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Editorial Results (free)

1. House District 91 Candidates Share Stage -

For the first time in a shortened campaign season, all seven candidates in the Oct. 8 Democratic primary for state House District 91 shared the same stage.

Early voting in the primary continues through Thursday, Oct. 3.

2. Historian's Memphis Visit Presents Complexities of Slavery Emancipation -

Who freed the slaves? The answer is more complex and relevant than the question's simplicity and tense might suggest, author and Yale University history professor David W. Blight said recently.

The Civil War historian was in Memphis earlier this month to speak at the National Civil Rights Museum about his 2007 book, "A Slave No More: Two Men Who Escaped to Freedom, Including Their Own Narratives of Emancipation." The book is built around manuscripts written by two former slaves - Wallace Turnage and John Washington. Blight came across the rare manuscripts four years ago through different connections.

3. City Budget an Issue in Mayor's Race -

More than half a century ago, the prominent civil rights leader A. Philip Randolph sent a letter challenging one of Memphis' most legendary political figures to a debate on race relations.

Randolph, founder of the country's first black labor union, had been sidelined in a previous attempt to speak at a gathering in Memphis by former mayor Edward Hull "E.H." Crump's political organization. So in an open letter to Crump, Randolph slammed him as "a symbol of Southern fascism" and a "menace and danger to American democracy."