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Editorial Results (free)

1. -
NEWSMAKERS
2. Williams-Sonoma Growth Highlights DeSoto Push -

In 1999, Williams-Sonoma Inc. opened its first DeSoto County distribution center on Polk Lane in Olive Branch.

3. African-American Icons Highlight Freedom Awards -

The National Civil Rights Museum will honor journalist Charlayne Hunter-Gault, Freedom Summer icon Bob Moses and baseball Hall of Famer Frank Robinson at the 2014 Freedom Awards.

4. Ole Miss, Memphis Move on to Next Hurdles -

Before they played the game, Ole Miss coach Hugh Freeze suggested it amounted to the “Super Bowl” for the University of Memphis. But in many respects it was more of a Blooper Bowl for both teams.

5. Real Estate Experts Look at Impact of North Mississippi -

Six years after the real estate bubble burst nationally, the recovery of the commercial and residential sectors in Memphis is slower than in other parts of the country. But they are recovering on their own new terms, say the incoming president of the Memphis Area Association of Realtors, the president of the West Tennessee Home Builders Association and a mortgage lender.

6. State Supreme Court Reverses Bartlett Murder Conviction -

The man convicted and sentenced to death for the brutal 2003 double murder of a husband and wife in Bartlett will get a new trial, the Tennessee Supreme Court ruled last week.

The court decision Thursday, Sept. 25, in the case of Henry Lee Jones is the latest reversal of a conviction in Shelby County Criminal Court by the highest court in the state.

7. Vols Hope to Snap 20-Game Road Slump vs. Ranked Opponents -

KNOXVILLE – It doesn’t get much easier for the University of Tennessee’s football team.

The Sept. 20 open date has come and gone. UT’s coaches and players had ample time to digest and dissect details of the 34-10 loss to No. 4-ranked Oklahoma on Sept. 13 and a week to prepare for a challenge just as formidable.

8. New Seat, Same Drive -

Dawn Distler was a bus driver for 10 years, but these days she does her work from the passenger seat.

Knoxville’s new director of transit, on the job since June 1, rides the Knoxville Area Transit buses often, making the most of her commute, traveling to work-related events or taking her staff on a friendly fact-finding mission.

9. HipD: Donelson Finds Its Cool Side -

The tag “Hip Donelson” evoked plenty of snickers, eye rolls and snarky comments when it first appeared. After all, the local joke goes, Donelson’s known for hip replacements – not hipsters.

10. Ugwueke Makes Impact on Lives at Methodist -

Michael Ugwueke’s present life, as president and chief operating officer of Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare, and president and CEO of Methodist Healthcare Memphis Hospitals, is full of red tape.

It is a life of regulations wrapped around regulations, encased in codes and jargon and nourished by so much legalese.

11. State Supreme Court Reverses Bartlett Double-Murder Conviction -

The Tennessee Supreme Court reversed Thursday, Sept. 25, the first-degree double-murder conviction of Henry Lee Jones for the 2003 murders of Clarence and Lillian James in Bartlett.

12. Cummins Eyes Memphis Site for Expansion -

Cummins Inc. is eyeing a Memphis property for a planned expansion of the company’s distribution operations, a move that would be welcome news for Memphis officials.

13. Middle-Class Squeeze: From Day Care to Health Care -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Three years ago, Jason Prosser was stunned to discover the cost of child care for his newborn son – so much so that he and his wife postponed having a second child.

14. Weirich Sworn In for Eight-Year Term -

Amy Weirich took the oath of office Tuesday, Sept. 23, for a full eight-year term of office, saying the prosecutor’s office has a role in crime prevention as well as prosecuting those accused of crimes.

15. More Insurers to Offer Health Law Plans Next Year -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Obama administration says consumers in most states will have more insurance options next year under the president's health care law.

The Health and Human Services department on Tuesday reported a net increase of 63 insurers joining the market in 43 states plus Washington, DC. The preliminary figures show 77 insurers entering for the first time, while 14 are dropping out.

16. Transportation Grants to Help Local Communities -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The Tennessee Department of Transportation is providing grants to help local communities with transportation projects and planning.

This is the second grant cycle for the Multimodal Access Grants and the first year for the Community Transportation Planning Grants.

17. -

NEWSMAKERS
18. Roxul Plant Makes Debut in Marshall County -

Almost a year and a half after breaking ground in Marshall County just south of the state line with Collierville and Fayette County, executives of the Danish company Roxul Inc. will formally open Wednesday, Sept. 24, their $160 million plant and packaging site in the Chickasaw Trail Industrial Park.

19. College Football Notebook: September 23, 2014 -

The University of Memphis had lost three straight games to Middle Tennessee and five of the last six. Getting beat by the Blue Raiders each year had become commonplace and another sign of a program in perpetual struggle.

20. County Commission Starts School Bond Process -

Shelby County Commissioners vote Monday, Sept. 22, on a resolution that is the first step in issuing $120 million in general obligation bonds over the next two years to finance “public works projects, including schools,” according to the resolution.

21. Tennessee Justices Name Slatery Attorney General -

The state Supreme Court on Monday named Republican Gov. Bill Haslam's top legal adviser, Herbert Slatery, as Tennessee's next attorney general.

The announcement comes in the aftermath of a failed conservative campaign to oust three Democratic justices who make up a majority on the five-member court. That effort focused heavily on incumbent Attorney General Bob Cooper's refusal to take part in a multistate lawsuit challenging President Barack Obama's health care law.

22. Road to Better Mass Transit -

Picking a new transit chief is critical for a city in transition.

Next year, Nashville residents will elect a new mayor and turn over its large Metro Council.

Davidson County also expects some 200,000 new residents over the next 20 years, and much of the success of future development will depend on the ease of navigating around Nashville – already the nation’s second-worst area for sprawl, according to Smart Growth America.

23. Prep Coaches, Players Sold on Jones the Recruiter -

Nothing surprises Murfreesboro Blackman High School football coach Philip Shadowens when it comes to college recruiting.

Shadowens has seen it all – including the flurry of activity created by Blackman senior quarterback and safety Jauan Jennings, rated the No. 18 athlete in the nation by Rivals.com.

24. Jones’ Wide Net Gathers Old Friends, Top Prospects -

Butch Jones was sitting in the office of Knoxville’s South-Doyle High School athletic director and football coach Clark Duncan during a visit to see recruit Jocquez Bruce last winter.

25. This week in Memphis history: September 19-25 -

2004: Roy Jones Jr. and Glen Johnson fought for the IBF light heavyweight championship at FedExForum. Johnson, the defending champion, knocked out Jones, the former champion, in the ninth round.

26. Education Secretary Praises Local Schools Leaders -

Sustainability is a term associated with environmental efforts, though innovation is a much more popular term across causes from economic development to education reform.

But when U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan came to Memphis this month as the last stop on a three-state bus tour of school districts, it was the word sustainability that came up more often than innovation.

27. Fed Keeps Rates Low, But Brace for the Inevitable -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Record-low interest rates will be around for at least a few more months, the Federal Reserve made clear Wednesday.

Enjoy the easy money while it lasts.

By mid-2015, economists expect the Fed to abandon a nearly 6-year-old policy of keeping short-term rates at record lows. Those rates have helped support the economy, cheered the stock market and shrunk mortgage rates. A Fed rate increase could potentially reverse those trends.

28. New Chief Justice Echoes Haslam Mantra on Review -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – First, the state Supreme Court hired Gov. Bill Haslam's top legal adviser as Tennessee's next attorney general. Now the high court's new chief justice is also adopting the Republican governor's rhetoric.

29. Athletes Behaving Badly -

Make us laugh. That’s all we ask. Florida State quarterback and Heisman Trophy winner Jameis Winston gets cited for stealing $32 worth of crab legs from a Publix: That’s funny.

Winston gets suspended for the first half of the upcoming Clemson game after shouting an obscene sexual phrase on campus while reportedly mimicking an Internet video: Not funny, and really stupid.

30. -

NEWSMAKERS
31. Ball Targets Carr's Tea Party Supporters -

Gordon Ball, the Democratic challenger to Republican U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander, is basing his uphill challenge of Alexander on his specific definition of being a moderate Democrat and where that intersects with tea party followers.

32. Third Parties Still Fighting for Ballot Access -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Four years after the Libertarian Party of Tennessee filed its first lawsuit to get on the ballot, the group is still fighting for access in a state that has some of the most restrictive rules in the country for smaller political parties.

33. South Carolina Back in SEC East Race -

The South Carolina defense still has improvement to make, but in beating Georgia 38-35 last Saturday the Gamecocks made a fourth-quarter goal-line stand and reasserted their presence in the SEC East Division.

34. Tennessee Justices Name Slatery as Attorney General -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The state Supreme Court on Monday named Republican Gov. Bill Haslam's top legal adviser, Herbert Slatery, as Tennessee's next attorney general.

The announcement comes in the aftermath of a failed conservative campaign to oust three Democratic justices who make up a majority on the five-member court. That effort focused heavily on incumbent Attorney General Bob Cooper's refusal to take part in a multistate lawsuit challenging President Barack Obama's health care law.

35. Influence Game: Chemical Trade Tries to Shape Regulations -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The powerful chemical industry is putting its lobbying muscle behind legislation that would establish standards for chemicals used in products from household goods to cellphones and plastic water bottles – but also make it tougher for states to enact their own regulations.

36. Latino Political Profile Continues Rise -

When Latino Memphis held its first annual Leadership Luncheon last week in East Memphis, the ballroom at the Holiday Inn University of Memphis included political and business leaders among the group of 800 people.

37. Young Volunteers Face Long Odds at Oklahoma -

Two games into the 2014 season, and it’s time for the University of Tennessee to play some big-boy football.

The Vols (2-0) took care of business at Neyland Stadium in the first two games against Utah State and Arkansas State.

38. Unintended Consequences: ER Visits Increase -

Hospital officials have been pushing for the state to expand Medicaid health care coverage for thousands of Tennessee’s poorest citizens, despite two significant and related concerns:

Expansion will lead to increased visits to the most expensive place in America for routine health care, the emergency room.

39. Coverage Gap Leaves Rural Tennessee Hospitals on Life Support -

Four rural hospitals have closed and dozens are at risk of shuttering: That’s the fallout, some say, from Gov. Bill Haslam’s decision not to join the Affordable Care Act in 2013 and tap into millions in promised federal funds for Tennessee’s financially-strapped health care institutions.

40. Lillard to Be President of Treasurers Group -

Tennessee State Treasurer David H. Lillard Jr. has been elected president of the National Association of State Treasurers.

The association provides advocacy and support for state treasurers and treasury staff throughout the United States and its territories.

41. This week in Memphis history: September 12-18 -

2004: Usher at FedExForum, the first show at the new arena followed days later by Alan Jackson and Martin McBride.

42. Legacy Building -

2014 is shaping up to be a banner year for Legacy Wealth Management, an independent financial planning and portfolio management firm that’s moved into a prominent new space, continued staffing up over the last several months and is preparing to launch a seminar series.

43. Power Play -

When the Tennessee Valley Authority board voted in August to build a new power plant in Southwest Memphis, it was a decision based on factors larger than the power needs in Memphis.

But it was also a decision that is just as important for Memphis as the decision to build the existing Allen Fossil Plant there 55 years ago.

44. Lillard to Be President of State Treasurers Group -

Tennessee State Treasurer David H. Lillard Jr. has been elected president of the National Association of State Treasurers.

The association provides advocacy and support for state treasurers and treasury staff throughout the United States and its territories.

45. Education Secretary Calls for System-Wide Reforms -

U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan saw much that he liked in Memphis Wednesday, Sept. 10, at the end of his three-day “back to school” bus tour of schools in three states.

The last stop was Cornerstone Prep Elementary School in Binghampton.

46. Authors, Readers Converge for Book Festival -

Earlier this year, interest in the first Mid-South Book Festival, scheduled to take place later this month, began to reach what seemed like a fever pitch, according to Literacy Mid-South executive director Kevin Dean.

47. Duncan Bus Tour Ends With Binghampton Kudos -

U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan wrapped up a three-day “back to school” bus tour of schools in several states Wednesday, Sept. 10, at Cornerstone Prep Elementary School in Binghampton.

48. Late Pass -

A football spirals in slow motion across the Texas sky. The state championship hangs in the balance. Spoiler alert: If you’ve not watched “Friday Night Lights,” go watch it – all 76 episodes – and then return.

49. Heart Foundation’s Novick Prepares for Ukraine Work -

Dr. William Novick isn’t real big on taking orders – especially from his doctors. Four weeks ago, he had his second hip replacement surgery since the first of the year.

50. ‘Love Mob’ Responds to Poplar Plaza Attack -

The amount of traffic that comes through the intersection of Highland Street and Poplar Avenue has made it a favorite of causes through the years – from war protestors and advocates to those on both sides of the death penalty, and, more recently, city employees upset over benefit changes.

51. College Savings on the Rise as Plans Average $20,000 -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The good news is that Americans are saving more than ever for college. The bad news is that the average amount wouldn't come close to getting a person a degree.

In a report released Tuesday, the College Savings Plans Network found that the average college savings or prepaid tuition account known as a "529" plan is now worth about $20,671 – almost double what these accounts were worth during the dog-days of the recession.

52. -

NEWSMAKERS
53. Shelby County Mortgage Market Down 19 Percent in August -

BankTennessee president and CEO Jim Rout sees new home sales and resales “fairly steady” at the moment.

But, in a common refrain among many local bankers looking at their recent numbers, the activity is not at the level that might be expected, considering still-historic low interest rates.

54. College Football Notebook: September 9 -

University of Memphis sophomore quarterback Paxton Lynch apparently likes the big stage. Lynch passed for a career-high 305 yards as he completed 27-of-41 passes (one touchdown, no interceptions) in the Tigers’ 42-35 loss at then-No. 11 UCLA.

55. City's Response to Poplar Plaza Attack Charts New Path -

The next front in City Hall’s discussion of youth violence won’t be another crime summit.

The last one happened just days before and within a mile of the Poplar Plaza shopping center where a mob of teenagers attacked, beat and injured three people Saturday, Sept 6.

56. Democrats Choose State Senate Nominee -

When Shelby County Democratic Party leaders gather Monday, Sept. 8, to pick their party’s nominee in the November special general election for state Senate District 30, it will also be an indication of how deep the wounds run from the party’s disastrous August election outing.

57. Safe House -

She talks about the bad old days easily now. That’s what years of steady sobriety will do. For the last three-plus years, Amy Phillips, 54, has worked as a program coordinator at Grace House of Memphis, a recovery program for women with alcohol and/or drug problems and, in many cases, co-occurring mental health disorders.

58. Memphis Running Back Makes AAC Honor Roll -

University of Memphis freshman Jarvis Cooper, who rushed for 101 yards and a touchdown during the fourth quarter of a 63-0 shutout of Austin Peay State University, was one of five players selected for the American Athletic Conference’s Weekly Honor Roll.

59. High-Flying Vols Can’t Overlook Arkansas State -

KNOXVILLE – You had to be hiding under a rock not to hear the buzz this week about the University of Tennessee’s football team.

One person not reveling in the Vols’ 38-7 season opening victory over Utah State on Sunday night was UT coach Butch Jones.

60. Focus on Teens ‘At Risk of Being Homeless’ -

Not only is Crossroads Campus a successful non-profit operation that’s building a bridge to help homeless animals and potentially homeless young people, it’s also a thriving retail business operation driven by the savvy of executive director Lisa Stetar and her staff.

61. -

NEWSMAKERS
62. Editorial: Seeking Creative Solutions for Economic Development -

Among the critical issues facing FedEx outside of the courts is the company’s continued expansion and where its Memphis hub figures into that.

Few in the current arc of the ongoing debate and discussion about payments-in-lieu-of-taxes quarrel with the use of the tax incentives when it comes to FedEx.

63. Al Green Among Kennedy Center Honorees -

WASHINGTON (AP) – It's a rare honor for an artist to receive accolades from the president, let alone have him sing one of your tunes.

Now Al Green can claim both, knowing that President Barack Obama is a fan. Green is among five artists receiving this year's Kennedy Center Honors, the national awards for influencing American culture through the arts, the center announced Thursday.

64. Tigers Look for Hollywood Script -

The Memphis Tigers and their long-suffering fans were excited. Who could blame them?

For the list of things we should never take for granted in Memphis includes low humidity, years without city elections, and wins by the local college football enterprise.

65. One Week Into Season, Playoff Resembling BCS -

The scoreboard at Brice-Williams Stadium in Columbia, S.C., was not yet a sparkle in Texas A&M quarterback Kenny Hill’s eye when Bill Hancock, executive director of the new college football playoff, gave us this:

66. Competition Calls -

Economic development and the quality of jobs coming to Shelby County are the dominant issues as county elected leaders begin a new four-year term of office this month.

And there are plenty of indications the local strategy is about to change, or at least shift, in response to the resurgence in manufacturing and distribution in North Mississippi.

67. ‘People’s Mayor’ to Share Story at RISE Gala -

Every politician has a past, but not like this one.

Evelyn Wynn-Dixon was, at the low point, a homeless single mother so distraught she believed her four young children would be better off without her. She considered jumping from a bridge overlooking Interstate 75 in Atlanta.

68. Regulators Set Rules Meant to Ward Off Bank Crisis -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal regulators are set to require big banks to keep enough high-quality assets on hand to survive during a severe downturn, the latest move under congressional mandate to lessen the likelihood of another financial meltdown.

69. Mississippi Holds First Tax-Free Sportsmen Holiday -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – If you're a sportsman, this weekend is your holiday.

Mississippi's inaugural tax-free holiday will begin Friday. It runs through Sunday.

The Legislature passed a law creating an annual tax-free weekend in September. The law went into effect on July 1. The holiday will be held annually on the first Friday of each September until midnight on the following Sunday.

70. Memphis Running Back Makes AAC Honor Roll -

University of Memphis freshman Jarvis Cooper, who rushed for 101 yards and a touchdown during the fourth quarter of a 63-0 shutout of Austin Peay State University, was one of five players selected for the American Athletic Conference’s Weekly Honor Roll.

71. Stepherson Named Chair-Elect of Grocers Association -

Randy Stepherson has been named 2014-2015 chairman-elect of the Tennessee Grocers & Convenience Store Association board of directors. Stepherson is president of Stepherson Inc., the family- and employee-owned parent company of Superlo Foods, which has five Memphis-area locations, and Stepherson’s.

72. -

NEWSMAKERS
73. Redbirds Prepare for Playoffs Appearance -

First-year Memphis Redbirds general manager Craig Unger grew up a St. Louis Cardinals fan and he spent the last five years working in the team’s front office. He even wears a huge World Series ring from the team’s 2011 championship.

74. Redbirds’ Easley, Scruggs Enjoy Stellar Season -

Oscar Taveras, Randal Grichuk and Stephen Piscotty. Those were the St. Louis Cardinals’ hot outfield prospects stashed in Memphis at season’s start.

Taveras and Grichuk have shuttled between the Cardinals and Redbirds and both are with the big club as the Redbirds’ regular season winds down. Piscotty has stayed with the Redbirds, but throughout the year Cardinals general John Mozeliak openly has talked about having playing time in St. Louis for Piscotty in the near future.

75. County Leaders Make Transition to Governing -

For government officials, the oath of office marks the boundary between the ability to get elected and the ability to govern.

But it’s not always apparent to those taking the oath what they have gotten themselves into.

76. Vols Among NCAA’s Youngest Headed Into Sunday Opener -

KNOXVILLE – For better or worse, University of Tennessee football coach Butch Jones won’t need to wait long to see the talent level of his highly touted freshman class.

Jones will find out Sunday night at 7 when the Vols play host to Utah State at Neyland Stadium. The Aggies will be an underdog – probably by a touchdown or so – and a trendy pick for some as an upset special.

77. Embracing Cremation -

As business decisions go, this was a tricky one.

Jeff and Steve Murphy, owners of Music City Mortuary, opened their Nashville business in 2001, catering primarily to the needs of other funeral directors, providing transportation, embalming and preparation services, shipping – everything a mortuary business provides.

78. Editorial: Some Priorities for Our Newly Elected Officials -

At the outset of a new term of office for the winners in the county general elections of August, we offer a few priorities.

We hope the mayor and county commission can come together in a concerted push for an expansion of Medicaid in Tennessee that so far has been lacking in volume and clarity.

79. People Power -

Meg Crosby and her fellow principals at the HR-focused consulting firm PeopleCap chose that name for their organization because of the way they think about the modern workplace – particularly, the ever-changing nature of the employees who populate it.

80. US Economy Grew at 4.2 Percent Rate in Second Quarter -

WASHINGTON (AP) – After a bleak start to the year, the U.S. economy grew at a brisk annual rate of 4.2 percent in the April-June quarter, the government said Thursday, slightly faster than it had first estimated.

81. Few Clues to Tennessee Attorney General Applicants -

NASHVILLE (AP) – The deadline to apply to become Tennessee's next attorney general is Friday, but anyone still on the fence about whether to join the fray won't have the benefit of sizing up the competition first.

82. It Begins -

KICKING IT OFF. Here we go again. Some years ago, I found myself at a tailgate party in downtown Tuscaloosa. Even though the game wasn’t until that afternoon and it was only mid-morning, there were plenty of people well into their cups.

83. Wade: College Football Returns With Passion -

First off, I don’t believe everything that Alabama wide receiver Amari Cooper says.

“Coach Lane Kiffin is a great coach and a great person to be around,” Cooper said of the Crimson Tide’s new offensive coordinator. “Coach is a likable guy.”

84. Mortarville to Memphis -

On the walls of his office at Hickory Ridge Middle School, principal Cedric Smith has a poster of an Iraqi flag. It’s from the time his Army reserve unit was called up in 2009 and stationed on a base that soldiers nicknamed “Mortarville” for how often it was hit by enemy shells.

85. Tennessee Lawmaker Calls Haslam ‘Traitor’ to GOP -

NASHVILLE (AP) – A Republican state lawmaker on Tuesday called Gov. Bill Haslam a "traitor to the party" over what he called efforts by a political action committee run by supporters to defeat opponents of Common Core education standards.

86. -

NEWSMAKERS
87. Finding Life Influencers -

Coaches such as Alabama’s Nick Saban get paid millions to lead and win championships, so it’s only natural that Saban would say something like this:

“We are not interested in the possibilities of defeat; they do not exist.”

88. Election Commission Certifies August Vote -

The Shelby County Election Commission certified the August election results Monday, Aug. 25, at the beginning of a week that includes an early oath of office for those elected to county offices on the ballot.

89. Appeals Panel Weighing Occupy Nashville Suit -

CINCINNATI (AP) – A special three-judge panel focused on issues of camping, protests, free speech and executive power on Monday during arguments in an appeal of a lawsuit brought by Occupy Nashville protesters arrested on War Memorial Plaza in October 2011.

90. Millington Leaders Emphasize Unique School System -

For much of the move to the demerger of public education in Shelby County, the Millington Municipal Schools district has been overshadowed by the five other suburban school systems.

All six formed starting in January and three weeks ago opened for classes, but Millington school system leaders, principals, teachers and civic leaders didn’t have their opening celebration until this past weekend, the day after the Millington Central High School Trojans beat the Germantown Red Devils in the first weekend of high school football.

91. Tennessee Supreme Court Orders New Trial for Noura Jackson -

The Tennessee Supreme Court ordered a new trial for Noura Jackson Friday, Aug. 22, who was convicted in 2009 of second degree murder in the death of her mother, Jennifer Jackson.

92. Huckabee: 'Stop the Fight' Over Common Core -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Conservatives should "stop the fight" over Common Core and instead consider the benefits that the academic standards offer students in struggling schools, former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee said Friday. The position puts him at odds with a significant bloc of Republicans.

93. Mason: Vanderbilt Success More Than Defeating UT -

Coach Derek Mason is determined to put his own mark of toughness on the Vanderbilt University football program as it continues its climb into the ranks of conference heavyweights.

94. Vols: Looks Like 6-6 Season -

Pull out your 2014 schedules, UT fans.

Fall camp is done, and it’s time to get in game-week mode with the season opener against Utah State fast approaching.

So go to the little box next to each of UT’s opponents on the 2014 schedule and pick the winner.

95. Boomsday More Than Fireworks, Football -

It’s hard to imagine a college freshman passing up her first opportunity to spend a weekend at home. But when Boomsday is on the schedule, laundry can wait.

“I’ve stayed for Boomsday since freshman year, even though it’s the first weekend you can go home,” says Carrie Bowman of Hendersonville, who graduated from the University of Tennessee last spring with a degree in speech pathology.

96. Kaaa-BOOM! -

This Labor Day weekend, hundreds of Knoxvillians will be working harder than ever so hundreds of thousands can kick back and relax.

Knoxville is hosting a huge street festival and one of the biggest fireworks shows in the country on Saturday, followed by the first UT game of the season on Sunday.

97. Belmont Welcomes Largest-Ever Freshman Class -

If you graduated from Belmont 20 years ago, you might not recognize the campus today.

Near ceaseless on-campus construction and a huge spike in enrollment has changed the once-sleepy little school into a major player in Nashville and in national collegiate circles.

98. E-Books Cut Costs for Tennessee State Students -

Tennessee State University students face higher costs, tacked on by state government, but that downer could be offset by “e-books” that can save students $735 each semester.

TSU is set to offer the electronic books to freshmen and sophomores for general education courses in an effort to lower the cost of traditional books, according to the university.

99. University of Tennessee Students Return to Transforming Campus -

Colleges and universities, no matter how venerable and historic, were designed to move forward, to be progressive.

New academic disciplines are developed, buildings are replaced and tuition goes up. Coaches come and go.

100. Vanderbilt Students Find Happiness in Music City -

As the Class of 2018 begins to poke around the Vanderbilt University campus, the newest Commodores will be met with the highest of expectations.

“This class is projected to have the highest academic quality in our history as measured by high school class rank and SAT scores,’’ says Doug Christiansen, vice provost for enrollment and dean of admissions.