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Editorial Results (free)

1. More at Moore -

The large old trees on its campus and the large paned windows of its brick buildings indicate the William R. Moore College of Technology has been around for a while.

It was the idea of William R. Moore, a dry goods wholesaler, who left a $500,000 endowment to fund the institution following his death in 1909.

2. Rogero Talks ‘Smart Growth,’ Democratic Politics -

Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero became the first woman to hold that office when she won the election in 2011.

She’s been actively involved in a number of local issues since her election, from urban-core revitalization and business recruitment to broader social issues such as marriage equality.

3. Moore Tech Awakens -

The large old trees on its campus and the paned windows of its brick buildings indicate the William R. Moore College of Technology has been around for a while.

It was the idea of William R. Moore, a dry goods wholesaler, who left a $500,000 endowment to fund the institution following his death in 1909.

4. Keeping Promises -

With more than 50,000 high school seniors applying for free community college tuition and fees through Gov. Bill Haslam’s Tennessee Promise, it’s reasonable to wonder if Tennessee’s community colleges have the infrastructure – including classroom space and instructors – to handle such an influx of new students.

5. Contrasting Ballot -

The midterm election saw contrasting issues and candidates, particularly in Tennessee where an incumbent governor and U.S. senator were both re-elected while four amendments to the state Constitution were passed.

6. Voters Approve Wine, Amendments -

Shelby County citizens voted 2-to-1 Tuesday, Nov. 4, against a proposed amendment to the Tennessee Constitution that gives the Tennessee Legislature the power to regulate abortion, including in cases of rape or incest.

7. Voters Approve Wine, Constitutional Amendments -

Shelby County citizens voted 2-to-1 Tuesday, Nov. 4, against a proposed amendment to the Tennessee Constitution that gives the Tennessee Legislature the power to regulate abortion, including in cases of rape or incest.

8. Amendments, Wine Dominate Election Day -

The last of 2014’s three elections promises to be defined just as much by the questions on the ballot as it is by the choices among candidates.

Election Day is Tuesday, Nov. 4, across Tennessee, with polls open in Shelby County from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.

9. Commission Splits on Repeal of Wage Standards -

Shelby County Commissioners split Monday, Oct. 27, on the first reading of two ordinance that would repeal prevailing wage and living wage standards set by the commission in earlier ordinances.

The commission approved on the first of three readings Monday an ordinance that would do away with the county’s prevailing wage standard, which has been moot since a change in Tennessee state law.

10. Alexander vs. Ball -

Lamar Alexander and Gordon Ball were on the same campaign trail but different races at about this time 36 years ago.

11. Council Considers Car Lot By New Graceland Hotel -

The Memphis City Council takes up a special use permit Tuesday, Oct. 21, to allow a used car lot at 3510 Elvis Presley Blvd., south of Winchester Road, by Babak Makki.

12. Political Leaders Weigh In on Ebola Prep -

There is the medical response to the potential of an Ebola outbreak in the U.S. And then there is the political response to the possibility of such an outbreak.

And health care professionals tend to stick to the medical response and leave the political response to those who are elected.

13. Budget Deficit Drops to $483 Billion, Lowest Since 2008 -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The deficit for the just completed 2014 budget year was $483 billion, the lowest of President Barack Obama's six years in office, the government reported Wednesday.

It's the lowest since 2008 and, when measured against the size of the economy, is below the average deficits of the past 40 years. The deficit equaled 2.8 percent of gross domestic product, which is the economy's total output of goods and services.

14. Methodist Opens Care Clinic in Marion -

A subsidiary of Memphis-based Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare has opened a primary care clinic in Marion, Ark., and officials hope more providers will follow suit to close the gap left by the sudden closure of Crittenden Regional Hospital in West Memphis.

15. Commissioner Rethinking Handling of Older Teens -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The head of the state Department of Children's Services is considering whether older teens should be moved from the department's custody into the adult correctional system after a third major escape attempt from one of its juvenile detention centers in less than a month.

16. Take a Right at Candyland, Cruise Down Memory Lane -

Bill Decker has confessed to committing an “old Nashville” act. The founder of Decker Wealth Management admits he recently gave a friend directions to a certain destination that included a turn at a now-demolished Nashville landmark.

17. Searching for Doctors -

So here’s the offer: lower salary – meaning it will take longer to pay down your student loan debt – less prestige, and perhaps even a questioning of your intelligence and skill.

In 2014, that’s what comes with the decision to become a primary care physician. Recently, a fourth-year medical student at the University of Pennsylvania, Mara Gordon, wrote an article for The Atlantic explaining her decision to become a primary care doctor.

18. Singing Mechanic’s Life Much Like the Songs He Sings -

The Singing Mechanic – “I’ve got that name. Nobody else can use it,” says Billy Devereaux – sits by his worn, 1,200-square-foot, two-room cottage and looks down at Boots, his Dutch Shepherd.

“He’s a possum killer and he runs security,” says Billy, 55, gazing across the swath of remote land separated by a long gravel trail from Smith Springs Road in Antioch.

19. Influence Game: Chemical Trade Tries to Shape Regulations -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The powerful chemical industry is putting its lobbying muscle behind legislation that would establish standards for chemicals used in products from household goods to cellphones and plastic water bottles – but also make it tougher for states to enact their own regulations.

20. Coverage Gap Leaves Rural Tennessee Hospitals on Life Support -

Four rural hospitals have closed and dozens are at risk of shuttering: That’s the fallout, some say, from Gov. Bill Haslam’s decision not to join the Affordable Care Act in 2013 and tap into millions in promised federal funds for Tennessee’s financially-strapped health care institutions.

21. Power Play -

When the Tennessee Valley Authority board voted in August to build a new power plant in Southwest Memphis, it was a decision based on factors larger than the power needs in Memphis.

But it was also a decision that is just as important for Memphis as the decision to build the existing Allen Fossil Plant there 55 years ago.

22. Governor Gets Report on Tennessee Juvenile Jails -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A security audit will be performed on all three of the state's youth development centers after a recent breakout and violence at the facility in Middle Tennessee, according to a preliminary report sent to the governor.

23. Vols Among NCAA’s Youngest Headed Into Sunday Opener -

KNOXVILLE – For better or worse, University of Tennessee football coach Butch Jones won’t need to wait long to see the talent level of his highly touted freshman class.

Jones will find out Sunday night at 7 when the Vols play host to Utah State at Neyland Stadium. The Aggies will be an underdog – probably by a touchdown or so – and a trendy pick for some as an upset special.

24. Crittenden Regional Hospital to Close -

Crittenden Regional Hospital in West Memphis stopped admitting patients Monday, Aug. 25, and will close permanently Sept. 7.

The hospital’s board of trustees made the decision, and hospital administrators announced the closing on the hospital’s website Monday.

25. Reshaping a City, One Lot at a Time -

John G. Brittle Jr. doesn’t have an office. He has a war room. The space, crowded with maps, charts, books, piles of paper and marked-up spreadsheets, is ground zero for InfillNashville, the 10-person team of site selection specialists that Brittle leads at Village Real Estate Services.

26. Bigger, Better, Louder -

“When it comes to college football, the South has no equal, because the Southeastern Conference has no equal. Find me a conference with a better commissioner, better players, better head coaches, better staffs, better game-day atmospheres, better-looking coeds – better anything.”

27. Poll: Obama Health Law is a Tale of 2 Americas -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama's health care law has become a tale of two Americas.

States that fully embraced the law's coverage expansion are experiencing a significant drop in the number of uninsured residents, according to a major new survey released Tuesday. States whose leaders still object to "Obamacare" are seeing much less change.

28. Local Projects Win State Grant Money -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam handed out five oversized grant checks Wednesday, July 23, on the University of Memphis campus for a total of $1.4 million in grants funding for various pedestrian, park and recreation projects across Shelby County.

29. ‘Significant Headwinds’ -

When Gov. Bill Haslam joined local economic development and civic officials at FedExForum in January to announce that Conduit Global would open a call center in Shelby County that would employ 1,000 people over the next three to five years, it provided a much-needed boost to the local office real estate sector.

30. CSC Sugar to Open Plant in Covington -

CSC Sugar LLC will open a sugar processing plant Monday, June 30, in the Rialto Industrial Park in Covington, Tenn., that will hire 50 people and prompt the hiring of more drivers at Larry Bowman Trucking in nearby Ripley.

31. Events -

The Circuit Playhouse will present the dark comedy “The Lyons” Friday, May 30, through June 22, at the theater, 51 S. Cooper St. Buy tickets at playhouseonthesquare.org.

32. 5 Arkansas Airports Win $2.9M in Grants -

Three members of the Arkansas congressional delegation say five airports in the state, including West Memphis Municipal Airport, will share in $2.9 million in federal grants.

Sens. Mark Pryor and John Boozman and Rep. Tim Griffin announced Thursday that the Federal Aviation Administration is awarding the grants for airport facility upgrades and improvements.

33. 5 Arkansas Airports Win $2.9 Million in Grants -

Three members of the Arkansas congressional delegation say five airports in the state, including West Memphis Municipal Airport, will share in $2.9 million in federal grants.

Sens. Mark Pryor and John Boozman and Rep. Tim Griffin announced Thursday that the Federal Aviation Administration is awarding the grants for airport facility upgrades and improvements.

34. Fairway Manor Development Opens -

City of Memphis and Memphis Land Bank officials formally opened Fairway Manor Thursday, May 15, in southwest Memphis.

35. City Council Approves Music Hall of Fame Funding -

Memphis City Council members have approved $250,000 in funding for a Memphis Music Hall of Fame at Hard Rock Cafe’s new location at Beale and Second streets.

The funding from the federal money turned over to the city when federal officials abandoned plans for Interstate 40 through Overton Park is the first of two funding requests organizers of the Hall of Fame plan to make of the city for the $1.2 million project, which will also include private funding.

36. Across the River -

The Arkansas land between the bridges across the Mississippi River at Memphis doesn’t have a name, at least not yet.

If graffiti is any indication, lots of people go there. And they cross numerous boundaries on dirt and gravel roads and paths that can end abruptly and are posted with “no trespassing” signs and other warnings as well as railroad video cameras.

37. US Attorney’s Office Names Civil Rights Head -

Brian K. Coleman, assistant U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Tennessee, will lead the civil rights unit of the prosecutor’s office.

Coleman was named to the post Tuesday, April 29, by U.S. Attorney Ed Stanton, as unit chief Larry Laurenzi moved to the post of first assistant in the office.

38. This week in Memphis history: April 11-17 -

2005: Work was stopped on construction of the DeSoto West Middle School and Desoto Elementary Schools following the discovery of archaeological remains, including human remains that could have been a burial ground. Archaeologists from the University of Memphis dated some of the material to 500 years before Spanish explorer Hernando DeSoto came into the area in the 16th century. Construction on the schools resumed later.

39. Fincher Announces Re-Election Bid -

U.S. Rep. Stephen Fincher of Frog Jump, Tenn., was expected to formally announce his re-election bid at a Republican Party event Monday, March 31, in Jackson, Tenn.

Fincher is seeking a third two-year term representing the 8th Congressional District, which covers rural West Tennessee as well as part of East Memphis and east Shelby County.

40. Arkansas Among Few States With Majority Override -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — A political scientist says that while veto overrides are rare in Arkansas, they could become more common if the margin between Democrats and Republicans at the statehouse remains narrow.

41. Fincher Outlines ‘Complicated’ Farm Bill Details -

The only active row-crop farmer in Congress has been on the road the last month talking particulars of a very complex farm bill with farmers not only in his West Tennessee district, which includes part of Memphis, but in five other states and other parts of Tennessee.

42. AutoZone Grows Sales, Net Income in 2nd Quarter -

Whenever AutoZone Inc. chairman, president and CEO Bill Rhodes presents the company’s quarterly earnings to analysts, it’s never long before he starts talking about the weather.

43. MalmoMemphis Completes Three Law Firm Leases -

Three Memphis law firms represented by MalmoMemphis Real Estate Inc. have renewed their office leases or leased new spaces.

44. Agriculture Census Shows Boom in Farm Sales -

WASHINGTON (AP) – American agriculture has experienced a boom, with market values of crops, livestock and total agricultural products reaching record highs even as the amount of U.S. farmland declined, according to a new government survey.

45. Tennessee Official: UAW no Deal Breaker for Memphis Site -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Tennessee officials promoting a 6-square-mile "mega site" outside Memphis say it would be ideally suited for a new auto assembly plant — even if its workers are represented by the United Auto Workers union.

46. Cohen Against Haslam’s College Plan -

The legislator who pushed and finally won passage of the Tennessee Lottery a decade ago doesn’t like the plan by Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam to use most of the lottery reserve for an endowment to offer two years of community college free to every Tennessee high school graduate.

47. Frigid Weather Pulls January Auto Sales Down 3 Percent -

DETROIT (AP) – Auto sales slid 3 percent in January as bouts of snow, ice and frigid temperatures in much of the country kept buyers snug in their homes instead of venturing out to car dealers.

48. Applications Open for Tennessee Supreme Court Vacancy -

NASHVILLE (AP) – The Governor's Commission for Judicial Appointments is now taking applications to fill an upcoming vacancy on the state Supreme Court.

Justice Bill Koch has announced he is retiring on July 15 to become dean of the Nashville School of Law. Candidates from Middle or West Tennessee can apply through Feb. 21. Koch has served on the state's highest court since 2007.

49. Billingsley Is Newest County Commissioner As "Tax Dead" Program Advances -

Former Germantown alderman Mark Billingsley is the newest Shelby County Commissioner.

On the second ballot Monday, Jan. 13, commissioners appointed Billingsley to fill the vacancy created by the resignation this month of Wyatt Bunker, who became mayor of Lakeland last year.

50. Can ‘Cardinal Way’ Improve Park Attendance? -

To put it in the game’s terms, the Memphis Redbirds/AutoZone Park/St. Louis Cardinals defeated political skepticism and doubt by a score of 8-4 and saved baseball at Third and Union for many summers to come.

51. Flipping the Switch -

Tim Bolding, executive director of United Housing Inc., had become increasingly interested over the years in energy efficiency, sustainability and alternate energy sources when he saw homes in New Orleans being rebuilt with solar panels.

52. Banks Tweak Checking, Online Options -

As the two banks with the biggest customer deposit shares in Memphis, First Tennessee Bank and Regions Bank must stay closely in touch with their clients’ checking and online banking needs.

53. How American-US Airways Deal Impacts Competitors -

NEW YORK (AP) – The Department of Justice announced Tuesday that it would let the merger of American Airlines and US Airways proceed after the two carriers agreed to give up landing and takeoff slots and gates at key airports, notably Washington's Reagan National and New York's LaGuardia. With the agreement, the government hopes to increase access to the nation's busiest airports for low-cost airlines and to maintain flights to smaller cities.

54. Builders Showcase -

The Vesta Home Show kicked off over the weekend, with large crowds turning out to explore six new homes in a gated Germantown community.

Don Glays, executive director of the West Tennessee Home Builders Association, said attendance during the opening weekend of the show was strong.

55. Oldham Opens Sheriff Re-Election Bid -

Shelby County Sheriff Bill Oldham opened his re-election campaign Saturday, Nov. 2, with something he didn’t have four years ago: a record.

56. New in Rural Tennessee: Discovery Park of America -

UNION CITY, Tenn. (AP) – The gleaming white building with curved exteriors and a spaceship-like tower emerges from the flat landscape of West Tennessee like something out of science fiction, but it's not a villain's lair or superhero's headquarters.

57. Tire-Maker Hankook to Build Tennessee Plant -

South Korean tire-maker Hankook announced Monday that it will build its first North American plant in Tennessee, creating 1,800 jobs.

Hankook, the world's seventh-largest tire maker, said it will build the $800 million facility in Clarksville. Construction on the 1.5 million-square-foot facility is scheduled to begin by the end of next year, and it will begin making high-end performance tires by early 2016.

58. Mississippi River Mayors Meet on Mud Island -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. and mayors from 13 other cities on the Mississippi River will meet Thursday, Oct. 17, on Mud Island to preview an economic impact report on the lower river and discuss their work with federal officials to build a container on barge shipping program.

59. Government: Most Heating Bills to Rise This Winter -

The government forecast Tuesday that most households will pay more for heat this winter. Heating oil users will catch a slight break, but still pay near-record prices to keep warm.

Prices for natural gas, electricity and propane should be higher, the primary reason that more than 90 percent of U.S. homes will incur higher heating expenses.

60. John P. Freeman Teacher Honored by State -

Melissa Collins, a second-grade teacher at John P. Freeman Optional School, has been honored by the Tennessee Department of Education as teacher of the year for the West Tennessee grand division.

61. Four West Tennessee Sites Declared Shovel-Ready -

Four industrial sites in West Tennessee have been certified by the state as shovel-ready “Select Tennessee Certified Sites.”

The designation by the state Department of Economic and Community Development means the sites have met standards that site consultants consider essential when advising companies looking for a new location.

62. Health Care’s ‘Lost Opportunity’: A Q&A with Phil Bredesen -

More than two years after leaving state office, Phil Bredesen, the popular former governor and mayor of Nashville, is still on the go. While enjoying a post-political life in Nashville that includes gardening and grandparenting with his wife, Andrea Conte, Bredesen remains active in promoting bipartisan solutions to issues such as the national debt as a speaker and as a member of the Governors’ Council of the Bipartisan Policy Center, a Washington, D.C.- based think tank.

63. $2.2 Million Grant Adds to Main to Main Funds -

A $2.2 million grant from the U.S. Department of Transportation to the Memphis Area Transit Authority brings the federal funding for the Main Street to Main Street Multi-Modal Connector Project to $17.2 million.

64. Feuer Powertrain Plans $140 Million Tunica Plant -

Feuer Powertrain Co. will make crankshafts at a $140 million plant in Tunica, Miss., starting in early 2015.

65. Weddle-West Voted GRE Board Chair-Elect -

Dr. Karen Weddle-West, dean of the graduate school, vice provost for academic affairs and director of diversity initiatives at the University of Memphis, has been voted chair-elect of the GRE (Graduate Record Examination) Board. The national board establishes all policies for the GRE program, the most widely used graduate-school admissions test, and oversees GRE assessments, services and research.

66. Saddle Creek to be Expanded, Renovated -

Trademark Property Co. of Fort Worth will demolish 20,000 square feet of existing space in its Saddle Creek South development in Germantown and add 40,000 square feet of retail space in the area between that and Saddle Creek West.

67. Job Training Spurs Unilever Growth -

The Unilever USA plant in Covington should be the largest ice cream manufacturing plant in the world by 2016, following an $108.7 million expansion announced last week in Covington.

But when the global company began making ice cream in Covington in 2011 at what used to be a SlimFast plant, it was not a promising beginning.

68. First Contract for Main to Main Connector Vetted -

The first contract in the $35 million Main to Main Connector project was approved Wednesday, Sept. 18, by a project coordinating committee.

The $1.9 million contract with Ferrell Paving Inc. of Memphis is the connection of South Main Street to the Harahan Bridge and a pedestrian and bicycle walkway on the bridge that is another phase of the project. The work will better light and improve and install sidewalks as well as add street markings to Carolina Avenue.

69. Haslam Cites Manufacturing Boom in Grants -

Armed with a $16.5 million fund approved by the General Assembly, Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam has lots of West Tennessee stops this week as he awards grants that will provide workforce training equipment to state schools certifying workers or training them for associate degrees.

70. Wealthy Business Executives Eye Political Races -

CHICAGO (AP) – He has never been elected to anything, not even "student council in high school," as he boasts. He has little patience for schmoozing. In dealing with people, he admits to being "pretty blunt" - more suited to running a large private equity firm, which Bruce Rauner did successfully for 30 years, than seeking votes for governor, which he intends to do in Illinois next year.

71. Obama Economic Adviser Leaving, Successor Picked -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama will replace Gene Sperling, his chief economic adviser and West Wing workaholic, with Jeffrey Zients, a top aide who has filled in as acting budget director and who led a White House effort to streamline government.

72. Tennessee Lawmakers Drafting Hemp Bill -

KNOXVILLE (AP) – Two state lawmakers in Tennessee are pointing to Kentucky's recent approval of hemp farming as they push for a similar measure.

The Knoxville News Sentinel reports Republican Sen. Frank Niceley of Strawberry Plains is drafting a bill with Republican Rep. Andy Holt of Dresden, and they plan to introduce the measure in next year's legislative session.

73. Shelby County to Play Key Role in 2014 State Election -

As prospective candidates weigh special election races in the next three months for a state House seat and suburban school boards, there are also signs of life in Shelby County in the statewide races on the 2014 election ballot.

74. Events -

The Greater Memphis Chamber will host a conversation with Bill Strickland, CEO of Manchester Bidwell Corp. and author of “Making the Impossible, Possible,” Wednesday, Aug. 21, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at The Peabody, 149 Union Ave. Strickland’s topic is “The Art of Leadership & The Business of Social Change.” Cost is $35 for members and $40 for nonmembers. Visit memphischamber.com or call 543-3571.

75. Events -

Playhouse on the Square will present a Great Wine Performances wine tasting and theater contest Tuesday, Aug. 20, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Playhouse, 66 S. Cooper St. Characters from “Les Miserables” will serve 10 French wines and tests attendees’ knowledge of the musical for prizes. Cost is $50 in advance or $65 at the door. Visit playhouseonthesquare.org.

76. Events -

The Fayette County chapter of West Tennessee Home Builders Association will meet Wednesday, Aug. 14, at 11:30 a.m. at Somerville Bank & Trust, 16790 U.S. 64. U.S. Rep. Stephen Fincher will discuss proposed government-sponsored enterprises reform bill. The meeting is open to the public. Cost is $10. Email rterry@mahba.com.

77. US Transportation Secretary Tours Main Street Downtown -

U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx got a look at Main Street Memphis from Uptown to South Main Wednesday, Aug. 7, as the city prepares to use $15 million in federal grant funds to renovate it and add a pedestrian and bicycle boardwalk across the Mississippi River.

78. Senate Set to Finish Work on Student Loan Deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Borrowing for tuition, housing and books would be less expensive for college students and their parents this fall but the costs would start climbing almost immediately under a deal the Senate was poised to pass Wednesday.

79. State Delays Office Lease Announcement -

Groups hoping to garner the state’s real estate needs Downtown will have to wait a little longer to find out if they placed the winning bid.

The state had originally planned to issue a notice of awarding the lease for its office space needs Tuesday, July 23, but that date has been changed to Aug. 19, when the executive subcommittee of the State Building Commission meets.

80. Downtown Offices Gain Attention -

The Downtown Memphis Commission focuses on living, working and playing Downtown.

Downtown has experienced tremendous success in the living and playing areas over the years, but the “work” part of the equation still needed a boost. So Downtown officials have launched several efforts to bring more workers to the area and promote and capitalize on existing commercial real estate successes.

81. Five Groups Bid for State Office Space -

Five groups have submitted bids to become the new home to roughly 900 state workers.

JP-Memphis, Memphis Commerce Square Partners, Peabody Tower GP, Peabody Place Gold GP and Hertz Memphis all submitted bids for the state’s real estate needs.

82. Deadline Arrives for State’s Office Space Needs -

The future of the state’s role as a major employer and user of office space Downtown could become much clearer next month.

Proposals are due Tuesday, July 2, for 100,000 square feet of office space that will become vacant when the state abandons the Donnelly J. Hill State Office Building Downtown.

83. Council Begins Action On End Of Budget Year Items -

Memphis City Council members approved several budget items Tuesday, June 18, for the end of the current fiscal year before turning their attention to the budget for the coming fiscal year.

That includes a long promised Holmes-Tchulahoma Park in South Memphis. The council appropriated $1.5 million for the park’s construction in a contract with Wagner General Contractors Inc.

84. Commission Pushes Back Seismic Standards Date -

The Shelby County Commission approved Monday, June 17, a set of three ordinances on third and final reading Monday that push back the effective date for new seismic measures for new home construction and renovations of existing buildings until the end of 2013.

85. Southern GOP Leaders Meet in Alabama -

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — Republican leaders from 10 Southern states have been meeting in Alabama to plan strategies for making new GOP inroads across the region.

Alabama Republican Chairman Bill Armistead says the two-day meeting of state party chairs and executive directors concluded Tuesday in Birmingham.

86. Commission OKs Land Sale for ‘Penny’ Hardaway Courts -

Shelby County Commissioners approved Monday, June 3, the transfer of nearly 10 acres of land in Cordova on the west side of Herbert Road at Fischer Steel Road to Gameday Health Kids Foundation as the location of “Penny’s Fast Break Courts Sports Facility” – the children’s basketball site named for NBA and University of Memphis basketball star Anfernee “Penny” Hardaway.

87. More Charges May Come in Case Involving Haslams -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Sudden guilty pleas by a pair of mid-level executives show the investigation into the truck stop chain controlled by the family of Tennessee's governor and the Cleveland Browns' owner is picking up steam, with prosecutors likely setting their sights on higher-ups at the company, experts say.

88. Beale Club Reopening About Timing -

The negotiations to reopen one of Beale Street’s busiest and most profitable nightspots were about not missing one of the busiest Downtown weekends of the year and how to handle the allegation that some employees of Club 152 either sold drugs or were complicit in drug sales in the club.

89. Events -

The Rotary Club of Memphis East will meet Wednesday, May 22, at noon at The Racquet Club of Memphis, 5111 Sanderlin Ave. Bill West, founder of The West Clinic, will speak. Cost is $17. R.S.V.P. to Lee Hughes at lmhughes@bellsouth.net.

90. Club 152 Hearing Delayed to Tuesday -

A first hearing on the nuisance court order that closed Club 152 on Beale Street last week was postponed Monday, May 20, to Tuesday before General Sessions Environmental Court Judge Larry Potter.

91. Main to Main’s Carpenter Moves to Plough Foundation -

Mike Carpenter, the project manager for the city’s Main Street to Main Street project, will become the executive director of the nonprofit Plough Foundation next month.

92. ZeroTo510 Accelerator Launches New Season -

Dr. Steve Bares, president and executive director of the Memphis Bioworks Foundation, is clear-eyed and unequivocal about what success looks like for the startup accelerator program his foundation operates and which launched its new season this week.

93. State Zeros in on Downtown Office Space -

The future of the state’s role as a major employer and user of office space Downtown could become much clearer this week.

Proposals are due Thursday, May 16, for 100,000 square feet of office space that will become vacant when the state abandons the Donnelley J. Hill State Office Building Downtown. A recent request for proposals from the agency that handles state real estate appears to put the state’s focus entirely on Downtown.

94. Council Approves Apartments, Golf Driving Range -

Memphis City Council members approved Tuesday, May 7, a golf driving range on Summer Avenue north of Sycamore View Road, a 240-unit apartment complex on 19.3 acres at Lenow and Dexter roads and a 69-unit apartment complex on the northern side of Shelby Farms Park to the west of Germantown Parkway.

95. Parks Controversy Back to City Council -

The committee recommendations are in for new names for three Confederate-themed city parks. And the long-running controversy about the parks is now back to the Memphis City Council.

The ad hoc committee of nine, which included several historians and two City Council members, held its final meeting Monday, April 29, and voted with little discussion on several ideas for what used to be known as Confederate, Forrest and Jefferson Davis parks.

96. Metropolitan Bank Still Growing 5 Years In -

Metropolitan Bank has come a long way in five short years. Since being founded amid the worst financial crisis in the U.S. in generations, the bank – which in March celebrated its fifth birthday – has grown its assets from $243 million at the end of 2008 to $722 million at the end of 2012.

97. Basketball Boon -

Before the Grizzlies began their first-round playoff series with the Clippers in Los Angeles, Dennis Flanagan looked ahead to Game 3, which was to be played on Thursday night, April 25, in Memphis.

98. Dickerson Learns Unintentional Consequences -

As a freshman lawmaker, state Sen. Steven Dickerson, R-Nashville, said he spent his first legislative session “pretty-tightly circumscribed.”

99. Failed Education Bills on Radar for Next Session -

NASHVILLE (AP) – In the last few years, Tennessee hasn't shied away from contentious education initiatives as it seeks to remain at the forefront of education reform in the nation.

U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan has even characterized the state's efforts as "courageous leadership."

100. Senate OKs Tennessee Animal Abuse Reporting Bill -

NASHVILLE (AP) – A proposal that would require anyone recording images of animal abuse to submit unedited footage or photos to law enforcement within 48 hours has passed the Senate.

The measure sponsored by Republican Sen. Dolores Gresham of Somerville was approved 22-9 on Tuesday. The companion bill is awaiting a vote on the House floor.