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Editorial Results (free)

1. American Recovery Drives the Dollar Sharply Higher -

NEW YORK (AP) – In the world of currencies, the dollar is starting to look like a safe home in a tough neighborhood.

A strengthening American economy, combined with a gloomy outlook for growth elsewhere, is pushing the U.S. currency sharply higher.

2. Yellen: Job Market Makes Fed Hesitant on Rate Hike -

JACKSON HOLE, Wyoming (AP) – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said Friday that the Great Recession complicated the Fed's ability to assess the U.S. job market and made it harder to determine when to adjust interest rates.

3. US Job Growth Eases but Tops 200,000 for a Sixth Month -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A sixth straight month of solid 200,000-plus job growth in July reinforced growing evidence that the U.S. economy is accelerating after five years of sluggish expansion.

4. Savers Beware: Fees May be Shrinking Your 401(k) -

WASHINGTON (AP) – It's the silent enemy in our retirement accounts: High fees.

And now a new study finds that the typical 401(k) fees – adding up to a modest-sounding 1 percent a year – would erase $70,000 from an average worker's account over a four-decade career compared with lower-cost options. To compensate for the higher fees, someone would have to work an extra three years before retiring.

5. US Finally Regains the Jobs Lost in the Recession -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy has reached a milestone: It has finally regained all the private-sector jobs it lost during the Great Recession.

Yet it took a painfully slow six years, and unemployment remains stubbornly high at 6.7 percent.

6. Blast of Winter Weather Can't Faze US Employers -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Brutal winter weather snarled traffic, canceled flights and cut power to homes and factories in February. Yet it didn't faze U.S. employers, who added 175,000 jobs, far more than the two previous months.

7. US Employers Add 113,000 Jobs; Rate Dips to 6.6 Percent -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A surprisingly weak jobs report for a second straight month has renewed concern that the U.S. economy might be slowing after a strong finish last year.

Employers added 113,000 jobs in January, far fewer than the average monthly gain of 194,000 last year. Job gains have averaged just 154,000 the past three months, down from 201,000 in the preceding three.

8. US Businesses Boost Hiring Despite the Shutdown -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy may be sturdier than many had assumed.

Employers added a surprisingly strong 204,000 jobs in October despite the 16-day government shutdown, the Labor Department said Friday. And they did a lot more hiring in August and September than previously thought.

9. 3 US Economists Win Nobel for Work on Asset Prices -

STOCKHOLM (AP) – Three American professors won the Nobel prize for economics Monday for shedding light on how stock, bond and house prices move over time– work that's changed how people around the world invest.

10. Surprise From Fed: No Pullback in Bond Purchases -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In a surprise, the Federal Reserve has decided against reducing its stimulus for the U.S. economy because its outlook for growth has dimmed in the past three months.

The Fed said it will continue to buy $85 billion a month in bonds while it awaits conclusive evidence that the economy is strengthening. The Fed's bond purchases are intended to keep long-term borrowing rates low to boost spending and economic growth.

11. Muddled US Jobs Picture to Weigh on Fed Decision -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Employers are sketching a hazy picture of the U.S. job market for the Federal Reserve to weigh in deciding this month whether to reduce its stimulus for the economy – and, if so, by how much.

12. Events -

The Memphis chapter of the American Payroll Association will meet Thursday, Aug. 8, at 11:30 a.m. at the Holiday Inn University of Memphis, 3700 Central Ave. Glenn Hopper of ADP will discuss tax compliance. Cost is $20 for members and $30 for nonmembers. Visit memphisapa.org.

13. Events -

The Rotary Club of Memphis East will meet Wednesday, Aug. 7, at noon at The Racquet Club of Memphis, 5111 Sanderlin Ave. Stanton Thomas, curator of the Carroll Cloar exhibit at Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, will speak. Cost is $17. R.S.V.P. to lmhughes@bellsouth.net.

14. Events -

Memphis Rotary Club will meet Tuesday, Aug. 6, at noon at the University Club of Memphis, 1346 Central Ave. U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen will speak. Cost for nonmembers is $18. R.S.V.P. to Taylor Hughes at taylor@memphisrotary.org.

15. Summer Travel Forecast: Better, but No Blowout -

NEW YORK (AP) – This summer, high rollers are flying to lavish hot spots for their vacations. The rest of us are driving to less luxurious places like nearby campgrounds.

The good news: At some U.S. campgrounds these days you get live bands, air guitar contests and chocolate pudding slip 'n slides.

16. Housing, Manufacturing Give US Economy Lift -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Gains in housing and manufacturing propelled the U.S. economy over the winter, according to reports released Tuesday, and analysts say they point to the resilience of consumers and businesses as government spending cuts kick in.

17. Unemployment Could Stay High as US Economy Slows -

WASHINGTON (AP) – High unemployment isn't going away – not as long as the economy grows as slowly as it did in the April-June quarter.

Weak consumer spending held growth to an annual rate of just 1.5 percent, even less than the 2 percent rate in the first quarter. And few expect the economy to accelerate in the second half of the year as Europe's financial woes and a U.S. budget crisis restrain businesses and consumers.

18. Weak Hiring Shows Economy Still Hurting -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A third straight month of weak hiring shows the U.S. economy is still struggling three years after the recession officially ended.

U.S. employers added just 80,000 jobs in June, and the unemployment rate was unchanged at 8.2 percent, the Labor Department said Friday.

19. Executive Coach Burtch Earns Int’l Designation -

Bill Burtch, founder and president of full-service management consultancy firm Harmony Coaching & Consulting, has received the Professional Certified Coach designation from the International Coach Federation, becoming the second PCC in Memphis. Burtch, who also holds the Senior Professional in Human Resources designation, focuses his consulting work in executive/team coaching, professional development training and human resources consulting.

20. US Employers Still Waiting for Sales to Pick Up -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy suddenly looks a lot weaker.

Only 69,000 jobs were added in May, the fewest in a year, and the unemployment rate rose from 8.1 percent to 8.2 percent.

21. Chamberlain Joins MBI -

Jessica Chamberlain has joined MBI as a workspace consultant.

Hometown: Arlington, Tenn.

22. S&P Warns it May Downgrade US Credit Rating -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Credit rating agency Standard & Poor's said on Thursday that there is a 50 percent chance it will downgrade the U.S. government's credit rating within three months because of the congressional impasse over approving an increase in the debt ceiling.

23. Auto Industry, Seeing New Life, is on Hiring Spree -

DETROIT (AP) – Volkswagen opened a plant in Tennessee last month with 2,000 workers. Honda is hiring 1,000 in Indiana to meet demand for its best-selling Civic. General Motors is looking for 2,500 in Detroit to build the Chevy Volt.

24. Post-Election, Political Leaders Talk Turnout -

Sometime this week, the Shelby County Election Commission will meet to certify the results of the Aug. 5 elections.

There may or may not be a challenge of those election results in Chancery Court by the Shelby County Democratic Party and several losing candidates. But discussion about why Democrats fared so poorly and Republicans did so well in the county general elections will probably endure beyond questions about voting irregularities.

25. GOP Carries Countywide Offices -

The only thing Republican candidates in Shelby County were denied in the Aug. 5 elections was a majority on the Shelby County Commission. The local GOP slate swept every countywide partisan race on the ballot with Thursday’s election results.

Voter turnout – early and Election Day – was almost 30 percent of Shelby County’s 600,000 voters. All election returns will be audited and must be certified by the Shelby County Election Commission.

Republican Bill Oldham, the former chief deputy of the Sheriff’s Department under outgoing Sheriff Mark Luttrell, beat Democrat Randy Wade in the race for sheriff.

The unofficial returns with all precincts reporting were:

Oldham: 89,613 (52%)

Wade: 82,981 (48%)

Wade, who was the Democratic nominee for sheriff in 2002, linked his 2010 campaign to the re-election bid of Democratic U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen. Wade, a former sheriff’s deputy, is Cohen’s district director.

Oldham campaigned on continuing the policies of Luttrell. But his campaign faltered when Oldham was forced to resign his job as chief deputy – the No. 2 position in the department – following a complaint to the U.S. Justice Department that his candidacy violated the Federal Hatch Act.

The civil complaint investigated by the Justice Department’s Office of Special Counsel left Oldham with the choice of either quitting the job or quitting the race. To keep both could have jeopardized federal funding the department receives.

The complaint was unique because deputies and high-ranking officers running for sheriff has been a regular feature of the sheriff’s race for decades. It wasn’t until 2002 that those in the department were required to take a leave of absence if they ran.

In other general election races, challenger Ken Hoover lost to Shelby County School Board Chairman David Pickler in the race for the District 5 seat on the seven-member board.

Pickler has been chairman for 11 of the 12 years the school board has been an elected body. Pickler ran on his record as chairman. Hoover also ran on Pickler’s record, saying his leadership style was too autocratic and not transparent enough.

The unofficial results were:

Pickler: 5,123 (51%)

Hoover: 4,956 (49%)

In the two other contested school board races, former Bolton High School principal Snowden “Butch” Carruthers beat Millington parent Charlene White in District 1. And political newcomer David Reaves beat fellow newcomer Lara A. McIntyre, both of Bartlett, for the District 3 seat.

White and McIntyre both called for change in school board methods during their campaigns.

District 7 school board member Ernest Chism ran unopposed.

The even-numbered district school board seats are on the 2012 county ballot.

After running for Probate Court clerk three other times, Democratic nominee Sondra Becton could not claim the office on her fourth try – even with the incumbent she campaigned against the three other times out of the race. Republican contender Paul Boyd easily beat Becton in the race for the office Chris Thomas gave up to run for and win a seat on the Shelby County Commission.

Becton lost to Thomas by 604 votes four years ago and was among the four Democratic challengers who unsuccessfully challenged the results in Chancery Court. This time she lost by more than 6,500 votes.

The vote totals were:

Boyd: 82,259 (52%)

Becton: 75,702 (48%)

Republican Tom Leatherwood easily defeated Democratic challenger Coleman Thompson to remain Shelby County register. The two faced each other in 2006, with Leatherwood winning.

The results Thursday were:

Leatherwood: 96,531 (58%)

Thompson: 68,784 (42%)

As early voting began, Thompson’s Pyramid Recovery Center was evicted from its longtime South Memphis space that was also an early voting site and an election day polling place. The landlord agreed to leave the voting sites up and running. But the possibility of a change in polling places served to highlight Thompson’s financial problems.

Late publicity about financial problems took a toll on another Democratic contender.

Newcomer Corey Maclin began campaigning early for Shelby County clerk, with incumbent Republican Debbie Stamson not seeking re-election. Maclin lost to Republican nominee Wayne Mashburn, the son of late county clerk Sonny Mashburn.

The unofficial returns were:

Mashburn: 88,619 (55%)

Maclin: 72,651 (45%)

Stamson’s husband, Steve Stamson, retired as Juvenile Court clerk, setting up the race that was won by Republican nominee Joy Touliatos, the chief administrative officer of the clerk’s office. She beat Democratic nominee Shep Wilbun, who won appointment to the clerk’s office in 2000 but lost to Stamson in the 2002 election and was beaten by Stamson again in 2006.

With all precincts reporting, the numbers were:

Touliatos: 85,849 (51%)

Wilbun: 73,345 (44%)

The remaining votes went to independent candidate Julia R. Wiseman.

Also seeking a return to countywide office was Minerva Johnican. Johnican, the Democratic nominee for Criminal Court clerk, lost to Republican nominee Kevin Key, the son of outgoing Criminal Court Clerk Bill Key and an administrator with the Circuit Court Clerk’s office.

The results were:

Key: 79,755 (49%)

Johnican: 74,831 (46%)

Independent candidate Jerry Stamson: 8,581 (5%)

Johnican, also a former Memphis City Council member and Shelby County Commissioner lost the clerk’s job in 1994 when she was upset by the elder Key.

Incumbent Republican Circuit Court Clerk Jimmy Moore easily defeated Democratic challenger Ricky Dixon. Although Dixon was part of the effort by Democratic party leaders to get voters to vote the entire party slate, Moore continued to show up at Democratic functions and make his case for crossover votes.

Regina Morrison Newman, the third Shelby County tustee in four years, lost her bid for a full term in the office to Republican challenger David Lenoir. It was an impressive political debut for Lenoir, who had heavy backing from the local GOP.

The results were:

Lenoir: 77,166 (49%)

Newman: 72,618 (46%)

Independent candidate Derrick Bennett: 6,353 (4%)

Newman was appointed to the office by the Shelby County Commission following the 2009 death of Trustee Paul Mattila. Mattila was appointed to the office and won a special election for the position following the 2008 death of Bob Patterson. Patterson was re-elected to a four-year term in 2006.

In the judicial races:

Attorney Bill Anderson Jr. emerged atop a field of 20 candidates for General Sessions Criminal Court Judge Div. 7 with 15 percent of the vote. Assistant County Attorney Janet Lansky Shipman was second and the only other contender to go into double digit percentages. The 20 candidates were the largest field in any race – primary or general – on the Shelby County ballot.

Prosecutor Bobby Carter, who had the backing of District Attorney General Bill Gibbons and former District Attorney General John Pierotti, was elected judge of Criminal Court Div. 3 in a close race with attorneys Glenn Wright and Latonya Sue Burrow.

Carter got 26 percent of the vote to Wright’s 25 percent and Burrow’s 24.7 percent.

The results in the three other special judicial races saw the three appointed judges rejected by voters.

  • Lee Wilson, the appointee to General Sessions Criminal Court Judge Div. 10, lost to former General Sessions Court Clerk Chris Turner by more than 64,000 votes. Turner’s victory was the strongest proof of the strong Republican turnout for races across the general election ballot. Turner had been the General Sessions Court clerk until 2006, when he was upset by Democratic challenger Otis Jackson. He is also a former Republican state legislator.
  • Lorrie Ridder, the appointee to Circuit Court Judge Div. 4, lost to attorney Gina Higgins by about 5,000 votes.
  • Rhynette Northcross Hurd, the appointee to Circuit Court Judge Div. 8, lost to attorney Bob Weiss by more than 12,000 votes.

Ridder and Hurd had been appointed to the Circuit Court vacancies by Gov. Phil Bredesen, who picked them each from a list of three finalists from the Judicial Nominating Commission. Bredesen even taped a robo-call on behalf of Hurd, his first robo-call for any candidate in the state.

Wilson was appointed to the General Sessions vacancy by the Shelby County Commission and adopted a domestic violence case docket for the court.

...

26. Candidate Filing List -- The Final Version -

Shelby County Sheriff Mark Luttrell appeared on his way to the Republican nomination for Shelby County mayor at Thursday’s noon filing deadline for candidates on the May 4 primary ballot.

27. UPDATE: Mayor's Race Grows At Filing Deadline -

Shelby County Sheriff Mark Luttrell appeared on his way to the Republican nomination for Shelby County mayor at Thursday’s noon filing deadline for candidates on the May 4 primary ballot.

Luttrell faces only token opposition from perennial candidate Ernie Lunati.

Meanwhile, the Democratic primary for mayor grew to three contenders as General Sessions Court Clerk Otis Jackson filed his qualifying petition just before the deadline. He joins interim County Mayor Joe Ford and Shelby County Commissioner Deidre Malone.

Luttrell ruled out a bid for Shelby County mayor last year (2009). But when Harold Byrd decided not to run in the Democratic primary, some local GOP leaders asked Luttrell to reconsider.

The result touched off a scramble of candidates from both parties for the open sheriff’s office. But before the noon deadline, the initial field of over a dozen possible contenders was narrowed to ten – six Democrats and four Republicans.

The other surprise at the filing deadline was the return of attorney Walter Bailey to the District 2 Position 1 seat he gave up in the 2006 elections. Bailey sought re-election then to another term despite a two term limit on commissioners. Bailey lost to J.W. Gibson who decided not to seek re-election. He also lost a court fight to overturn the term limits.

Bailey was the only candidate who had filed for the seat at the Thursday deadline.

Only one incumbent county commissioner – Republican Mike Ritz -- was effectively re-elected at the deadline because he had no opposition.

All but one of the eleven contested County Commission races will be decided with the May 4 primaries. The only general election battle for the August ballot is the district 5 contest between GOP challenger Dr. Rolando Toyos and whoever wins the May Democratic primary between incumbent Steve Mulroy and Jennings Bernard.

Former County Commissioner John Willingham also returned to the ballot among a field of Republican contenders in the primary for Shelby County Trustee.

And former Criminal Court Clerk Minerva Johnican joined the Democratic primary field for her old job. Incumbent Republican Bill Key pulled petition to seek re-election but did not file at the deadline.

Here is the list of races and contenders from The Shelby County Election Commission. All candidate have until noon Feb. 25 to withdraw from the ballot if they wish.

D-Democrat

R- Republican

I- Independent

Shelby County Mayor:

Deidre Malone (D)

Joe Ford (D)

Otis Jackson (D)

Mark Luttrell (R)

Ernest Lunati (R)

Leo Awgowhat (I)

Shelby County Sheriff:

James Coleman (R)

Bobby Simmons (R)

Bill Oldham (R)

Dale Lane (R)

Larry Hill (D)

Bennie Cobb (D)

Randy Wade (D)

James Bolden (D)

Elton Hymon (D)

Reginald French (D)

County Commission Dist 1 Pos 1

Mike Ritz (R) (incumbent)

County Commission Dist 1 Pos 2

Albert Maduska (R)

Heidi Shafer (R)

County Commission Dist 1 Pos 3

Mike Carpenter (R) (incumbent)

Joe Baire (R)

County Commission Dist 2 Pos 1

Walter Bailey (D)

County Commission Dist 2 Pos 2

Henri Brooks (D) (incumbent)

David Vinciarelli (D)

County Commission Dist 2 Pos 3

Eric Dunn (D)

Norma Lester (D)

Tina Dickerson (D)

Melvin Burgess (D)

Reginald Milton (D)

Freddie Thomas (D)

County Commission Dist 3 Pos 1

James Harvey (D) (incumbent)

James Catchings (D)

County Commission Dist. 3 Pos 2

Sidney Chism (D) (incumbent)

Andrew "Rome" Withers (D)

County Commission Dist. 3 Pos 3

Edith Moore  (D) (incumbent)

Justin Ford (D)

County Commission Dist 4 Pos 1

Chris Thomas (R)

John Pellicciotti (R)

Jim Bomprezzi (R)

County Commission Dist 4 Pos 2

Wyatt Bunker (R) (incumbent)

John Wilkerson (R)

Ron Fittes (R)

County Commission Dist 4 Pos 3

Terry Roland (R)

George Chism (R)

Edgar Babian (R)

County Commission Dist 5

Steve Mulroy (D) (incumbent)

Jennings Bernard (D)

Rolando Toyos (R)

Shelby County Clerk

Charlotte Draper (D)

Corey Maclin (D)

LaKeith Miller (D)

Wayne Mashburn (R)

Steve Moore (R)

Criminal Court Clerk

Vernon Johnson (D)

Minerva Johnican (D)

Ralph White (D)

Michael Porter (R)

Kevin Key (R)

Jerry Stamson (I)

Circuit Court Clerk

Jimmy Moore (R) (incumbent)

Steven Webster (D)

Carmichael Johnson (D)

Ricky W. Dixon (D)

Juvenile Court Clerk

Joy Touliatos (R)

Charles Marshall (D)

Sylvester Bradley (D)

Shep Wilbun (D)

Julia Roberson Wiseman (I)

Probate Court Clerk

Paul Boyd (R)

Sondra Becton (D)

Danny Kail (D)

Annita Sawyer Hamilton (D)

Peggy Dobbins (D)

Clay Perry (D)

Karen Tyler (D)

Shelby County Register

Tom Leatherwood (R) (incumbent)

Coleman Thompson (D)

Lady J. Swift (D)

Carlton Orange (D)

Shelby County Trustee

Regina Newman (D) (incumbent)

M. LaTroy Williams (D)

John Willingham (R)

Jeff Jacobs (R)

David Lenoir (R)

...

28. Renal Company Sells Clinic, Leases It Back From New Owner -

4185 Pace Road
Memphis, TN 38116
Sale Amount: $2 Million

Sale Date: Dec. 17, 2009
Buyer: BanBan South Memphis LLC
Seller: RAI II LLC
Loan Amount: $1.5 million
Loan Date: Dec. 15, 2009
Maturity Date: March 7, 2011
Lender: First Security Bank

29. Renasant Reclaims 16 Eads Parcels -

Renasant Bank has reclaimed 16 parcels – 13 of which are residential lots and three of which are common areas – in the Curtman Glenn Planned Development in unincorporated Shelby County near Eads following a foreclosure of the properties. The Tupelo, Miss.-based bank paid $1.6 million for the land from substitute trustee Paul N. Royal of the law firm Crislip, Philip and Associates.

30. Kelsey's GOP Opponent Drops Bid for Tenn. Senate -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) - State Rep. Brian Kelsey's only opponent in a Republican primary contest to fill a vacant Senate seat in suburban Memphis is dropping out of the race.

31. MBA Seeks More Applicants For Leadership Forum -

The Memphis Bar Association’s Leadership Forum, which began in 2004, offers attorneys in their third to eighth year of practice opportunities to network, meet nationally known legal icons and create projects to serve the community.

32. Paul Stanley's Fall From Grace -

Jim Kyle, a Memphis Democrat who serves as minority leader in the state Senate, gave the first lunchtime address of 2009 to the Memphis Rotary Club.

Rotarians got a bird’s-eye view of the state’s financial picture from Kyle, who described choices needed to close the state’s budget shortfall. Kyle this week announced his candidacy in the 2010 gubernatorial race.

33. Stanley Leaving Senate Aug. 10 -

After privately talking things over with his wife Tuesday, State Sen. Paul Stanley decided to resign from the legislature Aug. 10.

Stanley told The Daily News he "went back and forth" with his wife Kristi, director of government affairs for the Memphis Area Home Builders Association, over what to do about his future. Stanley called his decision the best one he could make for his family.

34. Shelby County GOP Chair Calls On Stanley To Resign -

The first calls for the resignation of State Sen. Paul Stanley have begun within the Republican Party.

35. Local GOP Head Calls On Stanley To Resign -  

The first calls for the resignation of State Sen. Paul Stanley have begun within the Republican Party.

Shelby County GOP chairman Lang Wiseman Monday afternoon called for the Germantown legislator to give up his Senate seat.

Stanley resigned his committee chairmanship last week over an alleged affair with a legislative intern.

The 22-year-old woman’s boyfriend has been charged in Nashville with theft and extortion. He is specifically accused of trying to blackmail Stanley for $10,000 in exchange for explicit pictures of the intern in Stanley’s Nashville apartment.

Stanley, who has refused comment since the incident went public last week, called the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation after the initial threat in April. TBI agents had the 47-year-old legislator arrange a meeting with Joel Watts, the boyfriend of former intern McKensie Morrison.

The TBI took Watts into custody after the exchange behind a Mexican restaurant.

“We are all obviously disappointed in the revelations of the past week,” Wiseman wrote as he praised Stanley for legislative accomplishments. “However, as more and more details continue to surface, it is clear that the time has come for Paul to resign his seat in the Senate. … There are certain basic standards that we require of those persons who we hold up as our leaders, and we have every right to expect that they will respect their position of honor. It is for this reason that the time has come for Sen. Stanley to do the honorable thing and step aside for the benefit of himself, his family, his Senate colleagues, his party and the voters of District 31.”

Wiseman’s statement came after remarks this weekend by Lt. Gov. and Senate speaker Ron Ramsey in Nashville. Ramsey told reporters at a GOP gathering there that he had called on Stanley to give up his committee chairmanship. He also condemned the alleged affair, saying Stanley only told him that he and his wife had separated but said nothing about the photographs and the alleged extortion attempt.

When asked by reporters, Ramsey and other legislators of both parties had said a resignation from the Legislature was up to Stanley.

But Wiseman said he and other local Republican leaders had been talking with Senate Republicans in recent days on what to do if Stanley didn’t step down soon.

Wiseman said his call for Stanley’s resignation is “not about moralizing.”

“We all deserve the chance for forgiveness if sought with a contrite and repentant heart. However, forgiveness is not the same thing as freedom from consequence.”

Wiseman left the timing of a resignation up to Stanley to minimize the cost of a special election.

...

36. Turner to Head Local Democrats -

In a battle of attorneys for the chairmanship of the Shelby County Democratic Party, it was Van Turner Jr. who carried the day at the weekend convention of the Shelby County Democratic Party.

37. Mathews Named to New Post at FedEx Institute -

Eric Mathews was named associate director of corporate research and development at the University of Memphis FedEx Institute of Technology. Mathews previously served FIT in temporary roles directing research and business development and was part of the institute's founding executive management. He earned a bachelor's degree from Rhodes College and a master's degree from the University of Memphis.

38. City Mulls Impact of Eminent Domain Ruling -

Even before the U.S. Supreme Court issued its decision in a major property rights case last month, the Memphis city attorney's office was finishing the legal strategy to help the Riverfront Development Corp. in its effort to remake the Front Street Promenade.