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Editorial Results (free)

1. HealthCare.gov's EZ Form Not for Legal Immigrants -

WASHINGTON (AP) — HealthCare.gov's simpler online application is being touted as a big win for consumers. But it can't be used by legal immigrants and naturalized U.S. citizens, who represent millions of potential new health insurance customers.

2. Council Delays Vote On Graceland-Area Car Lot -

Memphis City Council members delayed a vote Tuesday, Oct. 22, on a used car lot on Elvis Presley Boulevard near the site of the new Guesthouse at Graceland 140-room resort-style hotel.

The used car lot at 3510 Elvis Presley Blvd. would be a new site for the Hot Wheels car lot, which is farther south on Elvis Presley Boulevard on property owned by Graceland.

3. Tennessee Voters to Decide on Income Tax Amendment -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – In a few weeks, Tennesseans will vote on a constitutional amendment to bar lawmakers from ever imposing a state income tax.

But regardless of what voters decide on Nov. 4, it's unlikely that Tennessee lawmakers would seriously consider an income tax because it's become such a toxic political issue.

4. Ebola Screening Measures Rest on Federal Law -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Obama administration's plans to screen certain airline passengers for exposure to Ebola are based on the Constitution and long-established legal authority that would almost certainly stand up in court if challenged, public health experts say.

5. Tennessee Voters to Decide on Abortion Amendment -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee voters will have a chance this November to decide whether they want to give the state Legislature more power to regulate abortions.

In 2000, the Tennessee Supreme Court struck down laws requiring a two-day waiting period and mandatory physician-only counseling and preventing second-trimester abortions from taking place anywhere but in a hospital.

6. Collins Forms Mayoral Exploratory Committee -

Memphis City Council member Harold Collins has formed an exploratory committee as he considers a run for Memphis mayor in 2015.

7. Probate Court Trio Returns for New Terms -

The two judges and clerk whose court is at the center of the practice of estate law in Shelby County were returned to their offices by Shelby County voters in the August county general elections.

Probate Court Judges Karen D. Webster and Kathleen N. Gomes as well as Probate Court Clerk Paul Boyd each faced challengers in the election that drew a 27 percent voter turnout overall.

8. Real Estate Experts Look at Impact of North Mississippi -

Six years after the real estate bubble burst nationally, the recovery of the commercial and residential sectors in Memphis is slower than in other parts of the country. But they are recovering on their own new terms, say the incoming president of the Memphis Area Association of Realtors, the president of the West Tennessee Home Builders Association and a mortgage lender.

9. University of Tennessee Students Help Design Nashville’s Future -

Nashville may be a city on the rise, attracting new residents by the droves. But it’s also a laboratory for students at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville’s College of Architecture and Design, where they are designing the communities of the future in partnership with the Nashville Civic Design Center.

10. Viability of Black Creative Districts Explored -

Several weeks ago, Eric Robertson, the president of the neighborhood revitalization intermediary Community LIFT, was showing a group of visitors around the city’s various creative and entertainment districts.

11. County Commission Starts School Bond Process -

Shelby County Commissioners vote Monday, Sept. 22, on a resolution that is the first step in issuing $120 million in general obligation bonds over the next two years to finance “public works projects, including schools,” according to the resolution.

12. TSA Expands PreCheck at Memphis Airport -

Pace Cooper, president and CEO of Cooper Hotels, a hospitality development and management company that owns and manages hotels in multiple states, is accustomed to flying and the hassles that sometimes accompany air travel.

13. Methodist Primary Care Adds Marion Doctor -

Dr. Aaron Mitchell and nurse practitioner Jama Davis, both with Mitchell Family Medicine in Marion, Ark., have joined Methodist Primary Care Group. The practice was to re-open this week.

14. Road to Better Mass Transit -

Picking a new transit chief is critical for a city in transition.

Next year, Nashville residents will elect a new mayor and turn over its large Metro Council.

Davidson County also expects some 200,000 new residents over the next 20 years, and much of the success of future development will depend on the ease of navigating around Nashville – already the nation’s second-worst area for sprawl, according to Smart Growth America.

15. 100 Percent Sure -

IF A PROGRAM IS 100 PERCENT SUCCESSFUL, GET WITH THE PROGRAM. I wrote something three years ago when President Obama visited Booker T. Washington High School. In light of recent events, I’d like to visit those words again.

16. Methodist Primary Care Adds Marion Doctor -

Dr. Aaron Mitchell and nurse practitioner Jama Davis, both with Mitchell Family Medicine in Marion, Ark., have joined Methodist Primary Care Group. The practice was to re-open this week.

17. City Employees Return to Court Over Benefits -

The basic elements of an overhaul of city health insurance and pension benefits got some changes this week at the Memphis City Council. And it looks like the council might put off a vote on pension benefit changes originally set for a vote in October.

18. Unintended Consequences: ER Visits Increase -

Hospital officials have been pushing for the state to expand Medicaid health care coverage for thousands of Tennessee’s poorest citizens, despite two significant and related concerns:

Expansion will lead to increased visits to the most expensive place in America for routine health care, the emergency room.

19. Editorial: Same Old Response Still Not Working -

We need a new response to an old problem in our city.

And in the week since the mob attack at Poplar Plaza, we feel there has been a beginning. It’s not one that has satisfied many citizens and it will surely be tested in the coming weeks and beyond.

20. Heart Foundation’s Novick Prepares for Ukraine Work -

Dr. William Novick isn’t real big on taking orders – especially from his doctors. Four weeks ago, he had his second hip replacement surgery since the first of the year.

21. Council Aims at Moving Insurance Targets -

At just about every turn of the debate at City Hall about changes in health insurance coverage, Memphis City Council members have seen crucial numbers shift about the impact of the changes and the city’s liability.

22. Council To Review Conflicting Health Insurance Numbers -

City government’s open enrollment period for health insurance begins in October and new details of health insurance benefit cuts approved in June go in the mail later this month. Yet Memphis City Council members meet in a special committee session next week to again review conflicting numbers from actuaries on the coverage.

23. Appeals Panel Weighing Occupy Nashville Suit -

CINCINNATI (AP) – A special three-judge panel focused on issues of camping, protests, free speech and executive power on Monday during arguments in an appeal of a lawsuit brought by Occupy Nashville protesters arrested on War Memorial Plaza in October 2011.

24. Goodwill Center Helps Job Seekers Reclaim Dreams -

The event was held in the shadow of the shuttered Raleigh Springs Mall, in the expanded section of the Goodwill store at 3830 Austin Peay Highway. It was the grand opening of the Goodwill Job Center.

25. Wine Referendum Makes Suburban Ballot -

Voters in the six suburban towns and cities in Shelby County will vote in November on whether they want grocery stores to sell wine.

The referendum question is on the Nov. 4 ballot in Arlington, Lakeland, Collierville, Germantown, Millington and Bartlett, as of Friday, Aug. 22.

26. Mason: Vanderbilt Success More Than Defeating UT -

Coach Derek Mason is determined to put his own mark of toughness on the Vanderbilt University football program as it continues its climb into the ranks of conference heavyweights.

27. City Union Presents Alternative Plan on Benefits -

Memphis Fire Fighters Association president Thomas Malone takes the union’s plan for reversing city employee and retiree health insurance coverage cutbacks to a city oversight committee Thursday, Aug. 21, on employee issues.

28. Fullilove Calls Off Sales Tax Hike Try, Unions May Try -

Memphis City Council member Janis Fullilove pulled the plug Tuesday, Aug. 19, on a proposed November referendum on a citywide half cent sales tax hike.

29. Marek Pushes For Cameras on Memphis Cops -

The newly-elected chairman of a subcommittee of the recently reconstituted Citizens Law Enforcement Review Board plans to propose that the board recommend the city of Memphis outfit all on-duty Memphis police officers with cameras.

30. Marek Pushes For Cameras on Memphis Cops -

The newly-elected chairman of the recently reconstituted Citizens Law Enforcement Review Board plans to propose that the board recommend the city of Memphis outfit all on-duty Memphis police officers with cameras.

31. McIver Makes Push for Legal Aid Into Broader Community -

For Harrison McIver, receiving the American Bar Association’s Dorsey Award this month at the ABA’s annual meeting in Boston was a special honor.

The award goes annually to attorneys who have worked in legal aid or legal services corporations representing indigent citizens.

32. Obama Takes Step to Improve Government Technology -

CHILMARK, Mass. (AP) – The White House on Monday announced the creation of a team of digital experts tasked with upgrading the government's technology infrastructure and making its websites more consumer friendly.

33. New Business Helps Clients Organize Homes, Lives -

When Amy Tuggle and her mother, Fran Cutshall, moved to Memphis from St. Louis recently they each decided to make a career change.

34. Polls Open Under Eye of Federal Monitors -

Memphis Democrats declared victory two days before the Thursday, Aug. 7, election day in Shelby County.

It wasn’t anything they saw in the early voting turnout numbers. The turnout there was less than it was four years ago in the set of county general election and state and federal primary races.

35. Haslam, Alexander Look to Boost Republican Turnout -

U.S. Rep. Stephen Fincher remembers the first time that he talked with U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander.

Fincher had been elected to Congress long enough to have made several votes after a 2008 campaign in which he touted his conservative values and stances. And in the process, Fincher admitted to Alexander that he had been critical of Alexander’s voting record during the campaign.

36. End in Sight -

One more weekend of early voting and then it’s the four-day sprint to election day for candidates, their campaigns and the voters who didn’t vote during the early voting period.

Because of the length of the ballot – the longest of any election cycle in Shelby County political history – state election officials are encouraging voters who have made their decisions to vote early.

37. US, Europe Impose Tough New Sanctions on Russia -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Spurred to new action by the downing of the Malaysian airliner, the European Union approved dramatically tougher economic sanctions Tuesday against Russia, followed swiftly by a new round of U.S. penalties targeting key sectors of the Russian economy.

38. Suburban Precincts Lead in Early Vote Turnout -

Seven of the top 10 precincts for early voter turnout through this past weekend and the first of two weeks of early voting in Shelby County are in the suburbs.

Through Monday, July 28, a total of 43,725 citizens had voted early in Shelby County, which is 8.1 percent of the voters in Shelby County. The highest turnout by day so far since early voting opened July 18 was 7,038 on July 22.

39. Frayser Town Center Would be Based on Manhattan Park -

The town center plan for Frayser that debuted this past weekend at the first annual “Frayser Day” celebration is built on the model of Bryant Park in Manhattan only on a smaller scale to fit the Frayser Plaza Shopping Center.

40. Democratic Sample Ballot Omits Some Names -

Not every candidate who claimed the Democratic nomination in the May county primaries is on the Shelby County Democratic Party’s endorsement ballot that hits the streets this week.

With early voting underway in advance of the Aug. 7 election day, the sample ballot does not include Juvenile Court clerk candidate Henri Brooks, Circuit Court clerk nominee Rhonda Banks, Probate Court clerk candidate William Chism and County Clerk nominee Charlotte Draper.

41. Chamber Launches PILOT Education Campaign -

Memphis economic development officials wasted little time launching an information campaign about Memphis and Shelby County’s primary business incentive program.

On July 16, less than a month after the Memphis City Council adopted a budget that included deep cuts to employee and retiree benefits, the Greater Memphis Chamber posted a video exploring how the payment-in-lieu-of-taxes incentive program works and why it is needed.

42. Mays Dismisses Unions' Claim Against City -

U.S. District Judge Samuel “Hardy” Mays has dismissed a 3-year-old lawsuit filed by 13 labor unions representing city employees against the city of Memphis for the 4.6 percent pay cut all city employees took that year.

43. Early Vote Expands as Campaigns Enter New Phase -

There is a unique and persistent part of the political process that gnaws at candidates, separating them from the voters they court and sometimes stalk. You might call it the day of the ballot.

In the weeks leading up to the start of early voting, they get hit up constantly by those putting out endorsement ballots to be distributed during early voting and on election day, most often by paid poll workers. Candidates must pay to be on a ballot, which those organizing the ballots say is necessary to cover printing and distribution costs.

44. Wharton Ready to Shift Talk on Benefits Debate -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. is trying to turn the page on the emotional City Hall debate over cuts in health insurance benefits to city employees and retirees and also close the book on the city budget for the two-week old fiscal year.

45. House Votes to Slash IRS Tax Enforcement Budget -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The GOP-controlled House has voted to slash the budget for the Internal Revenue Service's tax enforcement division by $1.2 billion, a 25 percent cut that would mean fewer audits of taxpayers and make it more likely that people who cheat on their taxes will get away with it.

46. Juvenile Court Reform Moves to Child Welfare Cases -

For the last two years, much of the attention in Juvenile Court reforms has been on delinquent children who come to the court for their actions.

But this fall, the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges will begin an examination of its child welfare program – the reason that most children come to the court.

47. Council Hears Alternatives to Health Insurance Cuts -

Memphis City Council members fielded several plans Tuesday, July 15, for alternatives to health insurance cuts approved by the council last month. But leaders of the police and fire unions were not among those making an alternative proposal at the committee session, the first in a series of what amount to public hearings.

48. Sick Calls Drop, But Benefits Debate Still Volatile -

The Memphis Police Department returned to normal operations Sunday, July 13, for the first time in more than a week with fewer than 350 officers calling in sick.

And the number of sick calls among Memphis firefighters dropped to 60 Sunday, the lowest total for the department since sick calls among firefighters spiked Wednesday, July 9.

49. City Council Turns Again to Benefits Discussions -

Memphis City Council members won’t take any major votes Tuesday, July 15, on city employee benefits.

But the controversial topic will likely dominate much of another council day at City Hall. The council is in the gap between its approval of health insurance changes in June and an October vote on the companion proposal to change city employee pension plans for new hires and those with less than 10 years of service.

50. Electrolux Readies Air Conditioning Initiative -

The Memphis Electrolux plant is readying its “Keeping Memphis Cool” initiative to come later this week.

The company will donate room air conditioning units to needy families and individuals in Memphis through Neighborhood Christian Centers.

51. Wharton Courts Alternatives in Benefits Dispute -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. says any alternatives are welcome to the coming health insurance changes for city employees and retirees.

But delaying the roll out of those changes in January is not an option. And neither is reopening the city budget or the city property tax rate.

52. Kroger Launches Wine Sales Petition -

Kroger Delta Division is launching petition drives in more than 35 of its Shelby County stores to put a referendum on the Nov. 4 ballot to permit wine sales in local supermarkets.

The petition drive seeking the signatures of registered voters will be July 10-12 and July 17-19.

53. Memphis’ Water Remains Envy of Other Cities -

Brian Waldron is cautious even as he talks about the city’s advantages in its water supply and the abundance of that supply.

“We are in good shape and our future looks positive,” said the director of the University of Memphis Ground Water Institute.

54. Editorial: Enhanced Riverfront Much Needed for City -

The idea of a city’s riverfront as an ornate front door is a relatively new concept in the evolution of cities as old as ours.

Historically, riverfronts were busy, functional, ever-changing ports not built to dazzle but instead to serve as the engine of commerce in river towns like ours.

55. Chamber Head: Hard Choices on City Benefits Necessary -

The president and CEO of the Greater Memphis Chamber says efforts by municipal union leaders to boycott business members of the chamber and get those businesses to drop their chamber membership is having only a minimal effect.

56. Allen Gas Plant Would Be Historic Shift -

A new natural gas power plant to be built in the shadow of the Allen Steam Plant in Southwest Memphis got its first reviews Tuesday, July 8, at a Tennessee Valley Authority forum Downtown.

The session at Central Station featured lots of questions from citizens about the historic shift proposed, as well as some support for the conversion and some criticism.

57. City Could Consider Blue Flu a Strike -

At some point, if enough Memphis Police officers call in sick, the job action underway since the end of June could be considered a strike by the city of Memphis. And that would signal a new phase in what is the most significant job action by Memphis Police since the 1978 police and fire strikes.

58. Survey Finds Math, Science Grads Earn Top Dollar -

WASHINGTON (AP) – What you study – math and science are a plus – seems to matter more than whether your alma mater is public or private when it comes to finding a high-paying job after college, according to a report released Tuesday by the Education Department.

59. Blue Flu Tops 550 Cops Out -

As Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong has watched the number of police officers on sick leave grow and top 550, so has much of the city.

Armstrong and the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. have gone public in not just talking about the impact but putting numbers to it.

60. Kroger Launches Wine Sales Petition -

Kroger Delta Division is launching petition drives in more than 35 of its Shelby County stores to put a referendum on the Nov. 4 ballot to permit wine sales in local supermarkets.

The petition drive seeking the signatures of registered voters will be July 10-12 and July 17-19.

61. Grow Your Talent Pool With Older Workers -

Part one of a two-part series. Are you overlooking a valuable pool of prospective employees and volunteers? Are you unknowingly operating from outdated stereotypes of “senior citizens” and leaving talent sitting on the sidelines?

62. Juvenile Court Judge Race Remains Hard-Fought -

The candidates are counting down the days to the July 18 start of early voting in advance of the Aug. 7 election day.

With one more weekend of campaigning until early voting dictates a shift in tactics, the sizeable cast of the longest ballot of any Shelby County election cycle is searching at events for crowds comprised of mostly voters rather than other candidates and their campaign workers.

63. In Rare Move, Police Confirm ‘Blue Flu’ -

In the storied history of labor relations between City Hall and the rank and file of the Memphis Police Department, there is a standing rule about work slowdowns, sometimes referred to as “blue flu.”

64. Economic Development Growth Engine Looks to Make PILOTs More Effective -

For years, the payment-in-lieu-of-taxes incentive used to recruit or retain jobs in Memphis and Shelby County has been a lightning rod for criticism, particularly from municipal labor unions who view the incentives as corporate welfare that erodes the tax base.

65. Editorial: Time for City, County Residency Standard -

We have a residency problem.

In the world of local politics not everyone we elected from a district lives in that district.

But they should. There are laws that say they should.

Some of the folks we elect who don’t live in the district they represent make those laws that have residency loopholes big enough for them to build a house in.

66. Report: Health Law Sign-Ups Dogged by Data Flaws -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Many of the 8 million Americans signed up under the new health care law now have to clear up questions about their personal information that could affect their coverage.

67. Cohen Touts Labor Union Endorsements -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen, D-Memphis, rolled out endorsements Monday, June 30, from much of the leadership of local labor unions in his re-election campaign.

68. Let’s Talk Civics -

I type in the word civics at OneLook Dictionary Search. Giving credit to “MacMillan Dictionary,” the site gives me “a school subject in which you study how government works and what people’s rights, duties, and responsibilities are as citizens.”

69. Benefits Debate Goes Larger Than City Hall -

When several hundred firefighters, police officers and other city employees and retirees formed a picket line around City Hall Tuesday, June 24, it signaled the beginning of an escalating political dispute bigger than the City Council’s decision a week earlier to cut health insurance benefits for employees and retirees.

70. Heart of Arlington -

When Sandy Brewer and her family moved more than eight years ago from Cordova to a turn-of-the-century home just two blocks from Arlington’s Depot Square, she said it felt like taking a step back in time.

71. Hopson Contract Extension Represents Reform Mandate -

Public school superintendents in Tennessee are not elected in a popular vote anymore. They are appointed by school boards – the only hiring decision school boards make.

So when the Shelby County Schools board voted 6-0 Monday, June 23, to extend the three-year contract of superintendent Dorsey Hopson through June 2018, it was a mandate by the board for the student achievement gains Hopson and the board have set as goals.

72. Fire, Police Union Brass Say Lawsuit is Coming -

The leaders of the Memphis police and fire unions say they will sue the city over changes in employee health insurance approved this month and are prepared to add pension changes to the litigation if the council approves those changes next month.

73. GOP Lawmakers Demand Education Chief's Resignation -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam's office is dismissing as a "political stunt" a letter signed by 15 Republican lawmakers demanding the resignation of Education Commissioner Kevin Huffman.

74. 6 Cities Added to Tennessee Downtowns Program -

State officials say six cities have been chosen to participate in the Tennessee Downtowns program.

Department of Economic and Community Development Commissioner Bill Hagerty says the communities of Arlington, Carthage, Ducktown, Etowah, Jamestown and Shelbyville have been selected for the program.

75. Editorial: Park Situation Speaks to Bigger City Issues -

The parking controversy at Overton Park is probably the best place to begin to think more about what happens when we get our wish for more density within the parkways.

More people living and working or going to the same area or park, in this case, means change on a lot of different levels.

76. Koury Helps Local AIA Serve Community -

In 2010, the American Institute of Architects Memphis chapter launched lunITECTS, a non-professional group for people who have a keen interest in architecture and design.

During exclusive tours the lunITECTS visit neighborhoods, buildings and homes, all part of an effort to generate greater public discourse and involvement about architecture and design in the community.

77. Parking Wars -

It’s been a hot, humid and restless spring at Overton Park.

The park has been crowded, but not as crowded as expected given the political tempest over parking on Overton’s greensward.

78. IRS to Waive Penalties for Some Overseas Accounts -

The Internal Revenue Service is offering to waive steep penalties for Americans living abroad who haven't been paying their U.S. taxes.

But there is a catch: You have to be able to show that you didn't evade U.S. taxes on purpose.

79. Long Council Day Comes With Change, Emotions -

It was apparent early in the long council day Tuesday, June 17, at City Hall that there wouldn’t be many amendments to the $600 million operating budget and $84 million capital budget the council would approve later that evening.

80. Council Approves Budgets, Stable Tax Rate, Health Insurance Changes -

Memphis City Council members approved a $600 million operating budget and an $84 million capital budget Tuesday, June 17, for the city government fiscal year that begins July 1.

And the council gave final approval to larger changes to employee and retiree health insurance plans designed to make long term changes necessary to right the city’s financial condition.

81. County Commission to Discuss Brooks’ Residency -

A challenge of Shelby County Commissioner Henri Brooks’ residency is serious enough that her fellow commissioners are prepared to discuss it at a special meeting next week.

The Shelby County Attorney’s office is investigating whether Brooks lives in the district she has represented for the last eight years.

82. Brooks Residency Questioned -

The Shelby County Attorney’s office is investigating whether Shelby County Commissioner Henri Brooks lives in the district she has represented for the last eight years.

And the report to come at a special commission meeting, tentatively set for June 26, could determine whether the commission moves to oust her from the seat and appoint a replacement for the remaining two and a half months of her current term of office.

83. Good Medicine for the Soul -

It was one of those medication one-upmanships at a recent meeting when some attendees were discussing the number of medications they were taking to address a plethora of medical conditions.

Needed as the medications were, it seemed like a lot of information, side effects and drug interactions to manage, not to mention vitamins, herbal remedies and over-the-counter medicine. Seeing different specialists for different conditions and inconsistent communication seems to be a growing concern, a gap in patient care, particularly for those who do not have the knowledge or resources to manage their medication.

84. Supermarket Wine Coalition Begins Petition -

A coalition that advocated for supermarket wine sales has kicked off a statewide campaign to gather signatures in an effort to get the measure on the November ballot.

Under a law that passed this year, wine can be sold by grocery and conveniences stores starting in July 2016 if citizens vote to approve the change.

85. Supermarket Wine Coalition Begins Petition -

A coalition that advocated for supermarket wine sales has kicked off a statewide campaign to gather signatures in an effort to get the measure on the November ballot.

Under a law that passed this year, wine can be sold by grocery and conveniences stores starting in July 2016 if citizens vote to approve the change.

86. Shops of Wolflake Sells for $3.8 Million -

2965 N. Germantown Road
Bartlett, TN 38133
Sale Amount: $3.8 million

Sale Date: May 20, 2014
Buyer: Bartlett Interests LLC
Seller: Pref Wolflake Partners GP
Details: The Shops of Wolflake retail strip center at 2965 N. Germantown Road in Bartlett has sold for $3.8 million.

87. Collierville Warehouse Sells for $1.3 Million -

Foundation Properties LLC has paid $1.3 million for the 124,940-square-foot industrial property at 141 Eastley St. in Collierville.

88. Memphis Health Center Gets $3.3 Million Grant -

The Memphis Health Center Inc., which provides high-quality, affordable health care services to Shelby County citizens, has received $3.3 million in federal funding from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Health Resources and Services Administration.

89. Untapped Proved Passion for History -

Once the last of the food trucks departed, the tables and chairs were packed away, the beer garden cleared out and supporters exited through the courtyard archway a final time, the Tennessee Brewery returned to what it’s been for decades.

90. Now Application 'Inconsistencies' Vex Health Law -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A huge new paperwork headache for the government could also be jeopardizing coverage for some of the millions of people who just got health insurance under President Barack Obama's law.

91. Memphis Health Center Gets $3.3 Million Grant -

The Memphis Health Center Inc., which provides high-quality, affordable health care services to Shelby County citizens, has received $3.3 million in federal funding from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Health Resources and Services Administration.

92. Luttrell, Malone Clash on Pre-K Expansion -

The top two contenders for Shelby County mayor had the closest thing yet to a debate Monday, June 2, on budget priorities.

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell and his Democratic challenger, former County Commissioner Deidre Malone, didn’t address each other directly.

93. Justices Reject Reporter's Bid to Protect Source -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A reporter who has been ordered to divulge the identity of the source of classified information lost his bid Monday to get the Supreme Court to clarify whether journalists have a right to protect their confidential sources.

94. Michael Meets Resistance in Juvenile Court Campaign -

Dan Michael has worked for the last two Juvenile Court judges and hopes to succeed the latest, Curtis Person Jr., with the August election results.

95. City Council Approves Shady Grove Development -

The Memphis City Council approved Tuesday, May 20, a 22-lot residential planned development at the southeast corner of Shady Grove Road and Interstate 240 by Greenbrier Partners LLC.

96. Compromise Allows Greensward Parking This Weekend -

The Overton Park greensward will be used for overflow parking at the Memphis Zoo for one more weekend under a compromise announced Friday, May 23, by the Overton Park Conservancy.

Leaders of the conservancy, the city of Memphis, the zoo and Citizens to Preserve Overton Park met Friday morning, one day before a trial free park shuttle begins a five-week run between the park and the Overton Square parking garage.

97. Have Courage to Leap -

As Innovation and Growth Strategy consultants, we have methods, processes and exercises that we apply to client problems.

While tools from this vast toolbox work for any type of organization seeking to provide a better service or product (health care, nonprofit, hospitality, consumer goods, financial services, wholesalers and B2B) to generate insights and custom solutions that set them up as a category leader, what we sell is something else ultimately. This is perhaps the rarest asset in corporate America for an unknown reason, called courage.

98. Hopson Contract Extension Faces Tight Timeline -

The Shelby County Schools board will discuss Tuesday, May 27, an extension of Dorsey Hopson’s three-year contract to be superintendent of the school system.

And a vote could come at the board’s June 17 work session, if not sooner. Under state law, the body has up to 45 days before the August school board elections to extend the contract or leave the matter for consideration by the next school board.

99. Out With the Old -

A small group of people gathered last week in the front room of a new Southwest Memphis housing development for senior citizens.

The scene marked the ending of one era in public housing and the start of another as the doors opened to the newest facility in the nearly 20-year makeover of public housing.

100. City Council Approves Shady Grove Development -

The Memphis City Council approved Tuesday, May 20, a 22-lot residential planned development at the southeast corner of Shady Grove Road and Interstate 240 by Greenbrier Partners LLC.