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Editorial Results (free)

1. Tennessee Constitutional Officers Get Own Spokespeople -

Tennessee's secretary of state, comptroller and treasurer are abandoning an effort to use one communications officer to speak on all three constitutional officers' behalf.

Treasurer David Lillard announced Friday he has hired Shelli King, a former marketing consultant at WTVF-TV in Nashville, to be his chief spokeswoman. Comptroller Justin Wilson previously hired former WZTV-TV reporter John Dunn to be his spokesman.

2. Haslam Checks In With Bond Rating Agencies -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam was in New York City last week to talk with the major bond rating agencies.

Normally such trips come when a local or state government is about to issue new debt and wants a credit rating from the agencies. In this case, the Thursday, Sept. 25, visit was not for that. It was more of a status report on the state’s financial condition.

3. Vols Hope to Snap 20-Game Road Slump vs. Ranked Opponents -

KNOXVILLE – It doesn’t get much easier for the University of Tennessee’s football team.

The Sept. 20 open date has come and gone. UT’s coaches and players had ample time to digest and dissect details of the 34-10 loss to No. 4-ranked Oklahoma on Sept. 13 and a week to prepare for a challenge just as formidable.

4. South Carolina Back in SEC East Race -

The South Carolina defense still has improvement to make, but in beating Georgia 38-35 last Saturday the Gamecocks made a fourth-quarter goal-line stand and reasserted their presence in the SEC East Division.

5. Fire, Police Union Brass Say Lawsuit is Coming -

The leaders of the Memphis police and fire unions say they will sue the city over changes in employee health insurance approved this month and are prepared to add pension changes to the litigation if the council approves those changes next month.

6. Battle Lines -

The city’s operating and capital budgets are just about set for the new fiscal year next month. Hard decisions made about health insurance for city employees and retirees Tuesday, June 17, are unlikely to be revisited by the Memphis City Council.

7. Nashville Mayor Maps Issues Similar to Memphis -

The Nashville mayor who was once Davidson County's public defender says schools in his city aren’t meeting his test for success in public education.

He is concerned with attracting talent to the city and touts diversity as a key component of that. And his city has a critical need for a “more robust” mass transit system, he said last week.

8. City Council Continues Pension Talks -

Memphis City Council members continue their discussions Tuesday, March 18, about the city’s unfunded pension liability as well as possible changes in city employee heath care benefits.

But there is still no action on any part of the issues on the council agenda for a vote.

9. Council Looks to Pinpoint Pension Numbers -

The Tuesday, March 4, discussion Memphis City Council members had with Tennessee Comptroller Justin Wilson, Tennessee Treasurer David Lillard and consultants from four actuarial firms centered on the city’s pension liability.

10. Council Weighs Conflicting Liability Numbers, Approves Mall Plan -

Memphis City Council members cleared much of their committee calendar Tuesday, Feb. 4, to talk for four hours about specifics of the city’s pension fund liability crisis.

The discussion with Tennessee Comptroller Justin Wilson, Tennessee Treasurer David Lillard and consultants from four actuarial firms was aimed at trying to define the specifics of the problem, see if there is agreement on some of the numbers and better explain the differences.

11. Council Weighs Conflicting L:iability Numbers, Approves Mall Plan -

Memphis City Council members cleared much of their committee calendar Tuesday, Feb. 4, to talk for four hours about specifics of the city’s pension fund liability crisis.

The discussion with Tennessee Comptroller Justin Wilson, Tennessee Treasurer David Lillard and consultants from four actuarial firms was aimed at trying to define the specifics of the problem, see if there is agreement on some of the numbers and better explain the differences.

12. City Council to Dig Into Pension Liability -

The road to a specific solution to the city’s unsustainable pension liability and employee benefits begins Tuesday, March 4, in detailed, technical and complex financial discussions at City Hall that will dominate the committee schedule of the Memphis City Council.

13. Council Hires Actuary Consultant -

The Memphis City Council approved hiring its own actuary firm Tuesday, Feb. 18, to review the city’s financial state, namely city government’s unfunded pension liability. The council voted to hire Segal Consulting of Atlanta to advise it as the council prepared for a March 4 committee session in which it will meet with the administration’s actuary and others on the unsustainable trajectory the pension fund is on.

14. Council Hires Actuary Consultant -

The Memphis City Council approved hiring its own actuary firm Tuesday, Feb. 18, to review the city’s financial state, namely city government’s unfunded pension liability. The council voted to hire Segal Consulting of Atlanta to advise it as the council prepared for a March 4 committee session in which it will meet with the administration’s actuary and others on the unsustainable trajectory the pension fund is on.

15. Council Tours Pyramid, Weighs City Offices In Two Malls -

Memphis City Council members heard Tuesday, Feb. 18, that the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. wants to move some city government offices into the Soulsville Town Center in South Memphis and is weighing whether to renovate or tear down and build anew on the site of the Southbrook Mall in Whitehaven.

16. Official: FBI to Interview Election Administrator -

MEMPHIS (AP) – The FBI has told Shelby County Election Administrator Richard Holden it wants to speak with him and six other election workers about how they complete their job responsibilities, an official said Thursday.

17. Editorial: City Hall Reeling in Financial Straits -

The issue that promises or threatens to dominate 2014 at City Hall is the one that just about everyone in city government would rather see out of the spotlight.

In a word, it’s money.

City Hall’s money problem is not one that historically gets a lot of the spotlight for very long.

18. Debt and Liability -

There is rarely a good answer to the question “How much?” in politics.

With issues including the unfunded pension liability, overall debt, and revenue estimates and their validity, City Hall’s overall money problem begins but hardly ends with the question. It won’t be that simple.

19. Ratings Agencies Weigh In on City’s Bonds -

Standard & Poor’s, one of the big three bond-rating agencies, has assigned a AA rating to the city’s general obligation bonds and the revenue bonds proposed for use in a city purchase of AutoZone Park, and has given the city’s financial health a “stable” outlook on both fronts.

20. Lindow Rejoins The Centre Group -

Tracy Lindow has rejoined The Centre Group human resources firm as a senior consultant following several years in Germany. As a senior consultant, Lindow will help organizations improve their bottom line through human asset development by leveraging compensations strategies, executive search, employee attitude research and leadership skills development.

21. Wharton to Present Pension Plan to City Council -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. will take a five-year plan for meeting the city’s $709 million unfunded pension liability Tuesday, Dec. 17, to Memphis City Council members during their executive session.

22. Bad Blood -

December was already going to be a busy month at City Hall for the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.

He would be bringing a plan to provide $15 million in city financing for the $180 million Crosstown revitalization project and rolling out its fix to address the Tennessee Comptroller’s vocal concerns about the city’s unfunded pension liability.

23. AutoZone Park Deal Resurfaces at Crucial Time -

The Christmas tree in the plaza of AutoZone Park is more than a reminder of the holiday season.

The tree serves as a reminder for the tight timeframe that awaits a proposal for a city government purchase of the baseball park as the St. Louis Cardinals baseball franchise buys the Memphis Redbirds ball club, the Cardinals AAA minor league affiliate.

24. Comptroller Letter Calls for Prompt Action -

If anyone at City Hall has any illusions that the state of Tennessee is no longer concerned about city government’s unfunded pension liability, Tennessee Comptroller Justin P. Wilson cleared up that point with a letter sent to Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. this month and released Tuesday, Oct. 15.

25. Comptroller Letter Emphasizes Pension Decisions To Come -

If anyone at City Hall has any illusions that the state of Tennessee is no longer concerned about city government’s unfunded pension liability, Tennessee Comptroller Justin P. Wilson cleared up that point earlier this month with a letter to Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. that was released Tuesday, Oct. 15.

26. City Council to Vote on Bonds, Review Land Swap -

Memphis City Council members this week take up $375 million in refunding bonds and general obligation bonds, and discuss a land swap with Church of the River for access to a boardwalk on the Harahan Bridge across the Mississippi River.

27. Crosstown Funding at Crossroads -

The $180 million plan to bring the former Sears Crosstown building back to life with a mix of residential, commercial and retail tenants faces a critical hurdle Thursday, Oct. 10, as the Center City Revenue Finance Corp. considers a 15- or 20-year payment-in-lieu-of-taxes (PILOT) agreement for the project.

28. City Pension Crisis Meets Sanitation Overhaul -

The city’s looming pension liability crisis and the proposed solution to it intersected Tuesday, Oct. 1, with a plan to overhaul city sanitation services and, in the process, provide a pension supplement to sanitation workers.

29. City Hall Goes Back to Financial Issues -

After a summer break, the concerns about the long-term financial health of Memphis city government go back to the front political front burner at City Hall Tuesday, Sept. 17.

Memphis City Council members will take up a new report on the city’s pension plan that concludes the plan for city employees is unsustainable and “has continued to deteriorate.”

30. Other Shoe Drops in Troubled City Hall Finances -

Concerns about the long-term financial health of Memphis city government that subsided in June go back to the front political burner at City Hall this week.

The administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. has a report on the city’s pension plan from PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP of Atlanta that concludes the city’s pension plan for city employees is unsustainable and “has continued to deteriorate.”

31. 23-Member School Board Holds Final Meeting -

The countywide school board holds its last meeting as a 23-member body Tuesday, Aug. 27.

Effective Sept. 1, the transitional board slims down to seven members elected in 2012 from seven districts that cover all of Shelby County, including the city of Memphis.

32. Funding for Untested Rape Kits Sparks Debate -

The Memphis City Council’s sharpest debate during a Tuesday, Aug. 20, council agenda with several major issues wasn’t about Smart Meters or changes in garbage pickup.

It was about “several thousand” rape kits Memphis Police have – some dating back to the 1980s – that investigators never processed.

33. Editorial: Financial Stability Critical for City -

At the overtime sudden death end of the local budget season, if you live in Memphis you leave with a combined $7.78 cent tax rate – city of Memphis and county property tax rates – the highest property tax rate in the state of Tennessee.

34. Council Grapples With Attrition Plan Reality -

Every version of a city budget the Memphis City Council and Mayor A C Wharton Jr. considered in June included a plan to lose 300 city employees through attrition for long-term savings toward meeting rising future debt obligations.

35. Council Ponders Use of Reserve To Keep Fire Station Open -

Memphis City Council member considered briefly Tuesday, July 16, using $1.1 million from the $48 million city reserve fund to keep a North Memphis fire station open.

But they dropped the idea after Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. agreed to keep Fire Station #6, on Danny Thomas Boulevard north of Chelsea Avenue open at least until Labor Day.

36. Wharton: Revenue Officer Needed -

Call it a “budget resolution.” A week after the Memphis City Council set the city’s operating budget, capital budget and a property tax rate of $3.40, council members and Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. resolved Tuesday, July 2, to continue making changes in City Hall’s financial practices.

37. Strickland, Conrad Warn of Budget Pitfalls -

When most of the 13 people on the Memphis City Council began their service in 2008, the city’s property tax rate was $3.43 and rolling back that rate was a priority of a voting majority on the body.

38. Property Tax Hike Highlights New City Budget -

Memphis City Council members raised the city property tax rate Tuesday, June 26, by 4 cents above the recertified tax rate and put the rest of a turbulent budget season to rest.

The approval of the $3.40 property tax rate and city operating and capital budgets came in a council session that ended at 12:30 a.m. Wednesday morning.

39. Council Approves Tax Hike in $3.40 Property Tax Rate -

Memphis City Council members raised the city property tax rate Tuesday, June 26, by four cents above the recertified tax rate and put the rest of a turbulent budget season to rest.

The approval of the $3.40 property tax rate and city operating and capital budgets came in a council session that ended at 12:30 a.m. Wednesday morning.

40. Council to Take Final Votes on Budget -

The most critical vote at last week’s budget-dominated Memphis City Council meeting may have been the vote to adjourn leaving final budget decisions pending.

It left a week for all sides in the ongoing budget drama at City Hall a wealth of time by political standards to build support for their respective positions.

41. City Council Again Tackles Budget, Tax Rate -

Some Memphis City Council members say they are prepared for a long day Tuesday, June 18, at City Hall as they continue down the arduous path to a tax rate and budget for the coming fiscal year.

“Let’s just be ready to spend the night,” said council member Harold Collins last week. He commented as council-mediated discussions between the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. and municipal union leaders on possible cuts in employee benefits got nowhere quickly and ended after less than an hour.

42. Council Faces Pressure in Financial Crisis -

The Memphis City Council is caught between hints of a state takeover of city finances and the possibility of a lawsuit by most, if not all, of the city’s municipal labor unions in a fiscal crisis that is also evolving into a significant labor dispute.

43. Comptroller Urges Council to Act on Fiscal Problems -

That didn’t take long.

An ad hoc committee of Memphis City Council members trying to find common ground between the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. and the city’s municipal labor unions met for less than an hour Wednesday, June 12, before calling it a day.

44. Editorial: A Few Suggestions for Our City Leaders -

For the last three years or so the game at City Hall has been to move money around from one pocket to another to try to make projects happen in the toughest economic downturn since the Great Depression.

45. Budget Vote Faces Postponement -

Memphis City Council members have final votes on their agenda Tuesday, June 6, on an operating budget for the fiscal year that begins July 1 in addition to setting a city property tax rate.

But before the council meets at 3:30 p.m. at City Hall, 125 N. Main St., the group’s budget committee will hear from Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. and his administration one more time on possible changes to the budget and the tax rate.

46. Mayor, Council Talk Budget Reset -

This wasn’t what the Memphis City Council had in mind when its budget committee set Thursday, May 30, as its wrap-up session on the city budget.

Such sessions are usually the time when the budget committee takes final votes on whether it agrees with parts of the administration’s budget proposal and council members begin to roll out their own proposals and substitutions.

47. State Concerns Blow Up City Budget -

When the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. went to the state earlier this year for approval of a $112.4 million refunding bonds issuance, it was the second time in four years City Hall had used a debt tactic known as “scoop and toss.”

48. Critical State Report Remakes City Budget -

An April report from the Tennessee Comptroller of the Treasury critical of city finances threw the budget season at City Hall into remake mode Tuesday, May 21.

The bottom line for the budget is a remediation plan that will increase the city’s long term debt, force the city to use its reserves, and take reserves below the 10 percent level considered key with bond-rating agencies.

49. Judicial Redistricting Plan Leaves Shelby Same -

About a year after the Tennessee legislature set new district lines for itself and the state’s nine members of Congress, it is about to set the district lines for civil and criminal trial court judges at the state level.

50. A Higher Order of Sausage -

GOD’S SAUSAGE. (When you see this column, it’s the 40 Days of Waffle Shop again, so strike while the iron is hot.)

“You might just be a copywriter,” Brick Muller said, staring down at the piece of paper I’d just handed him. On it was an ad idea I’d just pounded out on the 1948 Royal typewriter he was paying me to use as a copywriter. The fact that this was his first recognition that I might be one was gratifying since I’d already been there for nine months.

51. Lawmakers Re-Elect State Constitutional Officers -

The Legislature has unanimously re-elected the Secretary of State Tre Hargett, Comptroller Justin Wilson and Treasurer David Lillard to another term in office.

52. Lawmakers Re-Elect State Constitutional Officers -

The Legislature has unanimously re-elected the Secretary of State Tre Hargett, Comptroller Justin Wilson and Treasurer David Lillard to another term in office.

53. State Comptroller: Waive $25 for Records Requests -

Comptroller Justin Wilson’s move to automatically waive the first $25 in fees for public records requests is drawing praise from open government advocates.

54. State Officials React to Critical Parole Audit -

A member of the Tennessee Senate Judiciary Committee says an audit of the Board of Probation and Parole casts doubt on the effectiveness of parolee supervision.

A performance audit by the state comptroller’s office showed at least 82 people parole officers said they checked on between January 2011 and May 2012 were, in fact, dead. One of them died more than 19 years ago.

55. Hargett: Shelby Election Problems Erode Public Confidence -

The election driven by ballot questions and one-time-only races looks to become an election that goes into overtime as well.

Tennessee Secretary of State Tre Hargett formally asked State Comptroller Justin Wilson Friday, July 27, to audit the administration of the Shelby County Election Commission and investigate election procedures and returns.

56. Pending Bill Could Raise Solar Taxes -

The week that two solar farms located in Haywood County and Memphis were dedicated, a bill that would increase property taxes on owners of solar production facilities like the two arrays was undergoing more changes in Nashville and encountering increased opposition from the state’s solar industry.

57. Waffle Shop Again Answers Prayers -

GOD’S SAUSAGE. “You might just be a copywriter,” Brick Muller said, staring down at the piece of paper I’d just handed him. On it was an ad idea I’d just pounded out on the 1948 Royal typewriter he was paying me to use as a copywriter. The fact that this was his first recognition that I might be one was gratifying since I’d already been there for nine months.

58. Tenn. Fiscally Sound but Cuts Needed -

Tennessee’s financial ledger is in good shape. The current state budget is balanced. For the first five months of the current budget year, general fund collections have outpaced projections by about $188 million.

59. Tenn. Comptroller Wants School Funding Formula Fix -

NASHVILLE (AP) – State Comptroller Justin Wilson says Tennessee's school funding formula is fraught with complexity and a lack of transparency that could lead to either inadvertent or intentional errors in distributing state money.

60. Sen. Kelsey Introduces Bill Targeting Local Gov. Debt -

Tennessee state Sen. Brian Kelsey, R-Germantown, has introduced a bill aimed at helping reduce local government debt.

61. Fuente Looks to Turn Tigers Around -

The next phase of University of Memphis football officially began Thursday, Dec. 8. That’s when 35-year-old Justin Fuente, co-offensive coordinator at Texas Christian University, told media and fans gathered at an on-campus press conference, “This is going to be Memphis’ team. … I don’t care what school you went to, you live in the city, I want this to be your team.”

62. Fuente Looks to Turn Tigers Around -

The next phase of University of Memphis football officially began Thursday, Dec. 8.

That’s when 35-year-old Justin Fuente, co-offensive coordinator at Texas Christian University, told media and fans gathered at an on-campus press conference, “This is going to be Memphis’ team. … I don’t care what school you went to, you live in the city, I want this to be your team.”

63. Report Criticizes Former Revenue Commissioner -

NASHVILLE (AP) – A report by the state's comptroller says former Tennessee Revenue Commissioner Reagan Farr approved millions of dollars in tax reductions for businesses without proper documentation or justification.

64. Tenn. to Sell Estimated $584 Million in Bonds -

NASHVILLE (AP) – The state of Tennessee plans to sell an estimated $584 million worth of bonds this week, the largest sale in the state's history.

The sale Tuesday through Thursday will use some of the proceeds to pay for new capital projects and infrastructure. These include economic development grants for Volkswagen in Chattanooga, Wacker Chemie in Bradley County, Hemlock Semiconductor in Clarksville and Electrolux in Memphis.

65. Comptroller Appoints Tenn. Business Advocate -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Tennessee Comptroller Justin Wilson has appointed the state's new small business advocate.

66. Tenn. Revenue Estimates Reflect Improving Economy -

NASHVILLE (AP) – More money should be coming into the state as a result of an improving economy, but high gas prices that are eating up people's disposable income are also affecting Tennessee's revenue projections, the State Funding Board said Friday.

67. Tenn. Funding Board Sets Growth Projections -

NASHVILLE (AP) – The State Funding Board has projected that Tennessee's general fund revenues could be up to $162 million more than expected this budget year.

The panel on Wednesday set official projections for the remainder of the current spending year and the one beginning July 1. Gov. Bill Haslam and lawmakers use the projections to plan the state's spending plan.

68. Board Cautious About Revenue Estimates -

Economic forecasts call for a growth in Tennessee revenues, but the State Funding Board is taking a cautious approach toward setting projections for the upcoming budget year.

Comptroller Justin Wilson said Monday that it would be equally damaging for the panel to either overestimate or underestimate tax collections.

69. Legislature Re-Elects GOP Constitutional Officers -

The Tennessee Legislature has re-elected two of its Republican constitutional officers.

A joint session of the entire state House and Senate on Wednesday elected by voice vote for Justin Wilson to continue as comptroller and David Lillard as treasurer.

70. Officials Uncertain About Final Revenue Estimates -

NASHVILLE (AP) – State officials say they're uncertain when final revenue projections for Tennessee will be released.

The State Funding Board was expected to make its estimates on Thursday, but Comptroller Justin Wilson adjourned the meeting to the call of the secretary of state.

71. State Funding Board to Hear Debt Policy -

NASHVILLE (AP) — State Comptroller Justin P. Wilson will recommend Wednesday that the State Funding Board adopt a model debt management policy for governmental entities throughout Tennessee.

72. Ex-GOP Lawmaker Bunch Named Administrative Judge -

NASHVILLE (AP) – A former state lawmaker who was a vocal critic of Tennessee's laws on appointing judges has been named an administrative law judge.

The Chattanooga Times Free Press reports for Tuesday's editions that Republican Sen. Dewayne Bunch of Cleveland has been appointed an administrative law judge by Secretary of State Tre Hargett, a fellow former state lawmaker.

73. Tenn. Sales Taxes Grow by Highest Rate Since 2007 -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Tennessee's latest revenue figures released Wednesday show monthly sales tax collections grew at their highest rate since April 2007 and that the state's general fund exceeded projections by $46 million through the first quarter of the budget year.

74. 2009 Year In Review -

2009 was a year without a script – and plenty of improvising on the political stage.

It was supposed to be an off-election year except in Arlington and Lakeland.

2008 ended with voters in the city and county approving a series of changes to the charters of Memphis and Shelby County governments. Those changes were supposed to set a new direction for both entities, kicking into high gear in 2010 and ultimately culminating two years later.

75. Funding Board Sets Low Tenn. Revenue Estimates -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) - The Tennessee State Funding Board on Friday agreed to a range of revenue estimates that dips below the predictions of economists previously consulted by the panel.

The four board members voted to set the general fund growth rate at between 1.8 percent and 2.3 percent for the budget year beginning July 1. Five economists earlier this week forecast a growth rate of between 1.99 percent and 3.5 percent.

76. Funding Board Delays Tenn. Revenue Estimates -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) - The State Funding Board has delayed setting the revenue projections that the governor and lawmakers use to prepare Tennessee's annual spending plan.

Treasurer David Lillard said at a meeting Thursday that "staff is not ready" to proceed with the revenue estimates. He asked that another meeting be scheduled for Friday.

77. Report: Tenn. Pre-K Not Effective After Second Grade -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A new report shows the effectiveness of Tennessee’s pre-kindergarten program diminishes after the second grade, but supporters say it still provides a valuable foundation that will help at-risk children succeed.

78. Justin's Empire: Timberlake drives business interests where it all began -

Justin Timberlake might be best known for hit records, dance moves and sold-out concerts, but the 28-year-old entertainer extraordinaire is much more than a singer/dancer/performer. The award-winning, chart-topping Timberlake – or, simply, JT – has become an institution, a brand name that transcends his showbiz persona and carries as much cachet as any living celebrity.

79. Education Department Recovers More Than $425,000 -

The Tennessee Department of Education has recovered more than $425,000 from a vendor that overbilled for services and then alerted the department to the problem.

A special investigation by the state comptroller found Edvantia Inc. overbilled for administering the Exemplary Educators program grant contracts. The program assigns teachers and administrators to schools in need.

80. Comptroller Suggests Reforms for Bond Financing -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) - The Tennessee comptroller on Friday recommended preventing smaller cities and counties from entering into complex bond deals because they are too risky.

Some cities, counties and utility districts in Tennessee are struggling under derivative bonding arrangements that sent their interest payments skyrocketing and suddenly reduced how much time they have to pay off their debts.

81. New Tenn. Comptroller Hires Legislative Manager -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) - New Comptroller Justin Wilson has hired Republican operative Susie Alcorn to lead the office's legislative duties.

82. Bredesen Appoints Morgan To Deputy Governor Post -

The day after the Tennessee Legislature replaced John Morgan as state comptroller, Gov. Phil Bredesen appointed Morgan deputy governor of Tennessee.

83. Lillard, Hargett in GOP Sweep of State Constitutional Offices -

NASHVILLE – Republicans, including two familiar faces from Shelby County, have been elected as Tennessee’s secretary of state, comptroller and treasurer in a legislative vote.

A joint session of the entire state House and Senate on Thursday voted 70-61 for Tre Hargett, a former GOP House leader from Bartlett, to replace Democratic Secretary of State Riley Darnell.

84. Repubs Sweep Tenn. Constitutional Officer Vote -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) - Republicans used their new majority in the Tennessee Legislature to elect three members of their party as secretary of state, comptroller and treasurer on Thursday.

A joint session of the entire state House and Senate voted 70-61 for Tre Hargett, a former GOP House leader, to replace Democratic Secretary of State Riley Darnell.

85. Tenn. House Pitched Into Uncertainty by Speaker Vote -

NASHVILLE (AP) – The surprise election of Republican Rep. Kent Williams as speaker of the Tennessee House has heightened the atmosphere of uncertainty in an already closely divided chamber.

86. Bios of GOP Choices For 3 State Constitutional Offices -

Legislative Republicans on Monday elected their three nominees for Tennessee’s constitutional offices.

The comptroller, treasurer and secretary of state were scheduled to be elected today by a joint assembly of the House and Senate, where Republicans have a 69-63 advantage.

87. Tenn. GOP Candidates Linked to Life Insurance Plan -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) - Two Republican candidates for Tennessee constitutional offices have been linked to a proposal for the state to benefit from taking out life insurance policies on unwitting retired state employees.

88. GOP Lawmaker Mulls Vote for Democratic Officers -

Tennessee state Rep. Kent Williams is considering breaking ranks with his fellow Republicans to vote to hold on to the state’s Democratic constitutional officers.

89. Archived Article: Standout (mack) - By SUZANNE THOMPSON Cooking from the heart By SUZANNE THOMPSON The Daily News The last thing Bonnie Mack needs is someone looking over his shoulder while hes in the kitchen. So last year, when President Clinton visited Blues City Cafe, where Mack is...

90. Archived Article: Briefs - A guide to the states environmental permitting process is now available from the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation A guide to the states environmental permitting process is now available from the Tennessee Department of Environmen...

91. Archived Article: Back2 - Tennessee emissions down by 32 million pounds Tennessee emissions down by 32 million pounds Tennessee has made a 32 million pound reduction this year in the release of more than 600 chemicals included on the Toxic Release Inventory, Justin P. Wilson...

92. Archived Article: Env Briefs - 05-08 Env briefs Shelby County environmental coordinator Edward F. Williams III will receive Tennessees Lifetime Environmental Stewardship Award from the states recently-appointed commissioner of environment and conservation, Justin Wilson. Williams...