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Editorial Results (free)

1. Bill Extends Tax Breaks for Wind Farms, Filmmakers -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Wind farms, NASCAR tracks and filmmakers would keep their treasured tax breaks as part of an $85 billion package of temporary tax cuts passed by a key Senate committee Thursday.

2. McCusker Aims for Criminal Court Clerk -

Michael McCusker is used to the assumptions when the assistant district attorney general tells voters he is running for office this year.

“A lot of people keep saying to me, ‘Wouldn’t judge be a natural progression for you?’ In some respects it would be,” admitted McCusker, who is instead running in the May Democratic primary for Criminal Court clerk.

3. Four Ways to Grow Your Alumni Association -

Part two of a two-part series on alumni fundraising. Alumni associations offer memberships and raise funds for the colleges and universities they are associated with. Many are independent nonprofit organizations; others operate as part of the institution’s alumni relations department.

4. Demerger Debate -

In five months, a new school year will begin in Shelby County. And for a second straight academic year, many parents will be able to say it is unlike any in their lifetimes.

The first and last school year of the unified Memphis City and Shelby County Schools systems will be followed by what educators are calling the “demerger.”

5. New Life -

When Rob Clark and his wife moved into their home in the historic Evergreen neighborhood in 1993, catalog and distribution operations were still active at the Sears Crosstown building.

That soon changed, and for roughly two decades the hulking property stood as a towering, painful reminder of the area’s faded glory.

6. New Life -

When Rob Clark and his wife moved into their home in the historic Evergreen neighborhood in 1993, catalog and distribution operations were still active at the Sears Crosstown building.

That soon changed, and for roughly two decades the hulking property stood as a towering, painful reminder of the area’s faded glory.

7. Government Might Deregulate Corn, Soybean Seeds -

MILWAUKEE (AP) – The federal government on Friday proposed eliminating restrictions on corn and soybean seeds genetically engineered to resist a common weed killer, a move welcomed by many farmers but worrisome to scientists and environmentalists who fear it could invite growers to use more chemicals on crops.

8. If Government Backs In-Flight Calls, Will the Airlines? -

NEW YORK (AP) – The Federal Communications Commission might be ready to permit cellphone calls in flight. But what about the airlines?

Old concerns about electronics being a danger to airplane navigation have been debunked. And airlines could make some extra cash charging passengers to call a loved one from 35,000 feet. But that extra money might not be worth the backlash from fliers who view overly chatty neighbors as another inconvenience to go along with smaller seats and stuffed overhead bins.

9. Negotiators Report Little Progress in Budget Talks -

WASHINGTON (AP) – House and Senate budget negotiators say they're not close to an agreement but plan to keep at it.

"We're trying to find common ground but we're not there yet," said House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan, R-Wis. He said Republicans and Democrats have spent lots of time in the recent past airing their differences but it's now time to find a way to strike an accord. "The hard part is figuring out where we agree," Ryan said.

10. FAA OKs Air Passengers Using Gadgets on Planes -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Airline passengers will be able to use their electronic devices gate-to-gate to read, work, play games, watch movies and listen to music – but not talk on their cellphones – under much-anticipated guidelines issued Thursday by the Federal Aviation Administration.

11. Both Sides Agree: No Major Budget Deal Foreseen -

WASHINGTON (AP) — On this, GOP budget guru Rep. Paul Ryan and top Senate Democrat Harry Reid can agree: There won't be a "grand bargain" on the budget.

12. Shutdown Over, Obama Surveys Damage and Blames GOP -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The government unlocked its doors Thursday after 16 days, with President Barack Obama saluting the resolution of Congress' bitter standoff but lambasting Republicans for the partial shutdown that he said had damaged the U.S. economy and America's credibility around the world.

13. As Shutdown Drags On, Time to Call in Mediator? -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Maybe it's time to call in a mediator – if there's one not on furlough.

President Barack Obama and congressional Republicans are in stalemate over a partial government shutdown now in its second week. And a looming crisis over the federal debt limit is rapidly approaching, with economists saying that could have a devastating effect on the U.S. economy.

14. Baptist Begins Work on Germantown Rehabilitation Facility -

Baptist Memorial Health Care Corp. is moving ahead with a new rehabilitation facility on South Germantown Road, aimed at helping meet increased demand from an aging population seeking to continue their independence after a devastating injury or illness.

15. Smaller School Board Could Take Several Paths -

There are at least two schools of thought about the path the seven-member countywide school board should take without the 16 members it has had since October 2011.

David Pickler, one of the seven members who remain, urged the board last week to take a different path than the former 23-member board at least in the way it conducts its business.

16. Cotton Growers See Bugs, Disease Ahead of Harvest -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – Arkansas cotton growers have watched their costs rise this season as bugs fed from the ground up and a fungus descended from above.

Corynespora leaf spot disease emerged late in the season, crop consultant David Hydrick said Thursday.

17. Organic Education -

Bethel Grove Elementary School of Memphis marked the opening of its American Heart Association Teaching Garden recently with a Plant Day Celebration and ribbon-cutting ceremony that included garden crafts, music and physical activity education.

18. DeBerry’s Political Path Sign of Times -

Flags over the state capitol in Nashville and all state office buildings remained at half staff Tuesday, July 30, in honor and memory of state Rep. Lois DeBerry of Memphis.

19. Senate Moves Forward on Transportation Spending -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A $108 billion measure that would boost funding for infrastructure projects and housing subsidies for the poor is moving ahead in the Senate.

The measure cleared a procedural hurdle by a bipartisan 73-26 vote Tuesday, and that sets up days of debate with the goal of passing the measure next week.

20. Senators Ready to Restore Lower College Loan Rates -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A bipartisan compromise on student loans promises better deals for students and parents over the next few years but could spell higher rates as the economy improves.

The Senate deal pegs the interest rates on new loans to the financial markets and was expected to come to a vote next week, well before students returning to campus this fall had to sign their loan agreements.

21. Coalition Sues to Halt Electronic Surveillance -

Rights activists, church leaders and drug and gun rights advocates found common ground and filed a lawsuit on Tuesday against the federal government to halt a vast National Security Agency electronic surveillance program.

22. Educators Stress Consistency Amid Change -

Three educators who have led schools inside and outside the conventional public school system locally say consistency at the school level will be important in a school year that will see a lot of change.

23. The Costco Connection -

MEMPHIS IN COSTCO. Have you ever noticed that what appears to be of a reasonable size in Costco grows in volume and dimension with every mile between Costco and home?

Sure, you need a little lime in your gin and tonic, but there are 50 of them in that green net bag you just dragged into the kitchen and squeezed onto the counter next to those 27 avocados. That lobster dip you sampled was terrific, but that tub you brought home would keep all of Bar Harbor happy for the summer. The average Starbucks doesn’t stock as much Caffè Verona as you do now. Clinics are coming to you for antacid pills. If FedExForum runs out of toilet paper, come on over to your garage. That stuffed bear is so big it not only scares your grandbaby, the fact that you bought it scares the hell out of you. You didn’t need to eat that hot dog the size of a fireplace log, but you had to because that dog and a refillable drink for a buck fifty is one of the five best deals in America and the other four don’t count.

24. Council Faces Pressure in Financial Crisis -

The Memphis City Council is caught between hints of a state takeover of city finances and the possibility of a lawsuit by most, if not all, of the city’s municipal labor unions in a fiscal crisis that is also evolving into a significant labor dispute.

25. Comptroller Urges Council to Act on Fiscal Problems -

That didn’t take long.

An ad hoc committee of Memphis City Council members trying to find common ground between the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. and the city’s municipal labor unions met for less than an hour Wednesday, June 12, before calling it a day.

26. Editorial: Financial Climate Complex as Ever -

Invest and hold has become invest and monitor in the world of personal finance, which means the days of forgetting about where a substantial part of your money is parked is probably over.

As our cover story points out, U.S. Treasury bonds – once a worry-free harbor for reliable returns at low to no risk – haven’t been that in the post-recession recovery. Before we address the issue of complexity, let’s talk about the need now more than ever for financial literacy. Building wealth is still a necessary goal that has been made more complex by changes in even the most basic forms of investing.

27. Talks Underway for Club 152 Reopening -

The owners of Club 152 on Beale Street and prosecutors with the Shelby County District Attorney General’s office have been talking since the club was shut down a week ago as a public nuisance.

Both sides are due back before General Sessions Environmental Court Judge Larry Potter Thursday, May 21.

28. If You Can’t Win, Change the Game -

In today’s dynamic world it is imperative for companies to continually realize growth through a sustainable competitive advantage. The trouble is that every innovation is just one new innovation away from becoming obsolete. How do proactive companies stay one step ahead?

29. Economic Development Through Entrepreneurism -

Last week we visited downtown Las Vegas to tour and learn more about what Zappos founder Tony Hsieh is doing to stimulate entrepreneurial activity and urban revitalization through his Downtown Project initiative. Hsieh is personally investing $350 million to transform downtown Las Vegas into the most community-focused large city in the world in less than five years.

30. CBU Partners With Congregational Health Network -

Christian Brothers University’s RN to BSN Nursing Program is strengthening its relationship with the Congregational Health Network with a new online training course.

The online course is being developed with the help of a $12,100 grant that CBU recently received from The Promise of Nursing for Tennessee Nursing School Grant Program, which is administered by the Foundation of the National Student Nurses’ Association.

31. AP IMPACT: Deficient Levees Found Across America -

NEW ORLEANS (AP) – Inspectors taking the first-ever inventory of flood control systems overseen by the federal government have found hundreds of structures at risk of failing and endangering people and property in 37 states.

32. Schools Court Case Continues on Two Fronts -

No new mediation sessions were scheduled as of Monday evening in the municipal school district court case in Memphis federal court.

But the continued lack of specifics by the parties about what is happening is an indication that the talks will likely continue.

33. Debt Drama -

One of the common refrains among money managers and economists in Memphis is that the nation’s political leaders spend too much time wrestling with crises and not enough actually solving problems.

Case in point: in a few weeks, the federal government will have reached the limit of its authorized borrowing capacity, the so-called “debt ceiling.” In truth, that moment already has come, but the U.S. Treasury Department has some procedural room to maneuver to keep things going for a few more weeks.

34. Ray Rico Freelance Moves Into Cooper-Young -

Ray Rico Freelance has inked a lease for 550 square feet in the heart of the Cooper-Young Historic District after working for six years as a freelancer out of his nearby home and hiring strictly contract labor.

35. Missions Double for Heart Foundation -

Children around the globe in countries that do not have the medical resources available here in the U.S. are getting a helping hand from The International Children’s Heart Foundation, a local organization targeting congenital heart disease.

36. Federal Review of Tobacco Products Grinds to a Halt -

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) – Talk about a smoke break.

Tobacco companies have introduced almost no new cigarettes or smokeless tobacco products in the U.S. in more than 18 months because the federal government has prevented them from doing so, an Associated Press review has found.

37. Huffman Brings Leverage to Possible Mediation -

Tennessee Education Commissioner Kevin Huffman would bring lots of political leverage with him should he mediate the coming merger of schools in Shelby County.

38. Lekhy Brings Fresh Perspective to Convention Center Role -

When Nikki Lekhy talks about Memphis, she speaks with the pride and knowledge usually heard in the voices of older residents who have been around for years and witnessed decades of changes.

But the newly promoted sales manager for the Memphis Cook Convention Center is only 25, just kicking off her career and looking at the city through fresh young eyes – a perspective many community leaders believe is crucial to the city’s future growth.

39. Garage Demolition First Step for Downtown Project -

The Downtown parking garage attached to the 147 Jefferson Ave. building is being demolished, the first of many steps the property owner is taking to redevelop its adjacent 12-story masonry office building for a proposed mixed-use facility.

40. Early Voting Coming to Close in Tennessee -

Tennessee election officials are hoping to break another record when the early voting period ends on Thursday, but they acknowledge remnants of superstorm Sandy could affect voter turnout in the northeastern part of the state.

41. Drought Holds its Grip as Growers Pivot to Wheat -

ST. LOUIS (AP) — The worst U.S. drought in decades showed little sign of easing last week as farmers closed out their corn and soybean harvests and turned their attention to winter wheat, which has been struggling to break through the moisture-starved soil in some states, according to a weekly report.

42. Smith: Woes Accelerate FedEx Change -

FedEx Corp. founder and CEO Fred Smith ended 10 hours of immersion for analysts and investors in changes at the Memphis-based corporation Wednesday, Oct. 10, by telling the group of 200, “I think maybe we arrived at a better strategy through the wrong process.”

43. Commission Argues Racial ‘Resegreation’ With Districts -

Attorneys on all sides of the federal court case over municipal school districts are waiting for a ruling from U.S. District Court Judge Samuel “Hardy” Mays on issues involving the Tennessee Constitution.

44. Crosstown Stakeholder Pleased With Development’s Direction -

Todd Richardson gave some schemes – albeit changing ones – of the redeveloped Sears Crosstown building in Midtown Friday, Oct. 5, at Universal Commercial Real Estate’s Regional Minority Business Entrepreneur Power Breakfast.

45. Events -

Greater Memphis Chamber will host A Conversation With … Dr. Mark Emmert, president of the NCAA, Tuesday, Oct. 2, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Holiday Inn University of Memphis, 3700 Central Ave. The topic is “Is College Sports Broken?” Cost is $35 for members and $40 for nonmembers. R.S.V.P. to Tunga Lee at tlee@memphischamber.com or 543-3571.

46. Events -

Greater Memphis Chamber will host A Conversation With … Dr. Mark Emmert, president of the NCAA, Tuesday, Oct. 2, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Holiday Inn University of Memphis, 3700 Central Ave. The topic is “Is College Sports Broken?” Cost is $35 for members and $40 for nonmembers. R.S.V.P. to Tunga Lee at tlee@memphischamber.com or 543-3571.

47. Entrepreneurial Ecosystem -

Maybe you’re a startup founder who wants to rub shoulders with your peers, pitch investors in the hope of landing venture capital and talk to a lawyer about drawing up paperwork.

Maybe you’re a veteran researcher who’s got a side project that looks like it could turn into something big. Or maybe you’ve got little more than an idea on the back of a napkin.

48. Ritz Settles In as Commission Chairman -

Shelby County Commissioners had some new seating arrangements and committee assignments Monday, Sept. 10, as commissioner Mike Ritz began his yearlong term as chairman of the body.

Former chairman and Democrat Sidney Chism was seated next to former chairman pro tempore and Republican Wyatt Bunker.

49. US Homes Cracking Due to Drought-Parched Soil -

ST. LOUIS (AP) – Carol DeVaughan assumed her suburban St. Louis home was simply settling when cracks appeared in the walls. When she noticed huge gaps between her fireplace and ceiling, and that her family room was starting to tilt, she knew she had bigger problems.

50. Decoding Prospects’ Secret Language -

Part one in a two-part series Let’s face it. Prospects have a language of their own. Sometimes they say one thing when they really mean another. Shocking, right? The language differences between sellers and buyers are akin to those between men and women – often worlds apart. Fortunately, prospects have a few go-to responses that, once decoded, will put you on an even playing field.

51. Problems Hit First Week of Early Voting -

As early voting began a week ago, Democrats and Republicans and those on both sides of the municipal school district issue had found common ground.

They had a general wariness that there might be problems with the balloting in advance of the Aug. 2 election day.

52. Weak Hiring Shows Economy Still Hurting -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A third straight month of weak hiring shows the U.S. economy is still struggling three years after the recession officially ended.

U.S. employers added just 80,000 jobs in June, and the unemployment rate was unchanged at 8.2 percent, the Labor Department said Friday.

53. Congress Passes Student Loans, Highway Jobs Bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Finding rare political accommodation on the cusp of a holiday recess, Congress passed legislation Friday designed to salvage 2.8 million jobs and shield students from a sharp increase in loan interest rates.

54. UTHSC Breaks Ground On Research Building -

The University of Tennessee Health Science Center broke ground Friday, June 8, on its $49 million Translational Science Research Building, which will be built on the grassy lot at the northwest corner of Union Avenue and South Manassas Street.

55. Home Browsers -

Amid the fast-pace world of the real estate business, having technology on your side is not only beneficial, but often necessary.

Due to the rising popularity of smartphones, real estate apps and the Web, homebuyers are doing their homework on neighborhoods, schools, amenities and crime well before they pick up the phone and seek professional advice.

56. City Needs to Keep Eye on Wells Fargo -

The out-of-court settlement by the city and county with Wells Fargo of the lawsuit alleging discriminatory and racially motivated home mortgage refinancing practices has great potential.

But there should be more to it than dollar figures.

57. Medical Realignment -

Private practice is fast becoming a thing of the past, as physicians groups across the country scramble to align with large health care systems in a move largely driven by national health care reform.

58. ‘A Unifier’ -

The Levitt Shell recently kicked off its season of free public concerts with its most well-attended opening weekend to date, continuing a 75-year tradition of bringing together Memphians from all walks of life to enjoy music in Overton Park.

59. ‘Hopefully’ Springs Eternal -

Near the end of a short essay, “El Dorado,” published in 1881, Robert Louis Stevenson wrote, “… to travel hopefully is a better thing than to arrive ….” (Hint: The essay is not about travel at all. It’s about life.)

60. Employers Posted More Job Openings in February -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Employers posted slightly more job openings in February, suggesting that modest hiring gains will continue in coming months.

The Labor Department said Tuesday that employers advertised 3.5 million job openings in February. That's up from a revised 3.48 million in January but still below the three-year high of 3.54 million in December.

61. Popular Small Business Bill Hits Senate Obstacles -

WASHINGTON (AP) – It might seem a recipe for success: Legislation to help small businesses raise capital passed the House last week with 95 percent of lawmakers voting for it and President Barack Obama's support. But in today's Congress, nothing comes easy.

62. House Passes Bipartisan Bill to Help Startups -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Showing that they can on occasion work together, House lawmakers on Thursday overwhelmingly passed a package of bills making it easier for small businesses and startups to raise the capital they need to grow and hire new workers.

63. Schools Transfer Terms Take Shape -

A set of ground rules for how public school buildings are transferred to municipal school districts is in the making despite a tie vote Monday, Feb. 6, that defeated a plan by some on the Shelby County Commission.

64. Tax Reform in This Election year: It's Not Likely -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Tax reform sounds like a good idea to lots of people, but where to start? Eliminate the popular deduction for home mortgages? End the write-off for charitable contributions? How about expanding the Social Security payroll tax?

65. Consolidation Talks Merge With Municipal Plans -

At the outset, members of the schools consolidation transition planning commission set out some basic ground rules for the set of public hearings they began in late January.

They wouldn’t answer questions about details of a merged school system that hadn’t been worked out yet. They would listen and they wouldn’t deal with items that weren’t part of what they are required to do by law – come up with a blueprint for a single countywide public school system.

66. Schools Consolidation Group Wants Meeting With Suburban Mayors -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell warned the schools consolidation transition planning commission that it cannot ignore the issue of suburban municipal school districts as it draws up the blueprint for a consolidated countywide school system.

67. Federal Budget Deficit to Dip to $1.1T, CBO Says -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The government will run a $1.1 trillion deficit in the fiscal year that ends in September, a slight dip from last year but still very high by any measure, according to a budget report released Tuesday.

68. Biz Owners Find Value In Giving Back -

There’s a growing breed of innovative for-profit entrepreneur that views positive social change as the foundation of business.

Rather than garnering donations or applying for grants as a nonprofit entity, social enterprise entrepreneurs are generating revenue and reinvesting profits in the community by providing services or manufacturing products.

69. Obama Takes on Big Government: 'It Has to Change' -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Seeking more power to shrink the government, President Barack Obama on Friday suggested smashing six economic agencies into one, an election-year idea intended to halt bureaucratic nightmares and force Republicans to back him on one of their own favorite issues.

70. Preserving the Magic -

Decades ago, Abram Schwab had the idea of putting a blues singer with a guitar on a stool somewhere in his general store on Beale Street to help along what was becoming a robust demand for the blues records his store sold.

71. Preventive Care: It's Free, Except When It's Not -

CHICAGO (AP) – Bill Dunphy thought his colonoscopy would be free.

His insurance company told him it would be covered 100 percent, with no copayment from him and no charge against his deductible. The nation's 1-year-old health law requires most insurance plans to cover all costs for preventive care including colon cancer screening. So Dunphy had the procedure in April.

72. FAA Issues Rules to Prevent Tired Airline Pilots -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Rules aimed at preventing airline pilots from flying while dangerously fatigued were issued Wednesday by the Federal Aviation Administration, a move safety advocates have been urging for more than two decades.

73. Pinnacle Facing Strong Headwinds -

It’s been a rough week for Memphis-based Pinnacle Airlines Corp. The regional air carrier – in an age of capacity cuts by major airlines targeting regional carriers – saw its common shares drop to $1.02 per common share Tuesday at the end of the trading day. The stock closed Wednesday at $1.18, but was back down to $1.05 at close Thursday.

74. Senate Rejects 2 Balanced Budget Amendments -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Senate on Wednesday voted against changing the Constitution to require a balanced budget as Congress hit yet another dead end in its search for a way out of its fiscal morass.

75. AutoZone Q1 Profit Improves 11 Pct. -

Memphis-based auto-parts retailer AutoZone Inc. keeps riding its business model to ever-higher growth, posting an 11 percent jump in its fiscal first-quarter profit and beating Wall Street’s earnings-per-share expectation.

76. GOP: Offsetting Cuts Must Cover Payroll Tax Relief -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Any extension of this year's payroll tax cut must be paid for with savings from elsewhere in the budget, House Speaker John Boehner said Wednesday.

Boehner's comment meant that House and Senate Republicans are united in demanding that any eventual measure, which could cost over $100 billion, not add to the federal deficit. It also suggested that President Barack Obama and Congress would have to find mutually acceptable savings before any extension could become law.

77. House Says No to Mandating Balanced Federal Budget -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Rejecting the idea Congress can't control its spending impulses, the House turned back a Republican proposal Friday to amend the Constitution to dam the rising flood of federal red ink. Democrats – and a few GOP lawmakers – said damage from the balanced-budget mandate would outweigh any benefits.

78. Occupy Memphis, Tea Party Members Meet -

MEMPHIS (AP) – Occupy Memphis member Mallory Pope had just finished telling a group of about 75 tea party followers Thursday night that politicians should not allow themselves to be influenced by lobbyists and unions when she received an unexpected invitation.

79. Extraordinary Valor -

The Lipscomb Pitts Breakfast Club welcomed best-selling author Doug Stanton as its guest speaker for November.

“Doug is an amazing storyteller, and we are really excited to have him as our speaker this month. November features the combination of Veteran’s Day and Thanksgiving, and we wanted to recognize and show our gratitude for the extraordinarily heroic service of our military veterans,” said Susan Stephenson, co-founder of Independent Bank, this month’s event host.

80. Congress Nears OK of Bill for Vets, Contractors -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Congressional Democrats and Republicans rallied on a rare patch of common ground Wednesday, moving toward passage of legislation helping unemployed veterans and government contractors.

81. House-Senate Negotiators Unveil Spending Bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) – House and Senate negotiators have agreed on a bundle of spending measures for the ongoing budget year, blending cuts to NASA and community development programs while averting cuts to nutrition programs.

82. A Primer for Seeking Capital as a Start-Up -

Start-up entrepreneurs that come up with the next world-changing investment strategy or widget are always faced with the difficult challenge of raising the initial capital needed just to get the idea off the ground.

83. Council Holds First Post-Election Meeting -

At their first set of meetings since the Oct. 6 city elections, Memphis City Council members take up some of the issues that surfaced in the campaigns while others have been delayed.

The Tuesday, Oct. 14, council session begins at 3:30 p.m. at City Hall, 125 N. Main St.

84. Law Professor Kiel Recounts Stories of ‘Memphis 13’ -

Daniel Kiel, a professor at the University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law, has spent years thinking and writing about issues like school desegregation in Memphis and the influence of race on education.

85. Obama Knocks GOP Leader, Says GOP Blocks Jobs Vote -

DALLAS (AP) – President Barack Obama is criticizing House Majority Leader Eric Cantor for saying the president's $447 billion jobs bill will not get a vote in its entirety in the Republican-led House.

86. Obama: Congress Should Vote on Jobs Bill in Oct. -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama demanded Monday that Congress vote on his jobs legislation package this month despite signs that the full measure faces stiff resistance. "I'm ready to sign it," the president said.

87. FedEx Earnings Up, Outlook Lowered -

Memphis-based FedEx Corp. increased its earnings per share for the first quarter of the fiscal year compared to the same quarter of 2010.

88. FedEx Earnings Up, Outlook Lowered -

Memphis-based FedEx Corp. increased its earnings per share for the first quarter of the fiscal year compared to the same quarter of 2010.

89. FedEx Says Consumer Confidence Drop Behind Demand Drop In Asia -

Memphis-based FedEx Corp. increased its earnings per share for the first quarter of the fiscal year compared to the same quarter of 2010.

90. Oil Industry: Boost in Energy Could Create 1M Jobs -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Government policies to increase domestic energy production could create up to a million jobs over the next seven years, the oil industry said in a report issued a day before President Barack Obama delivers a major speech on jobs.

91. 36M Lbs. of Turkey Recalled in Salmonella Outbreak -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Meat giant Cargill is recalling 36 million pounds of turkey after a government hunt for the source of a salmonella outbreak that has killed one person in California and sickened dozens more. The Agriculture Department says it is one of the largest meat recalls ever.

92. New Website Unites City’s Creative Talent -

Use what you’ve got before looking elsewhere.

It may sound like a simple concept, but it’s an area where Memphis needs improvement, says one local advertising and public relations professional.

93. Corruption Probe Surfaces in Millington -

A criminal investigation into corruption within Millington city government that began late last year surfaced Wednesday, July 27, with searches of government offices in the town by Tennessee Bureau of Investigation agents and investigators with the Shelby County District Attorney General’s office.

94. White House Threatens to Veto Boehner's House Plan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House threatened on Tuesday to veto emergency House legislation that aims to avert a threatened national default, a pre-emptive strike issued as Republican Speaker John Boehner labored to line up enough votes in his own party to pass the measure.

95. KQC Promotes Clients With ‘Uplifting Purpose’ -

Nikita Flynn, Terrell Gatewood and Renee Malone each bring a diverse and creative perspective to Kingdom Quality Communications, a marketing and communications business they launched in August 2007.

96. 8-Second Rule of First Impressions -

Eight seconds. It’s the length of a successful bull ride. And it’s also how long we have to leave an indelible impression on those we meet.

For the bull rider, that eight seconds is an eternity. For the rest of us, it’s gone in the mere blink of an eye.

97. Giving Back For Growth? -

Last week we spotlighted Agape’s Powerlines Community Network, which is a “place-based” program connecting under-resourced neighborhoods with resources and services needed to help create a more nurturing environment for children and families. This week let us refocus on the genesis of this column by discussing how community engagement makes a good growth strategy.

98. White House Considers Big Boost to Fuel Economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Obama administration is telling American automakers that it would like cars and light trucks to average 56.2 miles per gallon by 2025 – a boost to fuel economy that would save consumers money at the pump and help with global warming but drive up the cost of automobiles.

99. GOP Leader 'Cautiously Optimistic' on Debt Talks -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The No. 2 Republican in the House says he's "cautiously optimistic" that ongoing budget talks led by Vice President Joe Biden will produce an agreement on budget cuts at least as large as the accompanying increase in the government's ability to borrow.

100. Democrats Meet With Obama on Deficits -

WASHINGTON (AP) – House Democrats met with President Barack Obama for talks on cutting the U.S. deficit Thursday as the White House pushed back against calls from Republicans for Obama to show more leadership and offer more specifics on the issue.