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Editorial Results (free)

1. Charles Hughes to Head Rhodes’ Memphis Center -

Dr. Charles L. Hughes has been named director of Rhodes College’s Memphis Center, an academic hub focused on the human experience of the Memphis and Mid-South region. He will be teaching classes on Memphis history and culture, coordinating student projects and developing programs, and also will be continuing his own research on the area.

2. Events -

Stax Museum of American Soul Music will host an opening reception for “Stax: Visions of Soul” Friday, July 17, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Stax, 926 E. McLemore Ave. Gallery talk begins at 6:45 p.m. The exhibit, which runs through Dec. 31, features contemporary works of art inspired by Stax Records songs. Visit staxmuseum.com.

3. Building Blocks of Estate Planning -

Ray’s take: Estate planning is one of the most important steps any person can take to ensure their final property and health care wishes are honored when the time comes. You may not be able to take it with you, but you can have a say about where it goes.

4. Senate, House Look to Update Bush-Era Education Law -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's something most Democrats and Republicans in Congress can agree on — an update to the Bush-era No Child Left Behind education law is much needed and long overdue.

5. US Unemployment Falls to 7-Year Low, But Wages are Flat -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. unemployment fell to a seven-year low of 5.3 percent and employers hired at a solid pace in June, but other gauges of the job market drew a bleaker picture: A wave of people stopped looking for work, and paychecks failed to budge.

6. Southern Heritage Defined Differently Across Tennessee -

Tennessee’s loyalty was divided in the Civil War, and 150 years later, little is changed as the debate over Confederate symbols arises in the wake of the racist-fueled South Carolina church massacre.

7. Memphis Finance Gurus Retrace City’s Fiscal Path -

Mayors come and go at City Hall and what was a priority for one administration can change with the next. But one constant is finance.

It defines a city’s overall health, no matter who is in office, and thus its ability to borrow money to fund those priorities and then pay off that debt.

8. Supreme Court Upholds Nationwide Health Care Law Subsidies -

The Supreme Court on Thursday upheld the nationwide tax subsidies under President Barack Obama's health care overhaul, in a ruling that preserves health insurance for millions of Americans.

9. Tennessee State Employees Slighted by 'Voluntary' Buyout -

More and more, Tennessee’s state employees are feeling the same harsh realities of those working – or formerly working – in corporate America.

On the heels of 1,500 buyouts under the Bredesen administration in 2008 and 850 layoffs in 2010, Gov. Bill Haslam’s administration is offering voluntary buyouts to more than 2,000 employees in the executive branch.

10. Data Warehouse Raises HealthCare.Gov Privacy Concerns -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A government data warehouse that stores information indefinitely on millions of HealthCare.gov customers is raising privacy concerns at a time when major breaches have become distressingly common.

11. Overbey Has No Regrets for Sponsoring Insure Tennessee -

Republican Sen. Doug Overbey took the road less traveled this year when he sponsored Insure Tennessee at the request of Gov. Bill Haslam.

Despite the legislation’s failure in special and regular sessions, he has no regrets and looks forward to continuing the fight in 2016 for a market-based plan to obtain roughly $1 billion annually through the Affordable Care Act to provide coverage to some 280,000 Tennesseans who are caught in a gap between TennCare and the federal plan.

12. Ramsey Uses ‘System’ to Reshape State’s Political Landscape -

Senate Speaker and Lieutenant Gov. Ron Ramsey laughs at the notion he’s changed since being elected to the Legislature 23 years ago, that he’s lost touch with the common man or become “arrogant” as lieutenant governor of Tennessee.

13. Crone Joins Council, City Buys State Office Building -

Attorney Alan Crone is the newest member of the Memphis City Council.

The former chairman of the Shelby County Republican Party who has worked in the nonprofit sector for the last decade was the choice of city council members Tuesday, May 19, to fill the vacancy.

14. Greenstein Touts Doug Carpenter & Associates' ‘Connection Factor’ -

Cara Greenstein serves as public relations coordinator of doug carpenter & associates, where she practices her passion for connection through the pen, on the screen and at the table. Equal parts researcher, writer, administrator and collaborator, Greenstein advances social media engagement and helps cultivate relationships between clients, media and the community.

15. TCAT’s 27 Campuses Offer ‘A Different Life’ -

Ready for a new career? If you’re looking for a fresh start, Tennessee may be one of the best places in the world to find it.

Through May 15, residents who want to retrain in a new career field can apply for a full scholarship to the Tennessee College of Applied Technology, a unique and highly effective system of technical colleges with 27 main campuses around the state.

16. Will Tennessee Republicans Ever Be Truly Happy? -

Why aren’t Tennessee Republicans happier?

With the GOP so dominate in the Tennessee General Assembly and losses so rare – on the Hill or in elections – the party’s lawmakers should be jubilant with this year’s session. But it’s never enough.

17. Making Memphis Clean by 2019 -

Editor’s Note: This column will appear weekly throughout April in honor of Memphis and Shelby County’s Sustainability Month.

When guests are expected, one of the first things we do is clean up our home. We want our home to feel safe, warm and inviting. After all, our home directly reflects what we think about ourselves, and how others formulate their opinions about us.

18. Tennessee Agrees to Let Couple Give Child Chosen Surname -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The state Department of Health has agreed to let a Brentwood couple give their child the surname of their choice, bringing to an end a contentious legal battle that began last year.

19. Heritage Trail Redevelopment Plan Resurfaces -

A long-delayed city plan to remake a large swath of Downtown’s southern end appears to be making a comeback.

Memphis Housing and Community Development director Robert Lipscomb said Tuesday that the city expects to receive good news on the Heritage Trail development plan sometime this year.

20. Foote Homes Targeted by Federal Jobs Training Grant -

With a HUD official in town last week bearing word of a $3 million job training grant for public housing residents, city leaders remained focused on what Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. calls “the big one.”

21. HealthChoice CEO Touts Data-Driven Care -

Mitch Graves thinks there’s a better approach to health care than the model built around patching people up once they show up at their doctor’s office or in the emergency room.

And as CEO of HealthChoice LLC, an organization celebrating its 30th anniversary this year, he’s in a position to do something about that, and to help others in his field do something about it.

22. Love Song to a City -

As the story goes, Al Green wrote the lyrics to “Let’s Stay Together” in about five minutes. In 1972, the song – which spans just three minutes and 13 seconds – reached No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100.

23. Work Begins on Insure Tennessee Plan -

The first House session of the Tennessee legislature’s special session begins Wednesday, Feb. 4, after committee work on the only piece of business before the General Assembly – the Insure Tennessee Medicaid expansion proposal.

24. Wharton Defends, Touts Record at State of the City -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. defended and touted Thursday, Jan. 29, his administration’s pursuit of the economic development projects that his challengers in the October city elections will likely use to make their case.

25. Haslam Calls Special Session on Medicaid -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam has set Feb. 2 as the date for a special session of the Tennessee Legislature on his Medicaid expansion proposal.

The proclamation issued Thursday, Jan. 8, includes more details that legislators have been awaiting since Haslam announced the general terms of his proposal in December.

26. Batts Joins HealthChoice as Complex Care Manager -

Kenneth Batts has joined HealthChoice’s new Population Health team as complex care manager. In his new role, Batts will reach out to patients identified with complex medical needs to schedule home visits, where he’ll provide customized intervention and condition education, including goal setting, care coordination, and long-term support with the goal to achieve improvements in their health.

27. Poll: Americans Support Menu Labeling -

WASHINGTON (AP) – More than half of Americans say they already have enough information at restaurants to decide whether they are making a healthy purchase. But they want even more.

According to an Associated Press-GfK poll conducted in December, most Americans favor labeling calories on menus in fast food and sit-down restaurants. Most favor labels for prepared foods in the grocery store, too.

28. How Wealth Gap Complicates Sibling Relationships -

NEW YORK (AP) – When Jayson Seaver thinks about why he makes so much money while some Americans can't catch a break, he thinks of the sacrifices he's made, the jobs he worked to pay for college, the 12-hour days he spends at the office now.

29. Totty Joins Gateway Group Personnel -

Justin Totty has joined Gateway Group Personnel as a research associate in the company’s executive search division. In his new role, Totty focuses on sourcing the best candidates for clients across numerous fields and industries, specifically targeting accounting, finance and engineering.

30. Memphis Resolutions -

The end of the year hastens a season of resolutions about the year ahead, resolutions about what to include on the blank canvas of a new year.

No matter who you are, the road to 2015 starts at the same place – through the experience of 2014. With that in mind, we surveyed many of the people we’ve covered in these pages in the last year to talk about the possibilities ahead.

31. Tennessee Joins Multistate Lawsuit Over Immigration -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee is joining a multistate lawsuit seeking to halt President Barack Obama's executive action on immigration, state Attorney General Herbert Slatery announced Monday.

32. Haslam Reaches Agreement to Expand Medicaid in Tennessee -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam announced Monday that he has reached a deal to expand Medicaid in Tennessee after more than a year of discussions with federal officials.

The Republican's administration touted the plan as an alternative deal with federal officials. The two-year pilot program, dubbed Insure Tennessee, would provide coverage for the state's uninsured without creating new taxes for Tennesseans.

33. Reinventing Retirement -

Ray’s take: At the turn of the 20th century, the average life expectancy was 47 years. Today, the average American can look forward to about 78 years of life. The average life expectancy for today's 65-year-old has increased to 84, according to the National Center for Health Statistics. I currently have twelve clients over 90.

34. Average Affordable Care Premiums Going Up in 2015 -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Many people covered under President Barack Obama's health care law will face higher premiums next year, the administration acknowledged Thursday. While the average increases are modest, it's more fodder for the nation's political battles over health care.

35. Crafting the ‘Ask’ for This Giving Season -

It’s no secret that the holiday season offers the most opportune time for charitable organizations to capitalize on what is a perfect storm of the giving holiday spirit colliding with the year-end tax-deductible donation deadline. With so many organizations competing for donations at this time of the year, what sets any one organization’s “ask” apart from the rest? What is the key to crafting a message that hits the mark?

36. Page Robbins Provides Safe ‘Middle Ground’ -

The youngest is 53 and the oldest is 98. Some appreciate classical music and others prefer Elvis, the Mamas & the Papas or the Beatles, and others John Denver, Arlo Guthrie or Bruce Springsteen.

37. Poll: Employers Watching Insurance Costs Closely -

Despite years of rising medical costs and pressure from the health care overhaul, employers consider employee health insurance a priority. But new surveys suggest coverage may grow skimpier in the coming years.

38. Incumbent Council Members Weighing Choices -

The only open seat on the Memphis City Council in the 2011 city elections is once again an open seat going into the 2015 city elections.

Current council member Lee Harris was elected to the state Senate in the August elections and will resign effective Jan. 12. That means the remaining 12 council members will appoint someone to fill the year remaining in Harris’s four-year council term of office.

39. Soaring Generic Drug Prices Draw Senate Scrutiny -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Some low-cost generic drugs that have helped restrain health care costs for decades are seeing unexpected price spikes of up to 8,000 percent, prompting a backlash from patients, pharmacists and now Washington lawmakers.

40. Small Business Insurance Exchanges Seek Rebound -

Early enrollment for the health overhaul's small business insurance exchanges fell far short of the 2 million workers who were expected to sign up this year. The shortfall calls into question the future of the exchanges as they begin accepting enrollment for 2015.

41. Utensil University -

It’s competitive out there. A new graduate, even one with great grades and real-world experience, still might have to make an additional good impression on a potential employer.

That’s one reason some employers, once screening out the first wave or two of applicants, might decide to continue the interview process over a lunch or dinner. On the one hand, this is a good sign for the applicant – he or she has made it deep enough into the process that the boss is willing to spend a little money and more time to continue the conversation.

42. Pension Reform Decision Back At Square One -

It happened in the shadow of a change in the pension reform proposal Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. had backed all through the summer and two of three council votes.

As the Memphis City Council got its first formal presentation Tuesday, Oct. 21, of Wharton’s new hybrid pension plan, it settled City Hall’s tumultuous discussion about changes to health insurance coverage for city employees and retirees.

43. GOP Governors Don't See 'Obamacare' Going Away -

WASHINGTON (AP) — While Republicans in Congress shout, "Repeal Obamacare," GOP governors in many states have quietly accepted the law's major Medicaid expansion. Even if their party wins control of the Senate in the upcoming elections, they just don't see the law going away.

44. No On One -

NO. IT’S HER DECISION, NOT YOURS. The Tennessee General Assembly is 83 percent male – and those big, strong men in the majority are convinced they know what’s best for the little ladies in the minority, in fact, what’s best for all the women of Tennessee.

45. Government Website for Doc Payments Not Up to Snuff -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Another year, another headache for the Obama administration over a health care website.

This one is called "Open Payments." The goal was to allow consumers to find out if their doctors are getting drug company freebies, travel or other financial benefits that could create ethical conflicts. But since the site launched Tuesday, complaints have been piling up.

46. HipD: Donelson Finds Its Cool Side -

The tag “Hip Donelson” evoked plenty of snickers, eye rolls and snarky comments when it first appeared. After all, the local joke goes, Donelson’s known for hip replacements – not hipsters.

47. Ugwueke Makes Impact on Lives at Methodist -

Michael Ugwueke’s present life, as president and chief operating officer of Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare, and president and CEO of Methodist Healthcare Memphis Hospitals, is full of red tape.

It is a life of regulations wrapped around regulations, encased in codes and jargon and nourished by so much legalese.

48. Road to Better Mass Transit -

Picking a new transit chief is critical for a city in transition.

Next year, Nashville residents will elect a new mayor and turn over its large Metro Council.

Davidson County also expects some 200,000 new residents over the next 20 years, and much of the success of future development will depend on the ease of navigating around Nashville – already the nation’s second-worst area for sprawl, according to Smart Growth America.

49. New Chief Justice Echoes Haslam Mantra on Review -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – First, the state Supreme Court hired Gov. Bill Haslam's top legal adviser as Tennessee's next attorney general. Now the high court's new chief justice is also adopting the Republican governor's rhetoric.

50. Safe House -

She talks about the bad old days easily now. That’s what years of steady sobriety will do. For the last three-plus years, Amy Phillips, 54, has worked as a program coordinator at Grace House of Memphis, a recovery program for women with alcohol and/or drug problems and, in many cases, co-occurring mental health disorders.

51. Survey: Americans' Pessimism on Economy Has Grown -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Americans are more anxious about the economy now than they were right after the Great Recession ended despite stock market gains, falling unemployment and growth moving closer to full health.

52. In Case of Incapacitation -

Ray’s take: A financial power of attorney is a powerful tool in your financial planning arsenal in the event your investments or other financial matters need action and you can’t do it.

53. Senate Confirms McDonald as Veterans Affairs Secretary -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate on Tuesday unanimously confirmed former Procter & Gamble CEO Robert McDonald as the new Veterans Affairs secretary, with a mission to overhaul an agency beleaguered by long veterans' waits for health care and VA workers falsifying records to cover up delays.

54. Council Moves to Bridge Gaps in Health Coverage Changes -

The ad hoc committee that gathered municipal union leaders, city retirees and Memphis City Council members at the same table to talk about city health insurance meets Thursday, July 17, for the first time since the council approved health insurance plan changes that have drawn vocal protests from city employees and retirees.

55. Chamber Head: Hard Choices on City Benefits Necessary -

The president and CEO of the Greater Memphis Chamber says efforts by municipal union leaders to boycott business members of the chamber and get those businesses to drop their chamber membership is having only a minimal effect.

56. Health Choice Selects Abisch to Lead Population Health Services -

Ellen Abisch has joined Health Choice LLC as senior director of population health services. In the newly created position, Abisch will be responsible for designing, implementing and managing population health and wellness programs for the Health Choice network.
Prior to joining the physician hospital organization, she served as manager of benefits and wellness for ServiceMaster.

57. Gastro One Forms New Practice -

Gastro One and Memphis Gastroenterology Group have merged, creating the largest gastroenterology practice in the Memphis Metro area.

The merged practice, which will operate under the Gastro One brand name, features 35 doctors covering the spectrum of gastroenterology – the study, treatment and health of the digestive system (esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine/colon, liver, pancreas and gallbladder). Each gastroenterologist is a medical specialist trained in internal medicine and in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases involving the digestive system.

58. Checkered Progress on Disabled Care Despite Ruling -

Brent Kaderli has a wheelchair-accessible van waiting in the driveway, a hospital bed in a spare bedroom and an electric lift that's left unused. If the 30-year-old quadriplegic had his way, he'd be living here, in his father's house, with help from aides. Instead, he is in an institution, hoping each day for a place that feels more like a home.

59. Benefits Debate Goes Larger Than City Hall -

When several hundred firefighters, police officers and other city employees and retirees formed a picket line around City Hall Tuesday, June 24, it signaled the beginning of an escalating political dispute bigger than the City Council’s decision a week earlier to cut health insurance benefits for employees and retirees.

60. Fire, Police Union Brass Say Lawsuit is Coming -

The leaders of the Memphis police and fire unions say they will sue the city over changes in employee health insurance approved this month and are prepared to add pension changes to the litigation if the council approves those changes next month.

61. Health Choice Selects Jones to Lead Provider Engagement -

LaTasha Jones has been named director of provider engagement at Health Choice LLC, where she will be responsible for directing and managing the implementation of a clinical integration database for Health Choice providers and practices.

62. Shinseki Resigns Amid Veterans' Health Care Issues -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki apologized in public and then resigned in the privacy of the White House on Friday, driven from office by a mushrooming scandal over the agency's health care system that serves millions of the nation's former warriors.

63. Editorial: Wellness Programs Can Play Key Role in City -

Corporate wellness plans have come a long way in the last 20 years.

So has the idea of fitness and exercise in a city whose population is part of a region consistently near the top of national rankings for some significant health problems.

64. New Health Cost Controls Get Go-Ahead From Feds -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Obama administration has given the go-ahead for insurers and employers to use a new cost-control strategy that puts a hard dollar limit on what health plans pay for some expensive procedures, such as knee and hip replacements.

65. Consumers Losing Doctors With New Insurance Plans -

MIAMI (AP) – Some consumers who bought insurance under President Barack Obama's health care law are experiencing buyer's remorse after realizing that their longtime doctors aren't accepting the new plans.

66. Health Insurers Just Say No to Marijuana Coverage -

Patients who use medical marijuana for pain and other chronic symptoms can take an unwanted hit: Insurers don't cover the treatment, which costs as much as $1,000 a month.

Once the drug of choice for hippies and rebellious teens, marijuana in recent years has gained more mainstream acceptance for its ability to boost appetite, dull pain and reduce seizures in everyone from epilepsy to cancer patients.

67. Medicare Database Reveals Top-Paid Doctors -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Medicare paid a tiny group of doctors $3 million or more apiece in 2012. One got nearly $21 million.

Those are among the findings of an Associated Press analysis of physician data released Wednesday by the Obama administration, part of a move to open the books on health care financing.

68. Lebanon’s Pody Works for Amendment Passage -

Helping people with insurance requires the ability to plan for multiple scenarios.

That’s something Rep. Mark Pody, a Republican from Lebanon, Tenn., has taken with him to the Tennessee General Assembly, and he says it helps even when everyone is in agreement on a bill’s final outcome.

69. Experts Highlight Health Care Game-Changers -

Both before the Affordable Care Act became law and after, consumers viewed health care costs differently than they do other costs.

So said Dr. Scott Morris during a panel discussion at The Daily News Publishing Co. Inc.’s Health Care Reform seminar Thursday, April 3, at the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art.

70. Judge Upholds Country of Origin Label for Meat -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Shoppers who want to buy American beef for dinner instead of meat from Canada or Mexico will still be able to find the country of origin on the label.

A federal appeals court ruling Friday allows the government to go forward with rules that require labels on packaged steaks, ribs and other cuts of meat to say where the animals were born, raised and slaughtered. The meat industry attempted to block the rules, which went into effect last year, saying they are costly and provide no health benefits to the consumer.

71. Walk-In Clinics Rising as Response to ACA -

When the Affordable Care Act became law in 2010, medical providers were not sure what to expect.

But four years down the road, it’s evident the ACA has presented some opportunities – not just for patients, but for how care is delivered and, yes, marketed. And that has meant a rise in walk-in clinics nationally and locally.

72. Employers, Workers Navigate Compliance Rules -

As a certified health care reform specialist, Tim Finnell can stand back and from a distance say the Affordable Care Act does not really have a beginning and an end.

“There will never be final rules,” said Finnell, the president and founder of Group Benefits LLC. “Everything’s going to keep changing.”

73. Caught in the Middle -

Even before the Affordable Care Act came along, Deborah Casey was living between a logistical rock and an economic hard place. Casey, a 61-year-old widow, draws a monthly Social Security check based on her husband’s earnings. She works part-time for Shelby County (no benefits), and to continue receiving the same amount in that Social Security check, she has to keep tabs on how much she makes. This is exactly how someone who wants to provide for herself winds up on a “fixed income.”

74. Seminar Explores Complicated Details of Health Care Law -

The Affordable Care Act, more commonly known as Obamacare, became law in 2010.

But the law has grown and changed so much since then that its pages number more than 25,000, and if you stack them one on top of another they are more than 10 feet high, says Tim Finnell, founder and president of Group Benefits LLC.

75. Congress Confronts Medicare Cuts to Doctors' Fees -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Hope is fading for a Capitol Hill drive to permanently fix Medicare's outdated payment formula and spare doctors from automatic cuts in their fees next month. Now the question is whether lawmakers can regroup and come up with a short-term solution when the current patch expires.

76. With Health Law, Workers Ponder the I-Quit Option -

CHICAGO (AP) – For uninsured people, the nation's new health care law may offer an escape from worry about unexpected, astronomical medical bills. But for Stephanie Payne of St. Louis, who already had good insurance, the law could offer another kind of escape: the chance to quit her job.

77. Health Law Concerns for Cancer Centers -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Cancer patients relieved that they can get insurance coverage because of the new health care law may be disappointed to learn that some the nation's best cancer hospitals are off-limits.

78. Eddleman Joins Family Safety Center -

Vernetta Eddleman has joined the Family Safety Center, Memphis and Shelby County’s center for victims of domestic violence, as director of client services.

In her new role, Eddleman will be responsible for the planning, design, development and management of client services, and will also supervise and train staff and partner agency providers in delivering quality care to victims and their families.

79. EPA Recognizes Medtronic for Green Power Use -

The Medtronic Spine/Pyramid Campus appears at No. 52 on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Fortune 500 list of the largest green power users.

Medtronic Spine/Pyramid Campus is using 8 million kilowatt-hours (kWh) of green power annually, which is enough green power to meet 49 percent of the organization’s electricity use.

80. Uphill Struggles -

I read in the paper about some folks who’ve done well with weight loss and fitness resolutions. They attribute their success to posting goals, activities and results on Facebook. “Got up at 4, started running at 4:30, did three miles. Tomorrow, five.” That kind of thing.

81. Improving Disparities -

Working to better understand, and thus bring down, Shelby County’s infant mortality rate would be a giant undertaking.

But that is but one of many challenges that lie ahead of a husband-and-wife team of doctors who nine months ago moved from Nashville to Memphis to set up the Research Center on Health Disparities, Equity and the Exposome.

82. EPA Recognizes Medtronic For Green Power Use -

The Medtronic Spine/Pyramid Campus appears at No. 52 on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Fortune 500 list of the largest green power users.

Medtronic Spine/Pyramid Campus is using 8 million kilowatt-hours (kWh) of green power annually, which is enough green power to meet 49 percent of the organization’s electricity use.

83. Insurance Through Work? Health Law Affects You Too -

The health care overhaul's reach stretches far beyond the millions of uninsured Americans it is expected to help. It also could touch everything from the drug choices to doctor bills of people who have insurance through work.

84. Business Leaders Optimistic About Local Economy -

As they have for a few quarters now, Memphis-area business leaders continue to acknowledge an incremental sense of optimism about specific aspects of their companies and the economy, according to the results of the third Memphis Economic Indicator.

85. Proposed Medicare Drug Change Stirs Access Worries -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In a move that some fear could compromise care for Medicare recipients, the Obama administration is proposing to remove special protections that guarantee seniors access to a wide selection of three types of drugs.

86. IRS Nominee on Track for Approval Despite Acrimony -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama's choice to head the Internal Revenue Service told senators Tuesday he will work to restore public trust in the agency in the wake of the tea party scandal even as the IRS takes on new responsibilities administering the president's health care law.

87. Rainey Kizer’s Dexter Named Board Chair for Girls Inc. -

Latosha Dexter, an attorney with Rainey Kizer Reviere & Bell PLC, has been named board chair of Girls Inc. of Memphis, as well as the organization’s Mentor of the Year.

88. Education That Works is Win-Win-Win Idea -

John Adams expressed his thoughts on education saying, “There are two educations. One should teach us how to make a living, and the other, how to live.” His words seem to foreshadow a high school here in Memphis whose mission is to do just that.

89. TN eShare Direct Project Passes Milestone -

A growing number of local physicians are adopting Direct technology for the secure transferal of electronic medical records, and many more are expected to hop the wave in the next few months. Just in the first half of this month, the number of early adopters of the Direct system has surged from less than 1,000 to more than 1,400 in Tennessee.

90. Crosstown Plans Continue to Evolve -

The National Park Service nixed plans for planting greenery on one side of the Crosstown parking garage but is OK with developers of the old Sears Crosstown property replacing windows in the mammoth building with new, similar-looking and configured ones.

91. MLGW Conference Focuses on Future -

Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division will be hosting a training and networking event for faith and nonprofit leaders Friday, Nov. 8.

The MLGW Business of Service Conference will take place from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the MLGW Training Center, 4949 Raleigh-LaGrange Road.

92. Dimmer View of Economy Makes Fed Pullback Unlikely -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A lot can change in six weeks.

When the Federal Reserve last met in mid-September, almost everyone expected it to start reducing the stimulus it's given the U.S. economy to help it rebound from the Great Recession.

93. Events -

The University of Memphis and Lambda Chi Alpha will host a Lifeblood blood drive Wednesday, Oct. 30, and Thursday, Oct. 31, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the lobby of the Michael D. Rose Theatre, 470 University St. Visit lifeblood.org.

94. Healthy Memphis Common Table Marks 10 Years of Promoting Health -

With a motto of “eat healthy, eat less and move more,” Healthy Memphis Common Table (HMCT) has made its mark in the local community during the past decade, encouraging the public to lead healthier lifestyles and to “get activated” with their health and health care options.

95. McCullough Blends Right Ingredients With ‘Chef Jenn’ -

Jennifer McCullough, the white chef’s coat behind the brand Chef Jenn, began cooking up a dream in her home kitchen.

96. Brokers Simplify, Confuse Health Exchange Shopping -

This month's glitch-filled rollout of the health insurance marketplaces created by federal law is a business opportunity for brokers and agents, but regulators warn that it also opened the door for those who would seek to line their pockets by misleading consumers.

97. Lessons of the Great Recession -

Ray’s Take This last recession was a real wakeup call for everyone: once secure jobs evaporated, homes values were halved, retirement portfolios surrendered a decade’s worth of gains. It was a painful experience all around.

98. Williams Joins Del-Nat as Director of Finance -

Ronnie Williams has joined Del-Nat Tire Corp. as director of finance. Williams, who has a 15-year background in finance and accounting, most recently served as director of finance at Health Choice LLC. In his new role, he will be responsible for finance and accounting functions and will direct operations to meet budget and financial goals.

99. Postmaster: Money Woes Behind Rate Hike Request -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe said Thursday the Postal Service had no choice but to ask for an emergency rate hike given the agency's dire finances.

One day after his cash-strapped agency proposed raising the first-class stamp price to 49 cents, Donohoe urged swift action by Congress to overhaul the Postal Service and fix its finances.

100. Schools Move Focus to Early Childhood -

The date still isn’t firm for the Nov. 21 ballot. But the campaign for a half-cent hike in the city’s sales tax rate to fund an expansion of pre-kindergarten in the city of Memphis is underway.

So are the complications that have been a close companion of the idea since it was first proposed a year ago and approved by the Memphis City Council.