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Editorial Results (free)

1. Angels Of Our Better Nature -

SPIRITS OF A CITY. Emily Sutton and Annie Cook were prostitutes. And angels.

2. Mix It Up -

Memphis’ development eye is turning inward and upward as mixed-use projects are becoming more common than ever before.

Usually a mode of survival for densely packed cities, residential, office, retail and even manufacturing are cohabitating in single mixed-use buildings or lots as a way to recoup Memphis’ sprawl. Downtown and Midtown are being combed for infill and adaptive reuse possibilities as millennials are moving to the urban core in droves.

3. Serving Notice: Memphis Football a National Story Now -

They were down 14-0 not six minutes into the game. And they had given up a 68-yard touchdown on a trick play when star Ole Miss receiver Laquon Treadwell threw a pass.

In the stands, this cued some horrifying Memphis football flashbacks built up over decades of suffering.

4. Shelby County Commission Continues Quest for Legal Autonomy -

Shelby County commissioners have hired an attorney in their continued exploration of retaining their own permanent legal counsel independent of the county attorney’s office.

The body appointed former county commissioner Julian Bolton as special counsel in the matter Monday, Oct. 12. The commission has indicated Bolton is the attorney they’d like to hire on a permanent basis.

5. Memphis Mayoral Transition Begins -

The transition at City Hall begins this week from Mayor A C Wharton to Mayor-elect Jim Strickland.

Strickland won’t take office until January.

6. Metro Nashville’s Local-Hire Rule Gets Battered On Many Fronts -

The ink wasn’t dry on standards for Metro Nashville’s local-hire charter amendment when new Mayor Megan Barry put the measure on hold – despite sizable support in the August election.

7. A Steeple in Hell -

THE CHURCH OF GROUND ZERO. Headed to my desk, I passed a photograph on the wall. I pass it several times every day, but when I typed 9/11 at the top of the page, the date this column would run in The Daily News, I realized what the column would be about:

8. Preparation Enhances Chances for Small-Business Success -

The term “small business” is the ultimate misnomer.

In 2011, according to U.S. Census Bureau data, there were 5.68 million employer firms in the United States. And firms with fewer than 500 workers accounted for 99.7 percent of those businesses. Businesses with fewer than 20 workers made up 89.8 percent.

9. Kudzukian’s ‘Neo-Radio’ Platform Has Room to Grow -

What does kudzu have in common with a media content company in Memphis that bears its name?

Kudzukian founder Larry Robinson is hoping that his new, neo-radio concept will mirror the foot-a-day growth of the invasive southern vine.

10. Congress Passes 3-Month Highway, Transit Aid Patch -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress sent President Barack Obama a three-month bill to keep highway and transit money flowing to states on Thursday, one day before the deadline for a cutoff of funds.

11. Climate Change as Faith Issue a Tough Sell -

It’s been a tough few years for Tennessee Interfaith Power and Light. The state affiliate of a national network of faith communities, the organization offers its members a spiritual way to respond to climate change issues and challenges from political and other sources.

12. Municipal Schools Leaders Assess First Year -

Not so fast with those state achievement test quick scores that went out with some students’ last report cards. Tennessee Department of Education officials said earlier this month that the figures are in most cases rosier than expected.

13. New Carnival Cruise Brand Devotes Ship to Volunteer Trips -

NEW YORK (AP) – Carnival Corp. announced a new concept in cruising Thursday: service trips where passengers sail to a destination in order to volunteer there.

14. Harris Pushes For Insure Tennessee Comeback -

State Senate Democratic leader Lee Harris of Memphis will be on the campaign trail this summer.

Harris and other Democratic leaders in the majority Republican Tennessee legislature will campaign across the state this summer for the comeback of the Insure Tennessee proposal in the 2016 legislative session.

15. School’s End -

When Catholic Bishop Terry Steib put on a hardhat a week ago to break ground on the Immaculate Conception Cathedral School’s new $4.2 million Cathedral Center, he had the attention of the school’s youngest students.

16. Baker Book Traces Conciliatory Political Philosophy -

Long before his death last June, former U.S. Sen. Howard Baker of Tennessee was aware that other Republicans, including those who worked in his groundbreaking campaigns of the 1960s and 1970s, believed it was no longer possible for a political moderate like him to get elected in Tennessee.

17. Bike Fest Leaders Rally for Positive Change -

It is rewarding when people who seemingly have nothing in common, of being worlds apart, find common ground. And it is nothing short of inspirational when what they build on that common ground makes life better for all of us.

18. What Better Place for an NRA Convention? -

When the National Rifle Association announced that it would hold its 2015 convention in Nashville, the timing was propitious.

In 2010, gun sales and handgun permits were booming, and Tennessee had just enacted a controversial and contested new “guns in bars” law that allowed people with handgun permits to carry concealed firearms into bars and restaurants that serve alcohol.

19. Drive! Consortium Pushes Regional Auto Industry -

Tennessee’s bustling automotive-industry sector is going to get a whole lot busier in the coming months, at least if a large group of businesses, agencies and related parties behind the Drive! for the Future Consortium (Drive!) have anything to say about it.

20. Harris’ Bill Faces Opposition From Memphis City Council Members -

Legislation by Sen. Lee Harris requiring local governments to hold a referendum before they take on “extraordinary” debt could run into opposition from his own City Council and municipal leaders across Tennessee.

21. Facing Militant Threat, Corker Shoulders Matters of War -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Two years ago, Sen. Bob Corker wondered aloud whether the standstill Senate was worth a grown man's time.

Now the combination of Republicans' political fortunes in last November's elections and brutal terrorism overseas have put the two-term Tennessee lawmaker in the limelight. He heads the Foreign Relations Committee and is in charge of the weightiest question to ever face members of Congress: whether to authorize war.

22. Lew Says Congress Should Turn Efforts Toward Business Taxes -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Obama administration is pushing Congress to simplify federal business taxes after Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew said Democrats and Republicans are too far apart to agree on sweeping changes to taxes paid by individuals and families.

23. The Other Fellow -

Long before his death last year, former U.S. Sen. Howard Baker of Tennessee was aware that other Republicans, including those who worked in his groundbreaking campaigns of the 1960s and 1970s, believed it was no longer possible for a political moderate like him to get elected in Tennessee.

24. Shrinking Foreign Oil Bill Sends US Trade Deficit Lower -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. trade deficit fell in November to the lowest level in almost a year, thanks to the country's swiftly shrinking thirst for foreign oil.

The deficit – imports minus exports – narrowed to $39 billion during the month, down 7.7 percent from a revised October deficit of $42.2 billion, the Commerce Department reported Wednesday.

25. Immigrants Find Room to Grow in Nashville's Public Gardens -

With the growing season wrapped up for winter and the temperature hovering at 45 degrees on a recent Sunday, the community garden off Wedgewood Avenue looked to be draped in a brown afghan with just a few patches of green peeking through.

26. Competition, Cooperation Part of Regionalism Mix -

When a group of mayors with common borders get together, it is usually a sympathetic gathering of chief executives where there is much comparing of notes.

The items range from sewer projects and common problems to relationships with legislative bodies from aldermen to council members.

27. Obama Promotes Trade, Tax Fix, Innovation -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama on Thursday declared himself "much more optimistic" than he was last year about completing a major trade deal with Pacific Rim countries.

At the same time, the president acknowledged to executives on his advisory export council that a tough sales job will be necessary on a commerce issue certain to put him at odds with fellow Democrats during the last two years of his presidency.

28. US Trade Deficit Drops to $43.4 Billion in October -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. trade deficit fell slightly in October as exports rebounded while oil imports dipped to the lowest level in five years.

The deficit edged down 0.4 percent to $43.4 billion, a drop from a revised $43.6 billion in September, the Commerce Department reported Friday.

29. Precious Cargo -

In November, a trailer full of new, pre-released LeBron James shoes made by Nike was stolen in the Memphis area.

But thanks to a local task force dedicated to stopping cargo theft, the Oregon-based sports apparel giant, which operates a massive distribution center in Frayser, was able to recover nearly all of the shoes, which were valued at around $700,000.

30. Obama Offers Candor, Insights in Q&A With Top CEOs -

WASHINGTON (AP) – At times blunt, at others obliging, President Barack Obama entered a den of top corporate CEOs on Wednesday with a candid assessment of the limits of his governing agenda, the tripwires facing the economy recovery and the motivations of various foreign leaders.

31. Telecom Controversy Emerges at City Hall -

During the recent repaving of Danny Thomas Boulevard Downtown, city public works crews discovered a leak in sewer lines, and the political timing lined up with a controversy at City Hall that’s been out of the public eye for the most part since the spring.

32. Analysts: How GOP Congress Could Boost US Economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Voters made clear Tuesday that they're worried about the economy, despite steady job gains, a robust stock market and faster economic growth this year.

So what can – and should – the now-dominant Republicans in Congress and President Barack Obama do together to benefit more Americans?

33. Real Estate Rally -

Commercial real estate can offer insight into the strength of the local economy. Through the office, retail, industrial and apartment developments that mark the region the economy at work in the real world can be seen.

34. ‘State of Black Memphis’ Forum Urges Action -

Each year, the Urban League releases a national report that puts the “state of Black America” in the form of statistics on health care, education, economic power and similar factors.

This year, the Memphis Urban League Young Professionals used the report’s release to start a discussion billed as the “state of Black Memphis.”

35. FedEx Profits Surge Above Wall Street Estimates -

FedEx said fiscal first-quarter profits surged to $606 million, driven by gains in its freight, ground and express operations and a share buyback program.

Memphis-based FedEx reported earnings Wednesday, Sept. 17, of $2.10 per diluted share for the first quarter ended Aug. 31, up 37 percent from last year’s $1.53 per share and above Wall Street estimates. The average estimate of analysts surveyed by Zacks Investment Research was for earnings of $1.96 per share. FedEx shares were up 4.29 percent following the earnings release and conference call with company executives.

36. Ball Targets Carr's Tea Party Supporters -

Gordon Ball, the Democratic challenger to Republican U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander, is basing his uphill challenge of Alexander on his specific definition of being a moderate Democrat and where that intersects with tea party followers.

37. At the Counter -

THE COLLEGE INN, FULL CIRCLE. The future was in my hands. My parents had set me free and I sat there all by myself for the very first time, my own stool at the counter, my own menu in front of me and a cool new show on the TV above. It was 1957. I was eight. The show was Perry Mason. And I was in control.

38. 10 Secrets to Easy Business Marketing -

We’re the best kept secret in town! I have heard it more than a few times when someone is describing their business, their institution or services. It’s almost bragging rights to be a secret.

39. Standing Out in The Crowd -

Last weekend, I had the pleasure of participating in a panel as part of the Memphis Urban League Young Professional’s 2014 Empowerment Conference. We spoke on the topic of “Stand Out in the Crowd.”

40. Sentencing Changes Sought for Business Crimes -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The federal panel that sets sentencing policy eased penalties this year for potentially tens of thousands of drug dealers. Now, defense lawyers and prisoner advocates are pushing for similar treatment for an arguably less-sympathetic category of defendants: swindlers, embezzlers, insider traders and other white-collar criminals.

41. Springing to Life -

When Ridgeland, Miss.-based development firm the Bryan Co. broke ground on The Horizon condominium tower in 2007, it was at the peak of the housing bubble and optimism from elected officials and Downtown boosters was equally high.

42. Start of School Features Historic Change -

A child ready for his first day of school Monday, Aug. 4, in the new Bartlett City Schools system mistakenly got on a bus bound for Shelby County Schools that ran close to the route he was supposed to take.

43. School’s In -

When public schools open Monday, Aug. 4, for the academic year across Shelby County, the merger of public education into one school system will give way to the demerger into seven separate public systems.

44. Editorial: City Needs Better Ways to Attract, Retain Talent -

Perhaps there is a new type of metric we should be exploring in our effort to draw and retain those in their 20s and 30s to make Memphis their city.

We submit what is missing thus far in this difficult work is an ease factor that young professionals are finding in other cities.

45. Communicate Effectively With Your Audience -

The digital world has altered the way businesses communicate with audiences. Regardless of size, they have the opportunity to connect with customers on a more personal basis than at any other point in history.

46. FedEx Earnings Beat Estimates -

Fueled by a surge in e-commerce leading to increased gains in its Ground division, FedEx on Wednesday reported higher than expected earnings for the quarter that ended May 31.

Memphis-based FedEx reported it earned $2.46 a share in the fourth quarter and $6.75 a share for the full fiscal year, above analyst estimates of $2.36 for the quarter and $6.68 for the year.

47. FedEx, International Paper Join Buyback Trend -

Recent stock repurchases by major U.S. corporations since the recession are a financial fact of life and the city’s best known publicly-held companies are no exception to the practice that can have multiple motives as well as multiple effects.

48. Germantown Schools Joins Shared Services Pact -

When the Germantown Municipal Schools board voted May 5 to not participate in three shared services agreements with the other five suburban school systems, it “strained” the school system’s relationship with the other five, Germantown Schools superintendent Jason Manuel told the board Wednesday, May 14.

49. Ready to Work -

Could a framed photograph of the interviewer’s two children help you get the job? How about the Dallas Cowboys coffee mug on his desk? Or the diploma from the University of Memphis on her wall?

50. Aitken Talks Next Steps for Collierville Schools -

Budgets for the six municipal school systems and Shelby County Schools are starting to come together.

Shelby County Schools board members could vote in a special meeting Tuesday, April 22, on their budget proposal to the Shelby County Commission.

51. Bill Extends Tax Breaks for Wind Farms, Filmmakers -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Wind farms, NASCAR tracks and filmmakers would keep their treasured tax breaks as part of an $85 billion package of temporary tax cuts passed by a key Senate committee Thursday.

52. McCusker Aims for Criminal Court Clerk -

Michael McCusker is used to the assumptions when the assistant district attorney general tells voters he is running for office this year.

“A lot of people keep saying to me, ‘Wouldn’t judge be a natural progression for you?’ In some respects it would be,” admitted McCusker, who is instead running in the May Democratic primary for Criminal Court clerk.

53. Four Ways to Grow Your Alumni Association -

Part two of a two-part series on alumni fundraising. Alumni associations offer memberships and raise funds for the colleges and universities they are associated with. Many are independent nonprofit organizations; others operate as part of the institution’s alumni relations department.

54. Demerger Debate -

In five months, a new school year will begin in Shelby County. And for a second straight academic year, many parents will be able to say it is unlike any in their lifetimes.

The first and last school year of the unified Memphis City and Shelby County Schools systems will be followed by what educators are calling the “demerger.”

55. New Life -

When Rob Clark and his wife moved into their home in the historic Evergreen neighborhood in 1993, catalog and distribution operations were still active at the Sears Crosstown building.

That soon changed, and for roughly two decades the hulking property stood as a towering, painful reminder of the area’s faded glory.

56. New Life -

When Rob Clark and his wife moved into their home in the historic Evergreen neighborhood in 1993, catalog and distribution operations were still active at the Sears Crosstown building.

That soon changed, and for roughly two decades the hulking property stood as a towering, painful reminder of the area’s faded glory.

57. Government Might Deregulate Corn, Soybean Seeds -

MILWAUKEE (AP) – The federal government on Friday proposed eliminating restrictions on corn and soybean seeds genetically engineered to resist a common weed killer, a move welcomed by many farmers but worrisome to scientists and environmentalists who fear it could invite growers to use more chemicals on crops.

58. If Government Backs In-Flight Calls, Will the Airlines? -

NEW YORK (AP) – The Federal Communications Commission might be ready to permit cellphone calls in flight. But what about the airlines?

Old concerns about electronics being a danger to airplane navigation have been debunked. And airlines could make some extra cash charging passengers to call a loved one from 35,000 feet. But that extra money might not be worth the backlash from fliers who view overly chatty neighbors as another inconvenience to go along with smaller seats and stuffed overhead bins.

59. Negotiators Report Little Progress in Budget Talks -

WASHINGTON (AP) – House and Senate budget negotiators say they're not close to an agreement but plan to keep at it.

"We're trying to find common ground but we're not there yet," said House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan, R-Wis. He said Republicans and Democrats have spent lots of time in the recent past airing their differences but it's now time to find a way to strike an accord. "The hard part is figuring out where we agree," Ryan said.

60. FAA OKs Air Passengers Using Gadgets on Planes -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Airline passengers will be able to use their electronic devices gate-to-gate to read, work, play games, watch movies and listen to music – but not talk on their cellphones – under much-anticipated guidelines issued Thursday by the Federal Aviation Administration.

61. Both Sides Agree: No Major Budget Deal Foreseen -

WASHINGTON (AP) — On this, GOP budget guru Rep. Paul Ryan and top Senate Democrat Harry Reid can agree: There won't be a "grand bargain" on the budget.

62. Shutdown Over, Obama Surveys Damage and Blames GOP -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The government unlocked its doors Thursday after 16 days, with President Barack Obama saluting the resolution of Congress' bitter standoff but lambasting Republicans for the partial shutdown that he said had damaged the U.S. economy and America's credibility around the world.

63. As Shutdown Drags On, Time to Call in Mediator? -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Maybe it's time to call in a mediator – if there's one not on furlough.

President Barack Obama and congressional Republicans are in stalemate over a partial government shutdown now in its second week. And a looming crisis over the federal debt limit is rapidly approaching, with economists saying that could have a devastating effect on the U.S. economy.

64. Baptist Begins Work on Germantown Rehabilitation Facility -

Baptist Memorial Health Care Corp. is moving ahead with a new rehabilitation facility on South Germantown Road, aimed at helping meet increased demand from an aging population seeking to continue their independence after a devastating injury or illness.

65. Smaller School Board Could Take Several Paths -

There are at least two schools of thought about the path the seven-member countywide school board should take without the 16 members it has had since October 2011.

David Pickler, one of the seven members who remain, urged the board last week to take a different path than the former 23-member board at least in the way it conducts its business.

66. Cotton Growers See Bugs, Disease Ahead of Harvest -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – Arkansas cotton growers have watched their costs rise this season as bugs fed from the ground up and a fungus descended from above.

Corynespora leaf spot disease emerged late in the season, crop consultant David Hydrick said Thursday.

67. Organic Education -

Bethel Grove Elementary School of Memphis marked the opening of its American Heart Association Teaching Garden recently with a Plant Day Celebration and ribbon-cutting ceremony that included garden crafts, music and physical activity education.

68. DeBerry’s Political Path Sign of Times -

Flags over the state capitol in Nashville and all state office buildings remained at half staff Tuesday, July 30, in honor and memory of state Rep. Lois DeBerry of Memphis.

69. Senate Moves Forward on Transportation Spending -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A $108 billion measure that would boost funding for infrastructure projects and housing subsidies for the poor is moving ahead in the Senate.

The measure cleared a procedural hurdle by a bipartisan 73-26 vote Tuesday, and that sets up days of debate with the goal of passing the measure next week.

70. Senators Ready to Restore Lower College Loan Rates -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A bipartisan compromise on student loans promises better deals for students and parents over the next few years but could spell higher rates as the economy improves.

The Senate deal pegs the interest rates on new loans to the financial markets and was expected to come to a vote next week, well before students returning to campus this fall had to sign their loan agreements.

71. Coalition Sues to Halt Electronic Surveillance -

Rights activists, church leaders and drug and gun rights advocates found common ground and filed a lawsuit on Tuesday against the federal government to halt a vast National Security Agency electronic surveillance program.

72. Educators Stress Consistency Amid Change -

Three educators who have led schools inside and outside the conventional public school system locally say consistency at the school level will be important in a school year that will see a lot of change.

73. The Costco Connection -

MEMPHIS IN COSTCO. Have you ever noticed that what appears to be of a reasonable size in Costco grows in volume and dimension with every mile between Costco and home?

Sure, you need a little lime in your gin and tonic, but there are 50 of them in that green net bag you just dragged into the kitchen and squeezed onto the counter next to those 27 avocados. That lobster dip you sampled was terrific, but that tub you brought home would keep all of Bar Harbor happy for the summer. The average Starbucks doesn’t stock as much Caffè Verona as you do now. Clinics are coming to you for antacid pills. If FedExForum runs out of toilet paper, come on over to your garage. That stuffed bear is so big it not only scares your grandbaby, the fact that you bought it scares the hell out of you. You didn’t need to eat that hot dog the size of a fireplace log, but you had to because that dog and a refillable drink for a buck fifty is one of the five best deals in America and the other four don’t count.

74. Council Faces Pressure in Financial Crisis -

The Memphis City Council is caught between hints of a state takeover of city finances and the possibility of a lawsuit by most, if not all, of the city’s municipal labor unions in a fiscal crisis that is also evolving into a significant labor dispute.

75. Comptroller Urges Council to Act on Fiscal Problems -

That didn’t take long.

An ad hoc committee of Memphis City Council members trying to find common ground between the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. and the city’s municipal labor unions met for less than an hour Wednesday, June 12, before calling it a day.

76. Editorial: Financial Climate Complex as Ever -

Invest and hold has become invest and monitor in the world of personal finance, which means the days of forgetting about where a substantial part of your money is parked is probably over.

As our cover story points out, U.S. Treasury bonds – once a worry-free harbor for reliable returns at low to no risk – haven’t been that in the post-recession recovery. Before we address the issue of complexity, let’s talk about the need now more than ever for financial literacy. Building wealth is still a necessary goal that has been made more complex by changes in even the most basic forms of investing.

77. Talks Underway for Club 152 Reopening -

The owners of Club 152 on Beale Street and prosecutors with the Shelby County District Attorney General’s office have been talking since the club was shut down a week ago as a public nuisance.

Both sides are due back before General Sessions Environmental Court Judge Larry Potter Thursday, May 21.

78. If You Can’t Win, Change the Game -

In today’s dynamic world it is imperative for companies to continually realize growth through a sustainable competitive advantage. The trouble is that every innovation is just one new innovation away from becoming obsolete. How do proactive companies stay one step ahead?

79. Economic Development Through Entrepreneurism -

Last week we visited downtown Las Vegas to tour and learn more about what Zappos founder Tony Hsieh is doing to stimulate entrepreneurial activity and urban revitalization through his Downtown Project initiative. Hsieh is personally investing $350 million to transform downtown Las Vegas into the most community-focused large city in the world in less than five years.

80. CBU Partners With Congregational Health Network -

Christian Brothers University’s RN to BSN Nursing Program is strengthening its relationship with the Congregational Health Network with a new online training course.

The online course is being developed with the help of a $12,100 grant that CBU recently received from The Promise of Nursing for Tennessee Nursing School Grant Program, which is administered by the Foundation of the National Student Nurses’ Association.

81. AP IMPACT: Deficient Levees Found Across America -

NEW ORLEANS (AP) – Inspectors taking the first-ever inventory of flood control systems overseen by the federal government have found hundreds of structures at risk of failing and endangering people and property in 37 states.

82. Schools Court Case Continues on Two Fronts -

No new mediation sessions were scheduled as of Monday evening in the municipal school district court case in Memphis federal court.

But the continued lack of specifics by the parties about what is happening is an indication that the talks will likely continue.

83. Debt Drama -

One of the common refrains among money managers and economists in Memphis is that the nation’s political leaders spend too much time wrestling with crises and not enough actually solving problems.

Case in point: in a few weeks, the federal government will have reached the limit of its authorized borrowing capacity, the so-called “debt ceiling.” In truth, that moment already has come, but the U.S. Treasury Department has some procedural room to maneuver to keep things going for a few more weeks.

84. Ray Rico Freelance Moves Into Cooper-Young -

Ray Rico Freelance has inked a lease for 550 square feet in the heart of the Cooper-Young Historic District after working for six years as a freelancer out of his nearby home and hiring strictly contract labor.

85. Missions Double for Heart Foundation -

Children around the globe in countries that do not have the medical resources available here in the U.S. are getting a helping hand from The International Children’s Heart Foundation, a local organization targeting congenital heart disease.

86. Federal Review of Tobacco Products Grinds to a Halt -

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) – Talk about a smoke break.

Tobacco companies have introduced almost no new cigarettes or smokeless tobacco products in the U.S. in more than 18 months because the federal government has prevented them from doing so, an Associated Press review has found.

87. Huffman Brings Leverage to Possible Mediation -

Tennessee Education Commissioner Kevin Huffman would bring lots of political leverage with him should he mediate the coming merger of schools in Shelby County.

88. Lekhy Brings Fresh Perspective to Convention Center Role -

When Nikki Lekhy talks about Memphis, she speaks with the pride and knowledge usually heard in the voices of older residents who have been around for years and witnessed decades of changes.

But the newly promoted sales manager for the Memphis Cook Convention Center is only 25, just kicking off her career and looking at the city through fresh young eyes – a perspective many community leaders believe is crucial to the city’s future growth.

89. Garage Demolition First Step for Downtown Project -

The Downtown parking garage attached to the 147 Jefferson Ave. building is being demolished, the first of many steps the property owner is taking to redevelop its adjacent 12-story masonry office building for a proposed mixed-use facility.

90. Early Voting Coming to Close in Tennessee -

Tennessee election officials are hoping to break another record when the early voting period ends on Thursday, but they acknowledge remnants of superstorm Sandy could affect voter turnout in the northeastern part of the state.

91. Drought Holds its Grip as Growers Pivot to Wheat -

ST. LOUIS (AP) — The worst U.S. drought in decades showed little sign of easing last week as farmers closed out their corn and soybean harvests and turned their attention to winter wheat, which has been struggling to break through the moisture-starved soil in some states, according to a weekly report.

92. Smith: Woes Accelerate FedEx Change -

FedEx Corp. founder and CEO Fred Smith ended 10 hours of immersion for analysts and investors in changes at the Memphis-based corporation Wednesday, Oct. 10, by telling the group of 200, “I think maybe we arrived at a better strategy through the wrong process.”

93. Commission Argues Racial ‘Resegreation’ With Districts -

Attorneys on all sides of the federal court case over municipal school districts are waiting for a ruling from U.S. District Court Judge Samuel “Hardy” Mays on issues involving the Tennessee Constitution.

94. Crosstown Stakeholder Pleased With Development’s Direction -

Todd Richardson gave some schemes – albeit changing ones – of the redeveloped Sears Crosstown building in Midtown Friday, Oct. 5, at Universal Commercial Real Estate’s Regional Minority Business Entrepreneur Power Breakfast.

95. Events -

Greater Memphis Chamber will host A Conversation With … Dr. Mark Emmert, president of the NCAA, Tuesday, Oct. 2, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Holiday Inn University of Memphis, 3700 Central Ave. The topic is “Is College Sports Broken?” Cost is $35 for members and $40 for nonmembers. R.S.V.P. to Tunga Lee at tlee@memphischamber.com or 543-3571.

96. Events -

Greater Memphis Chamber will host A Conversation With … Dr. Mark Emmert, president of the NCAA, Tuesday, Oct. 2, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Holiday Inn University of Memphis, 3700 Central Ave. The topic is “Is College Sports Broken?” Cost is $35 for members and $40 for nonmembers. R.S.V.P. to Tunga Lee at tlee@memphischamber.com or 543-3571.

97. Entrepreneurial Ecosystem -

Maybe you’re a startup founder who wants to rub shoulders with your peers, pitch investors in the hope of landing venture capital and talk to a lawyer about drawing up paperwork.

Maybe you’re a veteran researcher who’s got a side project that looks like it could turn into something big. Or maybe you’ve got little more than an idea on the back of a napkin.

98. Ritz Settles In as Commission Chairman -

Shelby County Commissioners had some new seating arrangements and committee assignments Monday, Sept. 10, as commissioner Mike Ritz began his yearlong term as chairman of the body.

Former chairman and Democrat Sidney Chism was seated next to former chairman pro tempore and Republican Wyatt Bunker.

99. US Homes Cracking Due to Drought-Parched Soil -

ST. LOUIS (AP) – Carol DeVaughan assumed her suburban St. Louis home was simply settling when cracks appeared in the walls. When she noticed huge gaps between her fireplace and ceiling, and that her family room was starting to tilt, she knew she had bigger problems.

100. Decoding Prospects’ Secret Language -

Part one in a two-part series Let’s face it. Prospects have a language of their own. Sometimes they say one thing when they really mean another. Shocking, right? The language differences between sellers and buyers are akin to those between men and women – often worlds apart. Fortunately, prospects have a few go-to responses that, once decoded, will put you on an even playing field.