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Editorial Results (free)

1. County Primaries Reflect Different Political Fortunes -

Former Shelby County Commissioner Deidre Malone will challenge incumbent Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell in the August county general election after winning the Tuesday, May 6, Democratic mayoral primary.

2. Malone to Challenge Luttrell In August Mayoral Showdown -

Former Shelby County Commissioner Deidre Malone will challenge incumbent Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell in the August county general election after winning the Tuesday, May 6, Democratic mayoral primary.

3. Malone Takes Early Vote In Mayoral Primary -

Former Shelby County Commissioner Deidre Malone took the early vote in the three-way Democratic primary for Shelby County Mayor.

The first results of the Tuesday, May 6, election night showed Malone leading rivals county commissioner Steve Mulroy and former Shelby County Schools board member Kenneth Whalum Jr.

4. Brown’s Contempt Hearing Reflects Political Skirmish -

Joe Brown’s bid to unseat District Attorney General Amy Weirich in the 2014 elections probably wasn’t supposed to begin this way – in a courtroom dispute with Juvenile Court that has nothing to do with Weirich.

5. Criminal Justice Issues Likely to Dominate Races -

Expect to hear a lot between now and August about how the local criminal justice system does or does not work.

With Thursday’s filing deadline for candidates in the May 6 county primaries, two races for offices that are part of the system advanced to the August ballot.

6. Roland ReElected At Filing Deadline, Two Countywide Races Set For August -

One of the six Shelby County Commission incumbents seeking re-election this year was effectively elected to a new four-year term in a new district with the noon Thursday, Feb. 20, filing deadline for candidates in the May county primaries.

7. Election Filing Pace Quickens as Deadline Nears -

The May 6 Shelby County primary races began to move toward their final form Monday, Feb. 17, just ahead of the noon Thursday filing deadline for candidates.

Shelby County Commissioner Steve Mulroy brought the Democratic primary race for county mayor to four as he filed his qualifying petition Monday afternoon.

8. Dueling Election Databases Make Tracking Difficult -

If ever the political axiom of needing a scorecard to keep up with the players applied to an election cycle, it would be the set of three elections in 2014 across Shelby County.

The middle election of the three – the August ballot of county general elections and state and federal primary elections – is expected to be one of the longest in the county’s political history, if not the longest.

9. Brooks Pulls Petition for Juvenile Court Clerk -

Shelby County Commissioner Henri Brooks took another step Tuesday, Dec. 10, in her bid for Juvenile Court clerk. Brooks pulled a qualifying petition to run in the May 6 Democratic primary.

Brooks has been campaigning for months.

10. Brooks Pulls Petition for Juvenile Court Clerk -

Shelby County Commissioner Henri Brooks took another step Tuesday, Dec. 10, in her bid for Juvenile Court clerk. Brooks pulled a qualifying petition to run in the May 6 Democratic primary.

Brooks has been campaigning for months.

11. 2014 County Campaigns Come to Life -

There was plenty of political activity when suburban voters went to the polls last week to vote in school board races.

And much of it had to do with a different set of elections, the county primary and general elections on the ballot in 2014.

12. Oldham Opens Sheriff Re-Election Bid -

Shelby County Sheriff Bill Oldham opened his re-election campaign Saturday, Nov. 2, with something he didn’t have four years ago: a record.

13. Current Elections Merge With Future Campaigns -

The campaigns for elections in 2013 are beginning to overlap with campaigns on the ballot in 2014.

The set of 11 elections in three months ends with the Nov. 21 special general election for state House District 91 and a citywide referendum on a half percent sales tax hike.

14. Vergos Appointed To MATA Board, Hooks to Public Service -

A vocal critic of the Memphis Area Transit Authority has been appointed to the MATA board by Memphis Mayor Pro Tem Myron Lowery.

The City Council is scheduled to vote on the appointment of former council member John Vergos at its Sept. 1 meeting.

15. Library Director to Lead City’s Public Services -

Memphis library director Keenon McCloy will be doing double duty for the remainder of Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton’s time in office.

McCloy became director of the city’s division of Public Services & Neighborhoods as the resignations of director Kenneth Moody and deputy director Yalanda McFadgon became effective over the weekend. The division includes the library system.

16. Resignations Begin In Herenton Admin -

The director of the troubled city division of Public Services and Neighborhoods will be leaving City Hall with Mayor Willie Herenton on July 10.

The retirements of Kenneth Moody as well as the deputy director of the division, Yalanda McFadgon, were announced Monday in a brief press release from the mayor’s office.

17. UPDATE: Moody, McFadgon and Gray Out At City Hall -

The director of the troubled city division of Public Services and Neighborhoods will be leaving City Hall with Mayor Willie Herenton on July 10.

The retirements of Kenneth Moody as well as the deputy director of the division, Yalanda McFadgon, were announced today in a brief press release from the mayor’s office.

18. The Politics of Rape: What went wrong at MSARC -

There’s no such thing as a textbook rape victim. There are, however, some very thick and detailed textbooks on how medical and legal authorities should come to a victim’s aid.

Those two realities collided violently in March inside an examination room at the Memphis Sexual Assault Resource Center.

19. Disputes Continue Over MSARC Storm -

Memphis city attorney Elbert Jefferson called it “a perfect storm.”

That was how he described the controversy that surrounds the Memphis Sexual Assault Resource Center when he met last month with its employees.

20. Herenton Defends Damage Control Effort At Rape Crisis Center -

Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton told City Council members Tuesday afternoon that the Memphis Sexual Assault Resource Center (MSARC) will remain a part of city government and will not be transferred to Shelby County government as long as he is mayor.

In a two hour council executive session, Herenton responded in depth for the first time to questions about problems at the center.

Council member Jim Strickland also announced that he will propose the city transfer the agency to county government despite Herenton’s stand on the matter.

Strickland and other council members repeatedly asked Herenton how the center wound up with a staffing problem. And Herenton repeatedly responded that he wasn’t going to talk in any specific terms about problems running the center.

“I don’t know where this is all going. … What’s behind is behind me. I’m moving forward,” Herenton said. “The only useful purpose in me having a dialogue with you about what took place three months ago is that if mistakes were made it’s for the administration to insure that they are not made in the future. … The past allows you to grow from whatever the challenges were and make sure you don’t repeat them again.”

But later, Herenton said the center had staffing problems because of what he described as “hidden agendas” among those who worked at the center as well as personality conflicts.

He was also critical of some council members as well as what he termed “pressure groups” who have expressed concern about the city’s methods and a delay in handling the problems. He said both had politicized the problem based on two specific instances where rape victims were told to come back later for examinations.

“It got politicized. It got personalized. It was media driven,” Herenton said. “No, I wasn’t as upset about that particular incident and it doesn’t mean I’m insensitive to rape victims. I’m sensitive to all victims of crime.”

He also wondered aloud about why council members weren’t as concerned about two drownings of children at city pools last summer or the recent child abuse death of an infant. Several council members broke in to protest that they had shown concern and questioned whether Herenton was accusing them of being racist.

“When you come up, or any of you, and you’ve got a hue and cry because there’s some well connected people in the community got your hot button – got your attention – and you think I’m going to be moved by that? Hell no,” he added.

Strickland said “that was absolutely 100 percent not true.”

Herenton said he wasn’t talking about Strickland but fellow council member Kemp Conrad.

“Crime is going to happen,” Conrad replied. “The difference here is we had crime victims who came to a city service to be served and they weren’t served. We dropped the ball.”

“I’ve already said that,” Herenton countered. “So what do you want me to do about it? We dropped the ball. We’re trying to make sure we bounce the ball right and get it in the hoop next time.”

Conrad said after the meeting that he wasn't on the council during the drowning incidents. And he said statistics show most of the victims seen by MSARC are African-American.

Herenton’s initial response included moving supervision of the center to the City Attorney’s office with the Division of Public Service & Neighborhoods retaining day to day control. He also announced a partnership with the Child Advocacy Center that will send child rape and assault victims to the Midtown center for examination and immediate counseling by trained professionals from Le Bonheur Children’s Medical Center. Herenton said Tuesday he disagrees with critics who argue that having different sites for different victims to go to is not the best approach.

“I don’t have to explain to people the why of this and why of that,” Herenton said when asked why he believes MSARC should remain a city agency when the city is in the process of turning over full funding of the health department to Shelby County government. “I have made decisions that I think are in the best interest of this organization.”

He also said he has not decided whether Kenneth Moody will remain director of the Public Services & Neighborhoods division or what will happen to Yalanda McFadgon, the deputy director with specific oversight responsibilities for the center.

“You’ll know when I make it,” he said.

Read more in Thursday’s edition of The Daily News.

...

21. UPDATE: Herenton Defends Handling Of Rape Crisis Center -  

Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton told City Council members Tuesday afternoon that the Memphis Sexual Assault Resource Center (MSARC) will remain a part of city government and will not be transferred to Shelby County government as long as he is mayor.

In a two hour council executive session, Herenton responded in depth for the first time to questions about problems at the center.

Council member Jim Strickland also announced that he will propose the city transfer the agency to county government despite Herenton’s stand on the matter.

Strickland and other council members repeatedly asked Herenton how the center wound up with a staffing problem. And Herenton repeatedly responded that he wasn’t going to talk in any specific terms about problems running the center.

“I don’t know where this is all going. … What’s behind is behind me. I’m moving forward,” Herenton said. “The only useful purpose in me having a dialogue with you about what took place three months ago is that if mistakes were made it’s for the administration to insure that they are not made in the future. … The past allows you to grow from whatever the challenges were and make sure you don’t repeat them again.”

But later, Herenton said the center had staffing problems because of what he described as “hidden agendas” among those who worked at the center as well as personality conflicts.

He was also critical of some council members as well as what he termed “pressure groups” who have expressed concern about the city’s methods and a delay in handling the problems. He said both had politicized the problem based on two specific instances where rape victims were told to come back later for examinations.

“It got politicized. It got personalized. It was media driven,” Herenton said. “No, I wasn’t as upset about that particular incident and it doesn’t mean I’m insensitive to rape victims. I’m sensitive to all victims of crime.”

He also wondered aloud about why council members weren’t as concerned about two drownings of children at city pools last summer or the recent child abuse death of an infant. Several council members broke in to protest that they had shown concern and questioned whether Herenton was accusing them of being racist.

“When you come up, or any of you, and you’ve got a hue and cry because there’s some well connected people in the community got your hot button – got your attention – and you think I’m going to be moved by that? Hell no,” he added.

Strickland said “that was absolutely 100 percent not true.”

Herenton said he wasn’t talking about Strickland but fellow council member Kemp Conrad.

“Crime is going to happen,” Conrad replied. “The difference here is we had crime victims who came to a city service to be served and they weren’t served. We dropped the ball.”

“I’ve already said that,” Herenton countered. “So what do you want me to do about it? We dropped the ball. We’re trying to make sure we bounce the ball right and get it in the hoop next time.”

Conrad said after the meeting that he wasn't on the council during the drowning incidents. And he said statistics show most of the victims seen by MSARC are African-American.

Herenton’s initial response included moving supervision of the center to the City Attorney’s office with the Division of Public Service & Neighborhoods retaining day to day control. He also announced a partnership with the Child Advocacy Center that will send child rape and assault victims to the Midtown center for examination and immediate counseling by trained professionals from Le Bonheur Children’s Medical Center. Herenton said Tuesday he disagrees with critics who argue that having different sites for different victims to go to is not the best approach.

“I don’t have to explain to people the why of this and why of that,” Herenton said when asked why he believes MSARC should remain a city agency when the city is in the process of turning over full funding of the health department to Shelby County government. “I have made decisions that I think are in the best interest of this organization.”

He also said he has not decided whether Kenneth Moody will remain director of the Public Services & Neighborhoods division or what will happen to Yalanda McFadgon, the deputy director with specific oversight responsibilities for the center.

“You’ll know when I make it,” he said.

Read more in Thursday’s edition of The Daily News.

...

22. Rape Center Management Tops Council Agenda -

For the second time in two weeks, Memphis City Council members will discuss the management of the Memphis Sexual Assault Resource Center. The discussion is expected to dominate today’s council executive session at 1 p.m.

23. Herenton: Rape Center To Get Help From Le Bonheur -

Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton announced Monday a reorganization of the Memphis Sexual Assault Resource Center that will include Le Bonheur Children’s Medical Center handling all forensic examinations of child rape and sexual assault victims.

24. Prosecutor: Crisis Center Problems Threaten Cases -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) - A shortage of nurses at a regional rape crisis center has delayed physical exams for some victims, and prosecutors are worried about losing crucial forensic evidence for taking accused rapists to trial.

25. Methodist Names Brooks VP of Clinical Operations -

Robert Brooks has been named vice president of clinical operations for Methodist University Hospital.

26. Fannie, Freddie Shares Rise for Third Straight Day -

WASHINGTON (AP) - Shares of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac climbed for a third straight day Wednesday, as investors appeared less certain that a government bailout of the two troubled companies will happen anytime soon.

27. Council ExpectedTo Confirm Appointments -      Memphis City Council members are expected to confirm Mayor Willie Herenton's administrative team at today's meeting.
     Chief Administrative Officer Keith L. McGee is up for reappointment.

28. Several Job Swaps on Tap at Today's Council Meeting -

The new year formalities are almost completed at City Hall.

The oaths of office have been taken. The written and signed oaths are soon to be filed. Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton barely roiled the political waters with his New Year's Day speech. But he made a more detailed pitch for consolidation than he ever has before on Jan. 2.

29. Events -

Friends of Larry Finch holds a press conference to unveil its logo and announce coming events to benefit former University of Memphis Coach Larry Finch today at 11 a.m. at Cal's Championship Steak House at the Doubletree Hotel, 5069 Sanderlin Ave. Contact Kenneth Moody at 758-8753 for more information.