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Editorial Results (free)

1. Harris Files Ford Challenge at Deadline -

Memphis City Council member Lee Harris is challenging Democratic state Sen. Ophelia Ford in the August primary for District 29, the Senate seat held by a member of the Ford family since 1975.

2. Filing Frenzy -

Until Tuesday, no one was running for the District 7 seat on the Shelby County Schools board. No one had pulled a qualifying petition from the Shelby County Election Commission until just two days before the filing deadline for candidates on the August election ballot.

3. Brown’s Contempt Hearing Reflects Political Skirmish -

Joe Brown’s bid to unseat District Attorney General Amy Weirich in the 2014 elections probably wasn’t supposed to begin this way – in a courtroom dispute with Juvenile Court that has nothing to do with Weirich.

4. Brown Contempt Jailing Maps Political Challenge -

The arrest of the Democratic nominee for Shelby County district attorney general Monday, March 24, is the best indication yet of the tumult within the local Democratic Party as it attempts to win countywide offices four years after losing every race to Republicans.

5. DA Candidate Brown Jailed For Contempt in Juvenile Court -

Former Shelby County Criminal Court Judge Joe Brown, who is the Democratic nominee for District Attorney General in the August county general elections, was arrested and jailed Monday, March 24, for being in contempt of court.

6. Sugarmon Opens Campaign for Juvenile Court Judge -

City Court Judge Tarik Sugarmon told supporters Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court is “administratively top-heavy” and too expensive to operate as it currently is.

“We are going to make a change to a 50-year continuum of Juvenile Court,” Sugarmon told supporters at the Shelby County Election Commission last week as he filed his qualifying petition to run in the August election for Juvenile Court judge. “We’re going to reverse this trend. We are going to change this court.”

7. Criminal Justice Issues Likely to Dominate Races -

Expect to hear a lot between now and August about how the local criminal justice system does or does not work.

With Thursday’s filing deadline for candidates in the May 6 county primaries, two races for offices that are part of the system advanced to the August ballot.

8. Roland ReElected At Filing Deadline, Two Countywide Races Set For August -

One of the six Shelby County Commission incumbents seeking re-election this year was effectively elected to a new four-year term in a new district with the noon Thursday, Feb. 20, filing deadline for candidates in the May county primaries.

9. Michael Opens Campaign for Juvenile Court -

Chief Juvenile Court Magistrate Dan Michael says he is prepared if his opposition in the race for Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court judge tries to make an issue of reforms underway at the court.

10. Social Media Fails of 2013 -

Social media is a terrific opportunity to engage with the marketplace and build brand loyalty. Unfortunately, along with the reward comes risk. When a social media campaign backfires, your failure can be quite public.

11. Social Media Blunders of the Year -

With social media networks flying past some once unthinkable records, including surpassing 1 billion users across all major platforms, it’s not surprising that we’ve witnessed some significant brand blunders as users figure out how to properly utilize these tools.

12. ‘Serious, Systemic Failures’ Mar Juvenile Court System -

When U.S. Justice Department attorneys came to Memphis in 2010 and 2011 with a team of juvenile justice experts, they had good news and bad news for leaders of Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court.

13. Time for Court To Get it Right -

You have probably heard the phrase “going forward” used a lot. And the temptation is great to use it again in the case of the recent report on Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court by the Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Justice Department.

14. Big Changes Lie Ahead for Local Juvenile Court -

In the run-up to this month’s U.S. Justice Department report on Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court, the most animated discussions between the attorneys from the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division and those at Juvenile Court were about state law.

15. DOJ: ‘Fundamental Misunderstanding’ Exists In Local Juvenile Court -

The U.S. Justice Department report critical of Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court released last week is the fourth since May 2007 on court operations.

It is also the fourth to note the need for change in the court that has only had two judges since the merger of the city and county juvenile courts in the 1960s.

16. Carpenter Reflects on Five-Year Run -

As Memphis voters prepare to bring to an end another city campaign season, Shelby County Commissioner Mike Carpenter just ended a five-year run on the Shelby County Commission.

17. Commission Readies to Replace Carpenter -

After the Shelby County Commission fills seven positions on the new countywide school board next week, it will then consider a vacancy in its own ranks.

The departure of commissioner Mike Carpenter at the end of this month dovetails with the seating of the countywide school board that will replace the separate Memphis City Schools and Shelby County Schools boards on Oct. 1.

18. Event Marks Juvenile Court Centennial -

Law professionals will celebrate the 100th birthday of the Juvenile Court of Memphis and Shelby County later this month with events that include a 5K run, a continuing legal education seminar and a documentary about the court’s storied past.

19. West Memphis Mojo Rises -

On the night of the worst civic tragedy in West Memphis’ history, blues stood up and did its thing.

The “Blues Trail to Chicago” concert was briefly canceled before officials decided to go with the show in honor of the two second-generation law enforcement officers who were shot and killed earlier Thursday.

20. Commission Races Hinge on Public Issues -

Two issues figure in to the 11 competitive races for the Shelby County Commission – the future of the Regional Medical Center and local government consolidation.

Any push card for a credible candidate includes either something about how to save The MED or the candidate’s opposition to consolidation – or both.

21. Bloodworth Named Chair of Urban Land Institute’s District Council -

Russell Bloodworth has been named chair of the Urban Land Institute’s District Council representing Memphis and the Mid-South. He most recently served as assistant chairman to the previous chair, Frank Ricks of Looney Ricks Kiss.

22. Commission to Appeal Second Juvenile Court Judgeship -

The battle over more than one Juvenile Court judge is on its way to the Tennessee Supreme Court.

Shelby County Commissioners voted this week to appeal an earlier ruling by the Tennessee Appeals Court to the high court. The Supreme Court could choose to hear the case or deny the request for an appeal, which would leave the appeals court ruling in place.

23. Wrangling Expected Before Juvenile Court Ruling’s Appeal -  

The loser was expected to appeal.

But the Shelby County Commission will have a debate at the very least and possibly a close vote before any appeal of this week’s Tennessee Court of Appeals ruling on a second Juvenile Court judge’s position is approved.

A three-judge panel of the appeals court ruled this week that the Shelby County Commission cannot fill a second Juvenile Court judge’s position.

The ruling not only reverses a Chancery Court ruling and plans by a majority on the Commission, it also holds that part of a private act by the Tennessee Legislature is unconstitutional. Passed in 1967, the law provided for a second judge’s position.

The commission was not unanimous when it voted to create the position but did not fill it.

The move in early 2007 by the commission prompted Juvenile Court Judge Curtis Person Jr. to file the lawsuit the appeals court ruled on this week.

“It’s always been very clear, to me anyway, that this power could never be delegated by the Legislature,” Person, a former state legislator, told The Daily News.

“A court without a judge is an anomaly,” he added, quoting from the court ruling. “It was something that I felt I had to do to protect the court and to determine the future of the court. Therefore it had to be dealt with. It’s a huge constitutional issue.”

Hot air ahead

Person noted it is the second ruling of its kind from an appeals court panel on the issue in the past year. The previous lawsuit involved a city court created in the city of Jellico, Tenn.

“This opinion is much longer and has a lot more detail in it … about why it can’t be done,” Person said.

Commissioner Deidre Malone, who led the charge for the second judge’s position, said Monday she was disappointed by the decision. But she also said she would ask the commission to appeal the ruling to the Tennessee Supreme Court.

“My recommendation is going to be that we appeal,” Malone said. “My hope is that we kick it up to the state Supreme Court.”

The possibility of an appeal came as no surprise to Person.

“Certainly they have that right,” he told The Daily News.

Commission Chairwoman Joyce Avery was opposed to the second judgeship and praised the court’s decision.

“I think the court ruled in a correct manner. I always felt that Judge Person was elected as judge and he should remain as judge without two judges,” Avery said.

The differing opinions that remain are an indication that more debate is ahead before the commission decides on an appeal.

“There will be a lot of debate,” Avery said at the end of a nearly four-hour meeting with a relatively short agenda that did not include word of the ruling. “As you’ve seen today, commissioners like to talk.”

Catch-22

In 1967, Person supported passage of the private act in his role as a state legislator. The legislation unified what had been separate juvenile courts in Memphis and Shelby County.

The commission’s action and the appeals court ruling focused on a part of the private act known as “Section 20.”

The section created a second division of the unified Juvenile Court and authorized the County Commission to appoint a judge to that division.

The legislation also included a clause that said if Section 20 was ever declared unconstitutional, the rest of the legislation would stand on its own.

“We have concluded, however, that the General Assembly did not create or establish a court because it did not provide for the judgeship,” read the appeals court opinion written by Judge Patricia J. Cottrell. “While the General Assembly may have begun the process of establishing a court, it did not complete it. Because we find that Division 2 was not created in 1967, and, in fact, has not existed since that time, we find this argument by the commission inapplicable.”

Appeals court Judges Frank G. Clement and Richard H. Dinkins agreed for a unanimous opinion.

Chaotic times

Malone proposed the second judge’s position following Person’s election in the 2006 county elections. Avery and other critics argued the drive to create another position was a response by those who backed Veronica Coleman-Davis, who lost to Person in the election.

Malone and proponents argued a second and even third or fourth judgeship would not cost the county any more money and could replace a system of Juvenile Court referees who work under the Juvenile Court judge. The system of referees was put in place during the 40-year-plus tenure of the late Kenneth Turner, who did not have a law degree.

Person also served as a referee during Turner’s tenure as Juvenile Court judge.

He argued more than one judge controlling the direction of the court would create “chaos” and insisted the system of referees works well.

Critics of the current system pointed to other criminal and civil courts that operate efficiently with multiple divisions and one judge who serves as the administrative judge, usually on a rotating basis.

But Person points to a footnote in this week’s ruling that he said demonstrates the unique nature of Juvenile Court.

“Judges have duties regarding administrative aspects of the courts,” the footnote reads. “In order for a judge to perform these ministerial duties, it is necessary to know whether the Juvenile Court is composed of one or two divisions.”

Oops, their bad

Commissioner Steve Mulroy, a law professor at the Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law at the University of Memphis, said the opinion was a “strained reading of the 1967 act’s text.”

“We should have the Tennessee Supreme Court decide this matter once and for all,” he said.

Person’s suit also alleged a violation of the state open meetings law following the first vote in late 2006, just weeks after Person won an eight-year term as Juvenile Court judge.

Malone acknowledged some private discussion with other commissioners prior to the first vote.

Weeks later, she moved to rescind the action and take a second vote. The resolution was approved again.

The appeals court ruling held the second attempt was all the remedy that was needed to the violation of the state law.

“Where … the governmental body acts quickly and decisively to correct any mistake in its procedure, the primary goal of the Open Meetings Act has been accomplished,” said the ruling. “We do not believe that the Legislature intended to hinder such correction of error, but rather to encourage it.”

...

24. Appeals Court Sides With Person in Juvenile Court Lawsuit -  

The Tennessee Appeals Court ruled Monday that the Shelby County Commission cannot fill a second Juvenile Court judge’s position.

The ruling not only reverses a Chancery Court ruling and plans by the Commission. It also holds that a private act by the Tennessee legislature passed in 1967 which provided for a second judge’s position is unconstitutional.

The commission was not unanimous when it voted to create the position but did not fill it.

The move in early 2007 by the commission prompted Juvenile Court Judge Curtis Person Jr. to file the lawsuit that the appeals court ruled on this week.

Commissioner Deidre Malone, who led the charge for the second judge’s position, said Monday she was disappointed by the decision. But she also said she would ask the commission to appeal the ruling to the Tennessee Supreme Court.

“My recommendation is going to be that we appeal,” Malone told The Daily News. “My hope is that we kick it up to the state supreme court.”

Commission chairwoman Joyce Avery was opposed to the second judgeship and praised the court’s decision.

“I think the court ruled in a correct manner. I always felt that Judge Person was elected as judge and he should remain as judge without two judges.”

The differing opinions that remain are an indication that more debate is ahead before the commission decides on an appeal.

“There will be a lot of debate,” Avery said at the end of a nearly four hour meeting with a relatively short agenda that did not include word of the ruling. “As you’ve seen today, commissioners like to talk.”

Malone proposed the second judge’s position following Person’s election in the 2006 county elections. Avery and other critics argued the drive to create another position was a response by those who backed Veronica Coleman-Davis, who lost to Person in the election.

Malone and proponents argued a second and even third or fourth judgeship would not cost the county any more money and could replace a system of Juvenile Court referees who work under the Juvenile Court Judge. The system of referees was put in place during the 40 year plus tenure of the late Kenneth Turner who did not have a law degree.

Person also served as a referee during Turner’s tenure as Juvenile Court Judge.

He argued more than one judge controlling the direction of the court would create “chaos” and insisted the system of referees worked well.

Critics of the current system pointed to other criminal and civil courts that operate efficiently with multiple divisions and one judge who serves as the administrative judge, usually on a rotating basis.

Person voted for passage of the private act in his role as a state legislator before becoming a referee. The legislation unified what had been separate Juvenile Courts in Memphis and Shelby County.

The commission’s action and the appeals court ruling focused on a part of the private act known as “section 20.”

The section created a second division of the unified Juvenile Court and authorized the County Commission to appoint a judge to that division.

“We have concluded, however, that the General Assembly did not create or establish a court because it did not provide for the judgeship,” the appeals court ruled in an opinion written by Judge Patricia J. Cottrell. “While the General Assembly may have begun the process of establishing a court, it did not complete it. Because we find that division 2 was not created in 1967, and, in fact, has not existed since that time, we find this argument by the Commission inapplicable.”

Appeals court judges Frank G. Clement and Richard H. Dinkins agreed for a unanimous opinion.

The ruling noted that both sides in the lawsuit agreed that the Tennessee Constitution bars the legislature from delegating its authority to establish and create “inferior” courts including Juvenile Courts. Citing an 1879 Tennessee Supreme Court ruling, Cottrell wrote that the definition of a court includes “a judge or chancellor performing the judicial functions.” The court also ruled in 1916, “The presence of a judge or judges is necessary as an essential element of a court.”

...

25. UPDATE: Appeals Court Rules No Second Juvenile Court Judge -

The Tennessee Appeals Court ruled today that the Shelby County Commission cannot fill a second Juvenile Court judge’s position.

The ruling not only reverses a Chancery Court ruling and plans by the Commission. It also holds that a private act by the Tennessee legislature passed in 1967 which provided for a second judge’s position is unconstitutional.

26. Lawler Laments Being Typecast As He Runs for Mayor -

He’s a successful businessman of nearly four decades. He had finished a respectable third the last time he ran for Memphis mayor, which was the first time he ran for elected office. He has enough name recognition that people he doesn’t know ask for his autograph. And he can’t make campaign signs, buttons and T-shirts fast enough to satisfy the demand.

27. Prosecutor: Crisis Center Problems Threaten Cases -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) - A shortage of nurses at a regional rape crisis center has delayed physical exams for some victims, and prosecutors are worried about losing crucial forensic evidence for taking accused rapists to trial.

28. Cohen Crushes Tinker - Jackson Upsets Turner - Charter Changes Pass-Fail - Democratic Congressman Steve Cohen was the big winner in Thursday’s primary elections. Cohen, with 80 percent of the vote, crushed challenger Nikki Tinker in the hard fought 9th District Democratic primary.

The upset of the evening was the general election contest for General Sessions Court Clerk where Democratic challenger Otis Jackson beat Republican incumbent Chris Turner.

And only one of two sets of Shelby County charter amendments on the ballot were approved by voters.

Voter turnout was just under 16 percent in Shelby County. Voter turnout was clearly driven by the 9th District Democratic primary. More people voted in that primary which covers most but not all of Shelby County than voted countywide in the state Democratic primary for the U.S. Senate. Turnout in the Democratic primaries was twice that of the Republican primaries in Shelby County.

All results are unofficial pending audit and certification by the Shelby County Election Commission and Tennessee election officials

9th Congressional District
Democratic Primary
Steve Cohen 50,284 79%
Nikki Tinker 11,814 19%
Joe Towns Jr. 914 1%

Not even close. Cohen won the primary for the open all Shelby County seat two years ago by 4,400 votes over Tinker and 13 other candidates. This time around he was the incumbent and Tinker’s challenge was more strident with a pair of controversial attack ads in the gap between the end of early voting and election day. Both were probably factors in the vote totals along with a smaller field of five candidates.

Cohen faces independent candidate Jake Ford in the Nov. 4 general election.

7th Congressional District
Republican Primary
248 of 265 precincts reporting
Marsha Blackburn 29,158 65%
Tom Leatherwood 15,636 35%

These are the results district wide which includes not only the eastern part of Shelby County but a strip of Middle Tennessee up to the Kentucky state line. In Shelby County’s part of the 7th district, Leatherwood beat Blackburn with 62 percent of the vote. But it was 62 percent of just over 19,000 votes. Outside Shelby County it was always going to be difficult for Leatherwood.. The low voter turnout in Collierville and other eastern parts of the county made Leatherwood’s task impossible.

Blackburn faces Democrat Randy G. Morris on the Nov. 4 ballot.

Shelby County Charter Amendment #360
Yes  49,506   49.73%

No   50,043   50,27%

Closest contest of the night in Shelby County with a 537 vote margin and the highest turnout with 99,549 votes total.

This set of charter changes was to fix a legal problem noted in a recent Tennessee Supreme Court ruling. Another part of the package deal was increasing term limits for the county mayor and the county commission from two consecutive four year terms approved by voters in 1994 to three consecutive four year terms. The County Commission meets Monday to ponder whether it should offer another charter amendment on the Nov. 4 ballot that would fix the legal problem.

Shelby County Charter Amendment #361
Yes 65,548 68%
No 30,188 32%

This set of charter amendment includes provisions for recalling elected officials. It also establishes a new method for filling a vacancy in the office of County Mayor.

General Sessions Court Clerk
Otis Jackson 51,438 52%
Chris Turner 43,971 45%

The upset of the evening. Turner, the Republican nominee and the incumbent was seeking a fourth term. Jackson, the Democratic nominee, was making his fourth bid for county-wide office after coming close in a 2006 bid for County Clerk.

Trustee
Paul Mattila 54,734 57%
Ray Butler 29,977 31%

Mattila beats Butler in a race featuring an energetic and misleading campaign by M. LaTroy Williams in which Williams billed himself as the “real Democrat.” He was, in fact, an independent candidate garnering 8 percent of the vote. Mattila fills the remaining two years left in the term of office of the late Bob Patterson, a Republican. Mattila, a Democrat, worked with Patterson. Butler, the Republican, was also a friend of Patterson’s and the race amounted to who would best continue to operate the office as Patterson did.

Criminal Court Judge Div. 6
John Fowlkes 44,581 52%
Latonya Burrow 21,874 26%
Michael G. Floyd 12,071 14%
Claiborne H. Ferguson 6,240 7%

Fowlkes serves out the remaining six years left of the eight year term of office of Fred Axley who resigned from the bench shortly after winning re-election in 2006. Burrow finished a close second to Axley two years ago and again ran an energetic campaign this time around. But Fowlkes status in the legal community and his appointment to the bench by Gov. Phil Bredesen proved to be the advantage.

Assessor of Property
Cheyenne Johnson 59,637 60%
Bill Giannini 39,057 40%

Johnson, the Democratic nominee, easily beat Giannini, who is also doubling as local GOP chairman. Local Democrats keep the county-wide position in their column as voters go for the candidate endorsed by outgoing Democratic incumbent Rita Clark.

U.S. Senate
Democratic Primary
2,192 of 2,290 precincts reporting
Bob Tuke 54,613 32%
Gary G. Davis 37,193 22%
Mike Padgett 32,190 19%
Mark Clayton 30,359 18%
Kenneth Eaton 13,718 8%
Leonard Ladner 4,431 3%

These are the statewide results. Tuke got 42 percent of the Shelby County vote with Clayton finishing second. Tuke, the former state Democratic Party chairman, faces Republican incumbent Lamar Alexander, one of the most successful politicians in the history of the state, in the Nov. 4 general election.

Judicial Retention Races

All seven state appellate court judges, including two Tennessee Supreme Court justices, won their yes/no contests on the ballot across the state. That includes Tennessee Criminal Appeals Court Judge Camille McMullen of Millington who was just appointed to the bench in June by Gov. Phil Bredesen.

The Associated Press contributed to this story.

...

29. Obama, Huckabee Dominate Shelby in Tenn. Primaries -

The presidential primary season came to a rain-soaked and stormy end Tuesday evening in Memphis even as some voters were still showing up at the polls.

Democratic Sen. Barack Obama and Republican Mike Huckabee carried Shelby County in Tuesday's Tennessee presidential primaries in which 24 percent of Shelby County's 611,000 registered voters cast ballots.

30. Obama, Huckabee Carry Shelby In Tn Primary -

Democratic Sen. Barack Obama and Republican Mike Huckabee carried Shelby County in Tuesday’s Tennessee presidential primaries.

Huckabee went on to win statewide in the GOP contest while New York Sen. Hillary Clinton took the statewide Democratic primary.

31. Second Juvenile Court Judge Position Hinges on Appeal -

There won't be any move by the Shelby County Commission to fill a second Juvenile Court judge's position until the issue is decided by an appeals court.

Chancellor Kenny Armstrong refused to lift a stay of such an appointment Monday afternoon. As that was happening, commissioners, at their bi-monthly session, were opening a new front in the political discussion about changes to the court.

32. Juvenile Court Recommendations Call for Overhaul -

The possibility of a second Juvenile Court judge for Shelby County is an issue other judges in other courts will decide.

The high-profile change is but the most basic of several recommended by a County Commission committee. The ad hoc committee has been reviewing court operations since September, when many of its members and Juvenile Court Judge Curtis Person took office. Its discussion has been just as spirited as the public back-and-forth with Person.

33. COMEC to Raise Money and Awareness With Sunday Treasure Hunt -

Searching for a missing child is no laughing matter. It's easy to imagine that for people involved in a search - family, volunteer workers and law enforcement officials - passing moments can seem like hours.

34. State Senator Plans to Run for Juvenile Court Position -

After nearly 40 years in office, State Sen. Curtis S. Person Jr., R-Memphis, is making plans to retire from the Tennessee Senate in November.

But while other 71-year-olds might opt for leisure time at this point in life, Person would prefer a gavel to a fishing pole. The senator is making a bid for Shelby County Juvenile Court judge, the position from which his friend Judge Kenneth Turner will retire this year.

35. Local Attorneys Get Turn as Judge, Jury -

Starting over is the theme that fills every corner of David S. Kennedy's courtroom.

He is chief judge of the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Western District of Tennessee, which each year hears more than 20,000 pleas from debtors looking for a financial fresh start.

36. Baptist Names College of Health Sciences President -

Baptist Memorial Health Care named Betty Sue McGarvey president of the Baptist College of Health Sciences. McGarvey recently served the college as provost and is a graduate of the Baptist School of Nursing. She was a nursing instructor for two years and was among the 10 founders of the Baptist College of Health Sciences.

37. Archived Article: Newsmakers - GMAQ Elects Officers for 2005

GMAQ Elects 2005 Officers, Directors

The Greater Memphis Association for Quality announced the election of the following officers for 2005: Pat Brown, president; Marcia Boyd, vice president; Felecia Warner, secret...

38. Archived Article: Law Focus - 07-31-03 Law focus

Advocates needed to help troubled kids, CASA says

By LANCE ALLAN

The Daily News

Imagine being alone. Nowhere to go, no one to talk to and no one to turn to for help.

More often than not, thats the situation faced by...

39. Archived Article: Standout - Kinship with children defines Youth Villages CEO

Kinship with children defines Youth Villages CEO

By BRYAN MASSEY

The Daily News

When Patrick Lawler accepted a Newsmaker of the Year Award recently from the Memphis Gridiron Show Fund Inc....

40. Archived Article: Law Focus - Shelby County youth court on tap

Peer courts allow Tennessee youth to judge their own

By MARY DANDO

The Daily News

A program in which first-time young offenders can opt to be judged by a jury of their peers is being implemented statewide...

41. Archived Article: Jv Court (lead) - Juvenile Court returns $0

Juvenile Court windfall

adds to county coffers

By MARY DANDO

The Daily News

It is rare county commissioners get handed money at a budget committee meeting, but Wednesday was an exception.

Juvenile Court Cl...

42. Archived Article: Law Focus - Bob Martin Leaves Juvenile Court Juvenile court clerk retires after 16 years By MARY DANDO The Daily News C.R. "Bob" Martin said his goodbyes to colleagues and friends Nov. 30 on his final day as Shelby County Juvenile Court Clerk, a post ...

43. Archived Article: Standout (schedler) - Sherry Schedler has always known what kind of career she wanted to follow A voice for children By Sue Pease The Daily News Sherry Schedler has always known what kind of career she wanted to follow. Her work at the Juvenile Court of Memphis and Shelb...

44. Archived Article: Community (agape) - By STACEY PETSCHAUER Turning the tide Shelby County agency designed to move children from foster care to adoption By STACEY PETSCHAUER THE DAILY NEWS When enough people gather together in support of a common cause, there often is no limit to what th...

45. Archived Article: Memos - Bob Vornbrock has been named president of Thompson & Co Bob Vornbrock has been named president of Thompson & Co. He formerly was chief operating officer. Vornbrock is a graduate of the University of Missouri. Greg Bava has been named to the ...

46. Archived Article: Law Focus St - By SUZANNE THOMPSON Developing diversity City Court Judge Earnestine Hunt Dorse is appointed to an ABA committee on minorities in the judiciary By SUZANNE THOMPSON The Daily News As City Court Judge Earnestine Hunt Dorse attempts to unseat Juvenile ...

47. Archived Article: Law Briefs - The Memphis Bar Association announced the results of the associations Judicial Preference Election concerning all contested judicial and clerk races on Aug The Memphis Bar Association announced the results of the associations Judicial Preference Ele...

48. Archived Article: Standout - By SUZANNE THOMPSON A passion for helping youth Youth Villages administrator Patrick Lawler has a heart for the young By SUZANNE THOMPSON The Daily News When Patrick Lawler was an 18-year-old, he went to work for Tall Trees Youth Guidance School. Fo...

49. Archived Article: Childsupport - By SUZANNE THOMPSON Laws hammer deadbeat parents Legislation continues to provide tools to collect child support payments By SUZANNE THOMPSON The Daily News Beginning Oct. 1, Tennessee will have yet another tool to use in the collection of child sup...