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Editorial Results (free)

1. Nashvillians Offer Resolutions and Hopes for the New Year -

About 45 percent of Americans make New Year’s resolutions – or so says the Journal of Clinical Psychology. And one of the best ways to ensure they stick? Make them public.

So, we asked a few Nashvillians in various fields – some of whom we spoke with earlier in the year – to share their resolutions, goals or intentions for both their personal lives or businesses as well as hopes they have for the city.

2. Memphis Resolutions -

The end of the year hastens a season of resolutions about the year ahead, resolutions about what to include on the blank canvas of a new year.

No matter who you are, the road to 2015 starts at the same place – through the experience of 2014. With that in mind, we surveyed many of the people we’ve covered in these pages in the last year to talk about the possibilities ahead.

3. Unions Make Push to Recruit Protected Immigrants -

CHICAGO (AP) – Unions across the U.S. are reaching out to immigrants affected by President Barack Obama's recent executive action, hoping to expand their dwindling ranks by recruiting millions of workers who entered the U.S. illegally.

4. A Long And Winding Road -

Pennsylvania Hospital, the first hospital, was founded in 1751 by Dr. Thomas Bond and Benjamin Franklin in order to “care for the sick-poor and insane who were wandering the streets of Philadelphia.”

5. US Companies Eager to Embrace Cuba Face Hurdles -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Cargill aims to sell more corn and soybeans. MasterCard covets another site for Americans to swipe credit cards. Marriott sees beachfront property that needs hotels.

And outside Orlando, Florida, Danny Howell just knows there would be demand for his classic Chevrolet parts.

6. GOP Leader Announces He'll Undergo Cancer Treatment -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A GOP leader in the state Senate says he has been diagnosed with cancer and plans to undergo treatment.

Republican Caucus Chairman Bill Ketron of Murfreesboro told media on Thursday that he has been diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. He said in a statement that the cancer was found last month after he discovered a lump in his neck.

7. Knoxville Area a Magnet for Retirees -

Retired air traffic controller Sterling King moved to Knoxville when his brother needed him. Five years later, he has fallen in love with the area and everything it has to offer.

Moderate weather, without the bone-chilling Northern winters or the searing heat of Florida summers, is a big draw, along with its location in the foothills of the Great Smoky Mountains, says King, 58, who migrated from Dayton, Ohio, to Raleigh, North Carolina, and then to Knoxville.

8. A Present for the Kids -

GIVE THANKS. This Christmas, our country has given our kids a chance. As a county, we had a chance to do it for ourselves but local government wouldn’t fund it and local citizens wouldn’t pay for it. As a state, our governor had to be talked into asking for it and our Legislature would rather not talk about asking for help at all.

9. Greenfield Voted to Lead Veterinary Dental College -

Dr. Barden Greenfield has been unanimously voted president-elect for the American Veterinary Dental College. In 2009, Greenfield started Your Pet Dentist, the umbrella that incorporates his involvement in Memphis Veterinary Specialists, Nashville Specialists and the Animal Emergency and Specialty Clinic of Little Rock. He has been on the AVDC board for three years, serving as chair of the PR Committee and as a member of the Credentials Committee.

10. Haslam Reaches Agreement to Expand Medicaid in Tennessee -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam announced Monday that he has reached a deal to expand Medicaid in Tennessee after more than a year of discussions with federal officials.

The Republican's administration touted the plan as an alternative deal with federal officials. The two-year pilot program, dubbed Insure Tennessee, would provide coverage for the state's uninsured without creating new taxes for Tennesseans.

11. Armstrong’s Comments Overshadow Attorney General’s Visit -

Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong had some concerns Tuesday about speaking before U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder addressed a group of 100 local leaders at Hattiloo Theatre in Overton Square.

12. Milhaus Acquires Highland Row Property -

44 S. Highland St.; 366, 374 and 380 Ellsworth St.
Memphis, TN 38111
Sale Amount: $4.3 million

13. Pickard Joins Explorations on Tentative 2015 Ballot -

The contingency plans and other political maneuvering for the city of Memphis elections are well underway.

And a key part of the calculation is making plans for a change in plans.

Architect and planner Charles “Chooch” Pickard is one of several citizens running “exploratory” campaigns at this point.

14. Plough Foundation Grants $12 Million to Help Local Seniors -

The Plough Foundation has made an unprecedented series of grants totaling nearly $12 million to serve Memphis-area seniors.

The grants will help feed vulnerable Shelby County senior citizens a million meals, to rehab the homes of 500 low-income seniors and to build a continuum of care for elderly victims of abuse through a coordinated community response, among other projects.

15. Greater Imani Buys Broadmoor Property -

Greater Imani Baptist Church has purchased property from Broadmoor Baptist Church for $1.6 million.

Greater Imani acquired the Broadmoor property at 3824 Austin Peay Highway, according to a Nov. 3 warranty deed. Greater Imani filed a $2 million loan with Citizens Savings Bank and Trust Co. in conjunction with the purchase, according to a deed of trust filed the same day. William A. Adkins Jr., board president for Greater Imani, signed the deed of trust.

16. Haslam Says Decision on Medicaid Expansion Close -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam said Friday that he's talked with nine Republican governors who have expanded Medicaid for low-income people in their states, and he plans to announce what he will do by the end of the month.

17. Pension ‘Concept’ Flips Council Script -

For most of her seven years on the Memphis City Council, Wanda Halbert has been the most outspoken member when it comes to last-minute items added to the council’s agenda for a vote.

So, when Halbert rolled out a compromise plan on the city’s pension changes Tuesday, Dec. 2, she took some heat from other council members.

18. Greater Imani Church Buys Broadmoor Property -

Greater Imani Baptist Church has purchased property from Broadmoor Baptist Church for $1.6 million.

Greater Imani acquired the Broadmoor property at 3824 Austin Peay Highway, according to a Nov. 3 warranty deed. Greater Imani filed a $2 million loan with Citizens Savings Bank and Trust Co. in conjunction with the purchase, according to a deed of trust filed the same day. William A. Adkins Jr., board president for Greater Imani, signed the deed of trust.

19. Greenline Part of Larger Changes to Shelby Farms -

The visitors center at Shelby Farms Park is about to come down, the latest sign of the transformation of the park.

20. Shelby County November Vote Certified -

With a few adjustments and a legal question still to be decided in Nashville, the Shelby County Election Commission certified the last election of 2014 in Shelby County Monday, Nov. 24.

The results, audited by certified public accountants Watkins-Uiberall PLLC and Banks, Finley, White & Co., include new totals for the city of Memphis referendum on selling wine in food stores and the Memphis referendum on changes to the city charter provisions on the civil service system.

21. Events -

Chickasaw Council of the Boy Scouts of America will honor Barbara and J.R. “Pitt” Hyde with a Distinguished Citizens Award at a ceremony Monday, Nov. 24, with a reception at 6 p.m. and dinner at 7 p.m. Visit chickasaw.org/distinguishedcitizensawarddinner for tickets and more information.

22. Rogero Talks ‘Smart Growth,’ Democratic Politics -

Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero became the first woman to hold that office when she won the election in 2011.

She’s been actively involved in a number of local issues since her election, from urban-core revitalization and business recruitment to broader social issues such as marriage equality.

23. Events -

National Civil Rights Museum will host a lunch and learn with Daphene McFerren, director of The Benjamin Hooks Institute at the University of Memphis, Wednesday, Nov. 19, from noon to 1 p.m. at the museum, 450 Mulberry St. The topic is “Freedom’s Front Line: The Voting Rights Struggle in Fayette County, Tenn.” Cost is free; bring your own lunch. Visit civilrightsmuseum.org.

24. Events -

Memphis Grizzlies and BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee will host a family-friendly event Tuesday, Nov. 18, from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. near the giant Grizzlies jersey in Tom Lee Park Downtown. Attendees can register for a Fitness Trail Passport, and those who complete all six stations will be in the running for prizes, including tickets to Grizzlies opening night and autographed items. Visit getriverfit.com.

25. City Council to Consider Police Funding -

Memphis City Council members will consider Tuesday, Nov. 18, taking $1 million from city reserves to fully fund an additional Memphis police recruit class in the current fiscal year.

The $1 million from reserves would go with $2 million the council approved at the start of the fiscal year for a new recruit class.

26. Amendment 1 Supporters Say Vote Count Was Proper -

Supporters of stricter abortion regulations in Tennessee say an effort to have the Amendment 1 vote overturned subverts the will of the voters.

Amendment 1 passed last week with 53 percent of voters casting ballots in favor. The amendment changes the Tennessee Constitution to make it easier for lawmakers to restrict abortion.

27. Law Says ‘Promptly’ Address Public Records Requests -

A news reporter in Nashville called me recently when a public information officer with the Metropolitan Development and Housing Agency refused to release a document that had been voted upon a few days earlier by a subcommittee of the public agency’s board of directors.

28. Ridesharing Could Get City OK -

Legislation making its way through the Memphis City Council would allow transportation network companies such as Lyft and Uber to operate under the law.

Regulatory issues surrounding the services, which spread quickly across the country and sometimes violated dated municipal transportation policies, arose earlier this year.

29. Palazzolo Prepares to Lead Germantown -

Germantown Mayor-elect Mike Palazzolo was surprised that the mayor’s race became as hard-fought as it was.

But after beating former city division director George Brogdon last week, Palazzolo prepares to take the oath of office Dec. 15, assemble his administration and start work on a new economic development plan.

30. Sixth Circuit Upholds Gay Marriage Ban -

The Sixth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Thursday, Nov. 6, that bans on gay marriage in Tennessee as well as Kentucky, Michigan and Ohio are constitutional.

The long-awaited ruling, the latest in a series from the nation’s set of federal appeals courts, sets the stage for the U.S. Supreme Court to decide the now conflicting rulings among the appeals courts.

31. Voters Approve Wine, Amendments -

Shelby County citizens voted 2-to-1 Tuesday, Nov. 4, against a proposed amendment to the Tennessee Constitution that gives the Tennessee Legislature the power to regulate abortion, including in cases of rape or incest.

32. Voters Approve Wine, Constitutional Amendments -

Shelby County citizens voted 2-to-1 Tuesday, Nov. 4, against a proposed amendment to the Tennessee Constitution that gives the Tennessee Legislature the power to regulate abortion, including in cases of rape or incest.

33. Why are Tennesseans So Afraid of an Income Tax? -

The odds of an income tax becoming a reality in Tennessee – one of the nation’s lowest-taxed states – are slim to none.

And, yet there is an amendment on the Nov. 4 ballot that would change Tennessee’s constitution by giving the Legislature authority to prohibit passage of an income tax or payroll tax in the state.

34. Hooker Seeks Ruling on Tennessee Ballot Measure Votes -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – As if Tennessee's lengthy process for amending the state constitution weren't complicated enough, independent gubernatorial candidate John Jay Hooker is now raising concerns that the method for counting the votes does not pass constitutional muster.

35. Early Vote Turnout Lags Behind 2010 -

Early voting turnout in advance of the Nov. 4 Election Day was running about 17,000 voters behind the early vote turnout four years ago for the same election cycle through the second and final weekend in the early voting period.

36. Early Voting Tops 30,000 in Advance of Nov. 4 Election -

Early voting in advance of the Nov. 4 election day in Shelby County topped 30,000 as of Thursday, Oct. 24, going into the last week of the early voting period.

The total of 30,748 includes 5,125 early voters just on Thursday at the 21 sites across Shelby County.

37. Council Delays Vote on Graceland-Area Car Lot -

Memphis City Council members delayed a vote Tuesday, Oct. 22, on a used car lot on Elvis Presley Boulevard near the site of the new Guesthouse at Graceland 140-room resort-style hotel.

The used car lot at 3510 Elvis Presley Blvd. would be a new site for the Hot Wheels car lot, which is farther south on Elvis Presley Boulevard on property owned by Graceland.

38. HealthCare.gov's EZ Form Not for Legal Immigrants -

WASHINGTON (AP) — HealthCare.gov's simpler online application is being touted as a big win for consumers. But it can't be used by legal immigrants and naturalized U.S. citizens, who represent millions of potential new health insurance customers.

39. Council Delays Vote On Graceland-Area Car Lot -

Memphis City Council members delayed a vote Tuesday, Oct. 22, on a used car lot on Elvis Presley Boulevard near the site of the new Guesthouse at Graceland 140-room resort-style hotel.

The used car lot at 3510 Elvis Presley Blvd. would be a new site for the Hot Wheels car lot, which is farther south on Elvis Presley Boulevard on property owned by Graceland.

40. Tennessee Voters to Decide on Income Tax Amendment -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – In a few weeks, Tennesseans will vote on a constitutional amendment to bar lawmakers from ever imposing a state income tax.

But regardless of what voters decide on Nov. 4, it's unlikely that Tennessee lawmakers would seriously consider an income tax because it's become such a toxic political issue.

41. Ebola Screening Measures Rest on Federal Law -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Obama administration's plans to screen certain airline passengers for exposure to Ebola are based on the Constitution and long-established legal authority that would almost certainly stand up in court if challenged, public health experts say.

42. Tennessee Voters to Decide on Abortion Amendment -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee voters will have a chance this November to decide whether they want to give the state Legislature more power to regulate abortions.

In 2000, the Tennessee Supreme Court struck down laws requiring a two-day waiting period and mandatory physician-only counseling and preventing second-trimester abortions from taking place anywhere but in a hospital.

43. Collins Forms Mayoral Exploratory Committee -

Memphis City Council member Harold Collins has formed an exploratory committee as he considers a run for Memphis mayor in 2015.

44. Probate Court Trio Returns for New Terms -

The two judges and clerk whose court is at the center of the practice of estate law in Shelby County were returned to their offices by Shelby County voters in the August county general elections.

Probate Court Judges Karen D. Webster and Kathleen N. Gomes as well as Probate Court Clerk Paul Boyd each faced challengers in the election that drew a 27 percent voter turnout overall.

45. Real Estate Experts Look at Impact of North Mississippi -

Six years after the real estate bubble burst nationally, the recovery of the commercial and residential sectors in Memphis is slower than in other parts of the country. But they are recovering on their own new terms, say the incoming president of the Memphis Area Association of Realtors, the president of the West Tennessee Home Builders Association and a mortgage lender.

46. University of Tennessee Students Help Design Nashville’s Future -

Nashville may be a city on the rise, attracting new residents by the droves. But it’s also a laboratory for students at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville’s College of Architecture and Design, where they are designing the communities of the future in partnership with the Nashville Civic Design Center.

47. Viability of Black Creative Districts Explored -

Several weeks ago, Eric Robertson, the president of the neighborhood revitalization intermediary Community LIFT, was showing a group of visitors around the city’s various creative and entertainment districts.

48. County Commission Starts School Bond Process -

Shelby County Commissioners vote Monday, Sept. 22, on a resolution that is the first step in issuing $120 million in general obligation bonds over the next two years to finance “public works projects, including schools,” according to the resolution.

49. TSA Expands PreCheck at Memphis Airport -

Pace Cooper, president and CEO of Cooper Hotels, a hospitality development and management company that owns and manages hotels in multiple states, is accustomed to flying and the hassles that sometimes accompany air travel.

50. Methodist Primary Care Adds Marion Doctor -

Dr. Aaron Mitchell and nurse practitioner Jama Davis, both with Mitchell Family Medicine in Marion, Ark., have joined Methodist Primary Care Group. The practice was to re-open this week.

51. Road to Better Mass Transit -

Picking a new transit chief is critical for a city in transition.

Next year, Nashville residents will elect a new mayor and turn over its large Metro Council.

Davidson County also expects some 200,000 new residents over the next 20 years, and much of the success of future development will depend on the ease of navigating around Nashville – already the nation’s second-worst area for sprawl, according to Smart Growth America.

52. 100 Percent Sure -

IF A PROGRAM IS 100 PERCENT SUCCESSFUL, GET WITH THE PROGRAM. I wrote something three years ago when President Obama visited Booker T. Washington High School. In light of recent events, I’d like to visit those words again.

53. Methodist Primary Care Adds Marion Doctor -

Dr. Aaron Mitchell and nurse practitioner Jama Davis, both with Mitchell Family Medicine in Marion, Ark., have joined Methodist Primary Care Group. The practice was to re-open this week.

54. City Employees Return to Court Over Benefits -

The basic elements of an overhaul of city health insurance and pension benefits got some changes this week at the Memphis City Council. And it looks like the council might put off a vote on pension benefit changes originally set for a vote in October.

55. Unintended Consequences: ER Visits Increase -

Hospital officials have been pushing for the state to expand Medicaid health care coverage for thousands of Tennessee’s poorest citizens, despite two significant and related concerns:

Expansion will lead to increased visits to the most expensive place in America for routine health care, the emergency room.

56. Editorial: Same Old Response Still Not Working -

We need a new response to an old problem in our city.

And in the week since the mob attack at Poplar Plaza, we feel there has been a beginning. It’s not one that has satisfied many citizens and it will surely be tested in the coming weeks and beyond.

57. Heart Foundation’s Novick Prepares for Ukraine Work -

Dr. William Novick isn’t real big on taking orders – especially from his doctors. Four weeks ago, he had his second hip replacement surgery since the first of the year.

58. Council Aims at Moving Insurance Targets -

At just about every turn of the debate at City Hall about changes in health insurance coverage, Memphis City Council members have seen crucial numbers shift about the impact of the changes and the city’s liability.

59. Council To Review Conflicting Health Insurance Numbers -

City government’s open enrollment period for health insurance begins in October and new details of health insurance benefit cuts approved in June go in the mail later this month. Yet Memphis City Council members meet in a special committee session next week to again review conflicting numbers from actuaries on the coverage.

60. Appeals Panel Weighing Occupy Nashville Suit -

CINCINNATI (AP) – A special three-judge panel focused on issues of camping, protests, free speech and executive power on Monday during arguments in an appeal of a lawsuit brought by Occupy Nashville protesters arrested on War Memorial Plaza in October 2011.

61. Goodwill Center Helps Job Seekers Reclaim Dreams -

The event was held in the shadow of the shuttered Raleigh Springs Mall, in the expanded section of the Goodwill store at 3830 Austin Peay Highway. It was the grand opening of the Goodwill Job Center.

62. Wine Referendum Makes Suburban Ballot -

Voters in the six suburban towns and cities in Shelby County will vote in November on whether they want grocery stores to sell wine.

The referendum question is on the Nov. 4 ballot in Arlington, Lakeland, Collierville, Germantown, Millington and Bartlett, as of Friday, Aug. 22.

63. Mason: Vanderbilt Success More Than Defeating UT -

Coach Derek Mason is determined to put his own mark of toughness on the Vanderbilt University football program as it continues its climb into the ranks of conference heavyweights.

64. City Union Presents Alternative Plan on Benefits -

Memphis Fire Fighters Association president Thomas Malone takes the union’s plan for reversing city employee and retiree health insurance coverage cutbacks to a city oversight committee Thursday, Aug. 21, on employee issues.

65. Fullilove Calls Off Sales Tax Hike Try, Unions May Try -

Memphis City Council member Janis Fullilove pulled the plug Tuesday, Aug. 19, on a proposed November referendum on a citywide half cent sales tax hike.

66. Marek Pushes For Cameras on Memphis Cops -

The newly-elected chairman of a subcommittee of the recently reconstituted Citizens Law Enforcement Review Board plans to propose that the board recommend the city of Memphis outfit all on-duty Memphis police officers with cameras.

67. Marek Pushes For Cameras on Memphis Cops -

The newly-elected chairman of the recently reconstituted Citizens Law Enforcement Review Board plans to propose that the board recommend the city of Memphis outfit all on-duty Memphis police officers with cameras.

68. McIver Makes Push for Legal Aid Into Broader Community -

For Harrison McIver, receiving the American Bar Association’s Dorsey Award this month at the ABA’s annual meeting in Boston was a special honor.

The award goes annually to attorneys who have worked in legal aid or legal services corporations representing indigent citizens.

69. Obama Takes Step to Improve Government Technology -

CHILMARK, Mass. (AP) – The White House on Monday announced the creation of a team of digital experts tasked with upgrading the government's technology infrastructure and making its websites more consumer friendly.

70. New Business Helps Clients Organize Homes, Lives -

When Amy Tuggle and her mother, Fran Cutshall, moved to Memphis from St. Louis recently they each decided to make a career change.

71. Polls Open Under Eye of Federal Monitors -

Memphis Democrats declared victory two days before the Thursday, Aug. 7, election day in Shelby County.

It wasn’t anything they saw in the early voting turnout numbers. The turnout there was less than it was four years ago in the set of county general election and state and federal primary races.

72. Haslam, Alexander Look to Boost Republican Turnout -

U.S. Rep. Stephen Fincher remembers the first time that he talked with U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander.

Fincher had been elected to Congress long enough to have made several votes after a 2008 campaign in which he touted his conservative values and stances. And in the process, Fincher admitted to Alexander that he had been critical of Alexander’s voting record during the campaign.

73. End in Sight -

One more weekend of early voting and then it’s the four-day sprint to election day for candidates, their campaigns and the voters who didn’t vote during the early voting period.

Because of the length of the ballot – the longest of any election cycle in Shelby County political history – state election officials are encouraging voters who have made their decisions to vote early.

74. US, Europe Impose Tough New Sanctions on Russia -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Spurred to new action by the downing of the Malaysian airliner, the European Union approved dramatically tougher economic sanctions Tuesday against Russia, followed swiftly by a new round of U.S. penalties targeting key sectors of the Russian economy.

75. Suburban Precincts Lead in Early Vote Turnout -

Seven of the top 10 precincts for early voter turnout through this past weekend and the first of two weeks of early voting in Shelby County are in the suburbs.

Through Monday, July 28, a total of 43,725 citizens had voted early in Shelby County, which is 8.1 percent of the voters in Shelby County. The highest turnout by day so far since early voting opened July 18 was 7,038 on July 22.

76. Frayser Town Center Would be Based on Manhattan Park -

The town center plan for Frayser that debuted this past weekend at the first annual “Frayser Day” celebration is built on the model of Bryant Park in Manhattan only on a smaller scale to fit the Frayser Plaza Shopping Center.

77. Democratic Sample Ballot Omits Some Names -

Not every candidate who claimed the Democratic nomination in the May county primaries is on the Shelby County Democratic Party’s endorsement ballot that hits the streets this week.

With early voting underway in advance of the Aug. 7 election day, the sample ballot does not include Juvenile Court clerk candidate Henri Brooks, Circuit Court clerk nominee Rhonda Banks, Probate Court clerk candidate William Chism and County Clerk nominee Charlotte Draper.

78. Chamber Launches PILOT Education Campaign -

Memphis economic development officials wasted little time launching an information campaign about Memphis and Shelby County’s primary business incentive program.

On July 16, less than a month after the Memphis City Council adopted a budget that included deep cuts to employee and retiree benefits, the Greater Memphis Chamber posted a video exploring how the payment-in-lieu-of-taxes incentive program works and why it is needed.

79. Mays Dismisses Unions' Claim Against City -

U.S. District Judge Samuel “Hardy” Mays has dismissed a 3-year-old lawsuit filed by 13 labor unions representing city employees against the city of Memphis for the 4.6 percent pay cut all city employees took that year.

80. Early Vote Expands as Campaigns Enter New Phase -

There is a unique and persistent part of the political process that gnaws at candidates, separating them from the voters they court and sometimes stalk. You might call it the day of the ballot.

In the weeks leading up to the start of early voting, they get hit up constantly by those putting out endorsement ballots to be distributed during early voting and on election day, most often by paid poll workers. Candidates must pay to be on a ballot, which those organizing the ballots say is necessary to cover printing and distribution costs.

81. Wharton Ready to Shift Talk on Benefits Debate -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. is trying to turn the page on the emotional City Hall debate over cuts in health insurance benefits to city employees and retirees and also close the book on the city budget for the two-week old fiscal year.

82. House Votes to Slash IRS Tax Enforcement Budget -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The GOP-controlled House has voted to slash the budget for the Internal Revenue Service's tax enforcement division by $1.2 billion, a 25 percent cut that would mean fewer audits of taxpayers and make it more likely that people who cheat on their taxes will get away with it.

83. Juvenile Court Reform Moves to Child Welfare Cases -

For the last two years, much of the attention in Juvenile Court reforms has been on delinquent children who come to the court for their actions.

But this fall, the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges will begin an examination of its child welfare program – the reason that most children come to the court.

84. Council Hears Alternatives to Health Insurance Cuts -

Memphis City Council members fielded several plans Tuesday, July 15, for alternatives to health insurance cuts approved by the council last month. But leaders of the police and fire unions were not among those making an alternative proposal at the committee session, the first in a series of what amount to public hearings.

85. Sick Calls Drop, But Benefits Debate Still Volatile -

The Memphis Police Department returned to normal operations Sunday, July 13, for the first time in more than a week with fewer than 350 officers calling in sick.

And the number of sick calls among Memphis firefighters dropped to 60 Sunday, the lowest total for the department since sick calls among firefighters spiked Wednesday, July 9.

86. City Council Turns Again to Benefits Discussions -

Memphis City Council members won’t take any major votes Tuesday, July 15, on city employee benefits.

But the controversial topic will likely dominate much of another council day at City Hall. The council is in the gap between its approval of health insurance changes in June and an October vote on the companion proposal to change city employee pension plans for new hires and those with less than 10 years of service.

87. Electrolux Readies Air Conditioning Initiative -

The Memphis Electrolux plant is readying its “Keeping Memphis Cool” initiative to come later this week.

The company will donate room air conditioning units to needy families and individuals in Memphis through Neighborhood Christian Centers.

88. Wharton Courts Alternatives in Benefits Dispute -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. says any alternatives are welcome to the coming health insurance changes for city employees and retirees.

But delaying the roll out of those changes in January is not an option. And neither is reopening the city budget or the city property tax rate.

89. Kroger Launches Wine Sales Petition -

Kroger Delta Division is launching petition drives in more than 35 of its Shelby County stores to put a referendum on the Nov. 4 ballot to permit wine sales in local supermarkets.

The petition drive seeking the signatures of registered voters will be July 10-12 and July 17-19.

90. Memphis’ Water Remains Envy of Other Cities -

Brian Waldron is cautious even as he talks about the city’s advantages in its water supply and the abundance of that supply.

“We are in good shape and our future looks positive,” said the director of the University of Memphis Ground Water Institute.

91. Editorial: Enhanced Riverfront Much Needed for City -

The idea of a city’s riverfront as an ornate front door is a relatively new concept in the evolution of cities as old as ours.

Historically, riverfronts were busy, functional, ever-changing ports not built to dazzle but instead to serve as the engine of commerce in river towns like ours.

92. Chamber Head: Hard Choices on City Benefits Necessary -

The president and CEO of the Greater Memphis Chamber says efforts by municipal union leaders to boycott business members of the chamber and get those businesses to drop their chamber membership is having only a minimal effect.

93. Allen Gas Plant Would Be Historic Shift -

A new natural gas power plant to be built in the shadow of the Allen Steam Plant in Southwest Memphis got its first reviews Tuesday, July 8, at a Tennessee Valley Authority forum Downtown.

The session at Central Station featured lots of questions from citizens about the historic shift proposed, as well as some support for the conversion and some criticism.

94. City Could Consider Blue Flu a Strike -

At some point, if enough Memphis Police officers call in sick, the job action underway since the end of June could be considered a strike by the city of Memphis. And that would signal a new phase in what is the most significant job action by Memphis Police since the 1978 police and fire strikes.

95. Survey Finds Math, Science Grads Earn Top Dollar -

WASHINGTON (AP) – What you study – math and science are a plus – seems to matter more than whether your alma mater is public or private when it comes to finding a high-paying job after college, according to a report released Tuesday by the Education Department.

96. Blue Flu Tops 550 Cops Out -

As Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong has watched the number of police officers on sick leave grow and top 550, so has much of the city.

Armstrong and the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. have gone public in not just talking about the impact but putting numbers to it.

97. Kroger Launches Wine Sales Petition -

Kroger Delta Division is launching petition drives in more than 35 of its Shelby County stores to put a referendum on the Nov. 4 ballot to permit wine sales in local supermarkets.

The petition drive seeking the signatures of registered voters will be July 10-12 and July 17-19.

98. Grow Your Talent Pool With Older Workers -

Part one of a two-part series. Are you overlooking a valuable pool of prospective employees and volunteers? Are you unknowingly operating from outdated stereotypes of “senior citizens” and leaving talent sitting on the sidelines?

99. Juvenile Court Judge Race Remains Hard-Fought -

The candidates are counting down the days to the July 18 start of early voting in advance of the Aug. 7 election day.

With one more weekend of campaigning until early voting dictates a shift in tactics, the sizeable cast of the longest ballot of any Shelby County election cycle is searching at events for crowds comprised of mostly voters rather than other candidates and their campaign workers.

100. In Rare Move, Police Confirm ‘Blue Flu’ -

In the storied history of labor relations between City Hall and the rank and file of the Memphis Police Department, there is a standing rule about work slowdowns, sometimes referred to as “blue flu.”