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Editorial Results (free)

1. The Secret to Retaining Your Best Employees -

It’s that time of year again. Time to celebrate Labor Day, the holiday dedicated to recognizing the achievements of American workers. With an unemployment rate hovering around 5.3 percent, many employers are asking the same question: “How do we retain our best employees?”

2. US Stocks Close Flat Friday After Volatile Week -

U.S. stocks ended the day little changed Friday, letting investors breathe a little easier after a week where both the highs and lows were extreme.

The market gave investors a hard jolt the first two days of trading this week on concerns about the health of China's economy. The rebound Wednesday and Thursday was just as sharp as investors decided to scoop up beaten-up stocks.

3. Should Citizens Have to Pay to Look at Public Records? -

Lots is happening in the area of open government lately. In recent columns I’ve talked about legislation that would control access to police videos and about a proposed Supreme Court rule that would limit reporters’ use of electronic devices in courtrooms.

4. Fairgrounds’ Future -

It’s hard to imagine that a 65,000-seat stadium could be overlooked. Perhaps it’s because the Liberty Bowl wasn’t in the center of the Mid-South Fairgrounds when the stadium was built in 1965; it was on the eastern side of 155 acres of city-owned land, with a rail spur running along its eastern boundary.

5. Preseason Analysis: Vols Will Defeat Oklahoma, Finish 8-4 -

Tennessee’s football team has something to prove as it concludes the first week of preseason practices and moves forward to the 2015 season.

The Vols must prove they belong in the national picture in Butch Jones’ third year as coach.

6. Lot Shortage Looms Over Shelby County -

A shortage of developed lots in Shelby County is dragging down the new housing market, according to homebuilding officials.

Homebuilding activity in Memphis and Shelby County slowed in the second quarter, with builders filing fewer permits and selling fewer new homes than in the same three-month period last year.

7. Bedrock Eats & Sweets Opens Downtown -

One of the newest additions to the Downtown dining scene is a healthy eating option that Brandi Marter has expanded from a commercial kitchen in YoLo’s Midtown location to now a space of her own.

Marter’s Bedrock Eats & Sweets, which got started back in 2013 as a way for people to order pre-made healthy meals, has moved into the former Frank’s Market & Deli space, at 327 S. Main. Marter, an avid Crossfit athlete, signed a lease for the space earlier this year after scouting potential locations beyond Downtown, including on Broad Avenue.

8. Vols, Titans Fight to Fill Empty Stadium Seats -

When it comes to giving the consumer what it wants, few sports programs can match University of Tennessee football.

Neyland Stadium, which 40 years ago could accommodate only 70,000 fans, has swelled to a capacity of 102,455, fifth largest in college football. It has a $4 million, 4,580-square-foot Jumbotron, W-Fi connections for fans and enough flashing lights around the stadium’s interior to shame the Las Vegas Strip.

9. Want to Get Into Knoxville-Area Showbiz? Here’s How -

“Chasing the fun” keeps Jaime Hemsley, founder and owner of Gage Models and Talent Agency, in high gear to find her clients opportunities in the entertainment business.

“There’s lots of different ways to get involved in the industry,” she says, adding that her clients work both locally and nationally. Her agency recently booked a client with a TV reality dating show. Gage is headquartered in Knoxville but has clients throughout the southeast and works with agencies in New York and Los Angeles.

10. Buying a House? Here’s 12 Things You Must Do -

Anyone buying any home anywhere should have a checklist of things to do. In this area, there are several.

• Get a home inspection. Old or new, things may not be what they seem. As attorney Jean Harrison says of new homes, “Passing codes means they got at least a D-.” A home that has been pre-inspected could have serious flaws undiscovered by the seller’s inspector.

11. Seeds of Nutrition in South Memphis -

Second in a series of profiles on the Community Foundation of Greater Memphis’ GiVE 365 grantees.

The community garden/urban farming concept literally took root years ago. Knowledge Quest founder and director Marlon Foster remembers well the 25-by-25-foot plot at the Fowler Homes housing project back in 1999. It was a humble beginning planted with a few seeds and a lot of faith and hope.

12. Building Green in a Red-Hot Market -

Counting cranes has become a Nashville pastime, and the perks of all that development are clear – a robust economy, vibrant real estate market and more jobs.

Naturally, there is concern among some residents that all of the construction and increased population could harm the area’s environment, water and air quality and green space.

13. Speltz’s Design Flair Transforms Downtown Memphis -

Christopher Speltz’s work as an architectural designer for Renaissance Group hinges on transformation. As an illustrator for multifamily spaces 266 Memphis Lofts, Printer's Alley and the Annex Lofts, he's bringing much-needed flair to a stretch of South Front Street.

14. Conquering Fear of Heights on Mt. LeConte -

I was standing on the edge of a cliff during a hike to Mt. LeConte about two weeks ago.

Holding onto a thin metal handrail cable, I was walking a path maybe two feet wide on jagged rock with some water running through it, on the side of the mountain, about 4,000 feet above sea level.

15. Getting to the Bottom -

A BIG BASS PROBLEM. We’ve done it. Just like a lure, the light reflects off a shiny object and draws a crowd.

A huge shiny object. A huge crowd. And we’ve done it again. We’re letting something tiny by comparison, a minnow to a record catfish, foul the water and spoil the catch.

16. At Long Last -

It’s taken the city of Memphis 10 years to reel in Bass Pro Shops at The Pyramid, and business owners in the nearby Pinch District hope it will be a catalytic force they’ve been waiting for.

17. ‘Pioneering is a Bitch’ -

Christy Shuff was robbed on the night she moved some equipment into her soon-to-open new business, Rumours Gallery, on 12South Avenue.

That was 12 years ago, and Shuff, now 40, and her then-husband Will Shuff were aspiring urban pioneers, ready to take a chance on the downtrodden, but affordable 12South area, then home to a few businesses and mostly older houses.

18. Bass Pro Announces Opening Week Lineup -

Bass Pro Shops has unveiled the celebrity lineup and schedule for its opening festivities, kicking off with a free Evening for Conservation event Wednesday, April 29, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Here is the press release from Bass Pro:

19. Injuries Slow Development of Vols Defensive Players -

Tennessee football fans might want to look past the defensive lineup for the Orange & White Spring Game. It will bear little resemblance to the unit that will start the 2015 season opener against Bowling Green on Sept. 5 at Nashville’s LP Field.

20. What Better Place for an NRA Convention? -

When the National Rifle Association announced that it would hold its 2015 convention in Nashville, the timing was propitious.

In 2010, gun sales and handgun permits were booming, and Tennessee had just enacted a controversial and contested new “guns in bars” law that allowed people with handgun permits to carry concealed firearms into bars and restaurants that serve alcohol.

21. US Car Buyers Tap the Brakes in March, Following Torrid Run -

DETROIT (AP) – U.S. car buyers tapped the brakes in March, a sign of a long-expected slowdown in the blistering pace of sales.

March sales were up less than 1 percent compared with the same month a year ago. U.S. consumers bought 1.5 million new cars and trucks in March, according to Autodata Corp.

22. Affordability? It’s All in the Eye of the Buyer -

The new construction at 2314 Castleman sold last week for $1,365,000 after Brent Morris of Parks listed the home for $1,395,000. Morris has developed a niche in locating infill lots and teardowns – to use the plural of the now-popular noun created by adding verb to adverb – in the Green Hills area.

23. Ryan: Be Flexible On Location For More Office Space Options -

After 22 years heading up the Metro Housing and Development Authority for Nashville, Phil Ryan certainly knows the Middle Tennessee housing market.

He left MDHA in 2013, and in his current role as an affiliate broker with Cherry & Associates, he’s taking a look at the local real-estate mix from the corporate side.

24. Eakin: Rising Rents Hitting All of Middle Tennessee -

Selling business people on the idea of relocating to Nashville is easy for commercial real estate broker Barry R. Smith because he, too, bought into the city’s charm when he first came to town in 1981.

25. Restless Winter -

For most of its 103-year life as city property, the Mid-South Fairgrounds has been a place where Memphians remember why they came there in the past, as local leaders have periodically pushed to remake its landscape and in turn create more memories going forward.

26. Southaven Plans to Become Regional Shopping Destination -

Local officials are expecting the outlet mall under construction by Tanger and Poag Shopping Centers to make Southaven a regional business destination.

“We are 250 miles from six states and we will probably draw from all of them,” Carmen Kyle, executive director of the Southaven Chamber of Commerce, told The Commercial Appeal. “This isn’t your local mall.”

27. Wharton: Tourism Is Serious Business -

Sometimes in tourism, it is the little things that count. But “little” is relative. Consider the digital LED display screen on the west wall of the Memphis Cook Convention Center – big enough to be seen by eastbound traffic on the Hernando DeSoto Bridge – which local leaders debuted this month after three years of planning.

28. Cassius Cash Begins Job as New Superintendent of Smokies -

GATLINBURG, Tenn. (AP) – Growing up in Memphis, the son of a homicide detective and a cosmetologist, Cassius Cash didn't dream of one day being the superintendent of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

29. Dr. Phil Delivers Hockey Therapy to the Masses -

Dr. Phil toys with me as he allows me to work my center and left wing to get the puck tantalizingly close to his net.

Then that big smile erupts on the face of a man who hands out “Live With Happiness” dog-tags – like the one dangling beneath his Hawaiian shirt – as he passes through life. With a couple of cagey quick twists of his wrists, Dr. Phil clears his end of the rink and fires a slap shot past my befuddled defensemen and goalie.…

30. Editorial: Crosstown Redevelopment Signals More Change to Come -

Few Memphians can remember the view north on Cleveland when the Sears Crosstown building did not define the horizon.

And there is a whole generation of Memphians who have always known the colossal structure as a boarded-up relic of the era when big stores were really big stores. In this case, the big store could sell you all of the materials to build a house as well as everything you would need for the interior of the house.

31. Balancing Campaign and Small Business on Vitter's Agenda -

NEW YORK (AP) – The new chairman of the Senate Committee on Small Business & Entrepreneurship has big issues on his agenda, but he'll have to fit them in with a high-profile gubernatorial campaign.

32. ‘Government’s Too Big and People are Sick of It’ -

Knox County Mayor Tim Burchett is an enigma of the modern civil servant, a career politician who doesn’t seem to take himself too seriously. He thinks he’s paid too much (his salary is state mandated) and brings it up often in interviews with the media.

33. Growth is Great, But Where Will Workers Live? -

For the past two years, developers, property owners and Realtors alike have been treated to what some call the best real estate market in the country. Sellers are realizing astronomical returns on their investments as they shed properties that they have been strapped with for years.

34. Great Dishes From Nashville’s Landmark Restaurants -

When a restaurant’s been around for a decade or eight, that’s usually a pretty good indication that the food is palatable. We’ve rounded up some of the best dishes to try at Nashville’s longest standing dining establishments, and, of course, it’s impossible to pick just one thing. Feel free to recommend your own favorites in the online comments.

35. Automakers Report January US Sales Jumps, Led By GM, Toyota -

DETROIT (AP) – Automakers reported double-digit U.S. sales increases in January, a sign that car sales didn't spin out even with a major snowstorm hitting the Northeast.

General Motors led the way with an 18 percent gain over last January. Encouraged by low gas prices, buyers snapped up GM's big SUVs like the Chevrolet Tahoe and GMC Yukon.

36. When Vacation Rentals Make More Sense -

With just one child, my wife and I don’t find ourselves stressing out about the need for a large hotel room suite or adjoining rooms so our family has enough room to spread around. 

But with the need for privacy or an opportunity to sleep in – our son wakes earlier than my wife and he likes to watch TV – we find sleeping in one hotel room is increasingly tough on our travels.

37. Airlines Expect Another Big Year With Help From Cheaper Fuel -

DALLAS (AP) – Leaders of United and Southwest gave an upbeat forecast for 2015 that combined strong travel demand and cheaper fuel. Airline stocks soared on Thursday.

The price of jet fuel has dropped by about half since September, boosting airline profits and tamping down fear that global economic weakness could hurt the carriers. Analysts expect all four of the biggest U.S. airline operators to post bigger profits this year than in 2014.

38. Hello, Josephine! -

Wikipedia indicates that a song written by Fats Domino and Dave Bartholomew “charted #7 on the Billboard R&B charts and #14 on the Billboard pop charts” in 1960. The actual title of the song was “My Girl Josephine,” although “in various cover versions,” it became known as “Hello Josephine.” It’s a bluesy number, easy to play on the guitar, and the lyrics begin:

39. Got Help Paying for Health Care? Watch Your Mailbox -

WASHINGTON (AP) – If you're among the millions of consumers who got financial help for health insurance last year under President Barack Obama's law, better keep an eye on your mailbox.

40. Elvis Birthday Proves Eventful on Several Fronts -

Jack Soden, the head of Elvis Presley Enterprises, looked out at a crowd on the front lawn of Graceland last week in single-digit temperatures and talked about the durability of Elvis Presley’s appeal.

41. Shelby County Homebuilding Activity Continues to Slow -

Homebuilding in Shelby County was off last year’s pace again in November, with builders pulling fewer permits and selling fewer homes than in November 2013.

Shelby County homebuilders filed 43 permits last month, down 29.5 percent from 61 permits in November 2013, according to real estate information company Chandler Reports, www.chandlerreports.com. The 43 permits filed in November is down 31.7 percent from the 63 permits filed in October.

42. Blackie’s Body Shop Endures Changing Industry -

Cars are a lot different, and the business of an auto body shop is too, since Delmus “Blackie” Moore opened a body shop on Fourth Street in Downtown Memphis in 1951.

The business of body work is much faster, with less time for the custom work that once was much of Blackie Moore’s stock in trade.

43. Music City Christmas -

In years past, Carl Haley has offered his Grand Avenue transportation passengers the customary Christmas lights tour packages – about the same as other tours in Nashville – with a cruise by Opryland and a trip to a few choice, heavily decorated neighborhoods.

44. Ivey, U of M Seek to Boost Transportation Sector -

Dr. Stephanie Ivey never intended to get into the transportation field. After earning her doctorate in engineering from the University of Memphis, Ivey had planned on being involved in environmental work but, through a series of twists and turns, accepted a position at the U of M focused on transportation.

45. Edison Park Finds Ally in Habitat for Humanity -

This Thanksgiving marks two years that Aisha Lbhalla, her husband and their two young sons have lived in Edison Park.

They have a single-family home that backs up to her older son’s school, Thomas A. Edison Elementary. The house has four bedrooms, brick facing, a garage and nearly 1,500 square feet, Lbhalla says.

46. Patrick Ready to Cook at Relocated Rizzo’s Diner -

Chef Michael Patrick reaches for a metaphor to describe what it will feel like once the new, more expansive version of his Downtown eatery, Rizzo’s Diner, opens in the next several days at 492 S. Main St.

47. ’Tis the Season -

After the recession struck, desperate retailers competing for a shrinking amount of shopping dollars and market share began tinkering with time-tested holiday marketing strategies.

Good prices, great values, unique offerings and convenience no longer were enough to boost retail sales.

48. I Choose Memphis: Philipp von Holtzendorff-Fehling -

“I Choose Memphis” spotlights Memphians who are passionate about calling this community home. New Memphis Institute provides the profiles.

Name: Philipp von Holtzendorff-Fehling

49. Green Hills in Full Boom Despite Traffic Woes -

Stephen Graw first moved to Green Hills in 2004 right after college, renting a house with a bunch of buddies from school. Like his neighborhood, he’s done a lot of growing in the last decade and is now a senior advisor at Sperry Van Ness Nashville and on the Chamber West Leadership Council.

50. Riverside Drive Bike Lane Critics Remain -

In the five months since the southbound auto traffic lanes on Riverside Drive between Beale Street and Georgia Avenue were turned into bicycle and pedestrian lanes, bicycle usage of the lanes has risen from an average of 400 a month to more than 600 a month.

51. Out-of-Patience Investors Sell Off Amazon -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon has long acted like an ideal customer on its own website: a freewheeling big spender with no worries about balancing a checkbook. Investors confident in founder and CEO Jeff Bezos' invest-and-expand strategy flooded into the stock as the company revolutionized shopping, upended the book industry and took on the cloud — even though its vast range of initiatives ate up all the company's profits.

52. Central Centennial -

Central Station is 100 years old, an age that most train stations never reach. And if they do, they get there with some really harrowing years in mid-life.

The landmark at South Main Street and G.E. Patterson Drive marked its centennial this month with hundreds of people taking a look around the now recovered and renovated station as well as Amtrak trains and Canadian National railroad locomotives on the tracks that run by the station.

53. 5 Mysteries of US Job Market Waiting to be Solved -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Just how healthy is the U.S. job market?

Despite steady hiring and falling unemployment, the question has provoked sharp debate and considerable uncertainty on the eve of the September jobs report.

54. ‘Cutting Edge’ -

The first thing to understand about the task that Opera Memphis general director Ned Canty feels is before him is that he’s not leading a music organization that competes only with other music outlets and venues for audiences’ attention.

55. Some Fear Auto Industry Returning to Bad Habits -

DETROIT (AP) – Big discounts. Six- or seven-year loans, in some cases to buyers who would have been turned down in the past.

As the auto industry strives to sustain its post-recession comeback, car companies are resorting to tactics that some experts warn will lead to trouble down the road.

56. Client Service Remains Top Priority at The Barnett Group -

The Barnett Group, a Memphis-based employee benefits and financial services firm, didn’t get to the point where it’s provided benefits to more than 75,000 people by accident.

It’s always a reality that businesses are looking to do more with less, cut costs and look for areas where resources can be optimized. The industry space in which The Barnett Group operates is a fast-changing one, with a constant stream of new rules and regulations governing it.

57. Reshaping a City, One Lot at a Time -

John G. Brittle Jr. doesn’t have an office. He has a war room. The space, crowded with maps, charts, books, piles of paper and marked-up spreadsheets, is ground zero for InfillNashville, the 10-person team of site selection specialists that Brittle leads at Village Real Estate Services.

58. Lot Shortage Poses Next Roadblock -

Local homebuilders say a dearth of developed lots is slowing down the new housing rebound, weighing down an industry still trying to drag itself out of the rubble left by the worst recession in decades.

59. ‘Drive for Progress’ -

There’s a duality of meaning implied in the name of the civic organization where Nancy Coffee serves as president and CEO.

60. Roku CEO Discusses State of Internet Video, TV -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – If Netflix CEO Reed Hastings is the star of the Internet video-streaming phenomenon, then Roku CEO Anthony Wood is the best supporting actor.

61. Across the River -

The Arkansas land between the bridges across the Mississippi River at Memphis doesn’t have a name, at least not yet.

If graffiti is any indication, lots of people go there. And they cross numerous boundaries on dirt and gravel roads and paths that can end abruptly and are posted with “no trespassing” signs and other warnings as well as railroad video cameras.

62. Editorial: Memphis Must Make Time for Civic Renewal -

New beginnings are a constant throughout our lives as well as the seasons -- religious, cultural, natural, even sports – that many of us rely on to mark the path those lives take.

One of the more difficult aspects of maintaining a new beginning for so many of us is that it often represents a new way of looking at a world that doesn’t appear to have changed that much or even enough to match the change we are undergoing.

63. Distinctive Design Touches Will Dominate Belly Acres -

From a visual standpoint, there will be no mistaking Belly Acres, the farm-to-table burger restaurant coming to Overton Square at 2102 Trimble Place, once it opens in the next couple of months.

64. Feed the Imagination -

SHOPPING FOR SOMETHING DIFFERENT. The courtyard you’re in was once stacked with wooden cases, the food trucks you see were once mule-drawn wagons waiting to load those cases, the locally-brewed beer you’re sipping the reincarnation of what filled them, the live music you hear covering the century-old echoes of the South’s once busiest brewery – the Tennessee Brewery.

65. Tomato Baby Co. Offers Plants and Philosophy -

Being “Tomato Girl” isn’t a full time job for Alainia Hagerty. She has a day job that doesn’t involve selling dozens of varieties of tomato plants grown in her Brighton, Tenn., greenhouse.

But she views the online business with a national reach as a way of life.

66. Caught in the Middle -

Even before the Affordable Care Act came along, Deborah Casey was living between a logistical rock and an economic hard place. Casey, a 61-year-old widow, draws a monthly Social Security check based on her husband’s earnings. She works part-time for Shelby County (no benefits), and to continue receiving the same amount in that Social Security check, she has to keep tabs on how much she makes. This is exactly how someone who wants to provide for herself winds up on a “fixed income.”

67. Shelby County Building Permits Down Slightly in February -

With bitterly cold temperatures lingering over the Memphis area last month, homebuilders pulled slightly fewer housing permits in February when compared to the same month last year.

Shelby County homebuilders filed 67 permits in February, down from 73 permits in February 2013 but up slightly from 64 permits filed in January, according to real estate information company Chandler Reports, www.chandlerreports.com.

68. Grisham Thriller Smacks of Dickens -

At the pretrial conference, big-city lawyer Wade Lanier does an “evidence dump.” His witness list includes 45 people not previously disclosed in discovery. Local lawyer Jake Brigance moves for a continuance. Lanier says that with two weeks remaining before trial, there’s plenty of time for Jake to call these folks. Judge Reuben Attlee denies the motion. What will Jake do?

69. Healthy Design -

The road to community health and wealth is paved, at least in part, with smart design principles.

Density, a strong mix of uses, high design standards and amenities such as bike lanes and parks can produce healthier communities that attract business investment, Hernando Mayor Chip Johnson told Urban Land Institute Memphis members this week.

70. Older Americans Are Early Winners Under Health Law -

CHICAGO (AP) — For many older Americans who lost jobs during the recession, the quest for health care has been one obstacle after another. They're unwanted by employers, rejected by insurers, struggling to cover rising medical costs and praying to reach Medicare age before a health crisis.

71. Putting Your <3 Into Your Job -

The season of love is upon us. Is it fair to say you love what you’re doing for a living? Do you find yourself putting in your all every day, or is it a drag to get up in the morning – or worse yet, to go to bed the night before, knowing your next day’s work is looming over you?

72. Grizz Look at Final 30 With Hope for Strong Finish -

As the Grizzlies took their leave from FedExForum, having won their last home game before the NBA All-Star break, forward James Johnson looked toward the next night’s game at Orlando. He made clear that the Grizzlies were not thinking of Disney World or any other fantasyland, but were committed to the work immediately in front of them.

73. New Home Permits See Slight Bump -

Despite bitterly cold temperatures that plagued the Memphis area last month, homebuilders pulled slightly more housing permits in January when compared to the same month last year.

Shelby County homebuilders filed 64 permits in January, up from 57 permits filed in January 2013 and 53 permits in December 2013, according to real estate information company Chandler Reports, www.chandlerreports.com.

74. Working for Yourself -

Who’s your boss? Is it your manager, client or customer?

What if the answer is you? To improve your personal power, imagine that you are the only person judging your decisions and your work. Only you are responsible for giving yourself a pat on the back or a coaching session. I’m not talking about being self-critical; I’m talking about being self-reflective, without regard for how others see you.

75. Frigid Weather Pulls January Auto Sales Down 3 Percent -

DETROIT (AP) – Auto sales slid 3 percent in January as bouts of snow, ice and frigid temperatures in much of the country kept buyers snug in their homes instead of venturing out to car dealers.

76. Idea Factories -

Never mind how fully formed or exciting the concept sounds, Michael Overton, partner and creative director at inferno, is probably going to want to see it on the wall.

77. Horseback Rides With Weddings -

BRIDAL PATHS. As I did last year, I begin this year revisiting markers on the journey.

When I was little, I was sure you went to cool weddings by horseback.

After all, Roy and Dale were married, and they sang “Happy Trails To You” from the back of a horse every week. Mom and Dad were married, and they spent the first year of their marriage in Arizona riding horses and doing cool-sounding things like punching cattle, shooting rattlesnakes and smoking Old Golds.

78. Editorial: City Should Resolve to Keep it Real in 2014 -

The year 2013 may be the year that reality took a turn for the better without giving up its status as reality.

Economically, no rampant irrational exuberance in which bubbles have been known to get very big and send shrapnel everywhere when they inevitably burst. But there was some improvement to build on, tempered a great deal by a local unemployment rate that is more stubborn than the national rate.

79. Mississippi Children Learn With Blues Curriculum -

TUNICA, Miss. (AP) – In cotton country a couple miles east of the Mississippi River, just off a road known as the blues highway, fourth graders at Tunica Elementary School are exploring the Delta's homegrown music to learn about rhythm, rhyme and chord progression.

80. Pioneering Woman -

It was 2004 and Kim Grant Brown had just finished her junior year at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville.

During the break from her studies, Grant Brown, then 20 years old, acquired a loan and built her first house in Arlington.

81. Tiny Bag to Big Box -

ONE SCREW. ONE CENT. ONCE UPON A TIME.

Saturday at 491 South Highland.

That meant, if you couldn’t get out the door and out of earshot fast enough, you’d be working for Dad. “I need a #2 this or that,” he’d say – staring at the repurposed wooden Philadelphia Cream Cheese box in his hand that no longer held cream cheese and, evidently, not a single #2 this or that either – “Run down to the hardware store.”

82. RV Industry Shows More Signs of Recovery -

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) – RV manufacturers expect to pass another milestone in their steady recovery from the recession that landed the industry in a deep ditch.

Led by sales growth for towable RVs and pricier stand-alone motor homes, recreational vehicle makers expect to ship more than 300,000 units to dealers' lots this year for the first time since the economic downturn battered the industry in 2008 and 2009.

83. Commission to Consider Schools Agreements -

As the Thanksgiving holiday weekend began, Germantown’s still-forming municipal school district was the only suburban school system in Shelby County without an agreement in principle with Shelby County Schools.

84. Bartlett, Collierville and Millington Schools Pacts Approved by School Board -

Shelby County Schools board members approved agreements Tuesday, Nov. 26, for Bartlett, Collierville and Millington municipal school districts as well as quit claim deeds for the transfer of all but one of the school buildings within the borders of the three suburban cities.

85. Impulse Buying Can Come at a High Price -

Ray’s Take There’s a billion-dollar reason the racks of magazines, candy, and soft drinks are right by the checkout counters and at check-out on many a website. It’s called impulse buying, and it’s as bad for your budget as those candy bars are for your waistline.

86. Negotiators Report Little Progress in Budget Talks -

WASHINGTON (AP) – House and Senate budget negotiators say they're not close to an agreement but plan to keep at it.

"We're trying to find common ground but we're not there yet," said House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan, R-Wis. He said Republicans and Democrats have spent lots of time in the recent past airing their differences but it's now time to find a way to strike an accord. "The hard part is figuring out where we agree," Ryan said.

87. Weirich Opens Re-Election Campaign -

There were lots of judges on hand as Shelby County District Attorney General Amy Weirich opened her re-election campaign Sunday, Nov. 10.

88. Ignite Memphis Connects People, Ideas -

In a couple of weeks, via a series of structured slide-based presentations, a group of creatives will try to live up to the event’s official billing and ignite Memphis.

Undercurrent, which holds regular events around the city to help people connect with fellow Memphians, is producing the latest version of Ignite Memphis, which happens Nov. 19 at Crosstown Arts, 430 N. Cleveland St. The gathering will pack in everyone from former I Love Memphis blogger Kerry Crawford, who’ll talk about the secret to happiness, to Rhodes graduate Peter Hall, outlining 10 businesses that can be launched in Memphis for less than $1,000, and Opera Memphis general director Ned Canty, who will touch on video games, pop culture and opera by the time he’s finished.

89. Big Lots Closing its Wholesale Units -

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) – Big Lots Inc. said Friday that it will close its wholesale business by the end of the year, citing tough competition and weaker sales and margins.

90. Frontier Airlines Sold to Ultra-Cheap Airline Investor -

Frontier Airlines is being sold to William Franke, a pioneer of the cheap tickets and high fees airline business that has spread overseas and is growing in the U.S.

Franke is the former chairman of Spirit Airlines, which has earned consistent profits by jamming more seats on its planes and charging extra for things that other airlines do for free, such as printing a boarding pass at the airport, or using the overhead bin.

91. English Brings New Concept to Midtown -

Five years after opening one of the city’s most popular restaurants, Kelly English is preparing to open The Second Line, a more casual restaurant next door to his original eatery, Restaurant Iris.

92. Health Care’s ‘Lost Opportunity’: A Q&A with Phil Bredesen -

More than two years after leaving state office, Phil Bredesen, the popular former governor and mayor of Nashville, is still on the go. While enjoying a post-political life in Nashville that includes gardening and grandparenting with his wife, Andrea Conte, Bredesen remains active in promoting bipartisan solutions to issues such as the national debt as a speaker and as a member of the Governors’ Council of the Bipartisan Policy Center, a Washington, D.C.- based think tank.

93. Achievement School District Fields Questions at Carver -

The Achievement School District and the charter school operator that could run Carver or Fairley high schools for the state-run school district got lots of questions and some skepticism Monday, Sept. 16, at Carver.

94. Art for Jobs Show Raises Funds for Advance Memphis -

The nonprofit group Advance Memphis, the work of which focuses on helping the poor in South Memphis move up the economic ladder, has made its mark on the inner city.

Since its founding in 1999, the organization has graduated some 600 people from its programs. About 100 people graduate from its job readiness training each year.

95. Fewer School Districts Promoting Junk Food, Soda -

ATLANTA (AP) – There's been a big shift in how many school districts take money from soda companies and ban junk food from vending machines, health officials say.

A government survey found 44 percent of school districts banned junk food from vending machines last year, up from 30 percent in 2006.

96. Memphis Banks Show Broad Improvement -

Banking in Memphis is in the midst of a rebound, judging by the latest numbers from the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.

97. US Builders Broke Ground on More Homes in July -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. developers broke ground on homes at a faster pace in July. But the rise was all due to apartment construction, which is typically volatile. By contrast, builders began work on fewer single-family homes – the bulk of the market – and sought fewer permits to build them.

98. Retailers See Slow Start to Back-to-School Season -

NEW YORK (AP) – Shoppers are holding off on back-to-school shopping, and those who delay long enough might be rewarded with some steep discounts from desperate retailers.

Revenue at stores open at least a year – an industry measure of a retailer's health– rose 3.8 percent in July, the slowest pace since March, according to a preliminary tally of 10 retailers by the International Council of Shopping Centers. The figure, which excludes drugstores, was below a 5.5 percent increase in June.

99. Tricky Obstacles Ahead to Averting Shutdown -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Despite pressure from some liberal Democrats for a September showdown in hopes of ending huge automatic, government-shrinking spending cuts, Washington appears on track to avert what would be the first government shutdown in nearly two decades.

100. Ritz: School Finances Remain Complex -

Shelby County Commission Chairman Mike Ritz said Tuesday, July 23, the commission is unlikely to increase funding to the countywide school system in the near future.

Ritz spoke at the Memphis Rotary Club the day after the commission approved a $4.38 county property tax rate that includes $20 million in new funding for the schools – the first increase in county funding to public education since 2005.