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Editorial Results (free)

1. Arkansas Airports Get $8.5M in FAA Grants -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Members of Arkansas' congressional delegation have announced $8.5 million in Federal Aviation Administration grants to improve airports throughout the state.

U.S. Sens. John Boozman and Tom Cotton, and U.S. Reps. Rick Crawford, French Hill, Steve Womack and Bruce Westerman said in a statement Monday that 13 airports will receive the grants.

2. Three in Tennessee Test Positive For West Nile Virus -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — Three people in Tennessee have tested positive for West Nile virus.

The Tennessee Department of Health announced Thursday that one case is in East Tennessee, while the other two are in West Tennessee. Department spokesman Bill Christian says one of the cases has been identified as being in Shelby County. Christian says he could not be more specific about where the cases were discovered because of privacy regulations.

3. Council Gives Final Approval To Forrest Statue Removal -

Memphis City Council members gave final approval Tuesday, Aug. 18, to an ordinance setting the stage for removal of the Nathan Bedford Forrest statue in Health Sciences Park

4. New Graceland Hotel Sets Opening Date -

The new $90 million, 450-room resort hotel Elvis Presley Enterprises is building in Whitehaven is scheduled to open Oct. 27, 2016.

The Guest House at Graceland, located on Elvis Presley Boulevard north of the Graceland mansion, will open with a four-day event including concerts and other activities as well as the traditional ribbon cutting.

5. Binghampton Retail Plan Goes to Land Use Board -

Neighborhood retail in Binghampton tops the Thursday, Aug. 13, agenda of the Memphis-Shelby County Land Use Control Board.

Among the 25 items on the board’s agenda is Binghampton Development Corp.’s request for a planned development to accommodate a retail center with grocery store on 4.87 acres at Sam Cooper Boulevard and Tillman Street.

6. Bates Family Indicted on $18 Million Fraud -

After years of controversy and civil litigation, Memphis federal prosecutors announced Wednesday, Aug. 5, that a grand jury has indicted former Tennessee state Rep. Larry Bates and his two sons on multiple counts of mail and wire fraud and fraud conspiracy.

7. Bates Family Indicted On $18 Million Fraud -

After years of controversy and civil litigation, Memphis federal prosecutors announced Wednesday, Aug. 5, that a grand jury has indicted former Tennessee state Rep. Larry Bates and his two sons on multiple counts of mail and wire fraud and fraud conspiracy.

8. Challengers Unseat 4 DeSoto County State GOP House Members -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Four DeSoto County House Republican incumbents targeted by a pro-school choice group because of opposition to charter schools are among at least nine incumbents who lost party primaries Tuesday.

9. Warehouse At Perimeter Point Sells for $775,000 -

A Perimeter Point industrial building has been sold for $775,000.

Missouri-based Martabra Real Estate LLC acquired the flex warehouse building at 5055 Covington Way, just off Covington Pike south of Elmore Road, from CP Perimeter Point LLC, an affiliate of California-based Coastal Partners LLC.

10. TDOT Delays I-55 Roundabout To Reconsider Bridge Closing -

The Tennessee Department of Transportation has put on hold plans for an Interstate 55 roundabout on the Memphis side of the Memphis-Arkansas bridge citing a review of its plans to close the bridge for nine months during the construction process.

11. Cardwell a Link to Metro’s Past, Present -

Metro Trustee Charlie Cardwell definitely is a member of the “good old boys” network that ran Nashville for decades.

12. Local Green News Piles Up, From Shelby Farms to CBU -

Chelsea Avenue Floodwall Becomes ‘Permission Wall’: The city’s renaissance of murals is taking a different form on the section of North Memphis floodwalls that are a border of sorts for the still developing Chelsea Greenline.

13. Forrest Vote Signals Change in General’s Legacy -

When the city of Memphis voted to rename Forrest Park and two other Confederate-themed parks in Downtown Memphis two years ago, City Council member Bill Boyd criticized the move and extolled Nathan Bedford Forrest’s virtues.

14. Special Action on Same-Sex Nuptials a Waste of Time -

With Republican lawmakers scrambling for a response to the U.S. Supreme Court’s gay-marriage ruling, Tennesseans on both sides of the issue say they are seeking "equality."

Immediately after the court’s decision on Obergefell v. Hodges, Democratic U.S. Rep. Jim Cooper of Nashville said, "Love and equality won. I’m glad the Supreme Court ruled on the right side of history."

15. Chelsea Floodwall Focus of Public Art Festival -

More than 70 artists will display public art being painted along the Chelsea Greenline west of North Evergreen Street during a daylong festival July 18.

The festival is being organized by Paint Memphis with assistance from the UrbanArt Commission.

16. Chelsea Floodwall Focus of Public Art Festival -

More than 70 artists will display public art being painted along the Chelsea Greenline west of North Evergreen Street during a daylong festival July 18.

The festival is being organized by Paint Memphis with assistance from the UrbanArt Commission.

17. Southern Heritage Defined Differently Across Tennessee -

Tennessee’s loyalty was divided in the Civil War, and 150 years later, little is changed as the debate over Confederate symbols arises in the wake of the racist-fueled South Carolina church massacre.

18. Haslam Needs to Back Up Call for More Local Control -

If Gov. Bill Haslam is trying to build political capital, he’s making the right move by trying to light a fire under local officials.

He might also want to turn up the flame on his own game.

19. Drug Trafficking Indictment Targets Gang Members -

One of the leaders of a street gang banned last year from the Legends Park area has violated the “no-gang zone” court order and is now charged with drug trafficking.

Steve Nelson, an alleged leader of the Dixie Homes Murda Gang, directed the gang’s drug dealing activities from the Shelby County Jail. When he wasn’t in jail, he was arrested twice in the Legends Park area for violating the court order that bans gang activity as well as gang members from congregating in the area.

20. ‘If It’s on His Mind, You’re Going to Know It’ -

The state legislature’s vote this year to make the Bible the official book of Tennessee raised eyebrows among believers and nonbelievers statewide.

Although the bill passed the House of Representatives, it was tabled by the Senate following questions about its constitutionality and opposition from the governor, other elected officials and community leaders statewide.

21. TDOT Slates Meetings on I-55 Roundabout -

The Tennessee Department of Transportation will hold two public information sessions June 1 and June 4 on plans to build a new Interstate 55 interchange at E.H. Crump Boulevard, changing it to a roundabout design.

22. TDOT Slates Meetings on I-55 Roundabout -

The Tennessee Department of Transportation will hold two public information sessions June 1 and June 4 on plans to build a new Interstate 55 interchange at E.H. Crump Boulevard, changing it to a roundabout design.

23. Coliseum Fans Push for Roundhouse Reconsideration -

The city’s effort to either restart or reconfigure its plan for the Mid-South Fairgrounds began Saturday, May 23, on the steps of the south entrance to the Mid-South Coliseum.

And it continues Monday and Tuesday, June 1-2, with a set of four town hall meetings – two each evening.

24. Nashville's Next Mayor Must Solve Traffic, Education Woes -

“Traffic is getting worse by the day.” I must have heard that complaint six times last week. Those exact words.

Perhaps some road construction coupled with Vanderbilt’s graduation complicated the situation, but that seems to be the feeling here.

25. Baker Book Traces Conciliatory Political Philosophy -

Long before his death last June, former U.S. Sen. Howard Baker of Tennessee was aware that other Republicans, including those who worked in his groundbreaking campaigns of the 1960s and 1970s, believed it was no longer possible for a political moderate like him to get elected in Tennessee.

26. Restrictions for Tennessee's 7 Abortion Clinics Head to Governor -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Legislation that would place licensing restrictions on all seven of Tennessee's abortion clinics was overwhelmingly approved by state lawmakers Tuesday and sent to the governor, who's expected to sign them into law.

27. Egypt Central Road to Close Temporarily -

Egypt Central Road will be closed Tuesday, April 28, for road construction from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.

The closing for road construction is 500 feet west of Singleton Parkway. Traffic will detour approximately four miles on each side of the road closure using Bolen Huse and Coleman Roads.

28. What’s Better for Commuters? More I-24 Lanes or Monorail? -

With growing population comes increasingly congested commuter traffic, and the Rutherford County corridor between Nashville and Murfreesboro along I-24 is considered the most congested in Middle Tennessee.

29. Five of the Nation’s Finest -

Each year the U.S. Chamber of Commerce recognizes the contribution of small business to the national economy with the Blue Ribbon Small Business Awards. Five from Knoxville’s business community – The Tomato Head, Management Solutions LLC, Design Innovation Architects Inc., Visionary Solutions LLC and AMS Corp. – have been chosen for inclusion in the annual program.

30. What Better Place for an NRA Convention? -

When the National Rifle Association announced that it would hold its 2015 convention in Nashville, the timing was propitious.

In 2010, gun sales and handgun permits were booming, and Tennessee had just enacted a controversial and contested new “guns in bars” law that allowed people with handgun permits to carry concealed firearms into bars and restaurants that serve alcohol.

31. Lowery, Boyd Urge Wharton to Change Riverside Drive -

Memphis City Council chairman Myron Lowery and council member Berlin Boyd are urging Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. to “compromise” on the current layout of Riverside Drive between Beale Street and Georgia Avenue.

32. Is ‘Getting Rid of Public Schools’ Legislature’s Goal? -

Are Tennessee’s public schools headed for extinction? Not if it’s up to Memphis teachers.

A group from Shelby County recently packed a House committee meeting room at the Legislative Plaza in an effort to turn back bills they consider damaging to their profession and the future of public education.

33. US Home Sales Rebound Slightly in February -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Slightly more Americans bought homes in February, but tight inventories, affordability problems and nasty winter weather point to sluggish sales in the coming few months.

34. Prosecution Team Named For Jackson Retrial -

Preliminary hearings in the case of a Memphis woman who received a new trial in the stabbing death of her mother continue in Shelby County Criminal Court.

Mike Dunavant, the special prosecutor in the second-degree murder case against Noura Jackson, announced in a Monday, March 17, hearing before Judge Chris Craft that he has assigned assistant district attorneys Walt Freeland of Tipton County and Mark Davidson of Fayette County to the case.

35. Dunavant Names Prosecution Team for Jackson Retrial -

Preliminary hearings in the case of a Memphis woman who received a new trial in the stabbing death of her mother continue in Shelby County Criminal Court.

Mike Dunavant, the special prosecutor in the second-degree murder case against Noura Jackson, announced in a Monday, March 17, hearing before Judge Chris Craft that he has assigned assistant district attorneys Walt Freeland of Tipton County and Mark Davidson of Fayette County to the case.

36. State Legislators Misfire In Rush to Impress NRA Attendees -

With the National Rifle Association bringing 75,000 people to Nashville for its April 10-12 convention, the timing is seemingly right for the General Assembly to impress by passing a bevy of gun bills.

37. Battle of the Band(width) -

Joyce Coltrin’s business is wandering in Bradley County’s technological wilderness. And it’s likely to remain there – because of legal threats – until the General Assembly changes state law.

38. U of M Adds ‘Materials Science’ to Physics Name -

The University of Memphis Department of Physics is now the Department of Physics and Materials Science.

The name change reflects the department’s status as offering the only materials science program in West Tennessee.

39. University of Memphis Adds ‘Materials Science’ to Physics Name -

The University of Memphis Department of Physics is now the Department of Physics and Materials Science.

The name change reflects the department’s status as offering the only materials science program in West Tennessee.

40. Auto Industry Slows for Bad Weather, But Stays on Course -

DETROIT (AP) – February threw snowstorms and other roadblocks at the auto industry, but U.S. sales of new cars and trucks are still poised to hit their highest level in more than a decade this year.

41. Office That Defends Death Row Inmates Comes Under Fire -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A state agency that defends death row inmates is being criticized for using taxpayer dollars to pay for a legal battle that seeks information on the drugs and people involved in executions while also challenging a law that says electrocution can be used as an alternative to lethal injection.

42. Kelsey’s New Private School Voucher Plan Looks More Like Haslam’s -

Momentum is building this session for voucher legislation that would allow state dollars to follow students from struggling public schools to private and religious institutions.

But it is hardly etched in stone.

43. Haslam Wary of Gas Tax Hike -

Despite low gas prices, a backlog on road projects and prevailing winds for fuel-tax reform, Gov. Bill Haslam is pulling back from a gas-tax increase this session.

After floating the possibility of raising the tax in December, the Republican governor appears to be changing course, in part because of his loss in a Senate committee on Insure Tennessee, the Medicaid expansion alternative that failed to make debate in the full House or Senate.

44. Wharton: Tourism Is Serious Business -

Sometimes in tourism, it is the little things that count. But “little” is relative. Consider the digital LED display screen on the west wall of the Memphis Cook Convention Center – big enough to be seen by eastbound traffic on the Hernando DeSoto Bridge – which local leaders debuted this month after three years of planning.

45. This Week in Memphis History: February 13-19 -

2005: Molson Coors Brewing Co. announced it would close its Memphis brewery in Hickory Hill in 2007 as a result of the Canadian company’s merger with Adolph Coors Co. of Colorado. At the time, the brewery and bottling plant employed 410 people. The phase-out was to begin in the second half of 2005. Today the brewery is known as Blues City Brewery, a part of City Brewing of Latrobe, Wis., producing beers and other beverages under numerous brand names.

46. Common Core is Working – So Kill It -

Common Core determines what Tennessee’s K-12 students should know and when they should learn it, yet like many other issues it has become a political pariah, especially for the state’s Republican leaders.

47. Digital Billboard Debuts On Convention Center -

A digital LED display screen on the west wall of the Memphis Cook Convention Center was turned on Wednesday, Feb. 12, with a ceremonial flip of the switch.

The screen, 39 feet by 14 feet 6 inches, is visible to eastbound traffic on the Hernando DeSoto Bridge and has been a goal of the Memphis Convention and Visitors Bureau for three years.

48. Seven Memphis-Area RadioShacks to Close -

Seven RadioShack stores in the Memphis area are among the 1,784 retail sites the company plans to close, according to court documents related to its bankruptcy filing last week.

The Shelby County stores to close between Feb. 17 and March 31, according to the list, are in Wolfchase Galleria, 2760 N. Germantown Parkway; Trinity Commons, 714 Germantown Parkway; the Collierville store, 694 W. Poplar Ave.; Whitehaven Plaza, 4082 Elvis Presley Blvd.; Bartlett Towne Center, 6045 Stage Road; and Polo Shops, 7464 Winchester Road. The store in Holiday Plaza Mall in West Memphis is also slated to close.

49. Hagar Donates $25,000 To Blues Hall of Fame -

Sammy Hagar’s Red Rocker Bar & Grill formally opened at Southland Park in West Memphis Friday, Feb. 6, with a ceremony attended by the Red Rocker himself.

The rock-and-roller also donated $25,000 to the Blues Hall of Fame on the other side of the Mississippi River.

50. Weddle-West Approved as Memphis Provost -

Karen Weddle-West have been approved as the new provost of the University of Memphis by Tennessee Board of Regents Chancellor John Morgan.

51. Weddle-West Recommended As Memphis Provost -

Karen Weddle-West has been recommended as the new provost at the University of Memphis by University President David Rudd.

52. Haslam Stumps for Insure Tennessee -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam is stumping for his Insure Tennessee Medicaid expansion proposal with a stop in Frayser Wednesday, Jan. 21, ahead of the Feb. 2 special legislative session on the proposal.

53. The Other Fellow -

Long before his death last year, former U.S. Sen. Howard Baker of Tennessee was aware that other Republicans, including those who worked in his groundbreaking campaigns of the 1960s and 1970s, believed it was no longer possible for a political moderate like him to get elected in Tennessee.

54. Mid-South Community College, Arkansas State Trustees to Meet -

Arkansas State University trustees and Mid-South Community College trustees are both in West Memphis Friday, Jan. 9, for special meetings to discuss making the community college becoming part of the ASU system.

55. Andrew Jackson Home Pushes 7th President's Rock Star Image -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Andrew Jackson: President. Hero. Rockstar.

So reads a billboard welcoming arrivals at the Nashville International Airport, attempting to lure them from the honky-tonks of downtown Broadway to Jackson's historic home called The Hermitage a few miles to the east.

56. Corps of Engineers Begins River Work South of Memphis -

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers began work Monday, Jan. 5, on widening the navigation channel of the Mississippi River south of Memphis.

The work in six bendways on weirs extending from the west bank will close the river to commercial barge tows each day from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. between river mile 637 and 630. The work, which will be in the middle of the river, approximately 600 feet from the banks, is expected to take three months.

57. Cities Across Tennessee Deal With Short-Term Rental Safety, Zoning Issues -

Nashville isn’t the only city struggling with how to handle short-term rental properties.

Just about every jurisdiction in the state has been caught off guard by the explosive rise in the new shared economy, and what that means for decades-old zoning laws.

58. Building the Base -

It was late September, and local officials were deeply engaged with retail giant Target as the company explored investing in an online fulfillment center in Memphis when the discussions turned toward a familiar subject.

59. Community Hospitals Becoming Endangered Species -

The state of Mississippi has 110 hospitals and three-fourths of them are, as you might expect, in rural areas.

“And 56 of them have fewer than 50 beds,” said Mendal Kemp, director of the Center for Rural Health at the Mississippi Hospital Association.

60. Justices Weigh Bias Claim of Pregnant UPS Driver -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Two of the three women on the Supreme Court vigorously questioned a UPS lawyer Wednesday over the company's refusal to give lighter duty to a pregnant worker, a closely watched case with potentially broad impact for female workers and their employers.

61. Lauten Resigns as Fincher Aide -

The communications director for U.S. Rep. Stephen Fincher resigned Monday, Dec. 1, following controversy over a Facebook post criticizing President Barack Obama’s daughters.

Elizabeth Lauten, who worked in Fincher’s Washington office, criticized Sasha and Malia Obama for their appearance at the president’s annual turkey pardoning, urging them to “show more class.”

62. More at Moore -

The large old trees on its campus and the large paned windows of its brick buildings indicate the William R. Moore College of Technology has been around for a while.

It was the idea of William R. Moore, a dry goods wholesaler, who left a $500,000 endowment to fund the institution following his death in 1909.

63. Rogero Talks ‘Smart Growth,’ Democratic Politics -

Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero became the first woman to hold that office when she won the election in 2011.

She’s been actively involved in a number of local issues since her election, from urban-core revitalization and business recruitment to broader social issues such as marriage equality.

64. Moore Tech Awakens -

The large old trees on its campus and the paned windows of its brick buildings indicate the William R. Moore College of Technology has been around for a while.

It was the idea of William R. Moore, a dry goods wholesaler, who left a $500,000 endowment to fund the institution following his death in 1909.

65. Keeping Promises -

With more than 50,000 high school seniors applying for free community college tuition and fees through Gov. Bill Haslam’s Tennessee Promise, it’s reasonable to wonder if Tennessee’s community colleges have the infrastructure – including classroom space and instructors – to handle such an influx of new students.

66. Contrasting Ballot -

The midterm election saw contrasting issues and candidates, particularly in Tennessee where an incumbent governor and U.S. senator were both re-elected while four amendments to the state Constitution were passed.

67. Voters Approve Wine, Amendments -

Shelby County citizens voted 2-to-1 Tuesday, Nov. 4, against a proposed amendment to the Tennessee Constitution that gives the Tennessee Legislature the power to regulate abortion, including in cases of rape or incest.

68. Voters Approve Wine, Constitutional Amendments -

Shelby County citizens voted 2-to-1 Tuesday, Nov. 4, against a proposed amendment to the Tennessee Constitution that gives the Tennessee Legislature the power to regulate abortion, including in cases of rape or incest.

69. Amendments, Wine Dominate Election Day -

The last of 2014’s three elections promises to be defined just as much by the questions on the ballot as it is by the choices among candidates.

Election Day is Tuesday, Nov. 4, across Tennessee, with polls open in Shelby County from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.

70. Commission Splits on Repeal of Wage Standards -

Shelby County Commissioners split Monday, Oct. 27, on the first reading of two ordinance that would repeal prevailing wage and living wage standards set by the commission in earlier ordinances.

The commission approved on the first of three readings Monday an ordinance that would do away with the county’s prevailing wage standard, which has been moot since a change in Tennessee state law.

71. Alexander vs. Ball -

Lamar Alexander and Gordon Ball were on the same campaign trail but different races at about this time 36 years ago.

72. Council Considers Car Lot By New Graceland Hotel -

The Memphis City Council takes up a special use permit Tuesday, Oct. 21, to allow a used car lot at 3510 Elvis Presley Blvd., south of Winchester Road, by Babak Makki.

73. Political Leaders Weigh In on Ebola Prep -

There is the medical response to the potential of an Ebola outbreak in the U.S. And then there is the political response to the possibility of such an outbreak.

And health care professionals tend to stick to the medical response and leave the political response to those who are elected.

74. Budget Deficit Drops to $483 Billion, Lowest Since 2008 -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The deficit for the just completed 2014 budget year was $483 billion, the lowest of President Barack Obama's six years in office, the government reported Wednesday.

It's the lowest since 2008 and, when measured against the size of the economy, is below the average deficits of the past 40 years. The deficit equaled 2.8 percent of gross domestic product, which is the economy's total output of goods and services.

75. Methodist Opens Care Clinic in Marion -

A subsidiary of Memphis-based Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare has opened a primary care clinic in Marion, Ark., and officials hope more providers will follow suit to close the gap left by the sudden closure of Crittenden Regional Hospital in West Memphis.

76. Commissioner Rethinking Handling of Older Teens -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The head of the state Department of Children's Services is considering whether older teens should be moved from the department's custody into the adult correctional system after a third major escape attempt from one of its juvenile detention centers in less than a month.

77. Take a Right at Candyland, Cruise Down Memory Lane -

Bill Decker has confessed to committing an “old Nashville” act. The founder of Decker Wealth Management admits he recently gave a friend directions to a certain destination that included a turn at a now-demolished Nashville landmark.

78. Searching for Doctors -

So here’s the offer: lower salary – meaning it will take longer to pay down your student loan debt – less prestige, and perhaps even a questioning of your intelligence and skill.

In 2014, that’s what comes with the decision to become a primary care physician. Recently, a fourth-year medical student at the University of Pennsylvania, Mara Gordon, wrote an article for The Atlantic explaining her decision to become a primary care doctor.

79. Singing Mechanic’s Life Much Like the Songs He Sings -

The Singing Mechanic – “I’ve got that name. Nobody else can use it,” says Billy Devereaux – sits by his worn, 1,200-square-foot, two-room cottage and looks down at Boots, his Dutch Shepherd.

“He’s a possum killer and he runs security,” says Billy, 55, gazing across the swath of remote land separated by a long gravel trail from Smith Springs Road in Antioch.

80. Influence Game: Chemical Trade Tries to Shape Regulations -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The powerful chemical industry is putting its lobbying muscle behind legislation that would establish standards for chemicals used in products from household goods to cellphones and plastic water bottles – but also make it tougher for states to enact their own regulations.

81. Coverage Gap Leaves Rural Tennessee Hospitals on Life Support -

Four rural hospitals have closed and dozens are at risk of shuttering: That’s the fallout, some say, from Gov. Bill Haslam’s decision not to join the Affordable Care Act in 2013 and tap into millions in promised federal funds for Tennessee’s financially-strapped health care institutions.

82. Power Play -

When the Tennessee Valley Authority board voted in August to build a new power plant in Southwest Memphis, it was a decision based on factors larger than the power needs in Memphis.

But it was also a decision that is just as important for Memphis as the decision to build the existing Allen Fossil Plant there 55 years ago.

83. Governor Gets Report on Tennessee Juvenile Jails -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A security audit will be performed on all three of the state's youth development centers after a recent breakout and violence at the facility in Middle Tennessee, according to a preliminary report sent to the governor.

84. Vols Among NCAA’s Youngest Headed Into Sunday Opener -

KNOXVILLE – For better or worse, University of Tennessee football coach Butch Jones won’t need to wait long to see the talent level of his highly touted freshman class.

Jones will find out Sunday night at 7 when the Vols play host to Utah State at Neyland Stadium. The Aggies will be an underdog – probably by a touchdown or so – and a trendy pick for some as an upset special.

85. Crittenden Regional Hospital to Close -

Crittenden Regional Hospital in West Memphis stopped admitting patients Monday, Aug. 25, and will close permanently Sept. 7.

The hospital’s board of trustees made the decision, and hospital administrators announced the closing on the hospital’s website Monday.

86. Reshaping a City, One Lot at a Time -

John G. Brittle Jr. doesn’t have an office. He has a war room. The space, crowded with maps, charts, books, piles of paper and marked-up spreadsheets, is ground zero for InfillNashville, the 10-person team of site selection specialists that Brittle leads at Village Real Estate Services.

87. Bigger, Better, Louder -

“When it comes to college football, the South has no equal, because the Southeastern Conference has no equal. Find me a conference with a better commissioner, better players, better head coaches, better staffs, better game-day atmospheres, better-looking coeds – better anything.”

88. Poll: Obama Health Law is a Tale of 2 Americas -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama's health care law has become a tale of two Americas.

States that fully embraced the law's coverage expansion are experiencing a significant drop in the number of uninsured residents, according to a major new survey released Tuesday. States whose leaders still object to "Obamacare" are seeing much less change.

89. Local Projects Win State Grant Money -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam handed out five oversized grant checks Wednesday, July 23, on the University of Memphis campus for a total of $1.4 million in grants funding for various pedestrian, park and recreation projects across Shelby County.

90. ‘Significant Headwinds’ -

When Gov. Bill Haslam joined local economic development and civic officials at FedExForum in January to announce that Conduit Global would open a call center in Shelby County that would employ 1,000 people over the next three to five years, it provided a much-needed boost to the local office real estate sector.

91. CSC Sugar to Open Plant in Covington -

CSC Sugar LLC will open a sugar processing plant Monday, June 30, in the Rialto Industrial Park in Covington, Tenn., that will hire 50 people and prompt the hiring of more drivers at Larry Bowman Trucking in nearby Ripley.

92. Events -

The Circuit Playhouse will present the dark comedy “The Lyons” Friday, May 30, through June 22, at the theater, 51 S. Cooper St. Buy tickets at playhouseonthesquare.org.

93. 5 Arkansas Airports Win $2.9M in Grants -

Three members of the Arkansas congressional delegation say five airports in the state, including West Memphis Municipal Airport, will share in $2.9 million in federal grants.

Sens. Mark Pryor and John Boozman and Rep. Tim Griffin announced Thursday that the Federal Aviation Administration is awarding the grants for airport facility upgrades and improvements.

94. 5 Arkansas Airports Win $2.9 Million in Grants -

Three members of the Arkansas congressional delegation say five airports in the state, including West Memphis Municipal Airport, will share in $2.9 million in federal grants.

Sens. Mark Pryor and John Boozman and Rep. Tim Griffin announced Thursday that the Federal Aviation Administration is awarding the grants for airport facility upgrades and improvements.

95. Fairway Manor Development Opens -

City of Memphis and Memphis Land Bank officials formally opened Fairway Manor Thursday, May 15, in southwest Memphis.

96. City Council Approves Music Hall of Fame Funding -

Memphis City Council members have approved $250,000 in funding for a Memphis Music Hall of Fame at Hard Rock Cafe’s new location at Beale and Second streets.

The funding from the federal money turned over to the city when federal officials abandoned plans for Interstate 40 through Overton Park is the first of two funding requests organizers of the Hall of Fame plan to make of the city for the $1.2 million project, which will also include private funding.

97. Across the River -

The Arkansas land between the bridges across the Mississippi River at Memphis doesn’t have a name, at least not yet.

If graffiti is any indication, lots of people go there. And they cross numerous boundaries on dirt and gravel roads and paths that can end abruptly and are posted with “no trespassing” signs and other warnings as well as railroad video cameras.

98. US Attorney’s Office Names Civil Rights Head -

Brian K. Coleman, assistant U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Tennessee, will lead the civil rights unit of the prosecutor’s office.

Coleman was named to the post Tuesday, April 29, by U.S. Attorney Ed Stanton, as unit chief Larry Laurenzi moved to the post of first assistant in the office.

99. This week in Memphis history: April 11-17 -

2005: Work was stopped on construction of the DeSoto West Middle School and Desoto Elementary Schools following the discovery of archaeological remains, including human remains that could have been a burial ground. Archaeologists from the University of Memphis dated some of the material to 500 years before Spanish explorer Hernando DeSoto came into the area in the 16th century. Construction on the schools resumed later.

100. Fincher Announces Re-Election Bid -

U.S. Rep. Stephen Fincher of Frog Jump, Tenn., was expected to formally announce his re-election bid at a Republican Party event Monday, March 31, in Jackson, Tenn.

Fincher is seeking a third two-year term representing the 8th Congressional District, which covers rural West Tennessee as well as part of East Memphis and east Shelby County.