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Editorial Results (free)

1. Stonewall Jackson's Little Slice of Heaven in Brentwood -

“Everybody has to meet his Waterloo,” sings honky-tonk hero Stonewall Jackson in his breakthrough No. 1 hit back in 1959.

Of course, that line, the entire song really, means everybody must meet his or her fate someday.

2. After the Campaign -

The 2014 election year began in January with dissent from the floor.

At the end of the Shelby County Democratic Party’s annual Kennedy Day fundraiser in January, former Memphis City Council member and state Rep. Carol Chumney, who was not among the speakers, challenged the party establishment from her table to do more to support women running for office.

3. Holden’s Hat -

FINDING MEMPHIS. Last week the Church of the Holy Communion inaugurated a reading group called Words, and enticed an eclectic baker’s dozen of participants with Muddy’s cupcakes. I can’t speak for the rest, but I’ve worked for much less.

4. Wharton’s Hybrid Pension Falls in Council -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s hybrid pension proposal, the second of two parts of his overhaul of city employee benefits, was voted down Tuesday, Nov. 18, by the Memphis City Council in a bid by some on the council to end “uncertainty” among city employees.

5. Analysts: How GOP Congress Could Boost US Economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Voters made clear Tuesday that they're worried about the economy, despite steady job gains, a robust stock market and faster economic growth this year.

So what can – and should – the now-dominant Republicans in Congress and President Barack Obama do together to benefit more Americans?

6. Skip Check-In; Latest Hotel Room Key is Your Phone -

NEW YORK (AP) – Hotels don't want guests to have to linger at the front desk – or even stop by at all.

New programs are helping speed up the check-in process for busy travelers, or in at least one case, letting them go straight to their rooms by using their smartphone to unlock doors.

7. Rivals Gear Up for Next Round of Tennessee Whiskey War -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The passage of several months since a heated legislative debate over the legal definition of Tennessee whiskey has done little to mellow the dispute between two global liquor giants and the growing number of craft distillers caught between them.

8. Why are Tennesseans So Afraid of an Income Tax? -

The odds of an income tax becoming a reality in Tennessee – one of the nation’s lowest-taxed states – are slim to none.

And, yet there is an amendment on the Nov. 4 ballot that would change Tennessee’s constitution by giving the Legislature authority to prohibit passage of an income tax or payroll tax in the state.

9. Schools, Development Dominate Germantown Races -

Germantown will have a new mayor once all of the votes are counted Nov. 4 in the city’s municipal elections on the ballot.

But the race between former Germantown Community Services director George Brogdon and alderman Mike Palazzolo likely won’t completely settle the community’s discussion and debate about development and the future of the Germantown Municipal Schools district.

10. Hybrid Pension Plan Resets Council Debate on Benefits -

If it wasn’t apparent before, it became apparent Tuesday, Oct. 21, that the city’s effort to change the pension system of city employees is back at square one.

The council was already scheduled Tuesday to hear from Segal Consulting, the actuary firm the council hired at the outset of its discussion about pension changes proposed by Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.

11. Turner, Chism Survey New County Commission -

Shelby County Commissioners Van Turner and George Chism belong to different political parties. Turner is a Democrat and Chism is a Republican.

12. City Hall Opens Enrollment on Changing Health Plan -

City of Memphis employees just emerged from the open enrollment period for the still-evolving changes in health insurance benefits for 2015. And city retirees are about to enter their open enrollment period for the same benefits plans that take effect in January.

13. Ebola Screening Measures Rest on Federal Law -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Obama administration's plans to screen certain airline passengers for exposure to Ebola are based on the Constitution and long-established legal authority that would almost certainly stand up in court if challenged, public health experts say.

14. November Council Vote On Pension Reform Likely -

Memphis City Council members again delayed final votes on a set of ordinances that would change pension benefits for city employees.

The delay Tuesday, Oct. 7, on third and final reading of several pension ordinances was expected. The items are now on the Oct. 21 council agenda, but council members expect there will not be a vote then either and city Chief Administrative Officer George Little said the administration can live with a further delay.

15. Some Council Members Feel Dissed By Wharton -

It was a phrase guaranteed to put more diss in the dysfunction between the Memphis City Council and Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.

And some on the council had plenty to say Tuesday, Oct. 7, about the weekend press release from Wharton announcing changes in the city’s health insurance plan starting next year.

16. Council Delays Pension Action, Broods Over 'Key Members' Designation -

Memphis City Council members debated who is a “key member” of the body Tuesday, Oct. 7, as they delayed action on changes to city employee pensions into November.

The delay on third and final reading of several pension ordinances was expected. The items are now on the Oct. 21 council agenda. But council members expect there will not be a vote then either and city Chief Administrative Officer George Little said the administration can live with a further delay.

17. Football Dreams -

Call the doctor, the sports doctor. Because the collective temperature of Mid-South college football fans is at unsafe levels.

Mississippi State and Ole Miss are undefeated and tied for third in the Associated Press poll. The historically downtrodden University of Memphis football program just blasted preseason American Athletic Conference favorite Cincinnati on the road and hung with both Ole Miss and UCLA.

18. City Council Weighs Fluid Benefits Decisions -

Memphis City Council members have third and final votes scheduled Tuesday, Oct. 7, on a set of changes to the city’s pension benefits that are the second of two major sets of reforms in benefits for city employees and retirees.

19. Active Community Keeps Sports Medicine Busy -

George Hernandez is not only the CEO of Campbell Clinic, he’s a client.

An avid runner, Hernandez was doing a trail marathon last winter. Conditions were rainy, cold and windy. Worst of all, there were wet leaves underfoot covering protruding tree roots.

20. Prep Coaches, Players Sold on Jones the Recruiter -

Nothing surprises Murfreesboro Blackman High School football coach Philip Shadowens when it comes to college recruiting.

Shadowens has seen it all – including the flurry of activity created by Blackman senior quarterback and safety Jauan Jennings, rated the No. 18 athlete in the nation by Rivals.com.

21. Little Sees ‘Acceptance’ in City Insurance Drama -

City Chief Administrative Officer George Little says he hopes the city’s long debate about health insurance coverage changes will mean a shorter discussion about proposed pension changes to come.

22. Door Remains Open on City Health Insurance Changes -

The political struggle to close the door and lock in changes to city health insurance coverage is proving to be a challenge for the Memphis City Council.

The council voted Tuesday, Sept. 16, to adjust the health insurance changes it approved in June to grandfather in for a year approximately 300 retirees and their spouses when it comes to the 70 percent subsidy on insurance premiums they currently get from the city.

23. South Carolina Back in SEC East Race -

The South Carolina defense still has improvement to make, but in beating Georgia 38-35 last Saturday the Gamecocks made a fourth-quarter goal-line stand and reasserted their presence in the SEC East Division.

24. Council Could Close Door on Alternative Health Plans -

Memphis City Council members could put to rest alternatives to the health care insurance benefits cuts they approved in June when they meet Tuesday, Sept. 16.

The question is whether they would do that with some kind of vote or indication through discussion or whether they will simply let the June decision stand and take no further votes.

25. Al Green Among Kennedy Center Honorees -

WASHINGTON (AP) – It's a rare honor for an artist to receive accolades from the president, let alone have him sing one of your tunes.

Now Al Green can claim both, knowing that President Barack Obama is a fan. Green is among five artists receiving this year's Kennedy Center Honors, the national awards for influencing American culture through the arts, the center announced Thursday.

26. One Week Into Season, Playoff Resembling BCS -

The scoreboard at Brice-Williams Stadium in Columbia, S.C., was not yet a sparkle in Texas A&M quarterback Kenny Hill’s eye when Bill Hancock, executive director of the new college football playoff, gave us this:

27. Yellen: Job Market Makes Fed Hesitant on Rate Hike -

JACKSON HOLE, Wyoming (AP) – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said Friday that the Great Recession complicated the Fed's ability to assess the U.S. job market and made it harder to determine when to adjust interest rates.

28. City Union Presents Alternative Plan on Benefits -

Memphis Fire Fighters Association president Thomas Malone takes the union’s plan for reversing city employee and retiree health insurance coverage cutbacks to a city oversight committee Thursday, Aug. 21, on employee issues.

29. Harvey Offers Advice to New County Commissioners -

Who swears in the judges who will be swearing in other county leaders later this month when they all begin their terms of office?

That was one of the questions new Shelby County Commissioners had for outgoing commission Chairman James Harvey the day after the election last week.

30. Health Care Safety Net Tops Council Agenda -

Memphis City Council members get more information during the Tuesday, Aug. 5, council day on different parts of City Hall’s ongoing health benefits and pension liability discussions.

But the only item on the agenda for a vote Tuesday is a resolution to create a $2 million “safety net” that was delayed last month.

31. City Hall Saga Charts New Directions -

After a bit of a breather, all sides in City Hall’s simmering political dispute over health insurance changes for city employees and retirees sat down at the same table Tuesday, July 29, and offered a few new directions.

32. City Union Floats Alternative Health Care Plan as City Outlines Trust Fund -

Memphis City Council members will at least discuss an alternative health insurance plan next month.

The high deductible plan, which restores many of the coverage cuts approved in June by the council, is the proposal of the Memphis Fire Fighters Association.

33. Simmons First National Moves Into Tennessee -

A similar history, a foundation in agriculture lending and growth potential attracted Arkansas-based Simmons First National Corp. to buy Community First Bancshares Inc. of Union City, Tenn., and its $1.9 billion subsidiary First State Bank, says Simmons’ Chairman and CEO George A. Makris.

34. City Could Consider Blue Flu a Strike -

At some point, if enough Memphis Police officers call in sick, the job action underway since the end of June could be considered a strike by the city of Memphis. And that would signal a new phase in what is the most significant job action by Memphis Police since the 1978 police and fire strikes.

35. Wharton Says City Won’t ‘Split Hairs’ on Blue Flu -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. said Tuesday, July 8, the city will “approach it accordingly” when it comes to the more than 550 Memphis Police officers who have called in sick in the last week.

36. Beale Street Eastern Border Marks Changes -

For much of the renovated Beale Street Entertainment District’s 30-year history, George Miller was a figure in exile just on the other side of the district’s formal eastern border of Fourth Street.

37. Alexander Raises More Than $900,000, Launches New Ad -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Republican Sen. Lamar Alexander has raised more than $900,000 in the second quarter and has more than $3.4 million on hand in the final weeks before the primary.

Alexander's campaign is also launching a new television ad stressing the senator's opposition to President Barack Obama's health care law.

38. Lamar Alexander Shows Little Interest in Debates -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Lamar Alexander showed little interest Monday in taking up challenger Joe Carr's call for a debate in advance of the Republican Senate primary in August.

39. What’s in a Name? -

Let’s consider our own Memphis Grizzlies. The team kept a nickname that migrated from Vancouver because fans here have embraced it. In fact, you or someone in your family probably owns a cap or a shirt bearing the team nickname or the likeness of a grizzly bear.

40. Heart of Park Advances as Shelby Farms Parkway Stalls -

Within the space of a few days this month, the Shelby Farms Park Conservancy formally broke ground on the park’s $70 million Heart of the Park project and then its leaders watched as the Memphis City Council delayed the Shelby Farms Parkway project for a year.

41. Long Council Day Comes With Change, Emotions -

It was apparent early in the long council day Tuesday, June 17, at City Hall that there wouldn’t be many amendments to the $600 million operating budget and $84 million capital budget the council would approve later that evening.

42. Council Approves Budgets, Stable Tax Rate, Health Insurance Changes -

Memphis City Council members approved a $600 million operating budget and an $84 million capital budget Tuesday, June 17, for the city government fiscal year that begins July 1.

And the council gave final approval to larger changes to employee and retiree health insurance plans designed to make long term changes necessary to right the city’s financial condition.

43. Knoxville Democrats Stump for Memphis Votes -

Four years ago at about this time, Shelby County voters were seeing a lot of the four contenders for the Republican Party’s nomination for governor.

This election year, Shelby County voters are seeing a lot of the top two contenders for the Democratic nomination for U.S. Senate.

44. AutoZone Quarterly Profit Rises 7.4 Percent -

Memphis-based AutoZone Inc. has enjoyed double-digit earnings per share growth every quarter since the latter part of the administration of President George W. Bush – 31 straight quarters, to be precise.

45. Compromise Allows Greensward Parking This Weekend -

The Overton Park greensward will be used for overflow parking at the Memphis Zoo for one more weekend under a compromise announced Friday, May 23, by the Overton Park Conservancy.

Leaders of the conservancy, the city of Memphis, the zoo and Citizens to Preserve Overton Park met Friday morning, one day before a trial free park shuttle begins a five-week run between the park and the Overton Square parking garage.

46. IRS Paid at Least $13 Billion in Improper Tax Credits -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Internal Revenue Service paid more than $13 billion in tax credits last year to people who may not have qualified, a government investigator said Tuesday.

The Earned Income Tax Credits were supposed to go to low-income working families.

47. New Perspective -

When the U.S. Postal Service closed its branch office at 826 Mississippi Blvd. near E.H. Crump Boulevard in 2012, workers carted off an oil painting that hung there for several decades with little thought about the man portrayed in the painting.

48. Council Displeased With Budget Ideas -

This isn’t going to be pretty. Two weeks before Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. takes a budget proposal to the Memphis City Council, council members reacted angrily to how Wharton’s administration set the stage for its definitive recommendations.

49. Council Unhappy With Budget Plans So Far -

The administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. got a rough reception at the Tuesday, April 1, Memphis City Council session as it set the stage for Wharton’s budget proposal to come in two weeks.

50. Campfield Sticks to Goals of Smaller Government -

For a decade, state Sen. Stacey Campfield has been unafraid of making headlines.

First as a state representative, and then in the Senate, he’s spoken his mind and put forth legislation that meets his stated goals of shrinking government.

51. Tigers Season Ends On Common Theme -

RALEIGH, N.C. – Senior guard Geron Johnson had guaranteed the Memphis Tigers would win two NCAA Tournament games. But in the wake of their 78-60 loss to top-seeded Virginia Sunday night in the round of 32, Johnson looked a reporter in the eye and offered a revised declaration.

52. Tigers Season Ends on Common Theme: ‘Underachieved’ -

RALEIGH, N.C. – Senior guard Geron Johnson had guaranteed the Memphis Tigers would win two NCAA Tournament games. But in the wake of their 78-60 loss to top-seeded Virginia Sunday night in the round of 32, Johnson looked a reporter in the eye and offered a revised declaration.

53. Tigers Hang to Beat GW in NCAAs -

RALEIGH, N.C. – Senior guard Michael Dixon Jr. once thought his college basketball career was done.

You know the story. From Big 12 Sixth Man of the Year at Missouri to being exiled after sexual assault allegations that never became more than that, never turned into actual charges.

54. No Subject -

Season 4, Episode 3: “The Pitch.” The show: “Seinfeld.” The theme? Let’s call it “the absence of anything.” It’s actually the first half of an hour-long show that ran during the show’s normal TV lifespan. It has run as a half-hour episode in syndication for the past 100 years or so.

55. City Pension Change Outlined for 2015 -

The administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. made its formal proposal of a “long-term solution” and change in the city’s pension plan to a 401(k) style plan this week with specific terms Wharton has long said would be included.

56. Events -

Memphis Botanic Garden will host the official Tennessee Arbor Day Celebration Friday, March 7, at 10 a.m. at the garden, 750 Cherry Road. The city of Memphis will be recognized for earning the Tree City USA designation, and seedlings will be given away on a first-come, first-served basis. Cost is free. Visit memphisbotanicgarden.com.

57. Tigers Seniors Hope to Script Memorable Last Chapter -

The five Memphis seniors talked about their college basketball careers and they sounded older, wiser. And although nobody used this word, maybe a little scared about what might, or might not, come next.

58. Police Union Dispute Subsides, Leaves Questions -

A turbulent week at the Criminal Justice Center for the Memphis Police Department is the lead-in for a critical week at City Hall in the unfunded pension liability discussion.

Leaders of the Memphis Police Association and other municipal unions will be part of the discussions this week on the size of that unfunded liability and what steps the city should take to put city finances on a more sustainable basis.

59. The Sweet Spot -

Gary Wilkes usually doesn’t notice the smell at the family business, Wayne’s Candy Co. Inc., unless he has just returned from vacation.

60. Police, Fire Directors Discuss Budget With Council -

Memphis City Council members got deeper Tuesday, Feb. 4, into the specifics of Memphis Police and Fire Department budget decisions.

But they didn’t get a clearer picture of what the direction forward will be as they and Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. prepare to make some hard decisions about public safety in dealing with the city’s unfunded pension liability.

61. Council Hears More on Police and Fire Budget Decisions -

Memphis City Council member got deeper Tuesday, Feb. 4, into the specifics of Memphis Police and Fire Department budget decisions.

But they didn’t get a clearer picture of what the direction forward will be as they and Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. prepare to make some hard decisions about public safety in dealing with the city’s unfunded pension liability.

62. 'Old Man's Knee' May Bench Tigers' Pellom -

University of Memphis forward David Pellom did not play Saturday, Feb. 1, at SMU because of a sore left knee. He did not practice Monday because of the knee, and Tigers coach Josh Pastner called Pellom “questionable” for the Tuesday, Feb. 4, game at FedExForum against Rutgers.

63. US Factories Expanded at Much Slower Pace in January -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. manufacturing barely expanded last month as cold weather delayed shipments of raw materials and caused some factories to shut down.

The Institute for Supply Management, a trade group of purchasing managers, said Monday that its index of manufacturing activity fell to 51.3 in January from 56.5 in December. It was the lowest reading since May, though any reading above 50 signals growth. Manufacturers said export orders grew at a healthy pace but slightly less than in the previous month.

64. Finding ‘Delicate Balance’ -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. leaned heavily on reality and the practical in a State of the City address Wednesday, Jan. 29, at the University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law.

“We have the responsibility of balancing the expectations of our citizens versus the bottom line of our budget,” Wharton told an audience of several hundred, including city division directors and those in agencies working with the city. “We must strike the delicate balance of our affairs that is based in realism and pragmatism. This is important because ultimately the numbers that define our budget are real. The decisions that have the most positive impact are practical, and the work we have to do cannot wait.”

65. Wharton Faces Challenges in State of the City -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. may face the most challenging year of his tenure as he delivers his State of the City address Wednesday, Jan. 29.

The speech will be delivered at 10 a.m. at the University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law.

66. Damn This Traffic Jam! -

“Time for some traffic problems in Fort Lee.”

“Got it.”

So read an Aug. 13, 2013, email exchange between a couple of New Jersey pols. Why Fort Lee?

Earlier efforts to pluck Democratic endorsements in the Garden State for Gov. Chris Christie’s reelection campaign had failed as to Fort Lee’s mayor, Mark Sokolich. Moreover, the day before, the Democratic state senator who represents Fort Lee had effectively blocked Christie’s reappointment of a Republican state supreme court justice. On Aug. 12, Christie referred to Jersey’s Democratic state senators as “animals.”

67. ‘Boots on Street’ Approach Re-Examined -

When most of the members of the Memphis City Council were elected in 2007 in the largest turnover of seats in the history of the council, some of the new members made their first priority increasing the ranks of the Memphis Police Department.

68. Council Gets Overview of Public Safety Spending -

Memphis City Council members got a first and at times conflicting look Tuesday, Jan. 21, at the hard decisions they could make about city spending on public safety.

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. walked the council through some ideas for cuts in city spending beyond larger changes in city retirement and health benefits. Those obligations are the “cornerstone” of the efforts to get the city’s financial house in order, said city Chief Administrative Officer George Little.

69. Council to Get Updates on City Expense Cuts -

Memphis City Council members get a closer look Tuesday, Jan. 21, at some ways the city can reallocate $80 million over the next five fiscal years to begin paying $100 million annually toward an unfunded pension liability the city estimates is at $709 million.

70. Council to Get Updates on City Expense Cuts -

Memphis City Council members get a closer look Tuesday, Jan. 21, at some ways the city can reallocate $80 million over the next five fiscal years to begin paying $100 million annually toward an unfunded pension liability the city estimates is at $709 million.

71. Obama Picks Ex-Bank of Israel Head as No. 2 at Fed -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama took a step Friday toward reshaping the Federal Reserve under incoming chairman Janet Yellen, choosing a leading expert on the global economy to be her vice chairman.

72. Little Outlines Options for City’s Pension Liability -

Changing retirement and health care benefits for city of Memphis employees going forward is a given, said city Chief Administrative Officer George Little this week.

73. Wharton Administration Offers First Look at Pension Liability Options -

Finding $15 million in new revenue each year for the next five fiscal years for the city’s unfunded pension liability will mean “We can’t continue business as usual,” city of Memphis Chief Administrative Officer George Little warned Tuesday, Jan. 7.

74. US Spy Court: NSA to Keep Collecting Phone Records -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A secretive U.S. spy court has ruled again that the National Security Agency can keep collecting every American's telephone records every day, in the midst of dueling decisions in two civilian federal courts about whether the surveillance program is constitutional.

75. Tennessee Supreme Court Rules on Defamation Claims -

The Tennessee Supreme Court has ruled that cabinet-level state commissioners have absolute immunity from defamation claims for what they say when they are performing their official duties.

The court ruled Monday, Dec. 23, in the case of Zoyle Jones, a state Department of Corrections employee demoted for allegedly double-billing the state and a private organization for travel expenses.

76. Delta to Honor Extremely Cheap Mistake Fares -

NEW YORK (AP) – Some lucky fliers capitalized on a computer glitch Thursday and scored some really cheap flights on Delta Air Lines.

From about 10 a.m. to noon ET, certain Delta fares on the airline's own website and other airfare booking sites were showing up incorrectly, offering some savvy bargain hunters incredible deals. A roundtrip flight between Cincinnati and Minneapolis for February was being sold for just $25.05 and a roundtrip between Cincinnati and Salt Lake City for $48.41. The correct price for both of those fares is more than $400.

77. Tenn. Supreme Court Rules on Defamation Claims -

The Tennessee Supreme Court has ruled that cabinet-level state commissioners have absolute immunity from defamation claims for what they say when they are performing their official duties.

The court ruled Monday, Dec. 23, in the case of Zoyle Jones, a state Department of Corrections employee demoted for allegedly double-billing the state and a private organization for travel expenses.

78. Rape Kit Backlog Lawsuit Shifts Questions -

Since August, Memphis City Council members have been reviewing the numbers. Asking questions about them. Verifying them. Categorizing them.

It is the other numbers discussion at City Hall these days – the one about how many rape kits city agencies took on sexual assault victims that the Memphis Police Department never processed over a period of approximately 30 years.

79. Federal Lawsuit Filed Over Rape Kit Backlog -

A Memphis woman sexually assaulted in 2001 filed a “Jane Doe” lawsuit in Memphis Federal Court Friday, Dec. 20, against the city of Memphis over the city’s backlog of unprocessed rape kits going back to the 1980s.

80. Federal Lawsuit Filed Over Rape Kit Backlog -

A Memphis woman sexually assaulted in 2001 filed a “Jane Doe” lawsuit in Memphis Federal Court Friday, Dec. 20, against the city of Memphis over the city’s backlog of unprocessed rape kits going back to the 1980s.

81. Plan to Renovate Southbrook Mall Resurfaces -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s administration is working on a broader plan for economic development in Whitehaven that will include a renovation and possible public use of Southbrook Mall.

That’s what city Chief Administrative Officer George Little told Memphis City Council members Tuesday, Dec. 17.

82. City Council Questions Pension Plan -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. plans to ask the Memphis City Council sometime in February or March to close the city’s defined benefits pension plan to new hires and those city employees with less than 10 years of service.

83. Council Opens Unfunded Liability Plan Talks With Questions -

Memphis City Council members again rejected Tuesday, Dec. 17, an increase in the city’s monthly solid waste fee and affirmed a 2.1 percent hike in the Memphis Light Gas and Water Division water rate hike.

84. Wharton to Present Pension Plan to City Council -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. will take a five-year plan for meeting the city’s $709 million unfunded pension liability Tuesday, Dec. 17, to Memphis City Council members during their executive session.

85. City Council to Revisit Water, Waste Fee Hikes -

Memphis City Council members will at least talk at their last meeting of the year about undoing two votes they’ve taken recently.

The Tueday, Dec. 17, council agenda includes revisiting its Nov. 19 approval of a 2.13 percent increase in Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division water rates.

86. IRS Nominee on Track for Approval Despite Acrimony -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama's choice to head the Internal Revenue Service told senators Tuesday he will work to restore public trust in the agency in the wake of the tea party scandal even as the IRS takes on new responsibilities administering the president's health care law.

87. Ballpark Deal Back on Council’s Agenda -

After getting a rough reception last week, the deal for the city of Memphis to buy AutoZone Park and the St. Louis Cardinals to buy the Memphis Redbirds baseball team returns to the Memphis City Council Monday, Dec. 9, for a vote.

88. Council Votes Down Solid Waste Fee Hike -

Memphis City Council members voted down Tuesday, Dec. 3, the long-delayed effort by the Wharton administration to reset the city’s solid waste fee at the higher rate it was before the July 1 start of the current fiscal year.

89. Council Votes Down Solid Waste Fee Hike -

Memphis City Council members voted down Tuesday, Dec. 3, the long-delayed effort by the Wharton administration to reset the city’s solid waste fee at the higher rate it was before the July 1 start of the current fiscal year.

90. Council Approves Crosstown Funding, Delays Redbirds Decision -

Memphis City Council members approved $15 million in city funding that is a combination of federal grants, bonds and stormwater funding Tuesday, Dec. 3, as the last piece of financing for the Crosstown revitalization project.

91. Events -

Shelby County Trustee David Lenoir and the Delta Sigma Theta Memphis Alumnae Chapter will hold “Home for the Holidays: A Housing and Economic Empowerment Collaborative” Saturday, Nov. 23, from 8 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at Hickory Ridge Mall, 6075 Winchester Road. The event will include a small-business resource center, legal clinic, Homebuyer’s Corner, H.O.M.E. financial literacy and budgeting workshop, and more. Visit memphisalumnaedst.org.

92. Tigers Find Different Rhythm This Season -

A year ago in this exhibition matchup, the University of Memphis trailed at the half and beat Christian Brothers University by 11 points.

But Friday night, Nov. 8, at FedExForum, the Tigers defeated CBU 92-63 and nobody had to play more than 22 minutes as Memphis coach Josh Pastner mixed and matched his lineups throughout the game.

93. Council Shares Criticism of Mayor in Mall Debate -

Memphis City Council members profoundly disagree with one another on how far the city should go to fund a renovation of Southbrook Mall in Whitehaven.

But both sides of the council discussion were of one mind Tuesday, Nov. 5, about their dissatisfaction with the qualified support the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. has gradually given to the project.

94. Nichols Ready to Back Up Hype -

Every player has his favorite spot on the floor, that go-to place where everything seems to slow down, where the player most feels like himself even amid the chaos.

But maybe more important when you are a much-hyped, homegrown University of Memphis freshman is to have that special place off the floor. A retreat, where in this case young Austin Nichols can make the world spin a little more slowly and turn down the volume on all the outside noise.

95. City Pension Crisis Meets Sanitation Overhaul -

The city’s looming pension liability crisis and the proposed solution to it intersected Tuesday, Oct. 1, with a plan to overhaul city sanitation services and, in the process, provide a pension supplement to sanitation workers.

96. Council Delays Sanitation Changes -

Memphis City Council members put off a final vote Tuesday, Oct. 1, on raising the city’s monthly solid waste fee until December citing an upcoming fix to the city’s pension fund liability crisis.

97. City Leaders Outline Pension Crisis Talks -

There still isn’t an agreement on the numbers. But the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. met late last week with leaders of the unions representing city employees about the conclusion in a consultant’s report that the city’s pension fund liability is unsustainable to the tune of hundreds of millions of dollars.

98. Surprise From Fed: No Pullback in Bond Purchases -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In a surprise, the Federal Reserve has decided against reducing its stimulus for the U.S. economy because its outlook for growth has dimmed in the past three months.

The Fed said it will continue to buy $85 billion a month in bonds while it awaits conclusive evidence that the economy is strengthening. The Fed's bond purchases are intended to keep long-term borrowing rates low to boost spending and economic growth.

99. Events -

New Memphis Institute will host “Whatever It Takes: Creating World Class Public Education” on Wednesday, Sept. 11, from noon to 1:30 p.m. at the Holiday Inn University of Memphis, 3700 Central Ave. The discussion will feature Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson and Achievement School District superintendent Chris Barbic, and will be moderated by University of Memphis interim president Brad Martin. Tickets are $30. Visit newmemphis.org.

100. Events -

The Center City Revenue Finance Corp. board will meet Tuesday, Sept. 10, at 9 a.m. in the Downtown Memphis Commission conference room, 114 N. Main St. Visit downtownmemphiscommission.com.