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Editorial Results (free)

1. Road to Better Mass Transit -

Picking a new transit chief is critical for a city in transition.

Next year, Nashville residents will elect a new mayor and turn over its large Metro Council.

Davidson County also expects some 200,000 new residents over the next 20 years, and much of the success of future development will depend on the ease of navigating around Nashville – already the nation’s second-worst area for sprawl, according to Smart Growth America.

2. New Chief Justice Echoes Haslam Mantra on Review -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – First, the state Supreme Court hired Gov. Bill Haslam's top legal adviser as Tennessee's next attorney general. Now the high court's new chief justice is also adopting the Republican governor's rhetoric.

3. Hilton Donates $7,500 to Hope House -

Memphis-based Hilton Worldwide has donated $7,500 to Hope House as a part of the company’s ongoing community relations efforts.

Opened in 1995, Hope House focuses on improving the quality of life for area families affected by HIV and AIDS. It serves almost 50 children and 150 adults through programs such as childcare, counseling, education, medical support and parent support groups.

4. Coverage Gap Leaves Rural Tennessee Hospitals on Life Support -

Four rural hospitals have closed and dozens are at risk of shuttering: That’s the fallout, some say, from Gov. Bill Haslam’s decision not to join the Affordable Care Act in 2013 and tap into millions in promised federal funds for Tennessee’s financially-strapped health care institutions.

5. Will More Rentals Slow Rising Home Prices? -

Hardly a day goes by that a residential real estate broker is not asked: “When will it end?”

Elliot Eisenberg, Ph.D., authors Elliot Eisenberg’s Brief Blog and sends it daily to subscribers. Here’s what he had to say on the subject in his August 25 edition:

6. Middle Tennessee State’s Goal: Students Graduating on Time -

Tennessee’s higher education funding formula is based largely on retaining students, and Middle Tennessee State University plans to stay focused on student support in 2014.

The university initiated the “Quest for Student Success” in October 2013 in an effort to keep students on track and boost its 52 percent graduation rate to 62 percent by 2020.

7. Reshaping a City, One Lot at a Time -

John G. Brittle Jr. doesn’t have an office. He has a war room. The space, crowded with maps, charts, books, piles of paper and marked-up spreadsheets, is ground zero for InfillNashville, the 10-person team of site selection specialists that Brittle leads at Village Real Estate Services.

8. Events -

Church Health Center Wellness and Bring It Food Hub will hold a Bring It, Cook It, Take It cooking class Thursday, Aug. 14, at 5:30 p.m. at 1115 Union Ave. The class will include cooking demonstrations using fresh produce, plus tastings and recipes. Cost is $5 and includes a bag of produce. Visit churchhealthcenter.org.

9. Roast of the Town -

If you catch Jimmy Lewis these days and get him talking about coffee roasting, chances are he might never stop.

10. Lawsuit Over Nineteenth Century Club Dropped -

The Union Avenue building that once housed the Nineteenth Century Club could soon meet the wrecking ball.

A plaintiff seeking to stop the planned demolition of the once-stately mansion has dropped the appeal of a lawsuit challenging the legality of the sale of the property, removing a major obstacle to its proposed redevelopment.

11. Lawsuit Over Nineteenth Century Club Dropped -

The Union Avenue building that once housed the Nineteenth Century Club could soon meet the wrecking ball.

A plaintiff seeking to stop the planned demolition of the once-stately mansion has dropped the appeal of a lawsuit challenging the legality of the sale of the property, removing a major obstacle to its proposed redevelopment.

12. Lawsuit Over Sale of Nineteenth Century Club Dropped -

The Union Avenue building that once housed the Nineteenth Century Club could soon meet the wrecking ball.

Plaintiffs seeking to stop the planned demolition of the once-stately mansion have dropped their appeal of a lawsuit challenging the legality of the sale of the property, removing a major obstacle to the property's proposed redevelopment.

13. Anti-Meth Law Among Those Taking Effect July 1 -

NASHVILLE (AP) – A law limiting the purchase of cold and allergy medicines used to make illegal methamphetamine is among those taking effect Tuesday, as are statutes that require more disclosure from the Tennessee Department of Children's Services and allow use of the electric chair to execute death row inmates.

14. Events -

Hattiloo Theatre will hold a free season nine community grand opening Saturday, June 28, from 8 a.m. to midnight in its new Overton Square theater, 37 S. Cooper St. Events include performances, tours, concerts and more. Tickets to each event are on a first-come/first-served basis. Visit hattiloo.org/grand-opening-season-9.php for schedule.

15. Events -

Stax Music Academy, Stax Museum and Memphis Public Library will host Steve Cropper, guitarist for Booker T. & the MGs, for a Soul & Blues Brown Bag Series concert and Q&A Friday, June 27, at noon in the amphitheater behind the academy, 926 E. McLemore Ave. Visit staxmuseum.com.

16. White House Wants Delay in DOD Immigration Plan -

The White House has asked the Department of Defense to delay a plan that would allow some immigrants who entered the U.S. illegally as children to obtain a limited path to citizenship by serving in the military.

17. Medical Makeover -

After suffering from years of benign neglect, a new, more invigorated Memphis Medical Center is finally beginning to take shape.

A drive or walk around the area these days shows the hallmarks of a changing landscape – bulldozers, backhoes, cranes and construction crews working feverishly to forge the new urban environment.

18. House Votes to Make Research Tax Credit Permanent -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The House voted Friday to make permanent a tax credit that rewards businesses for investing in research and development, pushing Congress toward an election-year showdown over a series of expired tax breaks that are popular back home but add billions to the budget deficit.

19. Congress Considers Bill for Women's History Museum -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Citing history textbooks, national parks and landmarks that mostly leave women out, lawmakers Wednesday are reviving a long-stalled effort to create a National Women's History Museum in the nation's capital.

20. Heisley’s Legacy: Believing in Memphis -

It is said that the famous have their lives summed up in the first paragraph of their public obituary.

The first sentence from a recent obit in The New York Times read: “Michael Heisley, the billionaire financier, who bought the N.B.A.’s floundering Vancouver Grizzlies in April 2000 and soon moved them to Memphis, where he revitalized the franchise, died on Saturday in Illinois. He was 77.”

21. Events -

New Ballet Ensemble & School will present “Springloaded” Friday, April 25, through Sunday, April 27, at the Kroc Center, 800 East Parkway S. Dancers will perform “Coppelia ReMix” and other new works featuring a fusion of dance styles. Buy tickets at newballet.org.

22. Events -

Dining Out for Life will be held Thursday, April 24. Participating Memphis restaurants will donate a portion of proceeds from the day’s sales to Friends for Life. Visit diningoutforlife.com/memphis for a list of participating restaurants.

23. Hope House Golf Classic to be Held April 28 -

The Hope House Classic will be held Monday, April 28, at Chickasaw Country Club, 3395 Galloway Ave., to raise funding for programs and services that Hope House provides for children and families affected by HIV.

24. Hope House Golf Classic to be Held April 28 -

The Hope House Classic will be held Monday, April 28, at Chickasaw Country Club, 3395 Galloway Ave., to raise funding for programs and services that Hope House provides for children and families affected by HIV.

25. Open Gun Carry Sponsor Moves for Full House Vote -

NASHVILLE (AP) – The House sponsor of a bill seeking to remove permit requirements to carry guns openly in Tennessee wants to bypass committees and hold a full floor vote on the measure.

26. End of Windows XP Support Spells Trouble for Some -

NEW YORK (AP) – Microsoft will end support for the persistently popular Windows XP on Tuesday, and with an estimated 30 percent of businesses and consumers still using the 12-year-old operating system, the move could put everything from the operations of heavy industry to the identities of everyday people in danger.

27. Keep Hope Alive for Next Generation -

Teilhard de Chardin, the controversial French philosopher and Jesuit priest, once said, “The future belongs to those who give the next generation reason for hope.”

He was controversial, as are most visionaries, because his insights reduced the complex to the simple, the difficult to the achievable. Long before there was a plethora of slogans to promote achievement, Chardin was a champion of potential, of unlimited possibilities, of the evolution of personal goals, of always going from good to great. But hope – what’s hope have to do with that next generation who are sitting in classrooms across our country? Actually, hope has everything to do with it. Hope gives a future orientation to students who are bored at school.

28. Where There’s Smoke -

DON’T WAIT FOR THE FIRE TO FIND THE WATER. Neglect and denial burns in empty buildings and blighted neighborhoods, futures are hazy, moods are dark and the smoke from all of it chokes cities and sends those able to flee to greener ground at the edges, leaving behind a bitter landscape, a smoldering threat.

29. Events -

Germantown Performing Arts Center will host “action hero” performers STREB Saturday, March 29, at 8 p.m. and Sunday, March 30, at 3 p.m. at GPAC, 1801 Exeter Road. Buy tickets at gpacweb.com.

30. Events -

The Gavel Club of Memphis will meet for a Dutch treat lunch Friday, March 28, at 11:30 a.m. in the Holiday Inn University of Memphis Medallion Room, 3700 Central Ave. Nancy Crawford of the Better Business Bureau of the Mid-South will speak. Call 494-8639.

31. Clash of Contenders -

Shelby County Commissioner Steve Mulroy says his political plans last year didn’t include running for county mayor in 2014.

He was on U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen’s short list of recommendations for an open federal judgeship, a White House appointment he said he knew he might not get “the first time.”

32. Registration Still Open For Hope House 5K -

Hope House will hold its 15th Annual Help for Hope 5K at Harbor Town Square on Friday, March 28, at 6:30 p.m. Registration is open for walkers and runners.

Participants can register as individuals or as a group. All participants will receive a long-sleeve T-shirt, and food, drinks and musical entertainment will be provided after the race. The entry fee for individual runners is $30 before March 28 or $35 at race registration. Memphis Runners Track Club members can register for $25 before March 28 or for $30 at the race. Groups of 10 or more can register for $25 each. Registration at the 5K begins at 5 p.m.

33. Congress Confronts Medicare Cuts to Doctors' Fees -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Hope is fading for a Capitol Hill drive to permanently fix Medicare's outdated payment formula and spare doctors from automatic cuts in their fees next month. Now the question is whether lawmakers can regroup and come up with a short-term solution when the current patch expires.

34. Jeb Bush: Follow Through on Common Core Standards -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush on Wednesday urged state officials to follow through on Common Core education standards despite what he called an "avalanche" of criticism from those who oppose them.

35. ‘Champion of Working Man’ Rep. Turner Set to Retire -

State Rep. and Nashville Democrat Mike Turner is retiring from the General Assembly and considering a run for mayor.

36. ‘Bigger and Better’ -

At a benefit concert earlier this month at Evergreen Presbyterian Church for the financially struggling Memphis Symphony Orchestra, one audience member was noticeably moved during a performance of “Capriccio Espagnol,” a piece based on Spanish folk melodies from the late 1800s by Nikolai Rismky-Korsakov.

37. Making a Difference -

It’s a strange thing, acknowledges Memphis businessman Taylor Berger, to form an organization that you don’t necessarily want to be that organized.

38. Tennessee Lawmakers to Take Up Tuition Equality Bill -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Supporters of legislation to make children of people living in the country illegally eligible for in-state tuition say the proposal is fair and would benefit the state's economy.

39. Lawmakers Seek Compromise on School Voucher Bill -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Lawmakers trying to decide on a limited school voucher program in Tennessee or a broader one say they're close to reaching an agreement on legislation.

Republican Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris of Collierville is carrying a proposal for Republican Gov. Bill Haslam that's limited to students from low-income families attending the bottom 5 percent of failing schools. He had that measure withdrawn last year when Senate Republicans sought to expand to a larger number of children.

40. Gresham Tackles Hot Issues on Senate Education Committee -

As chair of the Tennessee Senate Education Committee, Sen. Dolores Gresham has plenty of hot-button issues crossing her desk these days.

41. Haslam: Remove Higher Education Barriers -

When Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam outlined an endowment from Tennessee lottery reserve funds to offer two years of community college free to all Tennesseans graduating high school – a plan he presented during his State of the State address Monday, Feb. 3 – it was a concept that had been years in the making.

42. More Than 30 Seconds -

It’s official. Super Bowl advertising is no longer a one-night event. The marketing strategies that reigned supreme in Super Bowl XLVIII took the better part of January to accomplish and are still unfolding online even this week.

43. Obama Asks CEOs for Help Hiring Long-Term Jobless -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Confronting an economic recovery slowed by persistent joblessness, President Barack Obama on Friday won commitments from nearly 300 companies to reach out to the nearly 4 million Americans who have been jobless for half a year or more.

44. Obama to Release 2015 Budget March 4 -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The White House says that President Barack Obama's budget for next year will be released on March 4, about one month behind schedule.

Budget office spokesman Steve Posner says the release will be late because Congress was late to finish up an omnibus spending bill for the current fiscal year. He said that action means the administration can now wrap up work on its budget tome.

45. Germantown Planning Commission OKs Plan for Whole Foods -

Developers on Tuesday, Jan. 7, cleared a key regulatory hurdle for a planned Whole Foods Market store in Germantown.

Before a packed house, the Germantown Planning Commission voted to approve a revamped plan for a new Whole Foods store at the southeast corner of the intersection of Poplar Avenue and Pete Mitchell Road, on the eastern edge of Germantown’s Central Business District.

46. New Prospects in 2014 for an Immigration Overhaul -

WASHINGTON (AP) – His agenda tattered by last year's confrontations and missteps, President Barack Obama begins 2014 clinging to the hope of winning a lasting legislative achievement: an overhaul of immigration laws.

47. Retirement Unlikely for Some Blue-Collar Americans -

Tom Edwards grew up in a family that's been cutting trees and hauling timber in the Pacific Northwest for more than a century. The Spanaway, Wash., resident says he has worked as a logger since he was a kid – it's just what an able-bodied youngster was expected to do.

48. Congress Letting 55 Tax Breaks Expire at Year End -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In an almost annual ritual, Congress is letting a package of 55 popular tax breaks expire at the end of the year, creating uncertainty – once again – for millions of individuals and businesses.

49. US Economy Expands at 4.1 Percent Rate -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy grew at a solid 4.1 percent annual rate from July through September, the fastest pace since late 2011 and significantly higher than previously thought. Much of the upward revision came from stronger consumer spending.

50. Health Care Debate Has Trust, Politics Themes, Too -

WASHINGTON (AP) – For months, the talk was all about computer code. About response times. About glitches and bugs.

People who didn't know a URL from an http were blithely expounding on software snags and web design, thanks to the clunky launch of healthcare.gov, the insurance marketplace for the government's big health care overhaul.

51. Union Mission Heightens Outreach During Holidays -

Memphis Union Mission is ramping up its efforts to help the homeless during the holiday season.

The nonprofit group just completed its annual Thanksgiving event late last month to feed the homeless, and preparations are underway for meals and services on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day.

52. Soulful Synergy -

What happened at the corner of McLemore Avenue and College Street in the 1960s is nothing short of extraordinary.

At the crossroads of segregated neighborhoods in South Memphis, two white business partners would open the doors wide to whites and blacks alike, who congregated to write and record songs that would set off a soul explosion heard around the world.

53. Renewal of Life -

LOOK FOR THE WONDER. REPEAT. I wrote about this last year. This year, just last week, it happened again.

Right outside my window is a ginkgo tree, and another on the other side of the house. Every fall they engage in an ancient mating dance, a spectacular competition for attention. So exhausting is the effort, it doesn’t last long. So intense is the result, it’s explosive. And then it’s gone, leaving only a memory.

54. Americans Not Willing to Spend Without Deals -

NEW YORK (AP) – This holiday season, Americans may not spend their green unless they see more red.

Despite signs that the economy is improving, big store chains like Wal-Mart and Kohl's don't expect Americans to have much holiday shopping cheer unless they see bold, red signs that offer huge discounts. As a result, shoppers are seeing big sales events earlier and more often than in previous holiday seasons.

55. Gonitzke Named CEO of National Foundation for Transplants -

Connie Gonitzke has been appointed president and CEO of the National Foundation for Transplants. Gonitzke joined the Memphis-based organization in 2002 as a patient advocate. In 2006, she was named director of resource development, and in 2008, she became the senior vice president of development.

56. Ending Tax Breaks Eyed as Way to Ease Budget Cuts -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Democrats' new mantra in budget talks is to close tax loopholes for certain businesses, investors and professionals as a way to raise more revenue to help ease autopilot spending cuts that soon are to become more painful.

57. ‘Hoarders’ Star Partners With ServiceMaster -

“Hoarders” television personality and Clutter Cleaner owner Matt Paxton met this week with ServiceMaster Clean and Restore franchisees and staff at the ServiceMaster Training Academy to discuss their newly formed partnership and examine hoarding, which has been officially listed as a mental disorder by the American Psychiatric Association.

58. ‘Pastor Larry’ Inspires at Sober House -

When you look at the big picture of poverty, homelessness, and under-education in this country, or here in Memphis, it appears rather bleak. However, when you focus on the individual efforts being made to combat those societal ills that are bending the cycle of poverty to the breaking point, from where I sit, the big picture is looking better all the time.

59. Campus Connections -

The University of Memphis is in the early stages of updating its campus master plan, and it will seek input from its neighbors as it moves into its next century of higher education.

The U of M has hired the Smith Group JJR of Ann Arbor, Mich., to lead the effort with Memphis-based LRK Inc. serving as the local partner.

60. Current Elections Merge With Future Campaigns -

The campaigns for elections in 2013 are beginning to overlap with campaigns on the ballot in 2014.

The set of 11 elections in three months ends with the Nov. 21 special general election for state House District 91 and a citywide referendum on a half percent sales tax hike.

61. Chafetz Helps Businesses Navigate Financial Straits -

When the economy took a swan dive five years ago, many companies found themselves on the bargain basement rack.

They weren’t all eager to be sold, however, nor were those flush with cash willing to immediately open the corporate pocketbook.

62. ‘Intertwined’ -

In 2007, the Grizzlies were no longer a novelty in Memphis. They also were no longer a playoff team. Rather, they were a punch line lost in the expansive blue and gray shadow of the University of Memphis and a fast-talking operator/coach named John Calipari.

63. Retailers Face Season of Uncertainty -

NEW YORK (AP) – Will Washington be the Grinch who stole Christmas?

After weeks of bickering between Congress and the White House, President Barack Obama on Wednesday signed into law a plan that ended a partial 16-day government shutdown and suspended the nation's debt limit until early next year.

64. World Welcomes US Budget Deal but Fears Remain -

LONDON (AP) – The world's disbelief at the political impasse in the U.S. turned to cautious relief Thursday as the country stepped back from the brink of default. But fears remain about another possible shutdown – and, even worse, a possible default – early next year.

65. Shutdown Over, Obama Surveys Damage and Blames GOP -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The government unlocked its doors Thursday after 16 days, with President Barack Obama saluting the resolution of Congress' bitter standoff but lambasting Republicans for the partial shutdown that he said had damaged the U.S. economy and America's credibility around the world.

66. Another Deadline Issued in Nineteenth Century Club Case -

The court case over the future of the Midtown mansion known as the Nineteenth Century Club has been issued another deadline.

The plaintiffs in the Chancery Court case, which is now on appeal, have until Nov. 1 at 10 a.m. to raise an additional $50,000 in a court bond if they hope to stay demolition pending appeal.

67. A Deal: Voting to Avoid Default, Open Government -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Up against one last deadline, Congress raced to pass legislation Wednesday avoiding a threatened national default and ending a 16-day partial government shutdown along the strict terms set by President Barack Obama when the twin crises began.

68. Officials: New Park Could Put West Tennessee on Map -

UNION CITY, Tenn. (AP) – As a new $80 million Discovery Park of America nears opening day, officials in western Tennessee hope the attraction helps put the area on the tourism map.

Tennessee Tourism Commissioner Susan Whitaker told The Paducah Sun that adding the park will allow the area on the Kentucky-Tennessee state line to become a tourism destination. Whitaker says the area combines history, education and entertainment in one experience.

69. Obama Administration Projected Strong Health Plan Signups -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Obama administration's internal projections called for strong enrollment in the states in the first year of new health insurance markets, according to unpublished estimates obtained by The Associated Press. Whether those expectations will bear out is unclear.

70. As Shutdown Drags On, Time to Call in Mediator? -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Maybe it's time to call in a mediator – if there's one not on furlough.

President Barack Obama and congressional Republicans are in stalemate over a partial government shutdown now in its second week. And a looming crisis over the federal debt limit is rapidly approaching, with economists saying that could have a devastating effect on the U.S. economy.

71. Room Service -

Hilton Worldwide celebrates its second Global Week of Service this week, and more than 700 Hilton employees are working locally on community involvement projects, such as this year’s signature event at the Pilgrim’s Rest housing facility, 747 Court Ave.

72. Chisley Named CEO of Methodist North Hospital -

Gyasi C. Chisley has joined Methodist North Hospital as CEO. In his new role, Chisley will lead thousands of associates and aligned and contracted medical staff. He says that as health care transitions from volume to value, his platform is to grow outpatient practices, physicians and services while creating a viable patient-centered environment.

73. Events -

The fifth annual Mike Conley Bowl-n-Bash, benefiting the Methodist Healthcare Comprehensive Sickle Cell Center, will be held Saturday, Sept. 28, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. at Billy Hardwick’s All Star Lanes, 1576 S. White Station Road. Individual tickets are $125; teams of four are $500. Visit methodisthealth.org/bowlnbash to register.

74. Crime Prevention -

There are lots of teddy bears and other stuffed animals in the Riverside neighborhood declared the city’s first no-gang zone this week by a General Sessions Environmental Court order.

A large cluster of the toys are attached and strapped to a large tree that shades the gang graffiti-scarred abandoned house at the corner of Farrington Street and Hollowell Avenue.

75. US Borrowing Authority to be Exhausted by Oct. 17 -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew said Wednesday the government will have exhausted its borrowing authority by Oct. 17, leaving the United States just $30 billion cash on hand to pay its bills.

76. New Study Warns of US Long-Term Debt Problems -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The government could run out of cash to pay its bills in full and on time sometime between the end of October and the middle of November if lawmakers fail to increase its $16.7 trillion borrowing cap, Congressional Budget Office Director Doug Elmendorf said on Tuesday.

77. Prescription for Success -

It’s been nearly a decade since the Memphis medical community and city leaders teamed up to create a master plan for what they called the Memphis Medical Center.

The district – which follows the main corridors of Union and Madison avenues and extends from Danny Thomas Boulevard to Cleveland Street and from Peabody Avenue to the Interstate 240 loop – already was home to more than 40 organizations that specialized in everything from clinical care to research. But the Memphis Medical Center organizers wanted to improve safety and promote overall economic development, including commercial, retail and residential real estate.

78. Groups Race to Hire, Train 'Obamacare' Guides -

CHICAGO (AP) – With the program known as "Obamacare" only weeks away from its key launch date, hectic preparations are in motion in communities across the country to deal with one of its major practical challenges: hiring and training a small army of instant experts who can explain the intricacies of health insurance to people who've never had it.

79. Affordable Aging -

The cost of caring for family members and loved ones as they age can become overwhelming if not planned for properly.

Stellar Home Care and Page Robbins Adult Day Care Center are offering families less-expensive alternatives that allow them to keep their loved ones in their homes longer.

80. Orion Gives Back to Local Community -

Orion Federal Credit Union is making a big difference throughout the Mid-South area with its Orion Gives Back community involvement program, working with a diverse range of local nonprofit organizations and helping to shine a light on their various missions.

81. Views of Memphis -

SURPRISE. THERE’S A BOOK. A couple of years ago, friend Willy Bearden – storyteller, writer, historian, filmmaker and lead singer in the Earnestine & Hazel House Band – and I worked on a project for Elmwood Cemetery. Willy scripted and produced a combination walking/driving tour of that magic ground and I voiced it, spending hours poring over the script with Willy and recording every word of it.

82. Rhodes Program Spotlights Community Service -

Rhodes College’s efforts to make community involvement an important part of student life was recently on display with its second annual REACH (Research, Engagement, and Community History) Symposium held in the Blount Auditorium of Buckman Hall.

83. Probe May Cause Issues for More Than DHS Official -

WASHINGTON (AP) – An internal investigation of President Barack Obama's choice to be the No. 2 official at the Homeland Security Department has the potential to become a political headache for former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and the Democratic candidate for governor in Virginia.

84. Entry Point -

The city of Germantown is embarking on an effort to guide growth and development of the city’s western gateway corridor for the next 20 years.

The planning area encompasses the Poplar Avenue corridor at the city’s western gateway, paying special attention to proposed development opportunities, improvements to Poplar Avenue and Kirby and a new set of regulations designed to guide development.

85. Labor of Love -

One morning a few days ago, Jeff Hulett woke up earlier than usual.

His days frequently are a blur of activity – given that he’s a PR and communications coordinator for the Church Health Center, as well as a husband and father – and on this particular morning he wanted to squeeze in some time to himself playing guitar.

86. Immigration Backers Plan Push for Reform -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Backers of comprehensive immigration legislation are gearing up for a campaign to push the House to act, even as some begin openly voicing fears they're already losing the fight.

87. Green Shoots -

The busiest time of the year along the Shelby Farms Greenline is also the busiest time of the year for Cheffie’s, an example of a business that is a direct beneficiary of being near the Tillman Street end of the greenline that extends east to Shelby Farms Park.

88. GOP Wants Delay in Health Law's Individual Mandate -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Framing a new argument against President Barack Obama's health care law, congressional GOP leaders called Tuesday for a delay in the law's requirement that individual Americans carry health insurance.

89. Potter Resets Hearing for Nineteenth Century Club -

Environmental Court Judge Larry Potter said Monday, June 24, that he hopes the new owners of the historic Nineteenth Century Club building on Union Avenue will preserve the decaying structure.

90. Potter Resets Hearing for Nineteenth Century Club -

Environmental Court Judge Larry Potter said Monday, June 24, that he hopes the new owners of the historic Nineteenth Century Club building on Union Avenue will preserve the decaying structure.

91. Events -

Lipscomb Pitts Breakfast Club will hold a Female Business Leader Lunch Thursday, June 20, from noon to 1:30 p.m. at Napa Cafe, 5101 Sanderlin Ave., suite 122. R.S.V.P. to rsvp.lpbc@lpinsurance.com.

92. Events -

The Rebel on Beale summer country music concert series will kick off with Emerson Drive Thursday, June 20, at 7:30 p.m. in W.C. Handy Park at Beale and South Third streets. Cost is free. Visit rebel953.com.

93. Lee House Renovation ‘Ready to Go’ -

The group that wanted to convert the historic James Lee House in Victorian Village has purchased the home and construction is expected to begin in the next few weeks.

94. Internet Sales Tax Bill to Hit Roadblock in House -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A bill to require Internet shoppers to pay sales taxes for online purchases may be cruising through the Senate but it will soon hit a roadblock in the House.

"There's a lot of political difficulty getting through the fog of it looking like a tax increase," said Rep. Steve Womack, R-Ark., one of the main sponsors of the bill in the House.

95. Hope House Operating at Half Capacity -

Hope House, a Memphis nonprofit that assists children and families impacted by HIV and poverty, is operating at half capacity due to lack of funding.

Last year, 65 area children were born HIV-positive, making them eligible to receive Hope House services. But without funding, all 65 children may not be able to receive the early childhood education that could have a major impact on their lives, says Craig Locke, director of development at Hope House.

96. House Panel Advances Welfare Penalty for Parents -

NASHVILLE (AP) – A Tennessee House committee on Tuesday recommended passing a bill that would dock the welfare payments of parents of children who fail at a school despite Republican Gov. Bill Haslam's opposition to the measure.

97. Call to Action -

Robert F. Kennedy Jr.’s famous father was a political iconoclast who captured the imagination of voters with stirring assurances in his speeches like, “Each time a man stands up for an ideal, he sends a tiny ripple of hope out into the world.”

98. Obama to Nominate Package of Labor Board Members -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama on Tuesday nominated three candidates for full terms on the National Labor Relations Board, which has been in limbo since a federal appeals court invalidated his recess appointments to the agency.

99. White House Celebrates the Sounds of Memphis Soul -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A White House celebration Tuesday night of Memphis soul music is an affirmation of the decades of hard work that went into making it a classic American music sound, said some of the artists tapped to perform.

100. Hope House Operating at Half Capacity -

Hope House, a Memphis nonprofit that assists children and families impacted by HIV and poverty, is operating at half capacity due to lack of funding.

Last year, 65 area children were born HIV-positive, making them eligible to receive Hope House services. But without funding, all 65 children may not be able to receive the early childhood education that could have a major impact on their lives, says Craig Locke, director of development at Hope House.