» Subscribe Today!
More of what you want to know.
The Daily News
X

Forgot your password?
Skip Navigation Links
Search results for 'Twitter' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:0
Shelby Public Records:0
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:0
Middle Tennessee:0
East Tennessee:0
Other:0

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

The Daily News subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. Varying Health Premium Subsidies Worry Consumers -

MIAMI (AP) – Linda Close was grateful to learn she qualified for a sizable subsidy to help pay for her health insurance under the new federal law. But in the process of signing up for a plan, Close said her HealthCare.gov account showed several different subsidy amounts, varying as much as $180 per month.

2. Senate Bill Targets Companies That Move Overseas -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Senate voted Wednesday to advance an election-year bill limiting tax breaks for U.S. companies that move operations overseas. But big hurdles remain.

The Senate voted 93-7 to begin debating the bill, which would prevent companies from deducting expenses related to moving operations to a foreign country. The bill would offer tax credits to companies that move operations to the U.S. from a foreign country.

3. Women Business Owners Face Gender Gap, Report Says -

NEW YORK (AP) – Women who own small business are still far behind their male counterparts when it comes to getting loans and government contracts, a congressional report said Wednesday.

4. Wal-Mart Ups Price Wars for Back-to-School Season -

NEW YORK (AP) – Wal-Mart Stores Inc. is upping the price game for the crucial back-to-school shopping season.

5. Right-Brained Reps in Left-Brained World -

According to Albert Einstein, the definition of insanity is “doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result.” Yet it’s all too common for sales managers to feel like they’re beating their heads against the wall trying to get their sales reps to follow established processes to manage orders and track progress. It can be frustrating for both sales managers and sales reps alike.

6. Early Vote Expands as Campaigns Enter New Phase -

There is a unique and persistent part of the political process that gnaws at candidates, separating them from the voters they court and sometimes stalk. You might call it the day of the ballot.

In the weeks leading up to the start of early voting, they get hit up constantly by those putting out endorsement ballots to be distributed during early voting and on election day, most often by paid poll workers. Candidates must pay to be on a ballot, which those organizing the ballots say is necessary to cover printing and distribution costs.

7. County Commission Continues Prekindergarten Debate -

Shelby County Commissioners pick up Monday, July 21, where they left off earlier in the month about a way to fund prekindergarten programs.

The commission faces dueling resolutions, with one setting up further study on an expansion, and the other dedicating $3 million in surplus funds from the just-ended fiscal year and the first $3 million of any surplus from the current fiscal year to Shelby County Schools and the suburban school systems.

8. Chef Jenn Products Coming To More Outlets, States -

The “Chef Jenn” lines of frozen seafood products from Memphis chef Jennifer McCullough are being picked up by East Coast grocery store chain Harris Teeter and also by Walmart in several regions.

9. House Passes Tax Breaks to Boost Charitable Giving -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The House passed a package of tax breaks Thursday designed to boost charitable donations by seniors, private foundations and procrastinators.

One provision provides tax breaks to people over 70 who make donations from their individual retirement accounts. Another reduces excise taxes on private charitable foundations.

10. Networking How To’s -

One of the best ways to advance a career in a competitive market is through networking. In many ways, it’s both the easiest and hardest part of a search. Today, I received two questions on the topic of networking best practices.

11. Locally Grown Foods Look to Bigger Business -

PHILADELPHIA (AP) – Once a niche business, locally grown foods aren't just for farmers markets anymore.

A growing network of companies and organizations is delivering food directly from local farms to major institutions like Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in downtown Philadelphia, eliminating scores of middlemen from farm to fork. Along the way, they're increasing profits and recognition for smaller farms and bringing consumers healthier, fresher foods.

12. 10 Surprising Social Media Facts -

With how quickly the social media landscape changes, it can be tough to keep up. Here’s the abridged version of the top 10 most surprising social media facts likely to have the greatest impact on your company’s social media strategy.

13. City Council Turns Again to Benefits Discussions -

Memphis City Council members won’t take any major votes Tuesday, July 15, on city employee benefits.

But the controversial topic will likely dominate much of another council day at City Hall. The council is in the gap between its approval of health insurance changes in June and an October vote on the companion proposal to change city employee pension plans for new hires and those with less than 10 years of service.

14. Chef Jenn Products to Appear In More Outlets, States -

The “Chef Jenn” lines of frozen seafood products from Memphis chef Jennifer McCullough are being picked up by East Coast grocery store chain Harris Teeter and also by Walmart in several regions.

15. Communicate Effectively With Your Audience -

The digital world has altered the way businesses communicate with audiences. Regardless of size, they have the opportunity to connect with customers on a more personal basis than at any other point in history.

16. Economists Lower Forecasts for US Growth -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. business economists have sharply cut their growth forecasts for the April-June quarter and 2014, though they remain optimistic that the economy will rebound from a dismal first quarter.

17. Leveling the Playing Field -

One of the biggest struggles many job seekers face is gathering enough information. It’s important to understand how much a company pays, if the environment is healthy, and how the interview process works.

18. Want Contracts? Work Harder, Women's Organization CEO Says -

NEW YORK (AP) – Pamela Prince-Eason isn't letting women business owners off the hook – if they want more contracts with big corporations or the government, they have to work harder to get them than they do now.

19. Top 10 Email Marketing Best Practices -

Part two in a two-part series. Email marketing has advanced significantly over the past decade, with the potential to be one of the strongest performers of all weapons in your marketing arsenal due to its unique ability for highly personalized content and comprehensive tracking delivered straight to the consumers’ inbox. Unfortunately, it’s also, perhaps, one of the most poorly executed of the marketing channels.

20. Airport Authority Looking at Rideshare Policy -

The battle that has raged between ridesharing services like Lyft and Uber at airports across the country has finally landed at Memphis International Airport.

For now, Lyft and Uber are prohibited from picking up passengers at Memphis International Airport, but that could change as airport and city officials develop policies for dealing with the emerging services.

21. Wisconsin Company Plans Paper Plant in Mississippi -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – A Wisconsin company will open a $48 million plant in Hattiesburg, Mississippi, to make paper towels, tissue and other projects, hiring 300 people over five years.

22. Corporations are People? It's a Real Legal Concept -

WASHINGTON (AP) – There may be more to that "we the people" notion than you thought.

These are boom times for the concept of "corporate personhood."

Corporations are people?

23. Giving Your Child Independence -

Parents of newly minted graduates have all heard about it: the “Boomerang Generation.” According to Pew Research Center, It’s estimated that some 45 percent of college graduates between the ages of 18 and 24 are living at home with family. If you are a parent, you may be wondering what you can do to give your children the gift of independence on this Fourth of July.

24. Commission Takes Final Votes on Tax Rates -

Shelby County Commissioners close out their budget season Monday, July 7, by making a decision on two competing county property tax rate proposals – both lower than the current $4.38 rate.

The commission meets at 1:30 p.m. at the Vasco Smith Administration Building, 160 N. Main St.

25. Highway Crisis Looms as Soon as August, US Warns -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Gridlock in Washington will lead to gridlock across the country if lawmakers can't quickly agree on how to pay for highway and transit programs, President Barack Obama and his top officials warned Tuesday.

26. 10 Deadly Sins of Email Marketing -

Part one in a two-part series. Data released last year by a research firm called Return Path cites that the average individual receives more than 400 commercial emails per month – emails from businesses selling products and services versus email from colleagues, friends or family.

27. Court to Weigh Government Duty to Settle Bias Claims -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court said Monday it will consider a dispute over the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's duty to try and settle charges of job discrimination before filing lawsuits against employers.

28. Council Moves Toward Pension Changes -

Two weeks after approving changes in health insurance plans for city employees and retirees, the Memphis City Council meets Tuesday, July 1, to talk over a companion set of changes to the city’s pension plan for employees.

29. Checkered Progress on Disabled Care Despite Ruling -

Brent Kaderli has a wheelchair-accessible van waiting in the driveway, a hospital bed in a spare bedroom and an electric lift that's left unused. If the 30-year-old quadriplegic had his way, he'd be living here, in his father's house, with help from aides. Instead, he is in an institution, hoping each day for a place that feels more like a home.

30. Grizzlies Draft UCLA's Adams, Memphis Native Stokes -

Whether it will prove to be a telling remembrance or not, news of the Grizzlies selecting guard UCLA shooting guard Jordan Adams with the No. 22 overall pick in Thursday night’s NBA Draft was largely met with mild disdain, sweeping indifference and a dash of tilt-your-head curiosity.

31. FAA, Developers Clash Over Tall Buildings -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The government wants to dramatically reduce the allowable height of buildings near hundreds of airports – a proposal that is drawing fire from real estate developers and members of Congress who say it will reduce property values.

32. Obama Aims to Put Human Face on Economic Struggles -

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) – President Barack Obama said Thursday that Washington needs to stop "playing to the most fringe elements of politics" and help Americans who are fighting to make ends meet, as he spent an afternoon with a working mother who wrote to him about her struggles.

33. Exiting Your Job Gracefully -

There’s a lot to be said for grace. Although many interpretations of the word exist, my favorite is Merriam-Webster’s. They define it as “a controlled, polite, and pleasant way of behaving.” After a number of questions from people about how to quit their jobs, I wanted to share a few thoughts with you.

34. Civil Rights Museum Sit-In Exhibit Goes Digital -

Raumesh Akbari remembers her first encounter with the sit-in exhibit at the National Civil Rights Museum.

As a sixth-grader, she had heard and read about the lunch counter sit-ins of the early 1960s. But like many visitors to the museum, she was too young to have encountered them herself.

35. Is a College Degree Still Worth It? Study Says Yes -

NEW YORK (AP) – Some comforting news for recent college graduates facing a tough job market and years of student loan payments: That college degree is still worth it.

Those with bachelor's or associate's degrees earn more money over their lifetime than those who skip college, even after factoring in the cost of higher education, according to a report released Tuesday by The Federal Reserve Bank of New York. The study, by economists Jaison R. Abel and Richard Deitz, also found that a degree is still a good investment for college grads whose jobs don't require college. About a third of all college graduates remain underemployed for most of their careers.

36. Why a Grim US Economic Picture is Brightening -

WASHINGTON (AP) – When the government updates its estimate Wednesday of how the U.S. economy fared last quarter, the number is pretty sure to be ugly. Horrible even.

The economy likely shrank at an annual rate of nearly 2 percent in the January-March quarter, economists estimate. That would be its bleakest performance since early 2009 in the depths of the Great Recession.

37. 9 Steps to Build Prospect Trust -

Buyers want to trust the salesperson they’re buying from before they part with their hard-earned money. That’s why building trust is a minimum cost of entry in the sales profession. If your prospects don’t trust you, you’ll always be working much harder than is necessary.

38. Court Raises Bar for Securities Class Action Cases -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court on Monday made it tougher for investors to join together to sue corporations for securities fraud, a decision that could curb the number of multimillion dollar legal settlements companies pay out each year.

39. Congress Probes How IRS Emails Could Go Missing -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Internal Revenue Service commissioner said Friday the agency will not share with Congress additional details about its lost emails related to the ongoing tea party investigation until its own review is finished because he said Republicans are releasing inaccurate, interim information.

40. Olive Garden, Red Lobster Sales Continue to Slide -

NEW YORK (AP) – Darden said Friday that sales continued to slide at Olive Garden and Red Lobster, with other costs dragging down its profit by 35 percent in the latest quarter.

The results fell short of Wall Street expectations, and shares were down 2.5 percent in midday trading.

41. Starbucks Contribution to Scholarship Overstated -

NEW YORK (AP) – It turns out Starbucks isn't contributing any upfront scholarship money to an online college degree program it introduced this week.

The Seattle-based company unveiled a program Monday that included a scholarship it described as "an investment" between Starbucks and Arizona State University. The program is designed to allow Starbucks workers to earn an online degree at the school at a steeply discounted rate.

42. Outlasting Outdated Industries -

One result of technological advances is a change in the way we do business. Sometimes this change results in new jobs, but often, it can also result in job loss.

Have you ever had the sense your job might be going away soon? Maybe you’ve noticed your industry is declining and being replaced by another. When this happens, you should pay attention.

43. Identity Theft and Social Media -

Ray’s take: You just logged into your online banking and your account is empty. You go to apply for a loan and are told you don’t qualify due to overextended credit. You file your tax return only to discover it has already been filed and your refund check issued and cashed. These are some of the very real things that have happened due to identity theft.

44. Long Council Day Comes With Change, Emotions -

It was apparent early in the long council day Tuesday, June 17, at City Hall that there wouldn’t be many amendments to the $600 million operating budget and $84 million capital budget the council would approve later that evening.

45. Tunica Reels as Competition, Recession Hit Casinos -

TUNICA RESORTS, Miss. (AP) – It was 3:30 p.m. on a Monday in May at Harrah's Tunica Hotel & Casino in northwestern Mississippi.

Gamblers were few in number, and dealers stood ready at idle card tables.

46. Council Approves Budgets, Stable Tax Rate, Health Insurance Changes -

Memphis City Council members approved a $600 million operating budget and an $84 million capital budget Tuesday, June 17, for the city government fiscal year that begins July 1.

And the council gave final approval to larger changes to employee and retiree health insurance plans designed to make long term changes necessary to right the city’s financial condition.

47. 5 Steps to Grow Your Email List -

One of the most cost-effective strategies for driving Web traffic and generating online leads is email marketing. Unfortunately, most small and mid-sized companies have an email database filled mostly of current clients, business partners and other friends of the firm. To put a fire under your email marketing and dramatically boost results, follow these five steps for growing your email database.

48. Tech Giants Seek to Halt Overseas Snooping by US -

NEW YORK (AP) – Microsoft Corp. and four other large American technology companies are using a Manhattan court case to draw a line in the cloud, saying the U.S. government has no right to seize computer data stored outside the country.

49. Obama to Sign Order Extending LGBT Protections -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama plans to sign an executive order banning federal contractors from discriminating against employees on the basis of their sexual orientation, a White House official said Monday.

50. Starbucks Clears College Degree Path for Workers -

NEW YORK (AP) – Starbucks is giving its baristas a shot at an online college degree, an unusual benefit in an industry where higher education is often out of reach for workers.

The coffee chain is partnering with Arizona State University to make an undergraduate degree available at a steep discount to 135,000 U.S. employees who work at least 20 hours a week.

51. Council to Vote on Insurance Changes, Budget -

Most of council day at City Hall Tuesday, June 17, will be devoted to closing out most, but not all, of the city’s budget season.

The Memphis City Council should make final decisions Tuesday on a stable city property tax rate and approve operating and capital budgets for the fiscal year that begins July 1.

52. FAA Controllers Still Working 'Rattler' Schedules -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Air traffic controllers are still working schedules known as "rattlers" that make it likely they'll get little or no sleep before overnight shifts, more than three years after a series of incidents involving controllers sleeping on the job, according to a government-sponsored report released Friday.

53. Check, Please: Priceline Buys OpenTable for $2.6 Billion -

NEW YORK (AP) – Priceline has negotiated a $2.6 billion entree into the restaurant business.

The global travel booking king announced Friday it is acquiring the OpenTable Inc. in a deal that would put Priceline into a new business doing for restaurant reservations much what it does for hotel bookings.

54. Amazon Launches Music Streaming for Prime Members -

LOS ANGELES (AP) – Amazon's newly announced music streaming service is yet another attempt by the company to move beyond e-commerce and infuse itself into the daily lives of Americans with an increasing number of offerings –including grocery delivery and streaming TV.

55. House Votes to Make Business Tax Break Permanent -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The House voted Thursday to make permanent a generous tax break that makes it easier for small businesses to buy new equipment and improve their property, part of an election-year showdown over a series of expired tax breaks worth billions.

56. Career Transitions for Scientists -

I’ve recently received multiple letters from scientists in the research community with questions about their career transitions. Most likely, this is because of Memphis’ thriving medical research community. After all, Memphians are developing new technologies for things from vaccines to cancer cures.

57. Congress, FBI Moving on Veterans Affairs Health Care -

WASHINGTON (AP) – As Congress moves to help thousands of military veterans enduring long wait times for VA medical care, the FBI said it has opened a criminal investigation into the Department of Veterans Affairs.

58. IRS to Publicize 'Bill of Rights' for Taxpayers -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Internal Revenue Service wants to read taxpayers their rights.

The agency is publicizing a "Bill of Rights" for taxpayers, including the right to quality service, the right to confidentiality and the right to a fair and just tax system, IRS Commissioner John Koskinen announced Tuesday.

59. FAA OKs Commercial Drone Flights Over Land -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Federal Aviation Administration said Tuesday it has granted the first permission for commercial drone flights over land, the latest effort by the agency to show it is loosening restrictions on commercial uses of the unmanned aircraft.

60. Use Repeatable Sales Process for Scalable Biz Growth -

For many B2B companies, the ability to grow correlates with the ability to effectively expand the sales team. If each member of your team has his own approach to selling your company’s products and services, replicating success and scaling your company can be difficult.

61. Merck to Pay $3.85 Billion for Hepatitis C Drug Developer -

TRENTON, N.J. (AP) – Merck & Co. will spend about $3.85 billion for Idenix Pharmaceuticals Inc., a small company developing hepatitis C medicines that, together with Merck's experimental drugs, could produce lucrative combo therapies that quickly cure most patients with the blood-borne virus afflicting tens of millions.

62. Survey: Growth to Pick Up, Hiring Steady -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. economic growth should accelerate in the second quarter and remain healthy for the rest of this year, according to a forecast by a group of U.S. business economists. Still, growth for the full year will likely come in lower than they previously estimated.

63. US Employers Add 217,000 Jobs; Rate Stays at 6.3 Percent -

WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S. employers added 217,000 jobs in May, a substantial gain for a fourth straight month, fueling hopes that the economy will accelerate after a grim start to the year.

64. Study: At-Home Dads Down Slightly Since Recession -

NEW YORK (AP) – The number of U.S. fathers home with their kids full-time is down, from a peak 2.2 million in 2010, the official end of the recession, to about 2 million in 2012, according to a report released Thursday by the Pew Research Center.

65. Conquering Rumors -

It seems that every week there’s another rumor. Some big corporation is going to lay off its employees. A company’s going to relocate to another city. A department is going to be restructured.

66. Skip the Website? Some Small Businesses Still Do -

NEW YORK (AP) – It's cheap. It's easy to do. And it can take less than 20 minutes to set up. Yet more than half of all small businesses still don't have a website.

"It's just ridiculous," says Jim Blasingame, a small business author and radio show host. "Every small business needs a website. Period. Nonnegotiable."

67. Marketing Lessons From Startups -

Having spent the lion’s share of my career marketing national corporations, I would certainly say there is a science to marketing at that level and the better brands market like well-oiled machines. Opening my own business eight years ago, however, and partnering with countless startups through those years, I’ve also learned there’s a thing or two startups can teach the big boys about marketing.

68. Obama: Power Plant Rule Will Shrink Power Prices -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In a sweeping initiative to curb pollutants blamed for global warming, the Obama administration unveiled a plan Monday aimed at cutting carbon dioxide emissions from power plants by nearly a third by 2030. But it delays the deadline for some states to begin complying until long after President Barack Obama leaves office.

69. Council to Discuss Retirement Plan Changes -

Memphis City Council members begin moving Tuesday, June 3, toward the first of three votes on a quartet of ordinances that would fundamentally change health care and pension benefits for city employees.

70. Career Banker to Take Over Veterans Department -

WASHINGTON (AP) – After less than four months at the Veterans Affairs Department, Sloan D. Gibson suddenly finds himself in charge of fixing the problems that led to the resignation of Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki.

71. Commission to Vote on Budget, Tax Rate -

Shelby County Commissioners take final votes Monday, June 2, on a $1.1 billion operating budget and a $75 million capital budget for Shelby County government, and the first of three votes on a new property tax rate for the fiscal year that begins July 1.

72. Hiring to Push Mississippi Nissan Employment Over 6,000 -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – A Nissan Motor Co. contractor has begun seeking applicants for 500 workers as part of the automaker's buildup to begin producing a new model in Mississippi.

73. Dressing for Career Success -

You’ve been applying online for months, and finally something has clicked. You have an interview in a few days for the perfect job at the best company in town.

This scenario sounds great on the surface, but can often lead to stress and anxiety when job seekers prepare to suit up for their next interview. And it makes sense, because your outfit can impact your overall interview success.

74. Lots of Questions Remain Unanswered in Grizz Nation -

We’re now going on two weeks since this whole WHAT’S GOING ON WITH THE GRIZZLIES? saga started.

So, what do we actually know?

We know that Grizzlies controlling owner Robert Pera fired team CEO Jason Levien and player personnel director Stu Lash. We know that Pera allowed coach Dave Joerger to interview for the Minnesota Timberwolves’ head coaching job.

75. Google to Build Prototype of Truly Driverless Car -

LOS ANGELES (AP) – Google plans to build and launch onto city streets a small fleet of subcompact cars that could operate without a person at the wheel.

Actually, the cars wouldn't even have a wheel. Or gas and brake pedals. The company says the vehicles will use sensors and computing power, with no human needed.

76. Median CEO Pay Crosses $10 Million in 2013 -

NEW YORK (AP) – They're the $10 million men and women.

Propelled by a soaring stock market, the median pay package for a CEO rose above eight figures for the first time last year. The head of a typical large public company earned a record $10.5 million, an increase of 8.8 percent from $9.6 million in 2012, according to an Associated Press/Equilar pay study.

77. Save Your Sales Team From Extinction -

Second in a two-part series. The Information Age has created a marketplace built predominantly of connected buyers who have largely determined whether or not to buy from us before they ever make contact with a sales rep. Due to readily available info about your company and competitors, sales support is unnecessary early in the buying process, forever changing the role of the sales rep.

78. Reynolds Expanding E-Cigarette Production -

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) – Reynolds American Inc. is expanding its Tobaccoville, North Carolina, manufacturing complex as it plans national distribution of its Vuse brand electronic cigarette this summer, the company said Friday.

79. FedEx Wants to Explore ‘Final Frontier’ -

FedEx announced one of its newest – and more unusual sounding ventures – with a cheeky tweet.

“Meet the FedEx Space Solutions team,” the company declared on Twitter in recent days, formally unveiling a new venture focused on the commercial space industry. Perhaps recognizing the implications, the company concluded the tweet by promising, “Yep, you read it right!”

80. Gas Prices Have Familiar Look as Summer Nears -

NEW YORK (AP) – The price of gasoline looks familiar this Memorial Day. For the third year in a row, the national average will be within a penny or two of $3.64 per gallon.

Stability wasn't always the norm. Between 2003 and 2008 average retail gasoline prices more than doubled, reaching an all-time high of $4.11 per gallon in 2008. Prices then collapsed as the U.S. plunged into recession. But after a two-year run-up between 2009 and 2011, the price of gasoline has remained in a range of roughly $3.25 to $3.75 per gallon.

81. Scaling Your Career -

One of the most exciting career transitions job seekers make is changing industries. You may want to move from nonprofit to corporate or from a large organization to a small business. These moves expose you to a new workplace and can reenergize you if you’re feeling burnt out in your current environment.

82. Creative Works Conference Launching in October -

A three-day conference for Memphis’ creative community is launching in the city later this year that includes a speaking roster of design, illustration, typography and other creative heavy-hitters from around the country.

83. AP Sources: Wolves Get Permission to Talk to Joerger -

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) – With the Memphis Grizzlies front office in turmoil, the Minnesota Timberwolves are considering trying to lure coach Dave Joerger away to coach the team in his home state.

84. Proposal: Airlines Openly Disclose Seat, Bag Fees -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Passengers love the idea, but airlines hate it. The government wants to require that travelers be told upfront about basic services that aren't included in the price of a ticket and how much extra they'll cost.

85. Cleaner Air Could Mean Higher Electric Bills -

NEW YORK (AP) – Electricity prices are probably on their way up across much of the U.S. as coal-fired plants, the dominant source of cheap power, shut down in response to environmental regulations and economic forces.

86. Obama Hosts CEOs Whose Firms are Investing in US -

WASHINGTON (AP) – It's the yin and the yang of the U.S. corporate climate.

At the White House, President Barack Obama played the role of business pitchman Tuesday, saluting executives whose companies have chosen to gain or expand their footprint in the United States.

87. Selling to Connected Buyers -

First in a two-part series. The buying experience has been completely reinvented over the last decade, and companies slow to adapt are losing revenue and market share as a result.

A 2011 Sales Executive Council study showed 57 percent of the buying process is completed before a prospect even makes contact with a sales rep. We now live in a world built predominantly of connected buyers whose minds are almost made up before they choose to interact with a member of your team, as most of the desired information is at their fingertips, day or night. If they make contact, buyers don’t distinguish between a customer service and sales rep, as they see them as one in the same.

88. Supreme Court Revives 'Raging Bull' Lawsuit -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court ruled Monday that a copyright lawsuit over the 1980 Oscar-winning movie "Raging Bull" can go forward, a decision that could open Hollywood studios to more claims from people seeking a share of profits from classic films, TV shows and other creative works.

89. City Council Reviews Fire Budget -

Memphis City Council members resume budget deliberations Tuesday, May 20, in committee sessions that take up half of the council day at City Hall.

Most of the time spent in the budget committee, chaired by council member Lee Harris, will be devoted to a review of the Memphis Fire Department budget proposal.

90. Hospitals Reach Out to Attract Affluent Immigrants -

HOUSTON (AP) – The menu includes pork or chicken dumplings, fried rice or chicken congee soup with jasmine rice and ginger. It's an enviable repast that diners take in bed – hospital beds.

91. Darden to Sell Red Lobster, Hold Onto Olive Garden -

NEW YORK (AP) – Darden is setting Red Lobster adrift, but betting that it can still turn around Olive Garden's fortunes.

The company, which is based in Orlando, Florida, said Friday that it would sell its seafood chain and the accompanying real estate to investment firm Golden Gate Capital in a $2.1 billion cash deal. The announcement came despite objections from some shareholders to the plan to separate Red Lobster, which was announced late last year.

92. AAA: Americans Ready to Travel After Rough Winter -

NEW YORK (AP) – A strong case of cabin fever and a little more money to spend should inspire a greater number of Americans to hit the road this Memorial Day weekend.

That's the forecast from auto club AAA, which on Friday said it expects a total of 36.1 million people to travel 50 miles or more. If that estimate holds true, it would be the largest amount of people traveling during the holiday weekend since 2005.

93. Economic Experts Offer Analysis, Forecast -

A report from Fitch Ratings May 14 declared that going forward the U.S. economy will have to grow without the help it has enjoyed in recent years from things such as low interest rates and government spending.

94. Senate: Firms Must Protect Against Malicious Ads -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Senate warned Google, Yahoo and other leading technology companies Thursday they need to better protect consumers from hackers exploiting their lucrative online advertising networks or risk new legislation that would force them to do so.

95. Senate Panel Approves 6-Year Highway Bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A Senate panel on Thursday approved a bill to keep federal highway programs going for the next six years, but it remained unclear whether Congress would act in time to prevent a disruption in transportation aid to states this summer.

96. Airlines Expect More Travelers to Fly This Summer -

NEW YORK (AP) – More travelers will take to the skies this summer, the U.S. airlines' trade and lobby group predicted Thursday.

About 210 million passengers – or 2.28 million a day– are expected to fly on U.S. carriers between June 1 and Aug. 31. That's up 1.5 percent from last summer and the highest level in six years, according to the trade and lobbying group, Airlines for America. U.S. carriers are increasing the available seat miles they fly by 4.5 percent.

97. Networking Over Coffee -

Workers change jobs more frequently now than ever before. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, employees only stay at a job for a little over four years on average.

In the past, people making quick transitions were sometimes looked at as flaky or unstable. Today, it’s common to assume those who transition more frequently are also more experienced. They’ve seen different environments, and have been forced to grow their skills.

98. Google Resumes Glass Sales in the US -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Google is once again selling its Internet-connected eyewear to anyone in the U.S. as the company fine-tunes a device that has sparked intrigue and disdain for its potential to change the way people interact with technology.

99. Consumers Losing Doctors With New Insurance Plans -

MIAMI (AP) – Some consumers who bought insurance under President Barack Obama's health care law are experiencing buyer's remorse after realizing that their longtime doctors aren't accepting the new plans.

100. Why Most Sales Proposals Fail -

You put so much time and energy into getting a prospect to agree to a meeting, preparing for that meeting, pitching your services and gaining agreement from the prospect to consider buying. So why, all too often, is so little time spent on the sales proposal itself? It’s like running the ball to the 10-yard line and then sitting down on the field.