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Editorial Results (free)

1. US, Europe Impose Tough New Sanctions on Russia -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Spurred to new action by the downing of the Malaysian airliner, the European Union approved dramatically tougher economic sanctions Tuesday against Russia, followed swiftly by a new round of U.S. penalties targeting key sectors of the Russian economy.

2. Suburban Precincts Lead in Early Vote Turnout -

Seven of the top 10 precincts for early voter turnout through this past weekend and the first of two weeks of early voting in Shelby County are in the suburbs.

Through Monday, July 28, a total of 43,725 citizens had voted early in Shelby County, which is 8.1 percent of the voters in Shelby County. The highest turnout by day so far since early voting opened July 18 was 7,038 on July 22.

3. Frayser Town Center Would be Based on Manhattan Park -

The town center plan for Frayser that debuted this past weekend at the first annual “Frayser Day” celebration is built on the model of Bryant Park in Manhattan only on a smaller scale to fit the Frayser Plaza Shopping Center.

4. Democratic Sample Ballot Omits Some Names -

Not every candidate who claimed the Democratic nomination in the May county primaries is on the Shelby County Democratic Party’s endorsement ballot that hits the streets this week.

With early voting underway in advance of the Aug. 7 election day, the sample ballot does not include Juvenile Court clerk candidate Henri Brooks, Circuit Court clerk nominee Rhonda Banks, Probate Court clerk candidate William Chism and County Clerk nominee Charlotte Draper.

5. Chamber Launches PILOT Education Campaign -

Memphis economic development officials wasted little time launching an information campaign about Memphis and Shelby County’s primary business incentive program.

On July 16, less than a month after the Memphis City Council adopted a budget that included deep cuts to employee and retiree benefits, the Greater Memphis Chamber posted a video exploring how the payment-in-lieu-of-taxes incentive program works and why it is needed.

6. Mays Dismisses Unions' Claim Against City -

U.S. District Judge Samuel “Hardy” Mays has dismissed a 3-year-old lawsuit filed by 13 labor unions representing city employees against the city of Memphis for the 4.6 percent pay cut all city employees took that year.

7. Early Vote Expands as Campaigns Enter New Phase -

There is a unique and persistent part of the political process that gnaws at candidates, separating them from the voters they court and sometimes stalk. You might call it the day of the ballot.

In the weeks leading up to the start of early voting, they get hit up constantly by those putting out endorsement ballots to be distributed during early voting and on election day, most often by paid poll workers. Candidates must pay to be on a ballot, which those organizing the ballots say is necessary to cover printing and distribution costs.

8. Wharton Ready to Shift Talk on Benefits Debate -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. is trying to turn the page on the emotional City Hall debate over cuts in health insurance benefits to city employees and retirees and also close the book on the city budget for the two-week old fiscal year.

9. House Votes to Slash IRS Tax Enforcement Budget -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The GOP-controlled House has voted to slash the budget for the Internal Revenue Service's tax enforcement division by $1.2 billion, a 25 percent cut that would mean fewer audits of taxpayers and make it more likely that people who cheat on their taxes will get away with it.

10. Juvenile Court Reform Moves to Child Welfare Cases -

For the last two years, much of the attention in Juvenile Court reforms has been on delinquent children who come to the court for their actions.

But this fall, the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges will begin an examination of its child welfare program – the reason that most children come to the court.

11. Council Hears Alternatives to Health Insurance Cuts -

Memphis City Council members fielded several plans Tuesday, July 15, for alternatives to health insurance cuts approved by the council last month. But leaders of the police and fire unions were not among those making an alternative proposal at the committee session, the first in a series of what amount to public hearings.

12. Sick Calls Drop, But Benefits Debate Still Volatile -

The Memphis Police Department returned to normal operations Sunday, July 13, for the first time in more than a week with fewer than 350 officers calling in sick.

And the number of sick calls among Memphis firefighters dropped to 60 Sunday, the lowest total for the department since sick calls among firefighters spiked Wednesday, July 9.

13. City Council Turns Again to Benefits Discussions -

Memphis City Council members won’t take any major votes Tuesday, July 15, on city employee benefits.

But the controversial topic will likely dominate much of another council day at City Hall. The council is in the gap between its approval of health insurance changes in June and an October vote on the companion proposal to change city employee pension plans for new hires and those with less than 10 years of service.

14. Electrolux Readies Air Conditioning Initiative -

The Memphis Electrolux plant is readying its “Keeping Memphis Cool” initiative to come later this week.

The company will donate room air conditioning units to needy families and individuals in Memphis through Neighborhood Christian Centers.

15. Wharton Courts Alternatives in Benefits Dispute -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. says any alternatives are welcome to the coming health insurance changes for city employees and retirees.

But delaying the roll out of those changes in January is not an option. And neither is reopening the city budget or the city property tax rate.

16. Kroger Launches Wine Sales Petition -

Kroger Delta Division is launching petition drives in more than 35 of its Shelby County stores to put a referendum on the Nov. 4 ballot to permit wine sales in local supermarkets.

The petition drive seeking the signatures of registered voters will be July 10-12 and July 17-19.

17. Memphis’ Water Remains Envy of Other Cities -

Brian Waldron is cautious even as he talks about the city’s advantages in its water supply and the abundance of that supply.

“We are in good shape and our future looks positive,” said the director of the University of Memphis Ground Water Institute.

18. Editorial: Enhanced Riverfront Much Needed for City -

The idea of a city’s riverfront as an ornate front door is a relatively new concept in the evolution of cities as old as ours.

Historically, riverfronts were busy, functional, ever-changing ports not built to dazzle but instead to serve as the engine of commerce in river towns like ours.

19. Chamber Head: Hard Choices on City Benefits Necessary -

The president and CEO of the Greater Memphis Chamber says efforts by municipal union leaders to boycott business members of the chamber and get those businesses to drop their chamber membership is having only a minimal effect.

20. Allen Gas Plant Would Be Historic Shift -

A new natural gas power plant to be built in the shadow of the Allen Steam Plant in Southwest Memphis got its first reviews Tuesday, July 8, at a Tennessee Valley Authority forum Downtown.

The session at Central Station featured lots of questions from citizens about the historic shift proposed, as well as some support for the conversion and some criticism.

21. City Could Consider Blue Flu a Strike -

At some point, if enough Memphis Police officers call in sick, the job action underway since the end of June could be considered a strike by the city of Memphis. And that would signal a new phase in what is the most significant job action by Memphis Police since the 1978 police and fire strikes.

22. Survey Finds Math, Science Grads Earn Top Dollar -

WASHINGTON (AP) – What you study – math and science are a plus – seems to matter more than whether your alma mater is public or private when it comes to finding a high-paying job after college, according to a report released Tuesday by the Education Department.

23. Blue Flu Tops 550 Cops Out -

As Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong has watched the number of police officers on sick leave grow and top 550, so has much of the city.

Armstrong and the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. have gone public in not just talking about the impact but putting numbers to it.

24. Kroger Launches Wine Sales Petition -

Kroger Delta Division is launching petition drives in more than 35 of its Shelby County stores to put a referendum on the Nov. 4 ballot to permit wine sales in local supermarkets.

The petition drive seeking the signatures of registered voters will be July 10-12 and July 17-19.

25. Grow Your Talent Pool With Older Workers -

Part one of a two-part series. Are you overlooking a valuable pool of prospective employees and volunteers? Are you unknowingly operating from outdated stereotypes of “senior citizens” and leaving talent sitting on the sidelines?

26. Juvenile Court Judge Race Remains Hard-Fought -

The candidates are counting down the days to the July 18 start of early voting in advance of the Aug. 7 election day.

With one more weekend of campaigning until early voting dictates a shift in tactics, the sizeable cast of the longest ballot of any Shelby County election cycle is searching at events for crowds comprised of mostly voters rather than other candidates and their campaign workers.

27. In Rare Move, Police Confirm ‘Blue Flu’ -

In the storied history of labor relations between City Hall and the rank and file of the Memphis Police Department, there is a standing rule about work slowdowns, sometimes referred to as “blue flu.”

28. Economic Development Growth Engine Looks to Make PILOTs More Effective -

For years, the payment-in-lieu-of-taxes incentive used to recruit or retain jobs in Memphis and Shelby County has been a lightning rod for criticism, particularly from municipal labor unions who view the incentives as corporate welfare that erodes the tax base.

29. Editorial: Time for City, County Residency Standard -

We have a residency problem.

In the world of local politics not everyone we elected from a district lives in that district.

But they should. There are laws that say they should.

Some of the folks we elect who don’t live in the district they represent make those laws that have residency loopholes big enough for them to build a house in.

30. Report: Health Law Sign-Ups Dogged by Data Flaws -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Many of the 8 million Americans signed up under the new health care law now have to clear up questions about their personal information that could affect their coverage.

31. Cohen Touts Labor Union Endorsements -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen, D-Memphis, rolled out endorsements Monday, June 30, from much of the leadership of local labor unions in his re-election campaign.

32. Let’s Talk Civics -

I type in the word civics at OneLook Dictionary Search. Giving credit to “MacMillan Dictionary,” the site gives me “a school subject in which you study how government works and what people’s rights, duties, and responsibilities are as citizens.”

33. Benefits Debate Goes Larger Than City Hall -

When several hundred firefighters, police officers and other city employees and retirees formed a picket line around City Hall Tuesday, June 24, it signaled the beginning of an escalating political dispute bigger than the City Council’s decision a week earlier to cut health insurance benefits for employees and retirees.

34. Heart of Arlington -

When Sandy Brewer and her family moved more than eight years ago from Cordova to a turn-of-the-century home just two blocks from Arlington’s Depot Square, she said it felt like taking a step back in time.

35. Hopson Contract Extension Represents Reform Mandate -

Public school superintendents in Tennessee are not elected in a popular vote anymore. They are appointed by school boards – the only hiring decision school boards make.

So when the Shelby County Schools board voted 6-0 Monday, June 23, to extend the three-year contract of superintendent Dorsey Hopson through June 2018, it was a mandate by the board for the student achievement gains Hopson and the board have set as goals.

36. Fire, Police Union Brass Say Lawsuit is Coming -

The leaders of the Memphis police and fire unions say they will sue the city over changes in employee health insurance approved this month and are prepared to add pension changes to the litigation if the council approves those changes next month.

37. GOP Lawmakers Demand Education Chief's Resignation -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam's office is dismissing as a "political stunt" a letter signed by 15 Republican lawmakers demanding the resignation of Education Commissioner Kevin Huffman.

38. 6 Cities Added to Tennessee Downtowns Program -

State officials say six cities have been chosen to participate in the Tennessee Downtowns program.

Department of Economic and Community Development Commissioner Bill Hagerty says the communities of Arlington, Carthage, Ducktown, Etowah, Jamestown and Shelbyville have been selected for the program.

39. Editorial: Park Situation Speaks to Bigger City Issues -

The parking controversy at Overton Park is probably the best place to begin to think more about what happens when we get our wish for more density within the parkways.

More people living and working or going to the same area or park, in this case, means change on a lot of different levels.

40. Koury Helps Local AIA Serve Community -

In 2010, the American Institute of Architects Memphis chapter launched lunITECTS, a non-professional group for people who have a keen interest in architecture and design.

During exclusive tours the lunITECTS visit neighborhoods, buildings and homes, all part of an effort to generate greater public discourse and involvement about architecture and design in the community.

41. Parking Wars -

It’s been a hot, humid and restless spring at Overton Park.

The park has been crowded, but not as crowded as expected given the political tempest over parking on Overton’s greensward.

42. IRS to Waive Penalties for Some Overseas Accounts -

The Internal Revenue Service is offering to waive steep penalties for Americans living abroad who haven't been paying their U.S. taxes.

But there is a catch: You have to be able to show that you didn't evade U.S. taxes on purpose.

43. Long Council Day Comes With Change, Emotions -

It was apparent early in the long council day Tuesday, June 17, at City Hall that there wouldn’t be many amendments to the $600 million operating budget and $84 million capital budget the council would approve later that evening.

44. Council Approves Budgets, Stable Tax Rate, Health Insurance Changes -

Memphis City Council members approved a $600 million operating budget and an $84 million capital budget Tuesday, June 17, for the city government fiscal year that begins July 1.

And the council gave final approval to larger changes to employee and retiree health insurance plans designed to make long term changes necessary to right the city’s financial condition.

45. County Commission to Discuss Brooks’ Residency -

A challenge of Shelby County Commissioner Henri Brooks’ residency is serious enough that her fellow commissioners are prepared to discuss it at a special meeting next week.

The Shelby County Attorney’s office is investigating whether Brooks lives in the district she has represented for the last eight years.

46. Brooks Residency Questioned -

The Shelby County Attorney’s office is investigating whether Shelby County Commissioner Henri Brooks lives in the district she has represented for the last eight years.

And the report to come at a special commission meeting, tentatively set for June 26, could determine whether the commission moves to oust her from the seat and appoint a replacement for the remaining two and a half months of her current term of office.

47. Good Medicine for the Soul -

It was one of those medication one-upmanships at a recent meeting when some attendees were discussing the number of medications they were taking to address a plethora of medical conditions.

Needed as the medications were, it seemed like a lot of information, side effects and drug interactions to manage, not to mention vitamins, herbal remedies and over-the-counter medicine. Seeing different specialists for different conditions and inconsistent communication seems to be a growing concern, a gap in patient care, particularly for those who do not have the knowledge or resources to manage their medication.

48. Supermarket Wine Coalition Begins Petition -

A coalition that advocated for supermarket wine sales has kicked off a statewide campaign to gather signatures in an effort to get the measure on the November ballot.

Under a law that passed this year, wine can be sold by grocery and conveniences stores starting in July 2016 if citizens vote to approve the change.

49. Supermarket Wine Coalition Begins Petition -

A coalition that advocated for supermarket wine sales has kicked off a statewide campaign to gather signatures in an effort to get the measure on the November ballot.

Under a law that passed this year, wine can be sold by grocery and conveniences stores starting in July 2016 if citizens vote to approve the change.

50. Shops of Wolflake Sells for $3.8 Million -

2965 N. Germantown Road
Bartlett, TN 38133
Sale Amount: $3.8 million

Sale Date: May 20, 2014
Buyer: Bartlett Interests LLC
Seller: Pref Wolflake Partners GP
Details: The Shops of Wolflake retail strip center at 2965 N. Germantown Road in Bartlett has sold for $3.8 million.

51. Collierville Warehouse Sells for $1.3 Million -

Foundation Properties LLC has paid $1.3 million for the 124,940-square-foot industrial property at 141 Eastley St. in Collierville.

52. Memphis Health Center Gets $3.3 Million Grant -

The Memphis Health Center Inc., which provides high-quality, affordable health care services to Shelby County citizens, has received $3.3 million in federal funding from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Health Resources and Services Administration.

53. Untapped Proved Passion for History -

Once the last of the food trucks departed, the tables and chairs were packed away, the beer garden cleared out and supporters exited through the courtyard archway a final time, the Tennessee Brewery returned to what it’s been for decades.

54. Now Application 'Inconsistencies' Vex Health Law -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A huge new paperwork headache for the government could also be jeopardizing coverage for some of the millions of people who just got health insurance under President Barack Obama's law.

55. Memphis Health Center Gets $3.3 Million Grant -

The Memphis Health Center Inc., which provides high-quality, affordable health care services to Shelby County citizens, has received $3.3 million in federal funding from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Health Resources and Services Administration.

56. Luttrell, Malone Clash on Pre-K Expansion -

The top two contenders for Shelby County mayor had the closest thing yet to a debate Monday, June 2, on budget priorities.

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell and his Democratic challenger, former County Commissioner Deidre Malone, didn’t address each other directly.

57. Justices Reject Reporter's Bid to Protect Source -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A reporter who has been ordered to divulge the identity of the source of classified information lost his bid Monday to get the Supreme Court to clarify whether journalists have a right to protect their confidential sources.

58. Michael Meets Resistance in Juvenile Court Campaign -

Dan Michael has worked for the last two Juvenile Court judges and hopes to succeed the latest, Curtis Person Jr., with the August election results.

59. City Council Approves Shady Grove Development -

The Memphis City Council approved Tuesday, May 20, a 22-lot residential planned development at the southeast corner of Shady Grove Road and Interstate 240 by Greenbrier Partners LLC.

60. Compromise Allows Greensward Parking This Weekend -

The Overton Park greensward will be used for overflow parking at the Memphis Zoo for one more weekend under a compromise announced Friday, May 23, by the Overton Park Conservancy.

Leaders of the conservancy, the city of Memphis, the zoo and Citizens to Preserve Overton Park met Friday morning, one day before a trial free park shuttle begins a five-week run between the park and the Overton Square parking garage.

61. Have Courage to Leap -

As Innovation and Growth Strategy consultants, we have methods, processes and exercises that we apply to client problems.

While tools from this vast toolbox work for any type of organization seeking to provide a better service or product (health care, nonprofit, hospitality, consumer goods, financial services, wholesalers and B2B) to generate insights and custom solutions that set them up as a category leader, what we sell is something else ultimately. This is perhaps the rarest asset in corporate America for an unknown reason, called courage.

62. Hopson Contract Extension Faces Tight Timeline -

The Shelby County Schools board will discuss Tuesday, May 27, an extension of Dorsey Hopson’s three-year contract to be superintendent of the school system.

And a vote could come at the board’s June 17 work session, if not sooner. Under state law, the body has up to 45 days before the August school board elections to extend the contract or leave the matter for consideration by the next school board.

63. Out With the Old -

A small group of people gathered last week in the front room of a new Southwest Memphis housing development for senior citizens.

The scene marked the ending of one era in public housing and the start of another as the doors opened to the newest facility in the nearly 20-year makeover of public housing.

64. City Council Approves Shady Grove Development -

The Memphis City Council approved Tuesday, May 20, a 22-lot residential planned development at the southeast corner of Shady Grove Road and Interstate 240 by Greenbrier Partners LLC.

65. Zoo Parking Controversy Continues to Accelerate -

When the Memphis Zoo pulled its funding of a free trial shuttle Tuesday, May 20, the Overton Park Conservancy moved up the start date two weeks from June 7 to this Saturday, May 24.

And the zoo move had the effect of moving up the end of overflow zoo parking on the Overton Park greensward by two weeks, as well.

66. Council Hesitates Over Fire Recruit Class Funding and Charter Restrictions -

Memphis City Council members discussed a new recruit class Tuesday, May 20, for the Memphis Fire Department that is not in Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s budget proposal.

But council members voted down a plan to come up with the $1.7 million for the class of 100 fire recruits from a $3 million cut in the line item for fire department sick leave, proposed by council member Kemp Conrad.

67. Zoo Pulls Park Shuttle Funding, Conservancy Moves Up Shuttle Start -

The Memphis Zoo pulled its funding Tuesday, May 20, for a trial zoo shuttle from the Overton Square parking garage. And the Overton Park Conservancy moved up the start of the shuttle service it will now fund on its own to start running two weeks earlier than planned.

68. Overton Park Compromise Takes Shape -

The Overton Park parking plan isn’t a compromise just yet. There are still details to be worked out and a big difference in the price estimate of a Memphis Zoo parking garage.

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s plan is to have some kind of agreement in place by the time shuttle service between the park and the Overton Square parking garage begins its month-long trial June 7.

69. Wharton Memo: Overton Greensward Parking Could End In June -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. is exploring two options for parking at the Memphis Zoo that would end overflow parking on the Overton Park Greensward by the first week in June.

A memo from Wharton dated Saturday, May 17, obtained by The Daily News says the city agrees that the overflow parking on the lawn “is not the highest and best use of the space”

70. Entrepreneurial Eagles -

It was a gathering of eagles. You know, the people who like to soar, and, more importantly, they like to push eaglets out of the nest so that they can also learn to soar.

And, like eagles, they have both vision and focus. I recently attended the CSG Entrepreneurship Days, sponsored by the Council of State Governments’ State Pathways to Prosperity Initiative and State Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris, who is the 2014 CSG National Chair.

71. County Commission Delays Development Vote -

The Shelby County Commission did not vote Monday, May 12, on a planned development by First Citizens Bank at Austin Peay Highway and Millington-Arlington Road because the commission was forced to adjourn for lack of a quorum before it could vote on the item.

72. Editorial: Wellness Programs Can Play Key Role in City -

Corporate wellness plans have come a long way in the last 20 years.

So has the idea of fitness and exercise in a city whose population is part of a region consistently near the top of national rankings for some significant health problems.

73. Land Grab -

It’s been implied, but an agreement on the general idea of building a Memphis Zoo parking garage was put in writing this week by the Overton Park Conservancy as protests over paid zoo parking on the park’s greensward are likely to continue.

74. Civil Rights Leaders Comment on Brooks’ Remarks -

The executive director of the civil rights organization Latino Memphis says comments this week by Shelby County Commissioner Henri Brooks about the struggles of Latinos as minorities in Memphis were regrettable.

75. County Commission Delays Development Vote -

The Shelby County Commission did not vote Monday, May 12, on a planned development by First Citizens Bank at Austin Peay Highway and Millington-Arlington Road because the commission was forced to adjourn for lack of a quorum before it could vote on the item.

76. Roof Contract Sparks Minority-Hiring Debate -

For weeks, a new roof at a county government building at Shelby Farms Park has been the setting for a debate among Shelby County Commissioners about minority hiring by companies that do business with the county.

77. Brewery’s Fate Unchanged Despite Untapped’s Success -

Tennessee Brewery Untapped, the festival-like celebration that’s turned the long-vacant brewery structure Downtown into a packed community space, is now roughly halfway through its six-week run.

Approaching the end arguably hasn’t served to diminish the enthusiasm of the crowds that still converge on the brewery’s courtyard and connected spaces each week of Untapped.

78. Commission Approves Compromise $52.1 Million in Schools Capital Funding -

Shelby County Commissioners approved Monday, May 12, an immediate infusion of $52.1 million in capital funding for Shelby County Schools and the six suburban school systems.

The compromise resolution worked out with leaders of the suburban school systems includes $4.8 million in capital projects at five of the six suburban school systems. It also keeps the $47.3 million in capital projects for Shelby County Schools a majority on the commission recommended in committee sessions last week. The Shelby County Schools list includes a new roof for Millington Central High School which is in the sixth of the six suburban school systems.

79. RNC Changes Debate Rules for 2016 -

MEMPHIS (AP) – Lunging for control of the GOP ahead of high-stakes elections, the Republican National Committee on Friday took steps to end free-for-all presidential debates and vowed to punish potential contenders who participate in rogue forums.

80. Commission to Vote On Austin Peay Project -

Shelby County Commissioners vote Monday, May 12, on the return of a planned development at the northwest corner of Austin Peay Highway and Millington-Arlington Road by First Citizens National Bank.

81. Referendums Next for Supermarket Wine Sales -

A coalition that advocated for supermarket wine sales in Tennessee is now shifting its focus to passing local referendums to make the law change a reality for communities around Tennessee.

Under the law passed this year, wine will be allowed to be sold by grocery and conveniences stores starting in July 2016 if citizens vote to approve the change.

82. Politics Continues After County Primaries -

A lot of the candidates from the Shelby County primary ballot were in the same room the day after the Tuesday, May 6, election.

The occasion was County Commission committee sessions.

It was mostly winners.

83. City Council Weighs Police Dollars, Oversight -

The Memphis City Council on Tuesday, May 6, got its first detailed look at the Memphis Police Department’s budget proposal, which was followed by the council starting the process of bringing back to life the Police Civilian Review Board. That would begin with a series of community meetings and recommendations from a citizens group in August.

84. Memphis Economic Indicator Presents Latest Snapshot -

On the qualitative side of the latest Memphis Economic Indicator, a survey measuring general business sentiment produced jointly by The Daily News and Dixon Hughes Goodman LLP, respondents tended to put Memphis at a kind of inflection point at the moment.

85. Referendums Next for Supermarket Wine Supporters -

A coalition that advocated for supermarket wine sales in Tennessee is now shifting its focus to passing local referendums to make the law change a reality for communities around Tennessee.

Under the law passed this year, wine will be allowed to be sold by grocery and conveniences stores starting in July 2016 if citizens vote to approve the change.

86. County Primaries Reflect Different Political Fortunes -

Former Shelby County Commissioner Deidre Malone will challenge incumbent Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell in the August county general election after winning the Tuesday, May 6, Democratic mayoral primary.

87. Primary Choices -

Shelby County voters will begin the process Tuesday, May 6, of electing a majority of new members to a Shelby County Commission that will also change to a set of 13 single-member districts when the winners take office on Sept. 1.

88. Early Voting Turnout Tops 26,000 -

Early voting turnout in advance of the May 6 Shelby County primaries topped 26,000.

Through Thursday, May 1, the last day of the early voting period, 26,298 citizens cast ballots. Thursday was also the heaviest day for turnout of the voting period, with 7,878 early voters and lines at some of the 21 polling locations.

89. Le Bonheur 101 Proof That Life Lessons Abound -

Learning does not cease when you graduate, at any level. Learning is a lifelong journey.

As author George Whitman once said, “The entire world is my school, and all humanity is my teacher.” I thought about that quote when I received an invitation to participate in Le Bonheur 101. I was not sure what I would learn about a hospital that I didn’t already know. I have spent more than my share of time inside hospitals as a patient and as a visitor when friends or family members were ill, and I have many friends in the medical profession who work in hospitals. However, the 101 part intrigued me. It sounded like school. So, for the sake of furthering my education, I accepted the invitation, and showed up on the assigned day ready to learn and gain a new perspective.

90. Early Voting Turnout Tops 26,000 -

Early voting turnout in advance of the May 6 Shelby County primaries topped 26,000.

Through Thursday, May 1, the last day of the early voting period, 26,298 citizens cast ballots. Thursday was also the heaviest day for turnout of the voting period, with 7,878 early voters and lines at some of the 21 polling locations.

91. White House Calls for More Privacy Laws -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The White House is asking Congress to pass new privacy laws that would add more safeguards for Americans' data and provide more protections for emails sought in the course of a law enforcement investigation.

92. Forest Hill Technology Center Sells for $5.2 Million -

3860 Forest Hill-Irene Road
Germantown, TN 38125
Sale Amount: $5.2 million

Sale Date: March 31, 2014
Buyer: 3860 Forest Hills Irene LLC
Seller: BACM 2007-1 Irene Road LLC
Loan Amount: $5.6 million
Loan Date: April 17, 2014
Maturity Date: N/A
Lender: First Tennessee Bank NA

93. May 6 Early Voting Nearing 1,000 Mark in Shelby Co. -

Early voting in advance of the May 6 election day in Shelby County was poised to top 1,000 at the beginning of the Easter weekend.

The first two days of the early voting period in the Shelby County primary elections showed 847 citizens voted early or cast absentee ballots, according to figures from the Shelby County Election Commission. With no balloting on Good Friday, the voting period was to resume Saturday for a third day with several campaigns planning to include early voting rallies in their weekend plans.

94. I Choose Memphis: Jittapong 'JT' Malasri -

“I Choose Memphis” spotlights Memphians who are passionate about calling this community home. New Memphis Institute provides the profiles.

Name: Jittapong “JT” Malasri

95. Bank Buys Collierville Property After Foreclosure -

First Citizens National Bank has paid $1.3 million in a substitute trustee’s deed for the industrial property at 141 Eastley St. in Collierville following a foreclosure.

96. Early Voting Goes Countywide Friday -

Early voting in advance of the May 6 county primary election day opens Friday, April 25, at 20 satellite locations across Shelby County.

A list of the locations can be found at www.shelbyvote.com. Polls are open weekdays from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. through the end of the early voting period Thursday, May 1.

97. Hopson Pushes Realignment, New Goals in Budget -

After hearing from more than a dozen citizens Tuesday, April 22, including some who quoted Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in their arguments against specific Shelby County Schools budget cuts, superintendent Dorsey Hopson had his own quote from the civil rights leader.

98. Affordable Care Act Only Chips Away at a Core Goal -

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) – Swan Lockett had high hopes that President Barack Obama's health overhaul would lead her family to an affordable insurance plan, but that hasn't happened.

Instead, the 46-year-old mother of four from Texas uses home remedies or pays $75 to see a doctor when she has an asthma attack.

99. Houston Levee Parcel Sells for $1 Million -

A vacant 1.4-acre parcel at Houston Levee Road and Poplar Avenue in Collierville has traded hands for $932,700.

PHD @ Houston Levee LLC bought the land in a November 6 special warranty deed from Interface Houston Levee LLC. Though the sale closed in November, the Shelby County Register of Deeds didn’t process the paperwork until last week.

100. A Funder’s View of Sustainability -

Editor’s Note: This column will appear Tuesdays through April in honor of Sustainability Month for Memphis and Shelby County.

As the Mid-South’s philanthropic partner since 1969, the Community Foundation of Greater Memphis is clearly here to stay. That’s why we are interested in initiatives that make our area more livable and connected right now and for future generations.