» Subscribe Today!
More of what you want to know.
The Daily News
X

Forgot your password?
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search
Search results for 'George Little' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:0
Shelby Public Records:34
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:2
Middle Tennessee:38
East Tennessee:12
Other:9

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

The Daily News subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. Is It Too Late? -

Carole King famously sang, “[I]t’s too late, baby now, it’s too late,/ Though we really did try to make it.” Something in this song created a gluey intangible not-yet-named noun that affixed itself to my soul. When I hear the words “Somethin’ inside has died, and I can’t hide/ And I just can’t fake it,” I feel a shudder throughout my being.

2. Campaign Strategies Shift As Mayoral Debates Begin -

It’s been a scrap from the start.

But with the first televised debate in the 2015 race for Memphis Mayor Monday, Aug. 10, more citizens got a first-hand look at what the top contenders have agreed is a milestone political race.

3. First Mayoral TV Debate Features Aggressive Contenders -

The first televised debate of the 2015 race of Memphis Mayor Monday, Aug. 10, saw incumbent Mayor A C Wharton Jr. and city council member Jim Strickland clash repeatedly while fellow council member and mayoral challenger Harold Collins said Strickland and Wharton were “acting like Tom and Jerry.”

4. Sparks Fly at Cooper-Young Mayoral Forum -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. was the target of two Memphis City Council members challenging him during most of a Cooper-Young political forum Tuesday, July 28.

It’s what Wharton predicted would happen once the campaign to the Oct. 8 ballot began to throw sparks.

5. Clinton to Propose Increasing Capital Gains Taxes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hillary Rodham Clinton plans later this week to propose raising capital gains taxes for some investors, part of a larger campaign effort to encourage greater focus on longer-term economic growth rather than more immediate gains for investors.

6. Grizzlies Believe Big Man Backup Brandan Wright A Seamless Choice -

It won’t always be as easy for Mike Conley in the NBA as it was for Scott Reall in high school. But when Reall talks about being Brandan Wright’s teammate at Brentwood Academy in the mid-2000s, you do get the idea that Wright brings some much-needed athleticism to the Grizzlies’ front court.

7. ‘Honda Girl’ Ashley Blair Finds Career Outside Car Ads -

Ten-year-old actress Ashley Blair takes her job seriously. She’s like many other actors in the region working to improve her craft and looking for the next project. The Knoxville area has a thriving community of actors, writers, directors, and producers, all trying to showcase their best work, both locally and nationally.

8. Piano-Playing Senator's Latest Tune: New Education Policy -

WASHINGTON (AP) – How does a musician-senator fill the time during yet another partisan Senate stalemate?

In Sen. Lamar Alexander's case, he sits down at a borrowed piano in his Capitol Hill office and, with a grin, bangs out "The Memphis Blues."

9. Why Isn't Stolen Data on Federal Employees for Sale? -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Obama administration is increasingly confident that China's government, not criminal hackers, was responsible for the extraordinary theft of personal information about as many as 14 million current and former federal employees and others, The Associated Press has learned. One sign: None of the data has been credibly offered for sale on underground markets popular among professional identity thieves.

10. Stones Rock Music City -

Pleased to meet you, hope you guessed our name. Well, hell, Mick, if it’s puzzling you, it’s Nashville. Music City USA.

We’re the national media’s flavor of the day – the “It city,” which has gone from being a secondary concert market – remember The Beatles played Memphis, not Nashville – to one of the country’s prime touring destinations.

11. CMA Fest a Blast for Artists, Merchants -

The Glimmer Twins wannabe in the white cowboy hat and the 21-year-old blonde who has worked her tail off to climb from the audience to one of the main stages at CMA Music Festival display different but genuine levels of excitement about Music City’s biggest week.

12. Anson VII Has Arrived -

My great-great-great-great grandfather Elijah Fleming had eight kids and no middle name.

According to an essay by a distant cousin of mine, five of the eight left their South Carolina homes “the night the stars fell.”

13. Square Roots -

Lucy Woodson and George Saig went to lunch recently in Overton Square.

They chose Babalu, the site where the entertainment district began in 1970 with the opening of the former TGI Friday’s, just months after Memphis voters approved “liquor by the drink.”

14. 'King of the Blues' B.B. King Dead at 89 at Home in Vegas -

LAS VEGAS (AP) – B.B. King, whose scorching guitar licks and heartfelt vocals made him the idol of generations of musicians and fans while earning him the nickname King of the Blues, died late Thursday at home in Las Vegas. He was 89.

15. Consumer Agency Opens Review of Student Loan Services -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau opened a public inquiry Thursday into student loan servicing practices that it says can make paying back loans "stressful or harmful."

16. IBM Team on Non-Emergency 911 Calls Sounds Familiar Theme in Memphis -

A team of outside experts will come to Memphis for a short period of time to analyze a specific problem and make recommendations to City Hall.

If that scenario sounds familiar, it’s because Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. sought the same solution in February to his administration’s stalled plan for a Mid-South Fairgrounds renovation.

17. Incumbent’s Advantage Faces Test in Mayor’s Race -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. rolls out a new plan for emergency medical services Tuesday, May 10, that is expected to involve some private, nongovernment involvement.

No further details of the announcement were forthcoming from his administration, but it returns the still-forming 2015 race for mayor to an issue that is basic to virtually every mayoral election: public safety.

18. New Questions About Southbrook Mall Renovation -

Late last year, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. was pushing a town center-type conversion of Whitehaven’s Southbrook Mall.

But Memphis City Council members questioned Tuesday, May 5, whether the Wharton administration’s plan for a town center at the Southbrook Mall site in Whitehaven was set up to fail once the funding reached the mall’s nonprofit board.

19. Council Questions Administration's Intent on Southbrook Mall -

Memphis City Council members questioned Tuesday, May 5, whether the Wharton administration’s plan for a town center at the Southbrook Mall site in Whitehaven was set up to fail.

The reaction came as citizens on the board of the nonprofit organization that owns the mall complained that the terms of $2.1 million in bond money they got for HVAC and roof repairs changed.

20. Events -

Five and Five Workshop (A Wake-Up Call for Business Owners) will be held Tuesday, April 28, from 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. at The Crescent Club, 6075 Poplar Ave., suite 909. Business coach and author Bridget DiCello and business attorney Alan Crone will present “The Five Most Common Mistakes Business Owners Make (and how to avoid them)” and “The Five Things Every Small Business Owner Should Have (but generally doesn’t).” Cost is $75. RSVP to fiveandfive@levelnineservices.com or 901-410-5154.

21. Wharton Traces City’s Path in Financial Crisis -

City Hall’s budget season in this Memphis election year will be about more than the dollar figures and line items in Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s budget proposal.

It will be about different versions of how the city got into its ongoing financial crisis.

22. Memphis Moves Closer to Downtown Building Purchase -

The state of Tennessee may have moved out, but the city of Memphis could be moving in.

The city has a tentative deal to buy the Donnelley J. Hill state office building near City Hall for $1.5 million.

23. Sammons Gets Good Look at Mayor-Council Relationship -

There was a moment Tuesday, April 7, at City Hall when outgoing chief administrative officer George Little paused in the middle of his grilling by the council to look over at incoming CAO Jack Sammons and smile.

24. Sammons Nomination Approved By Testy Council -

With an 11-0 vote, the Memphis City Council approved Tuesday, April 7, the return of former council member Jack Sammons to City Hall as the city’s new chief administrative officer.

25. Experts Talk Health Care Reform at Seminar -

One of the themes that quickly emerged from the speakers and subject matter experts participating in the latest installment of The Daily News’ seminar series, this time on health care, is that few things are more important when it comes to health care reform than bending the cost curve.

26. Make Some Noise? Grizzlies’ Goals Still Attainable -

Stylistically, it was a bit of short of spectacular. No one on the Grizzlies cracked 20 points, the opponent was bound for the NBA Draft Lottery, and the game was less about buzz and more about finally taking care of business on the home court.

27. Sammons to Become Memphis CAO -

Incoming city chief administrative officer Jack Sammons should arrive at City Hall on May 8, just a few days after Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. presents his budget propsosal to the Memphis City Council.

28. Memphis Fire Department to Test New Strategies -

The Memphis Fire Department plans to test software this summer that it hopes will reduce non-emergency ambulance calls it responds to.

The pilot program is one part of a long-term strategy for the department recently rolled out by the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.

29. Cool Catt -

The Honorable George Rose Smith is depicted in a John Deering wall-mounted bronze relief at the Central Arkansas Library System’s main branch. He’s in his robe, seated in front of a giant crossword grid. The inscription reads: “Wordsmith Extraordinaire – New York Times Crossword Puzzle Author – Arkansas Supreme Court Justice 1949-1987.”

30. Memphis Fire Department to Test New Strategies -

The Memphis Fire Department plans to test software this summer that it hopes will reduce non-emergency ambulance calls it responds to.

The pilot program is one part of a long-term strategy for the department recently rolled out by the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.

31. Sammons Appointment Stalled, Wharton Makes Other Moves -

His plan to make Jack Sammons his new chief administrative officer is stalled – at best – but other parts of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s election-year overhaul of his administration are starting to move.

32. Affordability? It’s All in the Eye of the Buyer -

The new construction at 2314 Castleman sold last week for $1,365,000 after Brent Morris of Parks listed the home for $1,395,000. Morris has developed a niche in locating infill lots and teardowns – to use the plural of the now-popular noun created by adding verb to adverb – in the Green Hills area.

33. Sammons 'Very Interested' in Wharton's Chief Administrator Job -

The Memphis City Council and the chief administrative officer both have offices in City Hall.

But to Jack Sammons, who served on the council for more than 20 years and was Chief Administrative Officer for eight months, there is no contest over which job is better.

34. Wharton Still Mum on Extent of Shake-Up -

The move of Memphis-Shelby County Airport Authority Board chairman and former Memphis City Council member Jack Sammons back to City Hall is not a done deal just yet.

35. Wharton's City Hall Shake-Up Has Ripples -

The political timing of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton’s shake-up of his leadership team could have been worse – closer to the October city elections in which he is seeking a second full term.

36. Wharton Eyes City Hall Shake-Up -

Facing specific criticism from political challengers that his administration is disorganized and hasn’t focused on priorities much past initial press conferences, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. acted this week to shake up his office starting at the top.

37. What Recession? Middle Tennessee Largely Spared -

After handling clients at SunTrust as a senior portfolio manager for high-net-worth clients, many with $10 million or more in assets, Dana Moore, CFA, and two colleagues (George Stadler, Angela Helbig), founded HMS Investment Advisors in 2009.

38. MORE Helps Small Businesses Avoid Maze -

For a small business owned by a women or a minority already encountering formidable barriers because of that, the bureaucratic hoops any small business has to deal with can be lethal.

For three years, Memphis Office of Resources and Enterprise, operated by city government, has been helping all small businesses specifically to navigate those hoops.

39. Debt, Pension Overhang Top City Council Priorities -

UPDATE: Council committee sessions are beginning late Tuesday – at 10:30 a.m. – because of weather-related road conditions, and committees will have a condensed schedule, according to council staff.

40. Council Signals Return to Schools Funding Mediation -

It’s back to mediation Thursday, Jan. 8, in the six-year long schools funding deadlock between the city of Memphis and Shelby County Schools.

That was the next step several Memphis City Council members pointed to after more than an hour behind closed doors at City Hall Tuesday with their attorney as well as city Chief Administrative Officer George Little.

41. Wharton Indicates Greensward Parking Possible -

A New Year’s eve letter from Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. indicates that when spring crowds begin to reach parking capacity in Overton Park, the park’s greensward will be used for overflow automobile parking at the Memphis Zoo.

42. Goat Milk and Smart Marketing -

Maybe it was that last Facebook post that put them over the top. Or, maybe it was the #voteforgoats hashtag.

Little Seed Farm’s goats aren’t telling, but they do look a bit smug.

The goats, along with Little Seed Farm owners James and Eileen Ray, recently pulled in a cool $25,000 by snagging the top spot in furnishing retailer west elm’s, “We Love LOCAL Small Business’’ grant contest.

43. Stonewall Jackson's Little Slice of Heaven in Brentwood -

“Everybody has to meet his Waterloo,” sings honky-tonk hero Stonewall Jackson in his breakthrough No. 1 hit back in 1959.

Of course, that line, the entire song really, means everybody must meet his or her fate someday.

44. After the Campaign -

The 2014 election year began in January with dissent from the floor.

At the end of the Shelby County Democratic Party’s annual Kennedy Day fundraiser in January, former Memphis City Council member and state Rep. Carol Chumney, who was not among the speakers, challenged the party establishment from her table to do more to support women running for office.

45. Holden’s Hat -

FINDING MEMPHIS. Last week the Church of the Holy Communion inaugurated a reading group called Words, and enticed an eclectic baker’s dozen of participants with Muddy’s cupcakes. I can’t speak for the rest, but I’ve worked for much less.

46. Wharton’s Hybrid Pension Falls in Council -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s hybrid pension proposal, the second of two parts of his overhaul of city employee benefits, was voted down Tuesday, Nov. 18, by the Memphis City Council in a bid by some on the council to end “uncertainty” among city employees.

47. Analysts: How GOP Congress Could Boost US Economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Voters made clear Tuesday that they're worried about the economy, despite steady job gains, a robust stock market and faster economic growth this year.

So what can – and should – the now-dominant Republicans in Congress and President Barack Obama do together to benefit more Americans?

48. Skip Check-In; Latest Hotel Room Key is Your Phone -

NEW YORK (AP) – Hotels don't want guests to have to linger at the front desk – or even stop by at all.

New programs are helping speed up the check-in process for busy travelers, or in at least one case, letting them go straight to their rooms by using their smartphone to unlock doors.

49. Rivals Gear Up for Next Round of Tennessee Whiskey War -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The passage of several months since a heated legislative debate over the legal definition of Tennessee whiskey has done little to mellow the dispute between two global liquor giants and the growing number of craft distillers caught between them.

50. Why are Tennesseans So Afraid of an Income Tax? -

The odds of an income tax becoming a reality in Tennessee – one of the nation’s lowest-taxed states – are slim to none.

And, yet there is an amendment on the Nov. 4 ballot that would change Tennessee’s constitution by giving the Legislature authority to prohibit passage of an income tax or payroll tax in the state.

51. Schools, Development Dominate Germantown Races -

Germantown will have a new mayor once all of the votes are counted Nov. 4 in the city’s municipal elections on the ballot.

But the race between former Germantown Community Services director George Brogdon and alderman Mike Palazzolo likely won’t completely settle the community’s discussion and debate about development and the future of the Germantown Municipal Schools district.

52. Hybrid Pension Plan Resets Council Debate on Benefits -

If it wasn’t apparent before, it became apparent Tuesday, Oct. 21, that the city’s effort to change the pension system of city employees is back at square one.

The council was already scheduled Tuesday to hear from Segal Consulting, the actuary firm the council hired at the outset of its discussion about pension changes proposed by Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.

53. Turner, Chism Survey New County Commission -

Shelby County Commissioners Van Turner and George Chism belong to different political parties. Turner is a Democrat and Chism is a Republican.

54. City Hall Opens Enrollment on Changing Health Plan -

City of Memphis employees just emerged from the open enrollment period for the still-evolving changes in health insurance benefits for 2015. And city retirees are about to enter their open enrollment period for the same benefits plans that take effect in January.

55. Ebola Screening Measures Rest on Federal Law -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Obama administration's plans to screen certain airline passengers for exposure to Ebola are based on the Constitution and long-established legal authority that would almost certainly stand up in court if challenged, public health experts say.

56. November Council Vote On Pension Reform Likely -

Memphis City Council members again delayed final votes on a set of ordinances that would change pension benefits for city employees.

The delay Tuesday, Oct. 7, on third and final reading of several pension ordinances was expected. The items are now on the Oct. 21 council agenda, but council members expect there will not be a vote then either and city Chief Administrative Officer George Little said the administration can live with a further delay.

57. Some Council Members Feel Dissed By Wharton -

It was a phrase guaranteed to put more diss in the dysfunction between the Memphis City Council and Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.

And some on the council had plenty to say Tuesday, Oct. 7, about the weekend press release from Wharton announcing changes in the city’s health insurance plan starting next year.

58. Council Delays Pension Action, Broods Over 'Key Members' Designation -

Memphis City Council members debated who is a “key member” of the body Tuesday, Oct. 7, as they delayed action on changes to city employee pensions into November.

The delay on third and final reading of several pension ordinances was expected. The items are now on the Oct. 21 council agenda. But council members expect there will not be a vote then either and city Chief Administrative Officer George Little said the administration can live with a further delay.

59. Football Dreams -

Call the doctor, the sports doctor. Because the collective temperature of Mid-South college football fans is at unsafe levels.

Mississippi State and Ole Miss are undefeated and tied for third in the Associated Press poll. The historically downtrodden University of Memphis football program just blasted preseason American Athletic Conference favorite Cincinnati on the road and hung with both Ole Miss and UCLA.

60. City Council Weighs Fluid Benefits Decisions -

Memphis City Council members have third and final votes scheduled Tuesday, Oct. 7, on a set of changes to the city’s pension benefits that are the second of two major sets of reforms in benefits for city employees and retirees.

61. Active Community Keeps Sports Medicine Busy -

George Hernandez is not only the CEO of Campbell Clinic, he’s a client.

An avid runner, Hernandez was doing a trail marathon last winter. Conditions were rainy, cold and windy. Worst of all, there were wet leaves underfoot covering protruding tree roots.

62. Prep Coaches, Players Sold on Jones the Recruiter -

Nothing surprises Murfreesboro Blackman High School football coach Philip Shadowens when it comes to college recruiting.

Shadowens has seen it all – including the flurry of activity created by Blackman senior quarterback and safety Jauan Jennings, rated the No. 18 athlete in the nation by Rivals.com.

63. Little Sees ‘Acceptance’ in City Insurance Drama -

City Chief Administrative Officer George Little says he hopes the city’s long debate about health insurance coverage changes will mean a shorter discussion about proposed pension changes to come.

64. Door Remains Open on City Health Insurance Changes -

The political struggle to close the door and lock in changes to city health insurance coverage is proving to be a challenge for the Memphis City Council.

The council voted Tuesday, Sept. 16, to adjust the health insurance changes it approved in June to grandfather in for a year approximately 300 retirees and their spouses when it comes to the 70 percent subsidy on insurance premiums they currently get from the city.

65. South Carolina Back in SEC East Race -

The South Carolina defense still has improvement to make, but in beating Georgia 38-35 last Saturday the Gamecocks made a fourth-quarter goal-line stand and reasserted their presence in the SEC East Division.

66. Council Could Close Door on Alternative Health Plans -

Memphis City Council members could put to rest alternatives to the health care insurance benefits cuts they approved in June when they meet Tuesday, Sept. 16.

The question is whether they would do that with some kind of vote or indication through discussion or whether they will simply let the June decision stand and take no further votes.

67. Al Green Among Kennedy Center Honorees -

WASHINGTON (AP) – It's a rare honor for an artist to receive accolades from the president, let alone have him sing one of your tunes.

Now Al Green can claim both, knowing that President Barack Obama is a fan. Green is among five artists receiving this year's Kennedy Center Honors, the national awards for influencing American culture through the arts, the center announced Thursday.

68. One Week Into Season, Playoff Resembling BCS -

The scoreboard at Brice-Williams Stadium in Columbia, S.C., was not yet a sparkle in Texas A&M quarterback Kenny Hill’s eye when Bill Hancock, executive director of the new college football playoff, gave us this:

69. Yellen: Job Market Makes Fed Hesitant on Rate Hike -

JACKSON HOLE, Wyoming (AP) – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said Friday that the Great Recession complicated the Fed's ability to assess the U.S. job market and made it harder to determine when to adjust interest rates.

70. City Union Presents Alternative Plan on Benefits -

Memphis Fire Fighters Association president Thomas Malone takes the union’s plan for reversing city employee and retiree health insurance coverage cutbacks to a city oversight committee Thursday, Aug. 21, on employee issues.

71. Harvey Offers Advice to New County Commissioners -

Who swears in the judges who will be swearing in other county leaders later this month when they all begin their terms of office?

That was one of the questions new Shelby County Commissioners had for outgoing commission Chairman James Harvey the day after the election last week.

72. Health Care Safety Net Tops Council Agenda -

Memphis City Council members get more information during the Tuesday, Aug. 5, council day on different parts of City Hall’s ongoing health benefits and pension liability discussions.

But the only item on the agenda for a vote Tuesday is a resolution to create a $2 million “safety net” that was delayed last month.

73. City Hall Saga Charts New Directions -

After a bit of a breather, all sides in City Hall’s simmering political dispute over health insurance changes for city employees and retirees sat down at the same table Tuesday, July 29, and offered a few new directions.

74. City Union Floats Alternative Health Care Plan as City Outlines Trust Fund -

Memphis City Council members will at least discuss an alternative health insurance plan next month.

The high deductible plan, which restores many of the coverage cuts approved in June by the council, is the proposal of the Memphis Fire Fighters Association.

75. Simmons First National Moves Into Tennessee -

A similar history, a foundation in agriculture lending and growth potential attracted Arkansas-based Simmons First National Corp. to buy Community First Bancshares Inc. of Union City, Tenn., and its $1.9 billion subsidiary First State Bank, says Simmons’ Chairman and CEO George A. Makris.

76. City Could Consider Blue Flu a Strike -

At some point, if enough Memphis Police officers call in sick, the job action underway since the end of June could be considered a strike by the city of Memphis. And that would signal a new phase in what is the most significant job action by Memphis Police since the 1978 police and fire strikes.

77. Wharton Says City Won’t ‘Split Hairs’ on Blue Flu -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. said Tuesday, July 8, the city will “approach it accordingly” when it comes to the more than 550 Memphis Police officers who have called in sick in the last week.

78. Beale Street Eastern Border Marks Changes -

For much of the renovated Beale Street Entertainment District’s 30-year history, George Miller was a figure in exile just on the other side of the district’s formal eastern border of Fourth Street.

79. Alexander Raises More Than $900,000, Launches New Ad -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Republican Sen. Lamar Alexander has raised more than $900,000 in the second quarter and has more than $3.4 million on hand in the final weeks before the primary.

Alexander's campaign is also launching a new television ad stressing the senator's opposition to President Barack Obama's health care law.

80. Lamar Alexander Shows Little Interest in Debates -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Lamar Alexander showed little interest Monday in taking up challenger Joe Carr's call for a debate in advance of the Republican Senate primary in August.

81. What’s in a Name? -

Let’s consider our own Memphis Grizzlies. The team kept a nickname that migrated from Vancouver because fans here have embraced it. In fact, you or someone in your family probably owns a cap or a shirt bearing the team nickname or the likeness of a grizzly bear.

82. Heart of Park Advances as Shelby Farms Parkway Stalls -

Within the space of a few days this month, the Shelby Farms Park Conservancy formally broke ground on the park’s $70 million Heart of the Park project and then its leaders watched as the Memphis City Council delayed the Shelby Farms Parkway project for a year.

83. Long Council Day Comes With Change, Emotions -

It was apparent early in the long council day Tuesday, June 17, at City Hall that there wouldn’t be many amendments to the $600 million operating budget and $84 million capital budget the council would approve later that evening.

84. Council Approves Budgets, Stable Tax Rate, Health Insurance Changes -

Memphis City Council members approved a $600 million operating budget and an $84 million capital budget Tuesday, June 17, for the city government fiscal year that begins July 1.

And the council gave final approval to larger changes to employee and retiree health insurance plans designed to make long term changes necessary to right the city’s financial condition.

85. Knoxville Democrats Stump for Memphis Votes -

Four years ago at about this time, Shelby County voters were seeing a lot of the four contenders for the Republican Party’s nomination for governor.

This election year, Shelby County voters are seeing a lot of the top two contenders for the Democratic nomination for U.S. Senate.

86. AutoZone Quarterly Profit Rises 7.4 Percent -

Memphis-based AutoZone Inc. has enjoyed double-digit earnings per share growth every quarter since the latter part of the administration of President George W. Bush – 31 straight quarters, to be precise.

87. Compromise Allows Greensward Parking This Weekend -

The Overton Park greensward will be used for overflow parking at the Memphis Zoo for one more weekend under a compromise announced Friday, May 23, by the Overton Park Conservancy.

Leaders of the conservancy, the city of Memphis, the zoo and Citizens to Preserve Overton Park met Friday morning, one day before a trial free park shuttle begins a five-week run between the park and the Overton Square parking garage.

88. IRS Paid at Least $13 Billion in Improper Tax Credits -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Internal Revenue Service paid more than $13 billion in tax credits last year to people who may not have qualified, a government investigator said Tuesday.

The Earned Income Tax Credits were supposed to go to low-income working families.

89. New Perspective -

When the U.S. Postal Service closed its branch office at 826 Mississippi Blvd. near E.H. Crump Boulevard in 2012, workers carted off an oil painting that hung there for several decades with little thought about the man portrayed in the painting.

90. Council Displeased With Budget Ideas -

This isn’t going to be pretty. Two weeks before Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. takes a budget proposal to the Memphis City Council, council members reacted angrily to how Wharton’s administration set the stage for its definitive recommendations.

91. Council Unhappy With Budget Plans So Far -

The administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. got a rough reception at the Tuesday, April 1, Memphis City Council session as it set the stage for Wharton’s budget proposal to come in two weeks.

92. Campfield Sticks to Goals of Smaller Government -

For a decade, state Sen. Stacey Campfield has been unafraid of making headlines.

First as a state representative, and then in the Senate, he’s spoken his mind and put forth legislation that meets his stated goals of shrinking government.

93. Tigers Season Ends On Common Theme -

RALEIGH, N.C. – Senior guard Geron Johnson had guaranteed the Memphis Tigers would win two NCAA Tournament games. But in the wake of their 78-60 loss to top-seeded Virginia Sunday night in the round of 32, Johnson looked a reporter in the eye and offered a revised declaration.

94. Tigers Season Ends on Common Theme: ‘Underachieved’ -

RALEIGH, N.C. – Senior guard Geron Johnson had guaranteed the Memphis Tigers would win two NCAA Tournament games. But in the wake of their 78-60 loss to top-seeded Virginia Sunday night in the round of 32, Johnson looked a reporter in the eye and offered a revised declaration.

95. Tigers Hang to Beat GW in NCAAs -

RALEIGH, N.C. – Senior guard Michael Dixon Jr. once thought his college basketball career was done.

You know the story. From Big 12 Sixth Man of the Year at Missouri to being exiled after sexual assault allegations that never became more than that, never turned into actual charges.

96. No Subject -

Season 4, Episode 3: “The Pitch.” The show: “Seinfeld.” The theme? Let’s call it “the absence of anything.” It’s actually the first half of an hour-long show that ran during the show’s normal TV lifespan. It has run as a half-hour episode in syndication for the past 100 years or so.

97. City Pension Change Outlined for 2015 -

The administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. made its formal proposal of a “long-term solution” and change in the city’s pension plan to a 401(k) style plan this week with specific terms Wharton has long said would be included.

98. Events -

Memphis Botanic Garden will host the official Tennessee Arbor Day Celebration Friday, March 7, at 10 a.m. at the garden, 750 Cherry Road. The city of Memphis will be recognized for earning the Tree City USA designation, and seedlings will be given away on a first-come, first-served basis. Cost is free. Visit memphisbotanicgarden.com.

99. Tigers Seniors Hope to Script Memorable Last Chapter -

The five Memphis seniors talked about their college basketball careers and they sounded older, wiser. And although nobody used this word, maybe a little scared about what might, or might not, come next.

100. Police Union Dispute Subsides, Leaves Questions -

A turbulent week at the Criminal Justice Center for the Memphis Police Department is the lead-in for a critical week at City Hall in the unfunded pension liability discussion.

Leaders of the Memphis Police Association and other municipal unions will be part of the discussions this week on the size of that unfunded liability and what steps the city should take to put city finances on a more sustainable basis.