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Editorial Results (free)

1. US New-Home Sales Close to Flat in September -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. sales of new homes were nearly flat in September, after the government sharply revised downward what was initially an August surge in buying.

New-home sales edged up 0.2 percent last month to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 467,000, the Commerce Department reported Friday. The report also revised down the August sales rate to 466,000 from 504,000.

2. US Existing Home Sales Fall in August -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Fewer Americans bought homes in August, as investors retreated from real estate and first-time buyers remained scarce.

Sales of existing homes fell 1.8 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.05 million, the National Association of Realtors said Monday. That snaps a four-month streak of gains. August sales are down from a July rate of 5.14 million, a figure that was revised slightly downward.

3. Applications for US Jobless Aid Rose Slightly -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The number of people seeking U.S. unemployment benefits rose 5,000 last week to a seasonally adjusted 320,000, which is close to pre-recession levels and suggests a stable job market.

4. Fears of Slowdown Sharpen Focus on US Jobs Report -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Fears of an economic slowdown are heightening anticipation of what Friday's U.S. jobs report for January might reveal.

Stock markets have sunk after signs of weaker growth in the United States, Europe and China. Turmoil in developing countries has further spooked investors. The upheaval has renewed doubts about the Federal Reserve's next steps.

5. US Manufacturing Grows at Fastest in 2.5 Years -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. manufacturing grew in November at the fastest pace in 2½ years as factories ramped up production, stepped up hiring and received orders at a healthy clip.

6. Survey: US Manufacturing Grew More Slowly in March -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A survey shows U.S. manufacturing activity expanded more slowly in March than February, held back by weaker growth in production and new orders. But factories hired at the fastest pace in nine months, an encouraging sign ahead of Friday's report on March employment.

7. Unemployment Aid Applications Rise to 367,000 -

The number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits rose to a seasonally adjusted 367,000, a level consistent with only modest hiring.

Weekly applications increased last week by 4,000 from the previous week’s level of 363,000, the Labor Department said Thursday. The previous week was revised higher from an initial reading of 359,000. The four-week average, a less volatile measure, was unchanged at 375,000.

8. Contracts to Buy US Homes Fell Slightly in June -

Americans signed fewer contracts to buy previously occupied homes last month, the latest sign the housing market recovery is uneven.

The National Association of Realtors said Thursday, July 26, that its index of sales agreements fell 1.4 percent last month to 99.3. May’s reading was revised down to 100.7.

9. US Economic Data Add to Signs of Slowing Recovery -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A raft of economic news Thursday sketched a picture of a weakening U.S. economy held back by sluggish home buying and factory production.

Americans bought fewer homes in June than in May. Manufacturing in the Federal Reserve's Philadelphia region contracted for a third straight month this month. And a gauge of future U.S. economic activity fell in June.

10. Jobless Claims Rise to 386K on Seasonal Factors -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits rose by 34,000 last week, a figure that may have been skewed higher by seasonal factors.

Applications for benefits increased to a seasonally adjusted 386,000, the Labor Department said Thursday. The gain followed a drop of 24,000 the previous week and was the biggest jump since April 2011.

11. US Economy Appears Weaker as Retail Sales Slump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The outlook for the U.S. economy appeared dimmer Monday after a report that Americans spent less at retail businesses for a third straight month in June.

The report led some economists to downgrade their estimates for economic growth in the April-June quarter. Many now think the economy grew even less than in the first quarter of the year, when it expanded at a sluggish 1.9 percent annual rate.

12. US Worker Productivity Fell 0.9 Pct. Annual Rate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. worker productivity fell by the largest amount in a year from January through March. The steeper drop than first estimated suggests companies would need to hire more if demand were to pick up.

13. US Trade Gap Widens at Fastest Pace in 10 Months -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. trade deficit rose in March at the fastest rate in 10 months. A rise in consumer goods lifted imports to a record level, outpacing a solid gain in U.S. exports.

14. US Applications for Unemployment Aid Drop Sharply -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The number of people seeking unemployment benefits fell last week by the most in nearly a year. The figure was a hopeful sign that hiring could pick up in coming months.

15. US Factory Orders Up 1.3 Pct. -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Businesses ordered more machinery and equipment from U.S. factories in February, a signal that many are investing in their companies despite the expiration of a tax credit.

16. Incomes Up Strong 0.5 pct., Consumer Spending Flat -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Americans' income rose in December by the most in nine months, a hopeful sign for the economy after a year of weak wage gains. But consumers didn't spend any more than they had in November.

17. Nation Adds 200K Jobs in December Hiring Surge -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Four painful years after the Great Recession struck and wiped out 8.7 million jobs, the United States may finally be in an elusive pattern known as the virtuous cycle – an escalating loop of robust job growth, healthier spending and higher demand.

18. Contracts to Buy Homes Hit Highest Level in a Year -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The number of Americans who signed contracts to buy homes jumped in October to the highest level in a year. But the gain follows three months of declines and isn't enough to signal a housing recovery.

19. Factory Activity Slows as Economy Stays Sluggish -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. manufacturing grew more slowly in October, hampered by weaker demand for exports and slower production at factories.

But companies ordered more goods, factories slashed their stockpiles and auto sales rose. Those trends suggest manufacturing activity could rebound in coming months.

20. Report Shows Service Firms Cut Workers Last Month -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Two days before the government's much-anticipated jobs report, a snapshot of employment trends in the service sector flashed an ominous sign.

Hotels, restaurants, banks and other service companies, which employ 90 percent of Americans, reduced the size of their work forces in September, according to a survey of purchasing managers conducted by the Institute of Supply Management.

21. More People Applied for Unemployment Benefits -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The number of people seeking unemployment benefits ticked up slightly last week, evidence that the job market isn't improving.

Weekly applications for unemployment benefits rose 2,000 to a seasonally adjusted 414,000, the Labor Department said Thursday.

22. Employers Add No Net Jobs in Aug.; Rate Unchanged -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Employers stopped adding jobs in August, an alarming setback for an economy that has struggled to grow and might be at risk of another recession.

The government also reported that the unemployment rate remained at 9.1 percent. It was the weakest jobs report since September 2010.

23. Bernanke Proposes no New Steps to Boost Economy -

JACKSON HOLE, Wyo. (AP) — Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke leaned on Congress on Friday to do more to promote hiring and growth, or risk delaying the economy's return to full health.

24. Verizon Strike Boosts Unemployment Aid Requests -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Thousands of Verizon workers on strike pushed the number of people seeking unemployment benefits last week to its highest level in a month.

But excluding the work stoppage, layoffs appear to be stabilizing. That should help ease fears that the economy is on the verge of a recession.

25. AP Survey: No Recession but Weakness Will Endure -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Another U.S. recession is not likely over the next 12 months. Neither is any meaningful improvement in the economy.

That's the picture that emerges from an Associated Press survey of leading economists who have grown more pessimistic in recent weeks. They say high unemployment and weak consumer spending will hold back the U.S. economy into 2012.

26. S&P Downgrade of Long-Term US Debt Divides Experts -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Standard & Poor's decision to downgrade the credit rating of long-term U.S. debt has unleashed a flood of responses from critics and defenders.

Many critics said S&P had no business downgrading U.S. Treasurys, which remain the safest and most easily tradable investment of choice around the world. And in fact investors offered backing for that argument Monday, when they continued to pour money into U.S. Treasurys.

27. Applications for Unemployment Aid Drop Below 400K -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of people seeking unemployment benefits dropped last week to the lowest level since early April, a sign the job market may be healing after a recent slump.

28. US Service Sector Expanded at Much Slower Pace -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S economy's service sector grew last month at the slowest pace since August, renewing concerns that more expensive gas and food may be weakening growth.

Service companies, which employ 90 percent of the nation's work force, still expanded for the 17th straight month. But their growth slowed considerably because of a sharp drop in demand for their services, the Institute for Supply Management said Wednesday.

29. Businesses Ordered More Factory Goods in March -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Businesses increased their demand for industrial machinery, computers and autos in March, lifting factory orders for the fifth consecutive month.

Orders rose 3 percent in March after a 0.7 percent increase in February, the Commerce Department reported Tuesday. A key category that signals business investment plans jumped 4.1 percent after a small increase in February and a big decline in January. Excluding the volatile transportation sector, orders rose 2.6 percent.

30. Fewer People Sought Unemployment Aid Last Week -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Fewer people applied for unemployment benefits last week, resuming a downward trend that signals stronger job growth ahead.

Applications for unemployment benefits fell to a seasonally adjusted 403,000 in the week ending April 16, the Labor Department said Thursday. The decline partially reversed a jump in applications from the previous week, which economists said was largely the result of a seasonal quirk.

31. Investors Drove Home Sales Up 3.7 Pct. in March -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Investors lifted U.S. home sales last month, plunking down cash to grab cheap homes at risk of foreclosure. But purchases made by first-time homebuyers fell, a troubling sign for the weak housing market.

32. New-Home Construction Increases 7.2 Pct. in March -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Builders broke ground on more new homes last month, giving the weak housing market a slight boost at the start of the spring buying season.

Home construction rose 7.2 percent in March from February to a seasonally adjusted 549,000 units, the Commerce Department said Tuesday. Building permits, an indicator of future construction, rose 11.2 percent after hitting a five-decade low in February.

33. Fewer People Sought Unemployment Aid Last Week -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Fewer people applied for unemployment benefits last week, a sign that layoffs are dropping and companies may be stepping up hiring.

The Labor Department said Thursday that the number of people seeking benefits dipped by 6,000 to a seasonally adjusted 388,000 for the week that ended March 26. That's the second decline in three weeks.

34. Fewer Americans Apply for Unemployment Benefits -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Fewer Americans applied for unemployment benefits last week, providing support for the view that there will be stronger job growth this year.

Applications fell to a seasonally adjusted 385,000 last week, marking the third decline in the past four weeks, the Labor Department reported Thursday.

35. Strong Economic Data Point to More Hiring -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Factories are producing more cars, computers and household appliances, and applications for unemployment benefits over the past four weeks are at the lowest point since summer 2008.

36. New-Home Sales in January Drop 12.6 Pct -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sales of new homes fell significantly in January, a dismal sign after the worst year for that sector in nearly a half-century.

New-home sales dropped to a seasonally adjusted rate of 284,000 homes last month, the Commerce Department said Thursday. That's down from 325,000 in December and less than half the 600,000-a-year pace that economists view as healthy.

37. Home Prices Hit Post-Bust Lows in Most Big Cities -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Home prices in a majority of major U.S. cities tracked by a private trade group have fallen to their lowest levels since the housing bubble burst, and analysts expect further declines this year.

38. Tax Cuts Raise Expectations for Economy in 2011 -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Expectations for economic growth next year are turning more optimistic now that Americans will have a little more cash in their pockets.

A cut in workers' Social Security taxes and rising consumer spending have led economists to predict a strong start for 2011.

39. Economy Grew Modestly in July-September Quarter -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The economy grew at a moderate pace last summer, reflecting stronger spending by businesses to replenish stockpiles. More recent barometers suggest the economy is gaining momentum in the final months of the year.

40. Home Starts Rise Slightly, Building Permits Fall -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Home construction rose slightly last month on the strength of single-family homes, but the market was still too weak to propel growth in the battered industry.

Construction of new homes and apartments rose 0.3 percent in September from a month earlier to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 610,000, the Commerce Department said. It was the strongest report on home construction since April.

41. May Home Sales Dip as Housing Market Struggles -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The housing market may be on the verge of taking another plunge that could weaken the broader economic recovery.

Sales of previously occupied homes dipped in May, even though buyers could receive government tax credits. And nearly a third of sales in May were from foreclosures or other distressed properties. That means home prices could soon be heading down after stabilizing over the past year.

42. Homebuilders Less Confident In Housing Market -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Homebuilders are losing confidence in the housing market now that government incentives that spurred home sales have ended.

The National Association of Home Builders reported Tuesday its housing market index fell to 17 in June, sinking five points after two straight months of increases. It was the lowest level since March.

43. New Home Sales Hit a Low; Durable Goods Orders Up -

WASHINGTON (AP) - Sales of new homes fell unexpectedly to their lowest point on record in February, in part because stormy winter weather kept buyers away. The results pointed to the U.S. housing industry's struggle to rebound from the worst slump in decades.

44. Factory Orders Rise 0.9 Percent in September -

WASHINGTON (AP) - Orders to U.S. factories rebounded in September, helped by strength in autos, heavy machinery and military aircraft.

The fifth increase in six months bolstered hopes that a revival in manufacturing will help support an overall economic recovery. The worry is that if consumer spending falters in coming months, orders will slump again.

45. Housing, Jobless Data Point To Fragile Recovery -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Housing construction rose in August and the number of newly laid-off workers seeking unemployment aid fell unexpectedly last week, adding to signs the recession has ended.

Still, the reports suggested a slow and fragile economic recovery. In part, that’s because the increased housing starts were due solely to a surge in construction of apartment buildings – while the much larger single-family homes sector fell for the first time in six months. And jobless claims remain far above the levels associated with a healthy economy.

46. Trade, Jobless Claims Figures Show Recession Fades -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. trade deficit in July hit the highest level in six months as a record rise in imports outpaced a third straight increase in foreign demand for American products, according to government data released Thursday. Both gains provided more evidence the worst recession since the 1930s was losing its grip on the global economy.

47. Industrial Production Up for 1st Time in 9 Months -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Production from the nation’s factories, mines and utilities rose more than expected in July, with the first gain in nine months driven by increased output from auto companies.

48. Pending Home Sales Up Fourth Straight Month -

U.S. pending home sales rose in May for the fourth straight month, spurred by low prices and a first-time homebuyers tax credit, fresh evidence that the housing sector may be recovering.

The National Association of Realtors reported Wednesday that its seasonally adjusted index of pending sales increased by 0.1 percent in May to 90.7. Analysts expected no change, according to Thomson Reuters.

49. US New Home Sales Dip 0.6 Percent -

New U.S. home sales fell slightly last month, in another sign that the housing market’s recovery is likely to be gradual and prolonged.

The U.S. Commerce Department reported Wednesday that sales dropped 0.6 percent in May to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 342,000, from a downwardly revised April rate of 344,000. Sales were down nearly 33 percent from May last year.

50. Jobless Benefit Rolls Drop Sharply -

The total number of people on the unemployment insurance rolls dropped for the first time since early January, the government reported Thursday, while new claims for benefits rose slightly.

The report shows that job losses are easing after companies made deep cuts earlier this year. But nearly half of recipients at the end of last month had exhausted the 26 weeks of benefits provided under the regular state program without finding work, according to U.S. Labor Department data. That’s a record and compared with about 36 percent in December 2007, when the recession began.

51. ISM: US Service Economy Shrinks More Slowly in May -

NEW YORK (AP) – The U.S. service sector shrank last month at the slowest pace since late last year and orders to U.S. factory orders rose in April, but the improvements were incremental and economists say a real recovery will be long and slow.

52. Manufacturing Index Beats Expectations -

On the same day of manufacturing icon General Motors Corp.’s bankruptcy filing, reports on the industrial sector from around the globe seemed to show the sector on the mend.

53. FASB Gives Firms More Leeway in Valuing Assets -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The board that sets U.S. accounting standards on Thursday gave companies more leeway when valuing assets and reporting losses, providing a potential boost to battered banks’ balance sheets.

54. January Existing Home Sales Fall by 5.3 Percent -

Sales of existing homes unexpectedly plunged in January to the lowest level in nearly 12 years as pessimism about the economy grew and buyers waited for President Barack Obama’s plan to help revive the U.S. housing market.

55. Manufacturing Index Rises From Record Low -

A private measure of the manufacturing sector’s health for January rose from a record low, but still posted the 12th straight month of contraction amid a global recession.

The Institute for Supply Management, a trade group of purchasing executives, reported Monday that its U.S. manufacturing index rose to 35.6 in January from an upwardly revised 32.9 in December. The January reading was above the 32.6 that economists surveyed by Thomson Reuters had expected.

56. New Home Sales Post 14.7% Drop in December -

Sales of new homes plunged to the slowest pace on record last month as the hobbled homebuilding industry posted its worst annual sales results in more than two decades.

The U.S. Commerce Department reported Thursday that new home sales fell 14.7 percent in December to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 331,000, from a downwardly revised November figure of 388,000.

57. Continuing Jobless Claims Rise More Than Expected -

The number of people continuing to seek unemployment benefits has risen sharply, according to government data released Thursday, indicating that laid-off workers are having a harder time finding new jobs as the recession enters its second year.

58. Fannie, Freddie Sink On Capital Concerns -

Shares of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac fell Wednesday amid continuing fears the mortgage finance companies will be forced to sell more new shares than anticipated to compensate for losses from the housing slump.

59. Realtors Group Maintains Upbeat Housing Forecast as November Index of Pending Sales Slips -

WASHINGTON (AP) - Pending U.S. home sales dipped in November, a trade group for real estate agents said Tuesday, but it expects the sales pace to pick up significantly in the second half of 2008.

60. Near-Term Home Sales IndexSees August Decline -      An index that forecasts near-term home sales fell in August to a record low as would-be homebuyers had difficulty getting mortgages. Economists said the housing market's woes show no sign of improving soon.
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