance and operational issues.

22. Memphis Finance Gurus Retrace City’s Fiscal Path -

Mayors come and go at City Hall and what was a priority for one administration can change with the next. But one constant is finance.

It defines a city’s overall health, no matter who is in office, and thus its ability to borrow money to fund those priorities and then pay off that debt.

23. Capitol Commission to Review Which Historical Figures Should Be Honored -

Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey and House Speaker Beth Harwell are encouraging the Tennessee Capitol Commission to evaluate the characteristics of Tennesseans honored in the Capitol Complex.

24. Nashville’s Long, Hot, Delicious Summer -

Summertime brings us wedges of juicy watermelon and drippy ice cream cones. It yields pies piled with blackberries and peaches so fresh they can fill a room with their aroma.

It offers jewel-toned tomatoes for slicing and piling onto BLTs.

25. Simmons Joins Cushman & Wakefield/Commercial Advisors -

Mary Leesa Simmons has joined Cushman & Wakefield/Commercial Advisors as vice president – senior asset manager. In her new role, Simmons provides all aspects of property management duties for the firm’s clients.
This includes financial administration, budgeting, reporting, lease administration, contract administration, tenant, client and vendor administration, capital improvements and property inspections.

26. First Horizon National Corp. Reveals Stress Test Results -

The Memphis-based parent company of First Tennessee Bank has passed its annual, federally mandated “stress test.”

27. Fast Growth for Knoxville Diocese -

For the smallest Catholic diocese in the U.S., the Knoxville diocese knows how to draw a crowd of movers and shakers.

At the April 19 groundbreaking for the new $25 million cathedral, the lineup of both secular and non-secular dignitaries attending a weekend of events was impressive.

28. Building Green in a Red-Hot Market -

Counting cranes has become a Nashville pastime, and the perks of all that development are clear – a robust economy, vibrant real estate market and more jobs.

Naturally, there is concern among some residents that all of the construction and increased population could harm the area’s environment, water and air quality and green space.

29. Garibaldi's Temptations Club Celebrates its 1980s Run -

Mike Garibaldi is known for his Memphis restaurant chain, Garibaldi's Pizza.

At the original Garibaldi’s, near the University of Memphis, is a picture on the wall of a smiling waitress in her 50s.

30. First Horizon National Corp. Reveals Stress Test Results -

The Memphis-based parent company of First Tennessee Bank has passed its annual, federally mandated “stress test.”

31. Memphis City Council’s Distrust of Wharton Boils to Surface -

If it wasn’t obvious in five previous budget seasons, Memphis City Council members made the point clearer Tuesday, June 16, just before they delayed final city budget votes for another week.

They don’t trust the numbers and explanations they are getting from Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. as they try to rearrange his $656.5 million budget that was proposed in April.

32. Proton’s Weaver Wizard of Tech Innovation -

On any given day, business executives, scientists and chemical engineers from across the U.S. and around the world come to East Tennessee to see for themselves the renewable energy technology developed by Lenoir City-based Proton Power Inc.

33. Memphis City Council Adds Health Benefits Extension to Budget To-Do List -

Memphis City Council members have another decision to make on their list of votes before the fiscal year ends June 30.

The council is weighing extending health insurance benefits through 2016 for city retirees younger than 65.

34. Opry Has Become Big Part of CMA Fest -

The relationship between the Grand Ole Opry – the 90-year-old radio program and down home variety show – and CMA Music Fest is a pretty simple formula.

“A win for CMA Music Fest is a win for the Opry,” says Pete Fisher, vice president and general manager of the nation’s longest continuously running radio program.

35. Bonnaroo Success ‘Testament to the Community’ -

Knoxville music promoter Ashley Capps – a big part of the brain trust that created Bonnaroo – really never needed the media to make the annual music and arts festival a success.

36. Better Catch Schwarber While He’s Still a Smokie -

SEVIERVILLE – Tennessee Smokies catcher Kyle Schwarber didn’t waste any time catching the attention of the Chicago Cubs manager Joe Maddon during spring training.

It was March 5, Schwarber’s 22nd birthday, and the Cubs were playing San Francisco. Schwarber came to bat for the first time in spring training with the bases loaded against Giants pitcher Ryan Vogelsong.

37. Making the Connection -

Archie Willis III had just earned his master’s degree in business at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill when he returned to Memphis in 1981 to help his father, A.W. Willis Jr., redevelop the Adler Hotel Annex.

38. Leading Bakery Products Producer to Build New Lebanon Plant -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A leading bakery products producer is investing $103 million to open a new manufacturing facility in Wilson County that's expected to create 147 jobs.

Gov. Bill Haslam and Economic and Community Development Commissioner Randy Boyd announced this week that Maplehurst Bakeries LLC, a division of Weston Foods, will build the facility in Lebanon.

39. Tigers’ Tubbs Receives All-America Recognition -

University of Memphis senior first baseman Tucker Tubbs has been named to the Louisville Slugger NCAA Division I All-American baseball team. Tubbs is a Third Team All-America selection, as chosen by Collegiate Baseball newspaper.

40. Backsplash -

In the beginning, there was Splash – the first legal casino in Tunica County following the Mississippi Legislature’s passage of the 1990 law legalizing “dockside” casinos in the state.

41. Talent Takes the Wheel -

As the economy continues to improve, employers are beginning to think of what they can do to attract and retain the best talent. In fact, I was just asked for tips on this very topic by a local employer.

42. Hopson, Barbic Look Ahead to New School Year -

Dorsey Hopson and Chris Barbic are comparing notes on the new school year that begins in August, the first in three years in which the structure of public education in Shelby County essentially will remain the same.

43. Ramsey Uses ‘System’ to Reshape State’s Political Landscape -

Senate Speaker and Lieutenant Gov. Ron Ramsey laughs at the notion he’s changed since being elected to the Legislature 23 years ago, that he’s lost touch with the common man or become “arrogant” as lieutenant governor of Tennessee.

44. Harris Pushes For Insure Tennessee Comeback -

State Senate Democratic leader Lee Harris of Memphis will be on the campaign trail this summer.

Harris and other Democratic leaders in the majority Republican Tennessee legislature will campaign across the state this summer for the comeback of the Insure Tennessee proposal in the 2016 legislative session.

45. Commission Budget Consensus Includes Tax Rollback -

There is still some “cognitive dissonance” left in the county’s budget season, county commissioner Heidi Shafer said near the end of the marathon Wednesday, May 20, budget committee session she oversaw.

46. What’s Next? -

When Steven Baldwin started his freshman year at Austin Peay State University in 2012, he had a smart, carefully considered plan for his future.

47. County Commissioners Add To Budget, Talk Property Tax Rollback -

Shelby County Commissioners added $4.7 million within the $1.1 billion county budget proposal by County Mayor Mark Luttrell Wednesday, May 20, in a day-long budget committee session.

The committee actions are recommendations to the full commission which could vote on a budget as early as the Memorial Day session of the commission on Monday, May 25. But the committee recommendations had a majority of seven votes on the 13-member body in many cases.

48. Farm Feast -

The first elementary school students came to Agricenter International for some hands-on education more than a decade ago. About 80 students went on a literal field trip, walking through the cotton, soybean and cornfields.

49. Southbrook Tests Wharton Administration Shake-Up -

It didn’t take very long for the city of Memphis’ new chief administrative officer to make a tough call.

And when Jack Sammons came down on the side of pulling back city funding for Southbrook Mall, political allies and foes of Mayor A C Wharton Jr. watched to see if he would go along with the decision.

50. Haslam Point Man To Leave Administration -

Mark Cate is leaving Republican Gov. Bill Haslam’s administration after serving as Haslam’s campaign manager in 2010 and as the governor’s chief of staff after he took office.

Cate served as point man for many of the governor’s top legislative initiatives, including caps on payouts from successful civil lawsuits and changing teacher tenure rules. He also spearheaded this year’s failed effort to pass Haslam’s Insure Tennessee proposal to extend health coverage to 280,000 low-income people.

51. Logistics Firm Opening Downtown Sales Office -

A fast-growing logistics firm will invest $1 million to open a sales office in the heart of Downtown Memphis.

Total Quality Logistics will invest $1 million to open the office in the 100 Peabody Place building Downtown, a move that is expected to create at least 100 new jobs over the next five years.

52. 'King of the Blues' B.B. King Dead at 89 at Home in Vegas -

LAS VEGAS (AP) – B.B. King, whose scorching guitar licks and heartfelt vocals made him the idol of generations of musicians and fans while earning him the nickname King of the Blues, died late Thursday at home in Las Vegas. He was 89.

53. East Tennessee’s Endangered 8 -

The East Tennessee Preservation Alliance’s list of endangered heritage sites for the region:

1. The Stonecipher-Kelly House in Morgan County was built around 1814 by the first permanent white settlers in that area, as part of a Revolutionary War land-grant.

54. Investors Pumping Hundreds of Millions Into Tennessee Startups -

The assignment sounded simple enough: Find out whether more money is coming into Nashville for startups.

If so, where is it coming from and what does it means to entrepreneurs, investors and the rest of us?

55. Haslam Point Man to Leave Governor’s Administration -

Mark Cate is leaving Republican Gov. Bill Haslam’s administration after serving as Haslam’s campaign manager in 2010 and as the governor’s chief of staff after he took office.

Cate served as point man for many of the governor’s top legislative initiatives, including caps on payouts from successful civil lawsuits and changing teacher tenure rules. He also spearheaded this year’s failed effort to pass Haslam’s Insure Tennessee proposal to extend health coverage to 280,000 low-income people.

56. Logistics Firm Opening Downtown Sales Office -

A fast-growing logistics firm will invest $1 million to open a sales office in the heart of Downtown Memphis.

Total Quality Logistics will invest $1 million to open the office in the 100 Peabody Place building Downtown, a move that is expected to create at least 100 new jobs over the next five years.

57. Long-Delayed Nuclear Plant in Tennessee Nears Completion -

SPRING CITY, Tenn. (AP) – Tom Wallace started working at the Watts Bar nuclear plant as a young man in 1979, hoping he could eventually become a reactor operator.

58. Why US Homebuyers Face a Tough Spring -

Eager to buy your first home this spring? Already own, but want to trade up? Be warned: there’ll be plenty of competition

Bidding wars have broken out in hot real-estate markets like Denver and Los Angeles, where there aren’t enough houses to meet demand. The lack of supply is a key reason home sales nationwide have yet to return to healthy levels following the housing collapse in 2008.

59. Convincing Girls, Women to Pursue Science and Math Careers -

Claudia Rawn is used to talking about science, so when asked to speak about women in the STEM disciplines, she was a bit out of her comfort zone.

The speaking invitation came from organizers with the University of Tennessee’s inaugural Women in STEM Research Symposium, held in April.

60. Comcast Announces Super-Fast Internet in Nashville, Mum on Cost -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Comcast says it is bringing its super-fast Internet service to Nashville, but won't say how much it will cost to install or subscribe.

The company announced Wednesday it will offer residential customers fiber optic service of two gigabits per second – or twice the speed of what is currently offered by some municipal electric providers and by Google. The tech giant's high-speed Internet service, Google Fiber, earlier this year announced it will expand to four metro areas in the southeastern U.S., including Nashville.

61. Pyramid Promises -

It took about 25 years for an elevator ride to reach the top of The Pyramid.

That’s how long several generations of political leaders – three county mayors and three Memphis mayors as well as a changing group of city council members over seven elections – have been seeking a Pyramid with a ride to the apex.

62. UAW Reports 55 Percent Membership at VW Plant in Tennessee -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The United Auto Workers union has 816 members at the Volkswagen plant in Tennessee, or about 55 percent of the total blue collar work force, according the union's latest disclosure with the U.S. Department of Labor.

63. Haslam Signs Bill to Allow Guns in All Tennessee Parks -

Local governments in Tennessee can no longer bar people with handgun carry permits from bringing firearms to parks, playgrounds and sports fields under legislation signed Friday by Republican Gov. Bill Haslam.

64. Obama Uses Hospital Funds to Push Medicaid Expansion -

MIAMI (AP) — The Obama administration is dialing up the pressure on a handful of states that have resisted expanding Medicaid coverage for their low-income residents under the federal health care overhaul.

65. Memphis & The Law -

Over the long life of the city’s legal community, Court Square has been a place where attorneys and judges come together outside the courtroom and their law practices.

In many cases, it’s a chance encounter since no court has ever met in Court Square – despite its name and the intent of those who drew up the plan for Memphis nearly 200 years ago.

66. MUS Students Win Regional Hunger Challenge -

A Memphis University School group took first place in a regional competition of community service, charitable giving, and hunger-relief awareness activities called the Hunger Challenge. The club’s activities resulted in about 60,500 meals provided to Memphians in crisis.

67. Haslam Signs Bill to Allow Guns in All Tennessee Parks -

Local governments in Tennessee can no longer bar people with handgun carry permits from bringing firearms to parks, playgrounds and sports fields under legislation signed Friday by Republican Gov. Bill Haslam.

68. Where to Park for Nashville Sounds Games -

The parking and transportation map is available at nashvillesounds.com/parking.

Additional parking and transportation options include the following:

69. Kelly, Berry Battle for Safety Spot in Legacy Showdown -

Todd Kelly Jr. concludes his first spring practice with Tennessee’s football team this week in a heated competition for a safety job.

70. Baker Book Traces Conciliatory Political Philosophy -

Long before his death last June, former U.S. Sen. Howard Baker of Tennessee was aware that other Republicans, including those who worked in his groundbreaking campaigns of the 1960s and 1970s, believed it was no longer possible for a political moderate like him to get elected in Tennessee.

71. Memphis & The Law -

Before there was Law Week, there was Law Day.

The observance by the Memphis Bar Association as well as bar associations and attorneys across the country was created in the mid-1950s as a way of promoting the legal community and its impact.

72. Biblical Lessons Lost in Lack of Health Care Debate -

Tennessee’s legislators spent hours this session arguing over guns and whether to pass a law making the Bible the state book of Tennessee.

In fact, the Bible bill took two days of debate in the House, where it passed, and thorough discussion in the Senate, before it died – at least until next year.

73. Perfect Timing -

She’s new here, both as a resident of the city and as the executive director of the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art.

So Emily Ballew Neff, while confident, ambitious and excited – everything the Brooks board of trustees would want her to be – is also careful not to overstep.

74. Dr. Neil Bomar Joins Support Solutions -

Dr. Neil Bomar has joined Support Solutions as its first staff psychiatrist, a role in which he will help individuals with intellectual disabilities and those with a history of long-term mental illness who are currently supported by the organization. Bomar’s addition makes Support Solutions one of the only industry providers in the Mid-South to provide this level of support.

75. City Hall Budget Season Begins -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton takes an operating budget proposal of more than $622 million to the Memphis City Council Tuesday, April 21.

The proposed budget will be larger than the current fiscal year’s budget, reflecting Wharton’s belief that the city has enough of its fiscal crisis behind it at this point to slowly begin reinvesting in areas such as public safety and street paving.

76. MUS Students Win Regional Hunger Challenge -

A Memphis University School group took first place in a regional competition of community service, charitable giving, and hunger-relief awareness activities called the Hunger Challenge. The club’s activities resulted in about 60,500 meals provided to Memphians in crisis.

77. Festival Spotlights Student Artists, Artwork -

Regardless of whether East Tennessee secondary students decide to pursue art as a career, the Dogwood Arts Festival gives them the opportunity to feel the excitement of having their work professionally framed and publicly displayed as part of Synergy, the annual art exhibit.

78. Dogwoods & Elvis -

Dogwood Arts Festival President Janet Testerman’s family lore with Knoxville’s spring celebration goes back to the days of Elvis when he was a showstopper at the event. Her mother, also named Janet, had the once-in-a-lifetime chance to meet the King.

79. Bass Pro Announces Opening Week Lineup -

Bass Pro Shops has unveiled the celebrity lineup and schedule for its opening festivities, kicking off with a free Evening for Conservation event Wednesday, April 29, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Here is the press release from Bass Pro:

80. Goldcrest 51 Makes Horse-Drawn Comeback -

A restored, 1903 Studebaker horse-drawn carriage was used this week to deliver the first kegs of Goldcrest 51 to Westy’s and Tennessee Brewery: The Revival.

Westy’s is owned by Jake Schorr, whose great-grandfather started the Tennessee Brewing Co., Goldcrest 51’s original home, in 1885.

81. Tennessee Senate Passes 48-Hour Waiting-Period Abortion Bill -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Women would have to wait 48 hours before an abortion, under legislation approved by the Senate on Wednesday after lawmakers rejected an amendment to exempt cases of rape or incest.

82. Tennessee House Bogs Down Over Making Bible Official Book -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A small-town Republican's proposal to make the Bible the official book of Tennessee ran into opposition from top members of his own party as the House delayed a scheduled vote on the measure Tuesday.

83. Universal Life Building Developers Acquire Key Public Financing -

Developers of the Universal Life Building have received approval for two key pieces of financing and a commitment from the city of Memphis to lease about half of the building.

Self-Tucker Properties LLC won approval Tuesday, April 14, for a nine-year payment-in-lieu-of-taxes agreement from the Center City Revenue Finance Corp. to renovate the building for office use. Architects Jimmie Tucker and Juan Self, principals of Self-Tucker Architects, also gained approval for $2 million in Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds for the project.

84. Job Search -

On Sunday, about 1,400 Memphians seeking jobs and internships flocked to the Hilton Memphis for the 2nd annual Multicultural Career Expo. They met with human resources professionals from 50 local companies that are seeking a diverse roster of candidates.

85. I Choose Memphis: Rodney J. Rowan -

“I Choose Memphis” spotlights Memphians who are passionate about calling this community home. New Memphis Institute provides the profiles.

Name: Rodney J. Rowan

Job title and company: Principal, Cherokee Elementary School, SCS I-Zone School

86. First Horizon Reaches $212.5 Million Mortgage Settlement with Feds -

First Tennessee Bank has reached a deal with the U.S. Department of Justice and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development over claims related to the bank’s underwriting and origination of certain FHA-insured mortgage loans.

87. Big Leap From Hollywood Hustle to Nolensville ‘Barn’ -

The step-grandmother of Clark Gable’s granddaughter leans back in her chair inside the Mennonite furniture store and holds up a foot.

“Look. I’m wearing orange socks. I must be eccentric,” says Linda Roberts as a gray, misty day chases me from Nolensville Road into the worn building tucked against Mill Creek.

88. Shelby County Mortgage Market Grows 23 Percent in March -

The last month of the first quarter showcased a Shelby County mortgage market with abundant vitality, including evidence that plenty of demand exists among buyers eager to sign on the dotted line.

Mortgage volume countywide grew 23 percent in March compared to the same month a year ago, according to real estate information company Chandler Reports, www.chandlerreports.com. Year over year, volume last month rose to a little more than $126 million, up from $103.1 million in March 2014, and lenders say continued low rates are one reason why.

89. Polishing the Diamond -

Paul Brehm is a baseball fan and the co-owner of a trucking company. On any given night, he personally represents one click through the AutoZone Park turnstile, if you want to think in those terms, but he has the capacity to increase that number several times over.

90. Five of the Nation’s Finest -

Each year the U.S. Chamber of Commerce recognizes the contribution of small business to the national economy with the Blue Ribbon Small Business Awards. Five from Knoxville’s business community – The Tomato Head, Management Solutions LLC, Design Innovation Architects Inc., Visionary Solutions LLC and AMS Corp. – have been chosen for inclusion in the annual program.

91. Interest in Guns Ranges From Self-Defense to Recreation -

While the stereotype of the “gun guy” clad in camouflage still exists, firearms owners are much more likely to be your dentist, doctor or the guy or gal next door.

As of March, there were more than 500,000 handgun permit holders in Tennessee – about one in 10 residents.

92. What Better Place for an NRA Convention? -

When the National Rifle Association announced that it would hold its 2015 convention in Nashville, the timing was propitious.

In 2010, gun sales and handgun permits were booming, and Tennessee had just enacted a controversial and contested new “guns in bars” law that allowed people with handgun permits to carry concealed firearms into bars and restaurants that serve alcohol.

93. King In Context -

The Selma to Montgomery voting rights march and the Alabama town’s Bloody Sunday in 1965 happened long before London Lamar was born.

When the Memphian went with her family to Selma last month for the 50th anniversary of the civil rights-era milestone, it was important to her to walk the Edmund Petus Bridge, the site of the brutal police charge that stopped the first attempt to march to Montgomery.

94. Anti-Abortion Legislation Finds Little Resistance -

Buoyed by passage of Amendment 1 last fall, legislation restricting abortions is starting to roll – with relative ease – through the General Assembly.

Rep. Susan Lynn, R-Mt. Juliet, and Rep. Matthew Hill, R-Jonesborough, began the push recently with measures backed by Gov. Bill Haslam, House Speaker Beth Harwell, Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey and the Republican ranks. Their bills couldn’t even draw enough resistance to require a roll-call vote.

95. Housing Market Should Be Strong in 2015 -

At one point during a recent Memphis real estate summit a rather remarkable thing happened.

The guest panelists – a banker, a homebuilder and a real estate agent – all agreed on something. 2015 could be a breakout year for the housing market.

96. Editorial: Revived Insure Tennessee Deserves a Floor Vote -

Insure Tennessee deserves a vote on the floors of the Tennessee House and Senate.

The amendments offered in the second life of the Medicaid expansion proposal are reasonable additions that answer legitimate concerns of legislators whose feelings about the Affordable Care Act and its ramifications run the gamut from blind faith to blind hatred.

97. Beat of Life Uses Music to Help Children in Crisis -

Jeni Dominelli knows what it feels like to be on the outside of society. After her father committed a high-profile white collar crime in San Diego in the 1980s, her childhood was at the same time shattered and thrown in the spotlight. Her family’s money was gone, the media had a field day and her father was sent to prison.

98. Eastman Brings Military Experience to YWCA -

Any nonprofit’s operations can benefit from some military precision, and that’s what the YWCA of Nashville & Middle Tennessee is hoping for with the hiring of Marjorie Eastman as its first president and chief operating officer.

99. ‘Teach a Man to Fish’ -

After getting his degree in social work, Don Leyrer, 62, spent the first half of his career in the field, including housing abused children, before moving on to law enforcement as a probation officer.

100. Is ‘Getting Rid of Public Schools’ Legislature’s Goal? -

Are Tennessee’s public schools headed for extinction? Not if it’s up to Memphis teachers.

A group from Shelby County recently packed a House committee meeting room at the Legislative Plaza in an effort to turn back bills they consider damaging to their profession and the future of public education.