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Editorial Results (free)

1. Gestalt Schools Signs Lease in Hickory Hill -

A charter school operator has inked a lease for space on Winchester Road in Hickory Hill.

Gestalt Community Schools has leased 57,000 square feet of space at 5360 Winchester Road inside the Mendenhall Square shopping center.

2. Luttrell Opens Campaign With Warning -

The way Mark Luttrell sees it, his campaign for mayor in 2014 is different than his campaign four years ago because then he was challenging an incumbent and now he is the incumbent.

3. Filing Frenzy -

Until Tuesday, no one was running for the District 7 seat on the Shelby County Schools board. No one had pulled a qualifying petition from the Shelby County Election Commission until just two days before the filing deadline for candidates on the August election ballot.

4. Schools’ Marketing Intensifies as Choices Grow -

January is a busy month on the school choice front in Shelby County. The state of Tennessee has an open-enrollment policy within school districts that allows students in low-performing schools to attend a different school.

5. Achievement School District Prepares for Third Year -

It was already official before Achievement School District superintendent Chris Barbic made the formal announcement last week.

Months ago, Barbic had confirmed that former Westside Middle School principal Bobby White would be leading the state-run school district’s effort at Frayser High School in the 2014-2015 school year.

6. New Achievement School District Schools Announced -

The Achievement School District will expand in its third school year to five Memphis schools, all of them to be run for the district by charter school companies.

Leaders of the state-run district for the bottom 5 percent of the state’s public schools in terms of student achievement announced Thursday, Dec. 12, that:

7. Events -

Shelby County Trustee David Lenoir and the Delta Sigma Theta Memphis Alumnae Chapter will hold “Home for the Holidays: A Housing and Economic Empowerment Collaborative” Saturday, Nov. 23, from 8 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at Hickory Ridge Mall, 6075 Winchester Road. The event will include a small-business resource center, legal clinic, Homebuyer’s Corner, H.O.M.E. financial literacy and budgeting workshop, and more. Visit memphisalumnaedst.org.

8. 3 Memphians Among State Supreme Court Applicants -

Two Memphis judges and a Shelby County Commissioner are among the five applicants for a vacancy on the Tennessee Supreme Court.

Criminal Court Judge Chris Craft, Tennessee Court of Appeals Judge Holly M. Kirby and Shelby County Commissioner Steve Mulroy have submitted applications to the Governor’s Commission on Judicial Appointments, the newly formed body that will send a list of three finalists to Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam.

9. Cleanup Crew -

DeAndre Brown runs what might be the best known landscape business in areas of Memphis where the yards have brush and trees taller than the vacant houses they completely obscure.

“We operate a little differently than other contractors. Most have subcontractors that work separately,” he said. “We are one large crew of 60 men or women. We get the heavy equipment in first. Then a team of weed eaters will go in behind that, then a team of people go in behind them and clean up.”

10. Achievement School District Meets With Parents -

Leaders of the Achievement School District meet Monday, Sept. 16, at three locations with parents of children attending four of the 13 schools the state-run district will add to its system in the 2014-2015 school year.

11. Districts for Low-Performing Schools Make Picks -

After one school year watching each other, leaders of the state-run Achievement School District and the countywide school system’s set of Innovation Zone schools got together this summer to compare notes and figure out which low-achieving schools each would take for the 2014-2015 school year.

12. Achievement School District and Innovation Zone Choose Third-Year Schools -

Leaders of the state-run Achievement School District and the countywide school system’s Innovation Zone schools have picked 13 schools for the 2014-2015 school year – the third school year of operation for each.

13. Missouri Financial Adviser Gets Probation in Memphis -

MEMPHIS (AP) – A Missouri financial adviser and campaign fundraiser for President Barack Obama was sentenced to six months of house arrest and five years' probation Monday for conducting a bizarre plot to stalk her daughter's ex-boyfriend.

14. Mumford Sentenced in Teacher Exam Fraud -

Clarence Mumford Sr., a one-time assistant principal in Memphis City Schools, was sentenced Monday, May 13, to seven years in prison for organizing and running a cheating ring on teacher tests.

Mumford was sentenced by Memphis federal Judge John Fowlkes following his guilty plea to 21 counts in the cheating scandal including conspiracy.

15. Butler Sevier’s Mead Helps Clients Craft New Realities -

Attorney Anne Mead is not in Kansas anymore. Recently named partner with the firm of Butler Sevier Hinsley & Reid PLLC, a family law practice, she said, “We have some pretty incredible people working for us, I’m really, really lucky.”

16. Curtis Coleman Announces Bid for Arkansas Governor -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – Little Rock businessman Curtis Coleman joined the race for the Republican gubernatorial nomination on Thursday, laying out an agenda that includes proposals to cut taxes and using public money to send Arkansas students to private schools.

17. Plea Change Set in Teacher Test Fraud -

A lawyer for a former Memphis public school assistant principal said Friday he’s seeking a plea change to federal charges that he helped current or aspiring teachers cheat on tests they must pass to prove they are qualified to lead their classrooms.

18. Plea Change Set in Teacher Test Fraud -

A lawyer for a former Memphis public school assistant principal said Friday he’s seeking a plea change to federal charges that he helped current or aspiring teachers cheat on tests they must pass to prove they are qualified to lead their classrooms.

19. Bulls-Eye -

It seemed an unlikely place to form a clay target shooting team.

Funding would be an issue. Transportation to and from the practice range could be tricky.

And the biggest hurdle for bringing the Tennessee Scholastic Clay Target Program (TNSCTP) to Manassas High School in Memphis was the fact that those who were being recruited to participate had no familiarity whatsoever with the sport.

20. Herenton Home Listed as Short Sale -

Former Memphis Mayor Willie W. Herenton’s home in Banneker Estates is on the market as a short sale.

The single-family home on Horn Lake Road has been on the market for more than 160 days. The house in the McKellar-Whitehaven-Levi PD neighborhood is listed for $369,900 with B.J. Worthy with RE/MAX on Track.

21. ‘Different Avenue’ -

Rudy Williams always knew she wanted to work in a hospital, but after a short stint in community college and a few years in the workforce, the path to her goal was looking like a long haul.

So a little more than a year ago, she gave it another try, enrolling in the 60-week medical assisting program at Vatterott Career College’s campus near her home in Bartlett. Now, she’s getting ready for an externship in a local clinic that could lead to a job in her field.

22. 100 Years of Design -

Evans Taylor Foster Childress, which celebrates its centennial in March, can trace its origins to two distinguished Memphis architectural firms.

23. That's a Wrap -

If the grand sweep of 2011 could be captured on celluloid and presented to an audience on the big screen, all the components of a great film would be readily apparent.

There was drama, in the form of a deluge and historic flooding that led the Mississippi River to crest at nearly 48 feet early in the year. One of the year’s big surprises saw President Barack Obama give the commencement address for the Booker T. Washington High School class of 2011 at the Memphis Cook Convention Center.

24. Cracker Barrel Names Cochran as its New CEO -

LEBANON, Tenn. (AP) – Casual dining chain Cracker Barrel Old Country Store Inc. said Monday that President and Chief Operating Officer Sandra B. Cochran will become its CEO next month as part of a succession plan that has been in the works for two years.

25. Kanda Joins Electronic Vaulting Services as VP -

Amit Kanda has been hired by Electronic Vaulting Services LLC as the new vice president of IT and business development.

26. ‘Innovation Conference’ Comes to U of M -

The University of Memphis Saturday will host some of the city’s most dynamic, innovative dreamers, thinkers and doers during TEDx Memphis 2011.

The day-long event will take place from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the FedEx Institute of Technology’s Fogelman Executive Center, 330 Deloach St.

27. TSC Takes ‘Romeo and Juliet’ Outside -

It has given Memphis the best of Shakespeare’s clowns, soldiers and politicians, and now the Tennessee Shakespeare Co. will add lovers to the list, presenting “Romeo and Juliet” in a new outdoor venue.

28. Disability Standards for Death Row Set -

In four Tennessee Supreme Court rulings over 16 years, attorneys, trial court judges and lower appellate courts thought they had established the standards for judging whether the death penalty can be applied in a capital murder case where the defendant claims “intellectual disability.”

29. DeSoto’s Housing Market Levels Out -

The DeSoto County residential market seems to be leveling off after several years of declining numbers. Sales figures for the year-to-date are slightly up, showing small surges and dropoffs after possibly bottoming out in 2008 and 2009.

30. Wade Says He Won't Turn Over Election "Informant" To TBI -

The Democratic nominee for Shelby County Sheriff says he has an “informant” who has information about irregularities in the Aug. 5 elections.

But Randy Wade told a standing room only crowd Thursday evening at Bloomfield Baptist Church that he will not turn over the name of his informant to the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation (TBI).

31. Survival Skills -

Despite July 2010’s rank as the lowest home sales month since February – and despite recent news that existing home sales plummeted to a 15-year low nationally – Shelby County real estate professionals continue to emphasize the local market.

32. GOP Carries Countywide Offices -

The only thing Republican candidates in Shelby County were denied in the Aug. 5 elections was a majority on the Shelby County Commission. The local GOP slate swept every countywide partisan race on the ballot with Thursday’s election results.

Voter turnout – early and Election Day – was almost 30 percent of Shelby County’s 600,000 voters. All election returns will be audited and must be certified by the Shelby County Election Commission.

Republican Bill Oldham, the former chief deputy of the Sheriff’s Department under outgoing Sheriff Mark Luttrell, beat Democrat Randy Wade in the race for sheriff.

The unofficial returns with all precincts reporting were:

Oldham: 89,613 (52%)

Wade: 82,981 (48%)

Wade, who was the Democratic nominee for sheriff in 2002, linked his 2010 campaign to the re-election bid of Democratic U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen. Wade, a former sheriff’s deputy, is Cohen’s district director.

Oldham campaigned on continuing the policies of Luttrell. But his campaign faltered when Oldham was forced to resign his job as chief deputy – the No. 2 position in the department – following a complaint to the U.S. Justice Department that his candidacy violated the Federal Hatch Act.

The civil complaint investigated by the Justice Department’s Office of Special Counsel left Oldham with the choice of either quitting the job or quitting the race. To keep both could have jeopardized federal funding the department receives.

The complaint was unique because deputies and high-ranking officers running for sheriff has been a regular feature of the sheriff’s race for decades. It wasn’t until 2002 that those in the department were required to take a leave of absence if they ran.

In other general election races, challenger Ken Hoover lost to Shelby County School Board Chairman David Pickler in the race for the District 5 seat on the seven-member board.

Pickler has been chairman for 11 of the 12 years the school board has been an elected body. Pickler ran on his record as chairman. Hoover also ran on Pickler’s record, saying his leadership style was too autocratic and not transparent enough.

The unofficial results were:

Pickler: 5,123 (51%)

Hoover: 4,956 (49%)

In the two other contested school board races, former Bolton High School principal Snowden “Butch” Carruthers beat Millington parent Charlene White in District 1. And political newcomer David Reaves beat fellow newcomer Lara A. McIntyre, both of Bartlett, for the District 3 seat.

White and McIntyre both called for change in school board methods during their campaigns.

District 7 school board member Ernest Chism ran unopposed.

The even-numbered district school board seats are on the 2012 county ballot.

After running for Probate Court clerk three other times, Democratic nominee Sondra Becton could not claim the office on her fourth try – even with the incumbent she campaigned against the three other times out of the race. Republican contender Paul Boyd easily beat Becton in the race for the office Chris Thomas gave up to run for and win a seat on the Shelby County Commission.

Becton lost to Thomas by 604 votes four years ago and was among the four Democratic challengers who unsuccessfully challenged the results in Chancery Court. This time she lost by more than 6,500 votes.

The vote totals were:

Boyd: 82,259 (52%)

Becton: 75,702 (48%)

Republican Tom Leatherwood easily defeated Democratic challenger Coleman Thompson to remain Shelby County register. The two faced each other in 2006, with Leatherwood winning.

The results Thursday were:

Leatherwood: 96,531 (58%)

Thompson: 68,784 (42%)

As early voting began, Thompson’s Pyramid Recovery Center was evicted from its longtime South Memphis space that was also an early voting site and an election day polling place. The landlord agreed to leave the voting sites up and running. But the possibility of a change in polling places served to highlight Thompson’s financial problems.

Late publicity about financial problems took a toll on another Democratic contender.

Newcomer Corey Maclin began campaigning early for Shelby County clerk, with incumbent Republican Debbie Stamson not seeking re-election. Maclin lost to Republican nominee Wayne Mashburn, the son of late county clerk Sonny Mashburn.

The unofficial returns were:

Mashburn: 88,619 (55%)

Maclin: 72,651 (45%)

Stamson’s husband, Steve Stamson, retired as Juvenile Court clerk, setting up the race that was won by Republican nominee Joy Touliatos, the chief administrative officer of the clerk’s office. She beat Democratic nominee Shep Wilbun, who won appointment to the clerk’s office in 2000 but lost to Stamson in the 2002 election and was beaten by Stamson again in 2006.

With all precincts reporting, the numbers were:

Touliatos: 85,849 (51%)

Wilbun: 73,345 (44%)

The remaining votes went to independent candidate Julia R. Wiseman.

Also seeking a return to countywide office was Minerva Johnican. Johnican, the Democratic nominee for Criminal Court clerk, lost to Republican nominee Kevin Key, the son of outgoing Criminal Court Clerk Bill Key and an administrator with the Circuit Court Clerk’s office.

The results were:

Key: 79,755 (49%)

Johnican: 74,831 (46%)

Independent candidate Jerry Stamson: 8,581 (5%)

Johnican, also a former Memphis City Council member and Shelby County Commissioner lost the clerk’s job in 1994 when she was upset by the elder Key.

Incumbent Republican Circuit Court Clerk Jimmy Moore easily defeated Democratic challenger Ricky Dixon. Although Dixon was part of the effort by Democratic party leaders to get voters to vote the entire party slate, Moore continued to show up at Democratic functions and make his case for crossover votes.

Regina Morrison Newman, the third Shelby County tustee in four years, lost her bid for a full term in the office to Republican challenger David Lenoir. It was an impressive political debut for Lenoir, who had heavy backing from the local GOP.

The results were:

Lenoir: 77,166 (49%)

Newman: 72,618 (46%)

Independent candidate Derrick Bennett: 6,353 (4%)

Newman was appointed to the office by the Shelby County Commission following the 2009 death of Trustee Paul Mattila. Mattila was appointed to the office and won a special election for the position following the 2008 death of Bob Patterson. Patterson was re-elected to a four-year term in 2006.

In the judicial races:

Attorney Bill Anderson Jr. emerged atop a field of 20 candidates for General Sessions Criminal Court Judge Div. 7 with 15 percent of the vote. Assistant County Attorney Janet Lansky Shipman was second and the only other contender to go into double digit percentages. The 20 candidates were the largest field in any race – primary or general – on the Shelby County ballot.

Prosecutor Bobby Carter, who had the backing of District Attorney General Bill Gibbons and former District Attorney General John Pierotti, was elected judge of Criminal Court Div. 3 in a close race with attorneys Glenn Wright and Latonya Sue Burrow.

Carter got 26 percent of the vote to Wright’s 25 percent and Burrow’s 24.7 percent.

The results in the three other special judicial races saw the three appointed judges rejected by voters.

  • Lee Wilson, the appointee to General Sessions Criminal Court Judge Div. 10, lost to former General Sessions Court Clerk Chris Turner by more than 64,000 votes. Turner’s victory was the strongest proof of the strong Republican turnout for races across the general election ballot. Turner had been the General Sessions Court clerk until 2006, when he was upset by Democratic challenger Otis Jackson. He is also a former Republican state legislator.
  • Lorrie Ridder, the appointee to Circuit Court Judge Div. 4, lost to attorney Gina Higgins by about 5,000 votes.
  • Rhynette Northcross Hurd, the appointee to Circuit Court Judge Div. 8, lost to attorney Bob Weiss by more than 12,000 votes.

Ridder and Hurd had been appointed to the Circuit Court vacancies by Gov. Phil Bredesen, who picked them each from a list of three finalists from the Judicial Nominating Commission. Bredesen even taped a robo-call on behalf of Hurd, his first robo-call for any candidate in the state.

Wilson was appointed to the General Sessions vacancy by the Shelby County Commission and adopted a domestic violence case docket for the court.

...

33. Levitt Shell Adds Development Director -

Debra Czestochowski has joined Levitt Shell as the organization’s first development director.

Hometown: Macomb, Ill.
Education: B.A. in English, University of Illinois
Work experience:
More than 30 years advancing nonprofit organizations in higher education and the performing arts, including a decade with the Memphis Symphony Orchestra before joining the Levitt Shell staff.
Family:
My husband, Joseph, heads International Arts Inc., based in Chicago and Memphis. Our son, Stefan, is a professional musician preparing for medical school. He lives in Chicago.
Favorite quote:
“A good idea doesn’t care where it came from.” From Jeff Sanford, wise Memphian and fellow Midwesterner.
Who has had the greatest influence on you?
My Grandpa Kindred, who raised his siblings and built a farm for his family and was the kindest man I have known. No one could have had a more perfect surname.
What drew you to the Levitt Shell?
The irresistible opportunity to join those who have regenerated a Memphis treasure in order to build community and diversity through free music and education.
What do you consider your greatest professional accomplishments?
Reaching fundraising goals is deeply satisfying, but it is most significant to me to achieve those goals via servant leadership, which focuses on facilitating the progress of others. I thank Leadership Memphis for acquainting me with the literature in this field.
What do you most enjoy about your work?
I enjoy the creativity and commitment of those around me – staff, board and volunteers. I enjoy the expressions on the faces of those who gather for each concert. I enjoy seeing families together, children dancing and musicians absorbing the energy of the experience as they perform. An evening at the Levitt Shell is joyful. It is what this world should be.

34. Ford Wins Democratic Mayoral Primary -  

Interim County Mayor Joe Ford became the Democratic nominee for mayor in the August county general elections Tuesday night.

And the August sheriff’s race will be a contest between Democrat Randy Wade and Republican Randy Wade.

All three were among the winners in Tuesday’s low turnout county primaries.

Approximately ten percent of Shelby County’s nearly 600,000 voters cast ballots in early voting and election day polling.

Ford, who was appointed interim mayor in December, beat County Commissioner Deidre Malone and General Sessions Court Clerk Otis Jackson in the Democratic primary. He will face Republican Mark Luttrell who had only token opposition in the Republican primary from perennial contender Ernie Lunati.

Luttrell has raised more money than all three of the Democratic primary contenders combined and began running television ads in the last week runup to election day.

The final unofficial totals in the Democratic mayoral primary are:

Ford 20,360 57%

Malone 12,916 37%

Jackson 2,168 6%

The pair of primaries for Sheriff featured eight candidates, seven of whom either currently work for the sheriff’s department or are past employees. Only Reginald French, in the Democratic primary was not a former or current department official.

Wade was the 2002 Democratic nominee, losing to Luttrell who is leaving as Sheriff after serving two terms. French was the Democratic nominee in the 2006 elections.

Oldham is Luttrell’s chief deputy, the number two position in the department. He is also a former director of the Memphis Police Department.

The final unofficials totals in the Republican primary are:

Bill Oldham 13,821 48%

Dale Lane 7,981 28%

Bobby Simmons 5,886 21%

James Coleman 943 3%

In the Democratic primary:

Randy Wade 22,643 67%

Reginald French 6,777 20%

Larry Hill 2,738 8%

Bennie Cobb 1,814 5%

Voters in the primary elections decided to return six Shelby County commissioners to new four year terms with Tuesday’s results. They also elected six new commissioners. The winner of the thirteenth commission seat will be decided on the August general election ballot in a contest between district 5 Democratic incumbent Steve Mulroy and Republican challenger Dr. Rolando Toyos. The winner of the match up will determine whether the commission remains majority Democrat or goes majority Republican.

Mulroy easily defeated Jennings Bernard in Tuesday’s Democratic primary.

Republican incumbent Mike Ritz ran unopposed as did new Democratic commissioner Walter Bailey.

In the remaining ten contests, the primaries decided who gets the seats since no one ran in the opposing party’s primary.

The most hotly contested contest among the commission races was for District 4 Position 1. Outgoing Probate Court Clerk Chris Thomas beat John Pellicciotti, appointed to a commission seat last year but running for a different position in the same district. Jim Bomprezzi, the former mayor of Lakeland, was the third contender in the contest.

The final unofficial totals in the Republican primary:

Thomas 7,631 52%

Pellicciotti 4,871 33%

Bomprezzi 2,298 15%

In position 2 of the same district incumbent Republican Wyatt Bunker easily overcame two challengers with former Lakeland alderman John Wilkerson finishing second and Ron Fittes finishing third.

Millington businessman Terry Roland claimed the third position in the district that takes in all six of Shelby County’s suburban towns and cities.

Roland beat George Chism to take the seat Pellicciotti was appointed to but opted not to run for in deference to Roland.

Heidi Shafer, an aide to outgoing County Commissioner George Flinn, claimed Flinn’s District 1 Position 2 seat over Albert Maduska.in the GOP primary.

District 1 incumbent Republican Mike Carpenter easily beat businessman Joe Baier.

In the Democratic commission primaries, Melvin Burgess claimed Malone’s District 2 Position 3 seat in a field of six contenders. His closest contender was Reginald Milton. Burgess, a city school system audit manager, had run for the seat before. He brought in 54 percent of the vote.

The other hard fought Democratic commission primary saw Justin Ford, son of the interim mayor, claim his father’s District 3 Position 3 seat.

Ford beat Edith Moore, a retired IBM executive, whom the commission appointed to the seat after the elder Ford became mayor.

The final unofficial vote totals are:

Ford 7,342 66%

Moore 3,822 34%

Democratic incumbent commissioners Henri Brooks, Sidney Chism and James Harvey were all re-elected over primary challengers.

The county-wide primaries for seven clerk’s positions saw the return of former Criminal Court Clerk Minerva Johnican 16 years after Republican challenger Bill Key took her job. Johnican decisively beat Ralph White and Vernon Johnson in her first bid for office since the 1994 defeat. She will face Republican Kevin Key, the son of Bill Key in the August general election.

The final unofficial vote totals are:

Johnican 16,381 51%

White 10,170 31%

Johnson 5,954 18%

Former Juvenile Court Clerk Shep Wilbun easily won the Democratic primary with 76 percent of the vote to face Republican Joy Touliatos in August for the office being vacated by Republican Steve Stamson. Touliatos was unopposed in the primary.

Democrat Coleman Thompson is back for another go at incumbent Republican Register Tom Leatherwood.

Aside from Leatherwood, Jimmy Moore is the only other of the seven clerks seeking re-election. Moore ran unopposed in the GOP primary. He will face Democrat Ricky Dixon in August.

Trustee Regina Newman was appointed to her office following the death last year of Paul Mattila. Newman easily overcame M LaTroy Williams in Tuesday’s Democratic primary. She will face David Lenoir, who beat former Shelby County Commissioner John Willingham in the Republican contest.

The final unofficial vote totals are:

Lenoir 15,922 58%

Willingham 11,569 42%

The other six candidate field on the ballot was in the Democratic primary for Probate Court Clerk. Sondra Becton posted impressive vote totals over her rivals, bringing in 35 percent of the vote with Peggy Dobbins her closest rival. Becton, who is making her fourth bid for the office, will face Republican Paul Boyd, who ran unopposed in his primary.

The final unofficial vote totals are:

Becton 10,929 36%

Dobbins 5,366 18%

Annita Hamilton 4,848 16%

Clay Perry 3,549 12%

Danny Kail 3,120 11%

Karen Tyler 2,782 9%

The closest contest of the evening was in the Democratic primary for County Clerk. Wrestling promoter and television personality Corey Maclin won his political debut by less than 1,400 votes over Charlotte Draper and LaKeith Miller. He will face Republican Wayne Mashburn who beat Steve Moore in the companion primary.

Early voting in advance of the Aug. 5 election day begins July 16. The August ballot will also feature state and federal primary elections including the statewide primaries for governor and the primaries for all nine of the state’s Congressional districts.

...

35. Events -

The Alliance for Nonprofit Excellence will hold its annual conference “The New Nonprofit Sector: Redefined, Retooled and Resilient” Wednesday at 8:30 a.m. at the Clark Opera Memphis Center, 6745 Wolf River Blvd. Sonal Shah, head of the White House’s Domestic Policy Council’s Office of Social Innovation and Civil Participation, will speak. Cost is $99 for members, $150 for nonmembers and $65 for students. For reservations, call 684-6605 or visit www.npexcellence.org.

36. Crump Makes His Name In Local Real Estate -

His surname is synonymous with Memphis political history, but Patrick Crump’s passion lies in Memphis real estate.

37. Events -

InMotion Orthopaedic Research Center and the Memphis Bioworks Business Association will present the Memphis Orthopaedic Research Lecture Series today from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. at Memphis University School, 6191 Park Ave. The speakers will be Drs. John Coleman and John Williams of Medtronic Inc. For reservations, call 866-1452.

38. Baker Donelson’s Williams Appointed To Volunteer Leadership Role at ILTA -

Merideth L. Williams has been appointed to the volunteer leadership role of conference vice president in the International Legal Technology Association. She will work with other volunteers in the delivery of educational programming to members of ILTA.

39. Wrangling Expected Before Juvenile Court Ruling’s Appeal -  

The loser was expected to appeal.

But the Shelby County Commission will have a debate at the very least and possibly a close vote before any appeal of this week’s Tennessee Court of Appeals ruling on a second Juvenile Court judge’s position is approved.

A three-judge panel of the appeals court ruled this week that the Shelby County Commission cannot fill a second Juvenile Court judge’s position.

The ruling not only reverses a Chancery Court ruling and plans by a majority on the Commission, it also holds that part of a private act by the Tennessee Legislature is unconstitutional. Passed in 1967, the law provided for a second judge’s position.

The commission was not unanimous when it voted to create the position but did not fill it.

The move in early 2007 by the commission prompted Juvenile Court Judge Curtis Person Jr. to file the lawsuit the appeals court ruled on this week.

“It’s always been very clear, to me anyway, that this power could never be delegated by the Legislature,” Person, a former state legislator, told The Daily News.

“A court without a judge is an anomaly,” he added, quoting from the court ruling. “It was something that I felt I had to do to protect the court and to determine the future of the court. Therefore it had to be dealt with. It’s a huge constitutional issue.”

Hot air ahead

Person noted it is the second ruling of its kind from an appeals court panel on the issue in the past year. The previous lawsuit involved a city court created in the city of Jellico, Tenn.

“This opinion is much longer and has a lot more detail in it … about why it can’t be done,” Person said.

Commissioner Deidre Malone, who led the charge for the second judge’s position, said Monday she was disappointed by the decision. But she also said she would ask the commission to appeal the ruling to the Tennessee Supreme Court.

“My recommendation is going to be that we appeal,” Malone said. “My hope is that we kick it up to the state Supreme Court.”

The possibility of an appeal came as no surprise to Person.

“Certainly they have that right,” he told The Daily News.

Commission Chairwoman Joyce Avery was opposed to the second judgeship and praised the court’s decision.

“I think the court ruled in a correct manner. I always felt that Judge Person was elected as judge and he should remain as judge without two judges,” Avery said.

The differing opinions that remain are an indication that more debate is ahead before the commission decides on an appeal.

“There will be a lot of debate,” Avery said at the end of a nearly four-hour meeting with a relatively short agenda that did not include word of the ruling. “As you’ve seen today, commissioners like to talk.”

Catch-22

In 1967, Person supported passage of the private act in his role as a state legislator. The legislation unified what had been separate juvenile courts in Memphis and Shelby County.

The commission’s action and the appeals court ruling focused on a part of the private act known as “Section 20.”

The section created a second division of the unified Juvenile Court and authorized the County Commission to appoint a judge to that division.

The legislation also included a clause that said if Section 20 was ever declared unconstitutional, the rest of the legislation would stand on its own.

“We have concluded, however, that the General Assembly did not create or establish a court because it did not provide for the judgeship,” read the appeals court opinion written by Judge Patricia J. Cottrell. “While the General Assembly may have begun the process of establishing a court, it did not complete it. Because we find that Division 2 was not created in 1967, and, in fact, has not existed since that time, we find this argument by the commission inapplicable.”

Appeals court Judges Frank G. Clement and Richard H. Dinkins agreed for a unanimous opinion.

Chaotic times

Malone proposed the second judge’s position following Person’s election in the 2006 county elections. Avery and other critics argued the drive to create another position was a response by those who backed Veronica Coleman-Davis, who lost to Person in the election.

Malone and proponents argued a second and even third or fourth judgeship would not cost the county any more money and could replace a system of Juvenile Court referees who work under the Juvenile Court judge. The system of referees was put in place during the 40-year-plus tenure of the late Kenneth Turner, who did not have a law degree.

Person also served as a referee during Turner’s tenure as Juvenile Court judge.

He argued more than one judge controlling the direction of the court would create “chaos” and insisted the system of referees works well.

Critics of the current system pointed to other criminal and civil courts that operate efficiently with multiple divisions and one judge who serves as the administrative judge, usually on a rotating basis.

But Person points to a footnote in this week’s ruling that he said demonstrates the unique nature of Juvenile Court.

“Judges have duties regarding administrative aspects of the courts,” the footnote reads. “In order for a judge to perform these ministerial duties, it is necessary to know whether the Juvenile Court is composed of one or two divisions.”

Oops, their bad

Commissioner Steve Mulroy, a law professor at the Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law at the University of Memphis, said the opinion was a “strained reading of the 1967 act’s text.”

“We should have the Tennessee Supreme Court decide this matter once and for all,” he said.

Person’s suit also alleged a violation of the state open meetings law following the first vote in late 2006, just weeks after Person won an eight-year term as Juvenile Court judge.

Malone acknowledged some private discussion with other commissioners prior to the first vote.

Weeks later, she moved to rescind the action and take a second vote. The resolution was approved again.

The appeals court ruling held the second attempt was all the remedy that was needed to the violation of the state law.

“Where … the governmental body acts quickly and decisively to correct any mistake in its procedure, the primary goal of the Open Meetings Act has been accomplished,” said the ruling. “We do not believe that the Legislature intended to hinder such correction of error, but rather to encourage it.”

...

40. Number of Realtors Grows Despite Slow Market -

Amy Chapman, broker/owner of Weichert, Realtors-Chapman & Associates, hosts a career night on Tuesdays for anyone interested in becoming a real estate agent.

No matter how many people show up - and attendance fluctuates week to week - Chapman tries to convey what it takes to be successful in real estate, from getting a license to building a client list to closing a sale.

41. Cullison Moves Up At Methodist LeBonheur in Germantown -

Methodist LeBonheur Germantown Hospital has named Rebecca Cullison assistant administrator of clinical support services.

Cullison has been with Methodist for three years, first as an administrative resident and most recently as the manager of system operations.

42. Harmon Receives Pro Bono Award -

Whitney Harmon, an attorney at Glankler Brown PLLC, has received the first Frank J. Glankler Jr. Pro Bono Award.

Glankler Brown committed this year to taking a minimum of 35 pro bono cases each year from Memphis Area Legal Services, an organization that provides legal assistance for people unable to afford representation. Harmon practices in the area of civil litigation and is a member of the American, Tennessee, Kentucky and Memphis Bar Associations, as well as the Association for Women Attorneys.

43. Justice Department Takes Closer Look at Liberty Bowl -

When the University of Memphis football team played East Carolina at Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium in early November, some special guests took in the homecoming game.

A delegation of U.S. Department of Justice investigators bought tickets to the game. It was part of a low-profile, two-day visit to the stadium by officials from the department's Disability Rights Section.

44. Crye-Leike's Cohn Earns GRI Designation -

Earlier this year, Cohn received the Senior Real Estate Specialist designation from the National Association of Realtors

Jerry Feinstone, president and founder of Bosco's, has been named the Tennessee Restaurant Association's 2007 E. Carlton Scruggs Tennessee Restaurateur of the Year. Feinstone is an active member on the Tennessee Restaurant Association board and was instrumental in rallying TRA support for the state's non-smoking ordinances.

45. Things Go From Hot To Smoking Hot In Election Contests -

With one week to the filing deadline for the Oct. 4 Memphis city elections, 124 citizens have thought seriously enough about running for the 15 offices on the ballot to check out qualifying petitions. Nearly 40 had filed by the end of the first week.

46. Beware the Ides of Memphis -

In the late 1960s, black leaders in Memphis sponsored a series of protests during which more than 60,000 students and teachers stayed home from school to build support for a desegregated school board and school system.

47. List to Replace Peete on Council is Long -

Memphis City Council members are expecting more than two dozen contenders to consider for the vacant District 8 Position 2 Super District seat on the council.

They include the owner of a neighborhood grocery store, an insurance executive, seasoned political partisans, a courthouse security guard, perennial candidates, a math teacher and neighborhood activists.

48. New Home to be Raffled to Raise Money for Southaven Charity -

Desoto Sunrise Homes has a light, and it's going to let it shine.

The faith-based charity in Southaven, Miss., will break ground Wednesday on a home it intends to award by raffle July 4.

All proceeds minus building costs will fund the construction of a group home for neglected and abused boys at an undetermined site in DeSoto County. The event will be held at the entrance of the Snowden Grove subdivision at the corner of Getwell Road and Central Park in Southaven.

49. Developers on Edge -

As with the old saying about one door opening when another closes, the same is apparently true when it comes to condominium projects and Downtown Memphis.

This month, for example, the development group behind the planned $40 million, eight-story Mirabella - which would have featured 60 condo units starting at $600,000 a pop - scrapped the high-end project because of lackluster sales.

50. Prestidge Chosen to Head Kroger Delta Division -

Mark Prestidge has been promoted to president of The Kroger Co.'s Delta Division. The Delta Division is based in Memphis and includes 111 Kroger stores in Arkansas, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri and Tennessee. Prestidge succeeds Richard Tillman, who recently announced his retirement after a 42-year career with Kroger. Prestidge previously served as vice president of operations for Kroger's Southwest Division.

51. Kobernus Joins MAAR As Governmental Affairs Director -

Aubrie Rhodes Kobernus has joined Memphis Area Association of Realtors (MAAR) as governmental affairs director. Kobernus received a master's degree in business administration from George Washington University in Washington, D.C., in May 2006. While pursuing her degree, she interned with NeighborWorks America and New Century Financial Corp., focusing on the mortgage and housing industry.

52. Heads Up on Cambodian Temple -

Cambodian legend has it that two deities once engaged in a challenge to offer the ultimate sacrifice. The challenge: If you can figure out my riddle, then I will chop my head off and vice versa.

That legend offers a glimpse of the cultural beliefs that are imparted and celebrated during the traditional Cambodian Buddhist New Year ritual of handing over the symbolic head from the old angel to the new angel. The old and new angels are figurative sisters who share the responsibility of caring for their father's head.

53. BRIDGES: One Big Facet of Uptown's Resurgence -

Marcus Jackson, a 20-year-old business major at the University of Memphis, is still amazed at his personal transformation over the last few years.

He went from being a typical, introverted high school student to winning a string of accolades. He was chosen captain of his school's track team, senior class secretary and homecoming king. Jackson's peers at Kirby High School voted him "Mr. Senior."

54. Retired Teacher Continues Work With Children -

Dr. Lirah Sabir believes it is her purpose in life to work with children.

It's no surprise, therefore, that after retiring from a 30-year career with Memphis City Schools in 2003, Sabir has assumed the position of director of Exchange City.

55. Public Administrator Named for Probate Court -

The Shelby County Commission appointed Scott Peatross to the position of public administrator in Shelby County Probate Court. Peatross is a partner in the law firm of Bateman Gibson LLC. He graduated from Rhodes College and Tulane Law School.

56. Archived Article: Law Talk - Law Talk - Leslie G

Coleman Finds Rewarding Work in Family Law

LANE GARDNER CAMP

The Daily News

Leslie Gattas Coleman, partner in the Memphis law firm of Pounders Coleman, was honored in December at the Memphis Bar Associations 2004 annu...

57. Archived Article: Newsmakers - Judge George Brown Joins National Arbitration Firm

Judge George Brown to Join Arbitration Firm

Judge George Brown will join Resolute Systems Inc. as a private mediator and arbitrator in the companys Memphis office upon his retirement from the ...

58. Archived Article: This Week - GIS Conference Held at University of Memphis

UTHSC, Jewish Family Service Host Health Conference

Nov. 29

The University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Nursing and Jewish Family Service present Vision for Health: A Bowen Persp...

59. Archived Article: Newsmakers - Tennessee Commissioner Receives Nursing Award

Mental Health Commissioner Receives Nursing Award

Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities Commissioner Virginia Trotter Betts received the National Nursing Centers Cons...

60. Archived Article: Law Talk - STEPHANIE MYERS

Pounders Wins Award, Breaks Gender Barriers

STEPHANIE MYERS

The Daily News

Memphis attorney Dorothy J. Pounders became the first woman recipient of the Memphis Bar Associations highest award, the Judge Jerome Turner Lawye...

61. Archived Article: Stable (lead) - Lead

Mounted Patrol to Build New Stable

City keeps costs down by using donated land

LANCE ALLAN

The Daily News

When racehorses are put out to pasture, it means their days of service are over and theyll spend their remaining days roami...

62. Archived Article: Market Focus - When the Memphis City School Board implemented a policy two years ago that all of its 118,000 students in 165 schools must wea

School uniform policy drives sales for area retailers

By ANDREW BELL

The Daily News

When the Memphis City Scho...

63. Archived Article: Architect (lead) - Great old building keeps firm Downtown Great old building keeps firm Downtown

By LANCE ALLAN

The Daily News

The new Downtown elementary school, opening in August, might fill a public school void in the area, but it caused a problem for one ...

64. Archived Article: Daily Digest - FedEx Freight wins

FedEx Freight wins

top safety award
FedEx Corp. subsidiary FedEx Freight East received a first place award in the American Trucking Associations National Fleet Safety Contest in the line haul carrier category for over 1...

65. Archived Article: Memos - Sgt. Jackie Setliff

Sgt. Jackie Setliff of the Shelby County Sheriffs Office was chosen as Officer of the Year by the Optimist Club. A ceremony honoring Setliff begins at 10 a.m. today in the Sheriffs Conference Room, 201 Poplar Ave., ninth floor...

66. Archived Article: Daily Digest - Buckeye marks

Buckeye marks

loss for quarter

Buckeye Technologies Inc. announced net sales for the quarter ended March 31 were $163.5 million, essentially equal to the comparable quarter of the prior year.

For the quarter, Buckeye incurr...

67. Archived Article: Memos - Cindi Gresham was promoted to senior vice president with the Boyle Insurance Agency

Cindi Gresham was promoted to senior vice president with Boyle Insurance Agency. She joined Boyle in 1987 as a customer service representative. Prior to the promo...

68. Archived Article: Daily Digest - Memphis Council approves

Memphis Council approves

Walgreens, Chick-fil-A plans

The Memphis City Council voted 9-3 Tuesday to approve a planned development that might bring a new Walgreens and a Chick-fil-A eatery to Poplar Avenue in East Me...

69. Archived Article: Memos - Veronica F

Veronica F. Coleman-Davis was appointed to Bank of Bartletts board of directors. She is a former U.S. Attorney in Memphis. She is president and chief executive officer of the National Institute for Law and Equity. Molly Okeon was promo...

70. Archived Article: Calendar - Calendar of events Jan

Calendar of events July 22-July 28

July 23

The Memphis Bar Association is hosting another in its Masters of the Law luncheon series at 12:15 p.m. Dorothy Pounders, a partner with Pounders Coleman, will discuss Client ...

71. Archived Article: Law Briefs - Summer School at the University of Memphis is 4 p

Former Vice President Gore will stump for the Shelby County Democratic Party's 17 candidates during a Get-Out-The-Vote Rally at the Overton Park Shell beginning at 2:30 p.m. Sunday. The rally is f...

72. Archived Article: Memphis 2005 (lead) - Business rolls out for Memphis 2005 Business rolls out for Memphis 2005 review By MARY DANDO The Daily News About 50 members of the business community met Thursday in the pavilion of St. Jude Childrens Research Hospital for the first annual year-end...

73. Archived Article: Real Focus - By JENNIFER MURLEY

U of M is one big construction zone nowadays

By JENNIFER MURLEY

The Daily News

There is hardly a corner of the University of Memphis campus untouched by a construction project of some kind within the past five years. <...

74. Archived Article: Memos - John P John P. Murphy has joined Thomas & Betts Corp. as senior vice president and chief financial officer effective late March. Murphy, 52, has been senior vice president and chief financial officer of Johns Manville Corporation since 1997. Pri...

75. Archived Article: Marketplace St - By SUZANNE THOMPSON Champions of life Ty Cobbs C.R.O.S.S. Fire Commandos couple evangelism and exercise By SUZANNE THOMPSON The Daily News Most people dont think of bungee cords when they think of Bible studies, but Ty Cobb wants to change that. His...

76. Archived Article: Marketplace - By SUZANNE THOMPSON Roadmap to success Memphis Entrepreneurship Institute at U of M adds classes, offers business owner hopefuls training, advice   By SUZANNE THOMPSON The Daily News Instructor Roger Kirk is looking forward to summer, but not b...

77. Archived Article: Comm Focus - By STACEY PETSCHAUER Breaking down barriers A new program seeks to improve community relations by promoting the building trades By STACEY PETSCHAUER The Daily News Building with bricks and mortar is the usual business of the Memphis Building & C...

78. Archived Article: Law (sexual Assault) - By STACEY PETSCHAUER Developing defenses New initiative brings together local groups to reduce the number of sexual assaults By STACEY PETSCHAUER The Daily News Although offense rates have been decreasing steadily for many types of crimes in recent ...

79. Archived Article: Memos - Resource Bancshares Mortgage Bruce Clark has been named senior vice president, systems technology and support, and chief information officer for AutoZone Inc. He most recently was chief information officer and senior vice president, telemarketing, f...

80. Archived Article: Standout St - By SUZANNE THOMPSON Colliervilles music man Lifelong musician Wayne Warren shares his love of performing arts with the community By SUZANNE THOMPSON The Daily News Wayne Warren played "Silent Night" on the piano during a Christmas pageant ...

81. Archived Article: Relo - By DIANNA DEAREN By DIANNA DEAREN The Daily News Two major relocation networks for independent real estate firms have consolidated, and local member firms expect this to expand and improve their services. Relo/ Inter-City Relocation Services, Inc. a...

82. Archived Article: Memos - James Spisak has been named the site director for Stream Internationals Memphis technical support center James Spisak has been named the site director for Stream Internationals Memphis technical support center. He previously was the general manager ...

83. Archived Article: Kiddie Guns.st - Memphis City Schools has developed a re-entry program for children, some of whom have been expelled for carrying guns in school U.S. attorney returns indictments on teens By SUZANNE THOMPSON The Daily News Veronica Coleman, U.S. attorney for the Wes...

84. Archived Article: Calendar - July 7 July 7 The Society for Technical Communication will meet at the Unicorn restaurant at the corner of Quince and Kirby. Social hour is at 6:30 p.m., and the meeting begins at 7 p.m. The speaker will be Mark Satterfield, a technical writer for B...

85. Archived Article: Calendar - July 9 July 9 The World Affairs Council of Memphis, the Tennessee Governors School for International Studies, the Mid-South Environmental Forum and the Memphis Bar Association will present "Environmental Security and Opportunities for U.S. Inve...

86. Archived Article: Lausanne Expansion Lj - lj 10/5 cates Lausanne begins work on $3 million addition By LAURIE JOHNSON The Daily News The Lausanne Collegiate School at 1381 W. Massey Road has started construction on its first expansion project in three decades  a $3 million addition des...

87. Archived Article: Law Focus - By SUZANNE THOMPSON Joining the judiciary Williams and McCarroll join and rejoin, respectively, Circuit Court bench By SUZANNE THOMPSON The Daily News Circuit Court Judge Karen R. Williams is seated in her chambers, surrounded by walnut paneling and...

88. Archived Article: Law Briefs - The Tennessee Supreme Court on Oct The Tennessee Supreme Court on Oct. 28 entered an Agreed Order of Enforcement adjudging Henry M. Beaty Jr., who is currently under suspension, to be in willful contempt of court and extending the current suspension...

89. Archived Article: Tech Center Chg - Tennessee Technology Center Tennessee Technology Center starts $5 million project By CAMILLE H. GAMBLE The Daily News Tennessee Technology Center has started construction on a $5 million renovation and expansion project at its Alabama Avenue main br...

90. Archived Article: Market Moving Lj - lj 10/5 cates Moving mania, On the move Memphis movers reporting record business for summer 1996 Collierville, Cordova are popular local destinations By LAURIE JOHNSON The Daily News From Memorial Day to Labor Day 1996, approximately 20 million Amer...

91. Archived Article: Legal Briefs - 10/26 Briefs A group of students from the University of Memphis law school, in conjunction with Memphis Area Legal Services, has opened a neighborhood office in Orange Mound. The Legal Service Center is located at 680 Hanley St., Room 120. The cente...